Professor Darrell Evans

Professor Darrell Evans

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)

Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)

UON welcomes Professor Darrell Evans

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)
Professor of Developmental Tissue Biology
BSc, PhD, CBlol, FRSB, FRMS, FHEA, FAS

Professor Darrell Evans joined the University of Newcastle in April 2017. As the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Professor Evans is responsible for providing strategic and innovative leadership to ensure the university delivers on its NeW Futures goals. He leads the transformation of the university’s education and academic endeavours, and continues to deliver equity of access and success, a great student experience and strong graduate outcomes.

Darrell is known as an energetic academic leader who has extensive expertise in curriculum development, innovation and enterprise, technology enhancement, learning spaces, quality assurance, and improvement and renewal agendas. He has been an active contributor to local, national and international debate, policy-making and has wide-ranging experience in outreach activities including promoting the public understanding of science through a variety of external relations channels including TV and radio.

Having moved through all levels of academic advancement from PhD and post-doc through to lecturer, reader and professor, Darrell has developed an understanding of the importance of creating an environment conducive to excellence in research, and education. As a former Vice-Provost, Associate Faculty Dean, departmental and divisional head, and a curriculum lead, DarrelI has had considerable experience in leading and motivating diverse academic groups and student populations. His overriding concern has been to develop conditions that empower individuals to achieve their goals as well as creating a vision to ensure the wider objectives of the institution are achieved.

Professor Evans is an active teacher focusing on structural and functional anatomy and embryology in all health related disciplines as well as biological and biomedical sciences. Darrell has been awarded an array of national and international education awards and honours. He is internationally recognised for advances and creativity in higher education practice. His productive pedagogical research program has focused on creating opportunities for students to develop skills to communicate with different audiences, and the development and analysis of learning approaches including near-peer teaching, formative assessment and active learning.

Darrell has an academic background as an anatomist and developmental biologist and his biological research program has focused on the mechanisms underlying cell movement and tissue assembly during development and repair with an emphasis on the musculoskeletal system. He currently holds the title of Professor of Developmental Tissue Biology at Newcastle.

Professor Evans is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology, the Royal Microscopical Society, the UK Higher Education Academy and the Anatomical Society (FAS). He is also an Honorary Fellow and Founder of the Monash Education Academy and holds an Honorary Professorship for the Warwick-Monash Alliance.

Professor Darrell Evans

UON welcomes Professor Darrell Evans

UON welcomes newly appointed DVC Academic, Professor Darrell Evans.

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Career Summary

Biography

As a graduate in Biomedical Science, Darrell undertook a PhD at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland looking at the contribution that different cell populations make to the development of skeletal muscle. Successful completion of his doctorate led to the offer of a postdoctoral position at Cornell University in the US working for renown craniofacial embryologist, Drew Noden. Darrell stayed three years at Cornell looking at the mechanisms underlying cell movement and tissue assembly in developing head structures.

Darrell’s return to the UK in 1997, saw him take up his first academic position as Lecturer in Anatomy and Embryology at Cardiff University. Within this role, Darrell started his own independent research laboratory focusing on the development and repair of musculoskeletal tissues. The lab received funding from agencies such as the Wellcome Trust, the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the Livanos Trust and new collaborations initiated with labs in the UK, the US and New Zealand. At Cardiff, Darrell was heavily involved in the teaching of anatomy and embryology within the medical, dental and biomedical programs and he took on leadership roles for an array of modules and subject panels as well as being made Deputy Sub-Dean for Basic Medical Sciences, within the School of Biosciences.    

In 2003, Darrell got the chance to join one of a small number of new medical schools being opened in the UK. Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS), a joint venture between the University of Sussex and the University of Brighton, provided him with the opportunity to further develop his expertise in curriculum development, teaching practice and to expand his research. Moving through the roles of senior lecturer, reader and then full professor, Darrell also took on roles as Associate Dean, Departmental Head of Anatomy and Acting Head of the Institute of Postgraduate Medicine. His research in developmental biology continued with a new focus on the development and repair of tendons. Whilst at BSMS, Darrell also initiated his pedagogical research program in response to his own creativity and experience in higher education teaching practice. His particular focus was on developing an array of opportunities for students to develop the skills to communicate with different audiences effectively. He also developed near-peer teaching programs, a package of formative assessment initiatives, and the provision of active learning approaches including model making and ‘theatre in the lecture’.

Darrell moved to Australia in 2013 as Vice-Provost (Learning and Teaching) at Monash University. During his four-and-a-half-year tenure there, he led the significant transformation of the learning and teaching experience. Major projects and initiatives led by Darrell included:

  • Inception and implementation of Monash’s multi-million-dollar education transformation agenda through the Better Teaching, Better Learning vision
  • Creation of the Monash Education Academy and Program for Continuing Education Excellence Development (CEED) to support educators across the university
  • Redesign of the Education Performance Standards Framework
  • Development of the Monash Assessment Vision and new Assessment Policy and Procedures
  • Formulation and implementation of the Education Technology Roadmap and introduction of a learning analytics framework
  • Initiation and development of the Monash MOOC Portfolio through the FutureLearn partnership and integration of digital education projects
  • Conceptualisation and delivery of the award winning Student Futures program to enhance the career prospects of Monash students in collaboration with PwC
  • Development of the learning environment design for major learning space initiatives including the $180M Learning and Teaching Building 
  • Establishment of the Centre for Undergraduate Research Initiatives and Excellence (CURIE)
  • Design and implementation of the Learning and Teaching Strategy for the Monash-Warwick Alliance  

Outside of the university arena, Darrell has been an active supporter of outreach. Whilst at BSMS, he was a leading member of the BrightMed widening participation team, working with a range of local schools. He was also invited to be part of the Channel 4/National Geographic ‘Inside Nature’s Giants’ team, and presented several times on a popular talk show in the UK, all about the wonders of anatomy.      

Darrell is Associate Editor of Anatomical Sciences Education, a Specialist Advisor for the Federative International Programme for Anatomical Terminology (Embryology), a member of Diplomatic Academy Advisory Board for the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and an inaugural judge for the Global Teaching Excellence Award led by the UK’s Higher Education Academy. Other past roles have included Associate Non-Executive Director of Sussex Community NHS Trust Board, Treasurer of the Anatomical Society, Director of the Company of Anatomists Limited and a member of the John Monash Science School Council.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Aberdeen - UK
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours)(Biological Sciences), Kingston Polytechnic - UK

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) University of Newcastle
Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2017 - 31/12/2018 Monash - Warwick Honorary Professor Monash University (AU) / Warwick University (UK)
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2015 -  Fellow The Anatomical Society
United Kingdom
1/01/2010 -  Fellow Royal Society of Biology
United Kingdom
1/01/2007 -  Fellow Higher Education Academy
United Kingdom
1/01/2005 -  Fellow Royal Microscopical Society
United Kingdom

Awards

Award

Year Award
2016 E-learning Excellence and Innovation Recognition Award
Liberate Higher Education
2012 Top Teacher Award in Year 1
Brighton and Sussex Medical School
2012 Choice Critics Award
Medical Education Journal
2011 E-learning Teaching Award
University of Brighton
2011 BSMS Student Award for outstanding contribution to the student experience
Brighton and Sussex Medical School
2010 Teaching Excellence Award
University of Sussex
2010 Top Teacher Award in Phase 1
Brighton and Sussex Medical School
2010 Excellence in Facilitating and Empowering Learning Award
University of Brighton
2010 Professor Alfonso Bovero Award
Brazilian Society of Anatomy
2007 Teaching Excellence Award
University of Sussex
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2003 Francis-West PH, Robson L, Evans DJR, Craniofacial development: The tissue and molecular interactions that control development of the head - Introduction, SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN, 39 (2003)
Citations Web of Science - 59

Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Evans DJR, 'Embryology of fascia', Fascia in the Osteopathic Field, Handspring Publishing, Pencaitland, Scotland (2017)
2015 Evans DJR, Pawlina W, 'The role of the anatomist in teaching of non-traditional discipline-independent skills', Teaching Anatomy - A Practical Guide, Springer, New York 319-330 (2015)
2015 Evans DJR, 'Using teaching assistants in anatomy', Teaching Anatomy - A Practical Guide, Springer, New York 45-53 (2015)
2013 Evans DJR, 'Embryology of the gut', The Gastrointestinal System at a Glance, Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester, West Sussex (2013)
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (47 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Foo J, Rivers G, Ilic D, Evans DJR, Walsh K, Haines T, et al., 'The economic cost of failure in clinical education: a multi-perspective analysis', MEDICAL EDUCATION, 51 740-754 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/medu.13266
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 White PJ, Larson I, Styles K, Yuriev E, Evans DR, Rangachari PK, et al., 'Adopting an active learning approach to teaching in a research-intensive higher education context transformed staff teaching attitudes and behaviours', Higher Education Research and Development, 35 619-633 (2016)

© 2015 HERDSA. ABSTRACT: The conventional lecture has significant limitations in the higher education context, often leading to a passive learning experience for students. This p... [more]

© 2015 HERDSA. ABSTRACT: The conventional lecture has significant limitations in the higher education context, often leading to a passive learning experience for students. This paper reports a process of transforming teaching and learning with active learning strategies in a research-intensive educational context across a faculty of 45 academic staff and more than 1000 students. A phased approach was used, involving nine staff in a pilot phase during which a common vision and principles were developed. In short, our approach was to mandate a move away from didactic lectures to classes that involved students interacting with content, with each other and with instructors in order to attain domain-specific learning outcomes and generic skills. After refinement, an implementation phase commenced within all first-year subjects, involving 12 staff including three from the pilot group. The staff use of active learning methods in classes increased by sixfold and sevenfold in the pilot and implementation phases, respectively. An analysis of implementation phase exam questions indicated that staff increased their use of questions addressing higher order cognitive skills by 51%. Results of a staff survey indicated that this change in practice was caused by the involvement of staff in the active learning approach. Fifty-six percent of staff respondents indicated that they had maintained constructive alignment as they introduced active learning. After the pilot, only three out of nine staff agreed that they understood what makes for an effective active learning exercise. This rose to seven out of nine staff at the completion of the implementation phase. The development of a common approach with explicit vision and principles and the evaluation and refinement of active learning were effective elements of our transformational change management strategy. Future efforts will focus on ensuring that all staff have the time, skills and pedagogical understanding required to embed constructively aligned active learning within the approach.

DOI 10.1080/07294360.2015.1107887
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2015 Kindratt T, Raza A, Anderson J, Evans DJR, Gimpel N, ''Don't be scared': Demystifying statistics in postgraduate medical education', Education for Primary Care, 26 53-54 (2015)
2015 White PJ, Larson I, Styles K, Yuriev E, Evans DR, Short JL, et al., 'Using active learning strategies to shift student attitudes and behaviours about learning and teaching in a research intensive educational context', Pharmacy Education, 15 162-172 (2015)

© 2015 FIP. Background: Active learning strategies were used to shift student attitudes and behaviours about learning and teaching in a research intensive Faculty of Pharmacy and... [more]

© 2015 FIP. Background: Active learning strategies were used to shift student attitudes and behaviours about learning and teaching in a research intensive Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at a large Australian University. Principles and active learning strategies were developed and tested in discrete content sections during the pilot phase, and then implemented for all students in first and second year units the following two years. Method: The impact of the approach on student perceptions of active learning, attendance in face-to-face classes and performance in exams were evaluated. Results: The majority of students perceived that active learning improved their understanding of content, developed skills in critical thinking and communication, and corrected misconceptions. Nevertheless, 53% of students felt they ¿learnt better¿ in traditional lectures than with active learning during the pilot phase. After strategies to improve student understanding of the generic skill benefit of active learning were implemented, this proportion fell to 34% in year one of implementation and 15% in year two. Students who reported that they ¿learnt better in traditional lectures¿ valued clear content presentation, whilst students who disagreed with this statement valued communication and critical thinking skills development and problem solving. Student attendance was 73% higher in active learning units than untransformed units during the implementation phase. Conclusion: The use of a coordinated and strategic approach to implement active learning led to positive changes in student attitudes to their learning and associated behaviours.

Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2014 Evans DJR, Zeun P, Stanier RA, 'Motivating student learning using a formative assessment journey', Journal of Anatomy, 224 296-303 (2014)

Providing formative assessment opportunities has been recognised as a significant benefit to student learning. The outcome of any formative assessment should be one that ultimatel... [more]

Providing formative assessment opportunities has been recognised as a significant benefit to student learning. The outcome of any formative assessment should be one that ultimately helps improve student learning through familiarising students with the levels of learning required, informing them about gaps in their learning and providing feedback to guide the direction of learning. This article provides an example of how formative assessments can be developed into a formative assessment journey where a number of different assessments can be offered to students during the course of a module of teaching, thus utilising a spaced-education approach. As well as incorporating the specific drivers of formative assessment, we demonstrate how approaches deemed to be stimulating, interactive and entertaining with the aim of maximising enthusiasm and engagement can be incorporated. We provide an example of a mixed approach to evaluating elements of the assessment journey that focuses student reaction, appraisal of qualitative and quantitative feedback from student questionnaires, focus group analysis and teacher observations. Whilst it is not possible to determine a quantifiable effect of the assessment journey on student learning, usage data and student feedback shows that formative assessment can achieve high engagement and positive response to different assessments. Those assessments incorporating an active learning element and a quiz-based approach appear to be particularly popular. A spaced-education format encourages a building block approach to learning that is continuous in nature rather than focussed on an intense period of study prior to summative examinations. © 2013 Anatomical Society.

DOI 10.1111/joa.12117
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
2014 Bell LTO, Evans DJR, 'Art, anatomy, and medicine: Is there a place for art in medical education?', Anatomical Sciences Education, (2014)

For many years art, anatomy and medicine have shared a close relationship, as demonstrated by Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical drawings and Andreas Vesalius' groundbreakin... [more]

For many years art, anatomy and medicine have shared a close relationship, as demonstrated by Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical drawings and Andreas Vesalius' groundbreaking illustrated anatomical textbook from the 16th century. However, in the modern day, can art truly play an important role in medical education? Studies have suggested that art can be utilized to teach observational skills in medical students, a skill that is integral to patient examination but seldom taught directly within medical curricula. This article is a subjective survey that evaluates a student selected component (SSC) that explored the uses of art in medicine and investigates student perception on the relationship between the two. It also investigates whether these medical students believe that art can play a role in medical education, and more specifically whether analyzing art can play a role in developing observational skills in clinicians. An "Art in Medicine" 8-week course was delivered to first year medical students at Brighton and Sussex Medical School. The use of art to improve observational skills was a core theme throughout. Feedback from the students suggests that they believe a strong association between art and medicine exists. It also showed a strong perception that art could play a role in medical education, and more specifically through analyzing art to positively develop clinical observational skills. The results of this subjective study, together with those from research from elsewhere, suggest that an art-based approach to teaching observational skills may be worth serious consideration for inclusion in medical and other healthcare curricula. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

DOI 10.1002/ase.1435
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2013 Evans DJR, 'The anatomy of Better Teaching and Better Learning - it¿s all in the design', CLINICAL ANATOMY, 29 223-223 (2013)
2013 Agabalyan NA, Evans DJR, Stanley RL, 'Investigating tendon mineralisation in the avian hindlimb: A model for tendon ageing, injury and disease', Journal of Anatomy, 223 262-277 (2013)

Mineralisation of the tendon tissue has been described in various models of injury, ageing and disease. Often resulting in painful and debilitating conditions, the processes under... [more]

Mineralisation of the tendon tissue has been described in various models of injury, ageing and disease. Often resulting in painful and debilitating conditions, the processes underlying this mechanism are poorly understood. To elucidate the progression from healthy tendon to mineralised tendon, an appropriate model is required. In this study, we describe the spontaneous and non-pathological ossification and calcification of tendons of the hindlimb of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). The appearance of the ossified avian tendon has been described previously, although there have been no studies investigating the developmental processes and underlying mechanisms leading to the ossified avian tendon. The tissue and cells from three tendons - the ossifying extensor and flexor digitorum longus tendons and the non-ossifying Achilles tendon - were analysed for markers of ageing and mineralisation using histology, immunohistochemistry, cytochemistry and molecular analysis. Histologically, the adult tissue showed a loss of healthy tendon crimp morphology as well as markers of calcium deposits and mineralisation. The tissue showed a lowered expression of collagens inherent to the tendon extracellular matrix and presented proteins expressed by bone. The cells from the ossified tendons showed a chondrogenic and osteogenic phenotype as well as tenogenic phenotype and expressed the same markers of ossification and calcification as the tissue. A molecular analysis of the gene expression of the cells confirmed these results. Tendon ossification within the ossified avian tendon seems to be the result of an endochondral process driven by its cells, although the roles of the different cell populations have yet to be elucidated. Understanding the role of the tenocyte within this tissue and the process behind tend on ossification may help us prevent or treat ossification that occurs in injured, ageing or diseased tendon. © 2013 Anatomical Society.

DOI 10.1111/joa.12078
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2013 Wilmot VV, Evans DJR, 'Categorizing the distribution of the saphenous nerve in relation to the great saphenous vein', Clinical Anatomy, 26 531-536 (2013)

Saphenous donor site neuralgia is a cause of morbidity post-coronary artery bypass surgery. Saphenous nerve damage during harvesting of the great saphenous vein is thought to be r... [more]

Saphenous donor site neuralgia is a cause of morbidity post-coronary artery bypass surgery. Saphenous nerve damage during harvesting of the great saphenous vein is thought to be responsible. We dissected 37 cadaveric lower limbs from the knee fold to the dorsal venous arches, to study the spatial relations of the saphenous nerve and great saphenous vein to identify its distribution within the leg. Distribution of the saphenous nerve was categorized into Type A, where the nerve traveled inferiorly and split into an anterior and posterior branch during its course between the knee fold and medial malleolus, Type B, where the nerve traveled anterior to the vein with a small caliber branch traveling posteriorly at the proximal end, Type C where two main branches originated at the knee fold, one anterior to and one posterior to the vein. Overall the vein and nerve crossed in 27 out of the 37 cases (73%), occurring between 5 and 29 cm from the malleolus (60% occurred between 16 and 26 cm). In 32 (86%) of cases, the distal part of the nerve and vein were tightly adhered to each other within a common sheath. The length of adherence ranged from 3 to 26 cm with an average of 14 cm. The saphenous nerve is highly vulnerable during harvesting of the great saphenous vein due to its close relationship and crossing branches. Knowledge of the distribution categories of the nerve can help guide the surgeon to avoid damaging nerve branches during harvesting. Clin. Anat. Clin. Anat. 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/ca.22168
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2013 Evans DJR, 'Connecting with different audiences: The anatomy of communication is essential', Anatomical Sciences Education, 6 134-137 (2013)

In the twenty-first century, communication has become truly global. Advances in technology have opened up a host of ways in which we are able to communicate to retrieve or pass on... [more]

In the twenty-first century, communication has become truly global. Advances in technology have opened up a host of ways in which we are able to communicate to retrieve or pass on information and knowledge. In many cases we have moved from a place-based communication approach to one of increasing mobility. With this shift in approach, it is apparent that effective communication skills are perhaps even more important so that we can connect appropriately with diverse audiences. Despite this, relatively little attention has been paid to training our students in different modes of communication and therefore we may not be fully preparing our students to play their part in the global community. Given anatomy's place within many health-care curricula, an ideal avenue is available for anatomists to take the lead in providing communications skills training for students. There are a variety of approaches, some of which are outlined in this article, which can be used to create appropriate opportunities for developing different communication skills and these can be woven into existing practices to ensure courses do not become overburdened. A sustained approach to communication skills training will help equip our students to communicate easily with the many aspects of modern society. Anat Sci Educ 6: 134-137. © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

DOI 10.1002/ase.1311
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2012 Pearce M, Evans DJR, 'Developing multimedia resources: For students, by students', Clinical Teacher, 9 178-182 (2012)
2012 Jackson TA, Evans DJR, 'Can medical students teach? A near-peer-led teaching program for year 1 students', American Journal of Physiology - Advances in Physiology Education, 36 192-196 (2012)

The General Medical Council states that United Kingdom graduates must function effectively as educators. There is a growing body of evidence showing that medical students can be i... [more]

The General Medical Council states that United Kingdom graduates must function effectively as educators. There is a growing body of evidence showing that medical students can be includedas teachers within a medical curriculum. Our aim was to design and implement a near-peer-led teaching program in an undergraduate medical curriculum and assess its acceptability among year 1 students. Students received six tutorials focusing on aspects of cardiac, respiratory, and blood physiology. Tutorials ran alongside standard module teaching. Students were taught in groups of ~30 students/group, and an active teaching approach was used in sessions where possible. Using anonymous evaluations, student feedback was collected for the program overall and for each tutorial. The program was voluntary and open to all first-year students, and 94 (of 138) medical students from year 1 at Brighton and Sussex Medical School were recruited to the study. The tutorial program was popular among students and was well attended throughout. Individual tutorial and overall program quantitative and qualitative feedback showed that students found the tutorials very useful in consolidating material taught within the module. Students found the small group and active teaching style ofthe near-peer tutors very useful to facilitating their learning experience. The end-ofmodule written examination scores suggest that the tutorials may have had a positive effect on student outcome compared with previous student attainment. In conclusion, the present study shows that a near-peer tutorial program can be successfully integrated into a teaching curriculum. The feedback demonstrates that year 1 students are both receptive and find the additional teaching of benefit. © 2012 The American Physiological Society.

DOI 10.1152/advan.00035.2012
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
2012 Pearce M, Evans D, 'Students developing resources for students', Clinical Teacher, 9 178-182 (2012)

Background: The development of new technologies has provided medical education with the ability to enhance the student learning experience and meet the needs of changing curricula... [more]

Background: The development of new technologies has provided medical education with the ability to enhance the student learning experience and meet the needs of changing curricula. Students quickly adapt to using multimedia learning resources, but these need to be well designed, learner-centred and interactive for students to become significantly engaged. Context: One way to ensure that students become committed users and that resources become distinct elements of the learning cycle is to involve students in resource design and production. Such an approach enables resources to accommodate student needs and preferences, but also provides opportunities for them to develop their own teaching and training skills. Innovation: The aim of the medical student research project was to design and produce an electronic resource that was focused on a particular anatomical region. The views of other medical students were used to decide what features were suitable for inclusion and the resulting package contained basic principles and clinical relevance, and used a variety of approaches such as images of cadaveric material, living anatomy movies and quizzes. The completed package was assessed using a survey matrix and found to compare well with commercially available products. Implications: Given the ever-diversifying arena of multimedia instruction and the ability of students to be fully conversant with technology, this project demonstrates that students are ideal participants and creators of multimedia resources. It is hoped that such an approach will help to further develop the skill base of students, but will also provide an avenue of developing packages that are student user friendly, and that are focused towards particular curricula requirements. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1743-498X.2012.00529.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2011 Valasek P, Theis S, DeLaurier A, Hinits Y, Luke GN, Otto AM, et al., 'Cellular and molecular investigations into the development of the pectoral girdle', Developmental Biology, 357 108-116 (2011)

The forelimbs of higher vertebrates are composed of two portions: the appendicular region (stylopod, zeugopod and autopod) and the less prominent proximal girdle elements (scapula... [more]

The forelimbs of higher vertebrates are composed of two portions: the appendicular region (stylopod, zeugopod and autopod) and the less prominent proximal girdle elements (scapula and clavicle) that brace the limb to the main trunk axis. We show that the formation of the muscles of the proximal limb occurs through two distinct mechanisms. The more superficial girdle muscles (pectoral and latissimus dorsi) develop by the "In-Out" mechanism whereby migration of myogenic cells from the somites into the limb bud is followed by their extension from the proximal limb bud out onto the thorax. In contrast, the deeper girdle muscles (e.g. rhomboideus profundus and serratus anterior) are induced by the forelimb field which promotes myotomal extension directly from the somites. Tbx5 inactivation demonstrated its requirement for the development of all forelimb elements which include the skeletal elements, proximal and distal muscles as well as the sternum in mammals and the cleithrum of fish. Intriguingly, the formation of the diaphragm musculature is also dependent on the Tbx5 programme. These observations challenge our classical views of the boundary between limb and trunk tissues. We suggest that significant structures located in the body should be considered as components of the forelimb. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2011.06.031
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 29
2011 Evans DJR, Fossey S, 'Perspectives on anatomical donation and holding services of thanksgiving', Clinical Ethics, 6 195-199 (2011)

The value of human bodies for the teaching of anatomy has been recognized since the 16th century. Many medical students are exposed to the process of body donation as human dissec... [more]

The value of human bodies for the teaching of anatomy has been recognized since the 16th century. Many medical students are exposed to the process of body donation as human dissection continues to play a fundamental role in many medical courses. The opportunity of dissection not only provides students with an educational approach to learning human structure but also exposes them to the emotions surrounding death and dying and the role of the anatomical donor in their journey. This paper explores the subject of body donation in relation to anatomical examination, the relationship the donor has to the medical student experience and the purpose of thanksgiving services. The paper concludes with a brief description of a study carried out at a UK medical school to seek the views of first and second-year medical students on the purpose, place and value of thanksgiving services.

DOI 10.1258/ce.2011.011043
2011 Evans DJR, 'Using embryology screencasts: A useful addition to the student learning experience?', Anatomical Sciences Education, 4 57-63 (2011)

Although podcasting has been a well used resource format in the last few years as a way of improving the student learning experience, the inclusion of enhanced audiovisual formats... [more]

Although podcasting has been a well used resource format in the last few years as a way of improving the student learning experience, the inclusion of enhanced audiovisual formats such as screencasts has been less used, despite the advantage that they work well for both visual and auditory learners. This study examines the use of and student reaction to a set of screencasts introduced to accompany embryology lectures within a second year module at Brighton and Sussex Medical School. Five mini-lecture screencasts and one review quiz screencast were produced as digital recordings of computer screen output with audio narration and released to students via the managed learning environment (MLE). Analysis of server log information from the MLE showed that the screencasts were accessed by many of the students in the cohort, although the exact numbers were variable depending on the screencast. Students accessed screencasts at different times of the day and over the whole of the access period, although maximum downloads were predictably recorded leading up to the written examination. Quantitative and qualitative feedback demonstrated that most students viewed the screencasts favorably in terms of usefulness to their learning, and end-of-module written examination scores suggest that the screencasts may have had a positive effect on student outcome when compared with previous student attainment. Overall, the development of a series of embryology screencasts to accompany embryology lecture sessions appears to be a useful addition to learning for most students and not simply an innovation that checks the box of "technology engagement. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Anatomists.

DOI 10.1002/ase.209
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
2011 Evans DJR, 'Promoting knowledge and understanding in society: Training our students for effective communication', Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, 3 35-46 (2011)

© 2011, © Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Purpose ¿ The ability to communicate with society is one of the key skills by which our students can help enhance knowledge and unde... [more]

© 2011, © Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Purpose ¿ The ability to communicate with society is one of the key skills by which our students can help enhance knowledge and understanding of different subjects within the general population. Unfortunately, up until recently few subject areas have provided tailored training for their students in the art of communicating with different audiences, especially a non-specialist one. This review paper aims to discuss the rationale for incorporating defined communication skills training (CST) into higher education courses, focusing on medicine, other healthcare professions and science. In addition the review aims to identify example methodologies used for the training and assessment of communication skills. Design/methodology/approach ¿ The approach taken for this review has been to: identify and review national, subject specific and individual drivers for why higher education should be including CST in their courses and programmes; evaluate some of the published approaches and innovations used to introduce CST into higher education courses; and finally, assess the factors that curriculum designers should consider when incorporating CST into their programmes or modules. Findings ¿ The review shows that there are a number of important drivers for including CST in higher education curricula, especially training which is directed to communicating with non-specialist audiences. The paper identifies a number of varied approaches for integrating training into existing and emerging HE courses and modules, aimed at developing both oral and written communication skills. Originality/value ¿ The paper demonstrates the need for CST in undergraduate courses and acts as a challenge to others to devise strategies to ensure their students are ready and able to communicate with society in the twenty-first century.

DOI 10.1108/17581181111150892
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2010 Ainsworth SJ, Stanley RL, Evans DJR, 'Developmental stages of the Japanese quail', Journal of Anatomy, 216 3-15 (2010)

Developmental biology research has used various avian species as model organisms for studying morphogenesis, with the chick embryo being used by the majority of groups. The focus ... [more]

Developmental biology research has used various avian species as model organisms for studying morphogenesis, with the chick embryo being used by the majority of groups. The focus on the chick embryo led Hamburger and Hamilton to develop their definitive staging series nearly 60 years ago and this series is still the mainstay of all laboratories working with avian embryos. The focus on the chick embryo has somewhat overshadowed the importance of another avian embryo that has proved to be equally powerful, the Japanese quail. Since the late 1960s, chimeras have been produced using chick and quail embryos and this technique has revolutionized the approach taken to the investigation of the cellular and molecular interactions that occur during development. Reviews of the literature demonstrate that many research groups are using the quail embryo in a number of established and new ways, and this species has become a primary animal model in developmental biology. Some staging of quail has been performed but this has been incomplete and variations in descriptions, stages and incubation timings mean that comparisons with the chick are not always easily made. There appears to be general agreement that, at the early stages of embryogenesis, there is little developmental difference between chick and quail embryos, although the basis for this has not been established experimentally. The accelerated ontogeny of quail embryos at mid to late stages of development means that registration with the chick is lost. We have therefore developed a definitive developmental stage series for Japanese quail so that differences are fully characterized, misconceptions or assumptions are avoided, and the results of comparative studies are not distorted. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

DOI 10.1111/j.1469-7580.2009.01173.x
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 43
2009 Fraher J, Evans DJR, 'The training of the next generation of anatomy teachers', Anatomical Sciences Education, 2 119-125 (2009)
2009 Williams R, Nelson L, Dowthwaite GP, Evans DJR, Archer CW, 'Notch receptor and Notch ligand expression in developing avian cartilage', Journal of Anatomy, 215 159-169 (2009)

The development of limb cartilage involves complex signalling pathways allowing the formation of distinct segments of cartilage that are maintained in the fully developed joint. I... [more]

The development of limb cartilage involves complex signalling pathways allowing the formation of distinct segments of cartilage that are maintained in the fully developed joint. In this study, we investigated the Notch signalling pathway and its role in cartilage development. The differential distribution of the Notch signalling family of receptors and their corresponding ligands in developing avian ( gallus gallus ) cartilage revealed expression of Notch.1, Delta.1, Jagged.1 and Jagged.2 in all limb mesenchyme cells at the early stages of cartilage anlagen development, which were subsequently restricted to the developing cartilage element. Expression of both Notch.1 and Jagged.1 became increasingly restricted to the surface cartilage once joint cavity formation had occurred. Delta.1 and Jagged.1 were restricted to a layer of cells underneath the surface cartilage and were also observed in the hypertrophic chondrocytes, where Notch.1 expression was evident in stage 40-44 limbs. Notch 2, Notch 3 and Notch 4 were not evident in early stage limbs but were present after cavitation, although expression was lost in late stage limbs (stage 40-44). We also demonstrated that inhibition of the Notch pathway leads to altered Notch receptor expression, disrupting cartilage differentiation. From these data it is clear that Notch signalling is a necessary and critical factor in regulating cell fate decisions allowing controlled chondrogenesis, elongation and subsequent maintenance of limb cartilage. © Journal compilation © 2009 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

DOI 10.1111/j.1469-7580.2009.01089.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
2009 Fraher JP, Evans DJR, 'Training tomorrow's anatomists today: A partnership approach', Anatomical Sciences Education, 2 119-125 (2009)

Anatomy is recognized to play a central role in the education and training of clinicians, healthcare professionals, and scientists. However, in recent years, the perceived decline... [more]

Anatomy is recognized to play a central role in the education and training of clinicians, healthcare professionals, and scientists. However, in recent years, the perceived decline in popularity of anatomy has led to a deficiency in the numbers of new anatomy educators. The tide is now turning with anatomy once again taking its rightful place in a wide of variety of disciplines, and therefore it is imperative that a new generation of anatomists is in place to meet this need. In response, the Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland has made the training of the next set of anatomists, one of its strategic priorities, and in collaboration with the American Association of Anatomists has developed a dedicated Training Program. The overall aim of the Program is to provide trainees with the necessary knowledge, understanding, aptitudes, and attitudes in appropriate detail, sufficient to enable them to teach and examine Anatomy with full competence at the undergraduate and postgraduate level. The Program offers opportunities to consolidate knowledge and deepen understanding of anatomy, improve skills in teaching and communication with students, and be competent in preparing teaching materials and assessment modalities. The Program uses a distance-learning approach with an incorporated Residential School and is particularly aimed at those undertaking a career in the biosciences. Early indications suggest that initiatives such as the development of this Training Program will help deliver the next generation of anatomists and ensure that anatomy continues to play a fundamental role in the education of clinicians, healthcare professionals, and scientists. © 2009 American Association of Anatomists.

DOI 10.1002/ase.81
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
2009 Evans DJR, Cuffe T, 'Near-peer teaching in anatomy: An approach for deeper learning', Anatomical Sciences Education, 2 227-233 (2009)

Peer teaching has been recognized as a valuable and effective approach for learning and has been incorporated into medical, dental, and healthcare courses using a variety of appro... [more]

Peer teaching has been recognized as a valuable and effective approach for learning and has been incorporated into medical, dental, and healthcare courses using a variety of approaches. The success of peer teaching is thought to be related to the ability of peer tutors and tutees to communicate more effectively, thereby improving the learning environment. Near-peer teaching involves more experienced students acting as tutors who are ideally placed to pass on their knowledge and experience. The advantage of using near-peer teachers is the opportunity for the teacher to reinforce and expand their own learning and develop essential teaching skills. This study describes the design and implementation of a program for fourth year medical students to teach anatomy to first- and second-year medical students and evaluates the perceptions of the near-peer teachers on the usefulness of the program, particularly in relation to their own learning. Feedback from participants suggests that the program fulfills its aims of providing an effective environment for developing deeper learning in anatomy through teaching. Participants recognize that the program also equips them with more advanced teaching skills that will be required as they move nearer toward taking on supervisory and teaching duties. The program has also provided the school with an additional valuable and appropriate resource for teaching anatomy to first- and second-year students, who themselves view the inclusion of near-peer teachers as a positive element in their learning. © 2009 American Association of Anatomists.

DOI 10.1002/ase.110
Citations Scopus - 86Web of Science - 86
2008 Demetriades A, Hardwidge C, Evans DJR, 'Spina Bifida and an extra lower limb', ACTA NEUROCHIRURGICA, 150 511-512 (2008)
DOI 10.1007/s00701-008-1572-3
2008 Evans DJR, Canavan A, 'Designing a clinical skills programme: A partnership between students, patients and faculty', International Journal of Clinical Skills, 2 130-134 (2008)
2008 Evans DJR, 'Designing Patient-Focused Information: An Opportunity for Communicating Anatomically Related Information', ANATOMICAL SCIENCES EDUCATION, 1 41-45 (2008)
DOI 10.1002/ase.6
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2008 Evans DJR, 'Designing patient-focussed information: An opportunity for communicating anatomically related information', Anatomical Sciences Education, 1 41-45 (2008)
2007 Blackburn SC, Wood CPJ, Evans DJR, Watt DJ, 'Radial nerve contribution to brachialis in the UK Caucasian population: Position is predictable based on surface landmarks', CLINICAL ANATOMY, 20 64-67 (2007)
DOI 10.1002/ca.20244
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
2006 Evans DJR, Valasek P, Schmidt C, Patel K, 'Skeletal muscle translocation in vertebrates', ANATOMY AND EMBRYOLOGY, 211 S43-S50 (2006)
DOI 10.1007/s00429-006-0121-1
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 5
2006 Evans DJR, Noden DM, 'Spatial relations between avian craniofacial neural crest and paraxial mesoderm cells', DEVELOPMENTAL DYNAMICS, 235 1310-1325 (2006)
DOI 10.1002/dvdy.20663
Citations Scopus - 89Web of Science - 82
2005 Evans DJR, Watt DJ, 'Provision of anatomical teaching in a new British Medical School: Getting the right mix', Anatomical Record - Part B New Anatomist, 284 22-27 (2005)

In response to a government report, which recommended a substantial increase in the number of medical students in the United Kingdom by 2005, several new medical schools have been... [more]

In response to a government report, which recommended a substantial increase in the number of medical students in the United Kingdom by 2005, several new medical schools have been set up throughout the country. One such school, the Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS), recently opened its doors to new students. BSMS offers a 5-year medical curriculum that uses an integrated systems-based approach to cultivate academic knowledge and clinical experience. Anatomy is one of the core elements of the program and, as such, features strongly within the modular curriculum. The challenge for the anatomy faculty has been to decide how best to integrate anatomy into the new curriculum and what teaching modalities should be used. A multidisciplinary approach has been taken using both traditional and contemporary teaching methods. Unlike most of the other new medical schools, BSMS uses cadaveric dissection as the cornerstone of its teaching, as the faculty believes that dissection still provides the most powerful technique for demonstrating anatomy as well as enhancing communication and teamwork skills. The dissection experience is handled using an understanding and professional way. However, to ensure that our students do not become detached from the process of patient-focused care, emphasis in the dissecting room environment is also placed on respect and compassion. To enhance conceptual understanding of structure and function and provide further clinical relevance, we are using imaging technology to demonstrate living anatomy. Unique to the BSMS curriculum is the teaching of the anatomy in the later years of the program. During specialist rotations, students will return to the dissecting room to study the anatomy relevant to that area. Such vertical integration ensures that core anatomical knowledge is gained at the most appropriate level relative to a student's clinical experience. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Citations Scopus - 42
2005 Evans DJR, Francis-West PH, 'Craniofacial development: making faces', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, 207 435-436 (2005)
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
2005 Valasek P, Evans DJR, Maina F, Grim M, Patel K, 'A dual fate of the hindlimb muscle mass: cloacal/perineal musculature develops from leg muscle cells', DEVELOPMENT, 132 447-458 (2005)
DOI 10.1242/dev.01545
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 25
2004 Dowthwaite GP, Bishop JC, Redman SN, Khan IM, Rooney P, Evans DJR, et al., 'The surface of articular cartilage contains a progenitor cell population', JOURNAL OF CELL SCIENCE, 117 889-897 (2004)
DOI 10.1242/jcs.00912
Citations Scopus - 427Web of Science - 380
2004 Lee ASJ, Zhang M, Evans DJR, 'Changes in the proportion and number of Pax7(+ve) and MF20(+ve) myoblasts during chick myogenesis in the head and limb', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, 48 31-38 (2004)
DOI 10.1387/ijdb.15005572
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2003 Rees E, Young RD, Evans DJR, 'Spatial and temporal contribution of somitic myoblasts to avian hind limb muscles', DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, 253 264-278 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S0012-1606(02)00028-3
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2003 Evans DJR, 'Contribution of somitic cells to the avian ribs', DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, 256 114-126 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S0012-1606(02)00117-3
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 28
2003 Oldfield SF, Evans DJR, 'Tendon morphogenesis in the developing avian limb: plasticity of fetal tendon fibroblasts', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, 202 153-164 (2003)
DOI 10.1046/j.1469-7580.2003.00145.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 8
2003 Anakwe K, Robson L, Hadley J, Buxton P, Church V, Allen S, et al., 'Wnt signalling regulates myogenic differentiation in the developing avian wing', DEVELOPMENT, 130 3503-3514 (2003)
DOI 10.1242/dev.00538
Citations Scopus - 110Web of Science - 110
2003 Francis-West PH, Robson L, Evans DJ, 'Craniofacial development: the tissue and molecular interactions that control development of the head.', Advances in anatomy, embryology, and cell biology, 169 (2003)

The molecular cascades that control craniofacial development have until recently been little understood. The paucity of data that exists has in part been due to the complexity of ... [more]

The molecular cascades that control craniofacial development have until recently been little understood. The paucity of data that exists has in part been due to the complexity of the head, which is the most intricate regions of the body. However, the generation of mouse mutants and the identification of gene mutations that cause human craniofacial syndromes, together with classical embryological approaches in other species, have given significant insight into how the head develops. These studies have emphasized how unique the head actually is, with each individual part governed by a distinct set of signalling interactions, again demonstrating the complexity of this region of the body. This review discussed the tissue and molecular interactions that control each region of the head. The processes that control neural tube closure together with correct development of the skull, midline patterning, neural crest generation and migration, outgrowth, patterning, and differentiation of the facial primordia and the branchial arches are thus discussed. Defects in these processes result in a number of human syndromes such as exencephaly, holoprosencephaly, musculoskeletal dysplasias, first arch syndromes such as Riegers and Treacher-Collins syndrome, and neural crest dysplasias such as DiGeorge syndrome. Our current knowledge of the genes responsible for these human syndromes together with how the head develops, is rapidly advancing so that we will soon understand the complex set of molecular and tissue interactions that build a head.

Citations Scopus - 85
2003 Davies DP, Evans DJR, 'Clinical dysmorphology: Understanding congenital abnormalities', Current Paediatrics, 13 288-297 (2003)

This article provides a nomenclature and classification of congenital abnormalities in order to better understand their origins, and hence provide a sound basis of management for ... [more]

This article provides a nomenclature and classification of congenital abnormalities in order to better understand their origins, and hence provide a sound basis of management for affected children and the future counselling of their families. The scheme proposed is built on earlier recommendations by various international groups but which have, in the authors' opinion, not had the recognition they deserve. © 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/S0957-5839(03)00028-9
Citations Scopus - 2
2002 Wigmore PM, Evans DJR, 'Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the generation of fiber diversity during myogenesis', International Review of Cytology, 216 175-232 (2002)

Skeletal muscles have a characteristic proportion and distribution of fiber types, a pattern which is set up early in development. It is becoming clear that different mechanisms p... [more]

Skeletal muscles have a characteristic proportion and distribution of fiber types, a pattern which is set up early in development. It is becoming clear that different mechanisms produce this pattern during early and late stages of myogenesis. In addition, there are significant differences between the formation of muscles in head and those found in rest of the body. Early fiber type differentiation is dependent upon an interplay between patterning systems which include the Wnt and Hox gene families and different myoblast populations. During later stages, innervation, hormones, and functional demand increasingly act to determine fiber type, but individual muscles still retain an intrinsic commitment to form particular fiber types. Head muscle is the only muscle not derived from the somites and follows a different development pathway which leads to the formation of particular fiber types not found elsewhere. This review discusses the formation of fiber types in both head and other muscles using results from both chick and mammalian systems. © 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

DOI 10.1016/S0074-7696(02)16006-2
Citations Scopus - 78Web of Science - 76
2002 Evans DJR, 'Mechanical Influences on Skeletal Muscle Tissue and its Development', European Journal of Morphology, 40 261-266 (2002)
DOI 10.1076/ejom.40.5.261.28903
2002 Hollins AJ, Campbell L, Gumbleton M, Evans DJR, 'Caveolin expression during chondrogenesis in the avian limb', Developmental Dynamics, 225 205-211 (2002)

Caveolin is the principal component and critical structural and functional element of caveolae, omega-shaped plasmalemmal invaginations, which have been implicated in a wide range... [more]

Caveolin is the principal component and critical structural and functional element of caveolae, omega-shaped plasmalemmal invaginations, which have been implicated in a wide range of cellular processes in several different tissues. In the present study, we have investigated both the spatial and temporal expression of caveolin proteins during chondrogenesis in the avian tibiotarsus at days 10-20 of embryonic development. By using semiquantitative Western blotting, we found that caveolin-1 was clearly expressed in developing avian cartilage. The positive expression of caveolin-1 in cartilage showed an upward trend of accumulation temporally, with the highest levels of expression at 20 days of development. By using immunocytochemistry, we detected all three caveolin proteins in the cells of the outer fibrous articular surface, although caveolin-1 demonstrated the strongest and most consistent reactivity. In all cases, however, immunoreactivity appeared to be concentrated in cells facing the articular cavity. In the epiphyseal cartilage, immunocytochemistry revealed that caveolin-1 was present in the majority of chondrocytes within all layers of the cartilage and at all stages examined. A discrete, intense band of caveolin-1 immunoreactivity was apparent within the layer of flattened cells immediately underlying the proliferating rounded chondrocytes and suggests that caveolin-1 might be involved in regulating the progression of cells through these gradually maturing cell layers. In contrast to the results for caveolin-1, in the case of caveolin-2 and -3, chondrocytes were devoid of immunoreactivity in all regions of the epiphyseal cartilage. Overall, this study demonstrates that caveolin-1, -2, and -3 are expressed during chondrogenesis in the developing avian limb, although the patterns of expression are restricted both spatially and temporally throughout the differentiating cell layers of the cartilage. The results suggest that caveolin proteins might play a differentiation-dependent role during avian chondrogenesis. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/dvdy.10143
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
1999 Evans DJR, Britland S, Wigmore PM, 'Differential response of fetal and neonatal myoblasts to topographical guidance cues in vitro', Development Genes and Evolution, 209 438-442 (1999)

Fusion of mononucleated myoblasts into parallel arrays of mutinucleated myotubes is an essential step in skeletal myogenesis. The formation of such a highly ordered structure requ... [more]

Fusion of mononucleated myoblasts into parallel arrays of mutinucleated myotubes is an essential step in skeletal myogenesis. The formation of such a highly ordered structure requires myoblasts to come together, orient and align in the correct location prior to fusion. We report here that fetal and neonatal myoblasts can use topographical features as strong guidance cues in vitro. Myoblasts were cultured on multiple grooved substrata of varying dimensions, and the axial orientations of individual cells were recorded. Both fetal and neonatal myoblasts aligned parallel with the direction of deep grooves (2.3-6.0 µm), which is correlated well with the location of myoblasts in similar sized grooves during secondary myogenesis. Fetal myoblasts also responded to shallower grooves (0.04-0.14 µm) by aligning parallel or perpendicular to the direction of the grooves, indicating the ability of these cells to respond to fine elements normally encountered within the developing muscle architecture. In contrast, neonatal myoblasts failed to respond to shallow grooves, adding to the suggestion that fetal and neonatal myoblasts may represent separate populations of myoblasts. Overall, the results demonstrate that myoblasts respond to large and small features of the physical topography in vitro and indicate that structural elements in the microenvironment of the muscle may play a critical role in myoblast spatial organization during myogenesis.

DOI 10.1007/s004270050275
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 32
1996 Wigmore PM, Maleki F, Evans DJR, McErlain M, 'After embryonic day 17, distribution of cells on surface of primary muscle fibres in mouse is non-random', DEVELOPMENTAL DYNAMICS, 207 215-221 (1996)
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
1994 Evans D, Baillie H, Caswell A, Wigmore P, 'During fetal muscle development, clones of cells contribute to both primary and secondary fibers', Developmental Biology, 162 348-353 (1994)

All mammalian muscle fibers are formed by cell fusion, but fiber formation occurs in two successive waves. Initially a small number of large fibers (primaries) are produced and ar... [more]

All mammalian muscle fibers are formed by cell fusion, but fiber formation occurs in two successive waves. Initially a small number of large fibers (primaries) are produced and are used as a scaffold for the formation of a larger number of smaller later forming fibers (secondaries). It has been reported that different populations of myoblasts are present at different ages, but it is unclear whether separate populations of cells contribute to primary and secondary fibers during the period of fetal development. We have tested this by injecting two replication-deficient retroviruses, carrying a marker gene (lac Z), into the hind limbs of Embryonic Day (E) 15 and E17 mouse fetuses. All fetuses were killed at E19. Clusters of marked fibers (assumed to correspond to single clones) found after injection at both ages contained both primary and secondary fibers. This indicates that at these ages, a single population of cells contributes to both primary and secondary fibers. © 1994 by Academic Press, Inc.

DOI 10.1006/dbio.1994.1092
Citations Scopus - 25
1994 Evans D, Wigmore P, 'A revised technique for locating and embedding genetically marked muscle fibers in mice.', Microscopy research and technique, 27 194-195 (1994)
DOI 10.1002/jemt.1070270210
Show 44 more journal articles

Conference (47 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Yuriev E, White PJ, Larson I, Styles K, Evans DR, Rangachari PK, et al., 'Concerted implementation of active learning in a research intensive faculty: Changes in staff and students attitudes and behaviors', ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, San Francisco, CA (2014)
2013 Evans DJR, Beaney DJ, 'BrightMed: an opportunity to open up anatomy to the next generation', FASEB JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2013)
2013 Stanley RL, Carolin AM, Agabalyan NA, Evans DJR, 'Novel use of a three-dimensional in vitro environment; does flexor and extensor tendon cell behavior differ?', FASEB JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2013)
2013 Agabalyan NA, Evans DJR, Stanley RL, 'The role of the tenocyte in tendon ossification in an avian model', FASEB JOURNAL, Boston, MA (2013)
2013 Stanley RL, Agabalyan NA, Evans DJR, 'Are cells from flexor and extensor tendons inherently different? Use of a developmental model', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY, Univ E Anglia (UEA), Thomas Paine Study Ctr, Norwich, ENGLAND (2013)
2013 Agabalyan NA, Evans DJR, Stanley RL, 'Does avian tendon tissue contain an inherent population of multipotent cells?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY, Univ E Anglia (UEA), Thomas Paine Study Ctr, Norwich, ENGLAND (2013)
2012 Agabalyan NA, Stanley RL, Evans DJR, 'Characterisation of the ossified avian tendon', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY (2012)
2012 Evans DJ, 'The ABC of Communication: Easy as 123?', FASEB JOURNAL, San Diego, CA (2012)
2012 Evans DJR, 'Students teaching students - facilitating deeper learning of anatomy?', FASEB JOURNAL, San Diego, CA (2012)
2012 Evans DJR, 'Motivating student learning using a formative assessment journey', UK (2012)
2011 Adds PJ, Brown NA, Evans DJR, Ataliotis P, '3-D Reconstruction of the Deep Postvertebral Muscles of the Chick', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY (2011)
2011 Evans DJR, 'Riding the crest and bringing students with you', FASEB JOURNAL, Washington, DC (2011)
2011 Evans DJR, Agabalyan NA, Stanley RL, 'Tendon injury and disease: finding a suitable experimental model', FASEB JOURNAL, Washington, DC (2011)
2011 Stanley RL, Holderbeke ID, Evans DRJ, 'Investigating the behaviour between flexor and extensor tendon-derived cells in vitro: a novel approach', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY, Univ East Anglia (UEA), Norwich, ENGLAND (2011)
2011 Agabalyan NA, Stanley RL, Evans JR, 'Tendon ossification: have we identified a suitable model?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY, Bristol Univ, Bristol, ENGLAND (2011)
2010 Ainsworth SJ, Stanley R, Perugini V, Evans DJR, 'Musculoskeletal injury and disease-potential answers from development?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY, Univ Coll London, London, ENGLAND (2010)
2010 Wincup CJ, Evans D, Walker-Bone K, 'EFFECT OF CORTICOSTEROID ON TENOCYTES: SHOULD STEROIDS BE USED AS A TREATMENT FOR TENDONOPATHIES?', RHEUMATOLOGY, Birmingham, ENGLAND (2010)
DOI 10.1093/rheumatology/keq712
2009 Ainsworth SJ, Evans DJR, 'Can cranial neural crest-derived cells help repair cartilage? A continuing story', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY (2009)
2009 Evans DJR, 'Do students of anatomy need to communicate with different audiences?', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY (2009)
2009 Adds PJ, Brown NA, Ataliotis P, Evans DJR, 'Mapping the fate of cells from the intersomitic cleft and the subectodermal region in the chick embryo', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY (2009)
2009 Evans DJR, 'Anatomy Leading the Competition - Variety is the Spice of Life', FASEB JOURNAL (2009)
2009 Ainsworth SJ, Evans D, 'Exploring the Chondrocytic Potential of Cranial Neural Crest Cells', FASEB JOURNAL (2009)
2009 Ainsworth SJ, Stanley R, Evans D, 'Developmental stages of Coturnix coturnix japonica, the Japanese quail', FASEB JOURNAL (2009)
2009 Ainsworth SJ, Evans DJR, 'Exploring the chondrocytic potential of cranial neural crest cells', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY, York Univ, York, ENGLAND (2009)
2008 Ainsworth S, Evans DJR, 'Repairing cartilage: can cranial neural crest cells help?', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY (2008)
2008 Adds PJ, Ataliotis P, Brown NA, Evans DJR, 'Cell fate mapping of epaxial tendons in the chick embryo: evaluation of localization of microinjections', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY (2008)
2007 Evans DJR, Lawrence-Watt DJ, 'Communicating clinical anatomy to a lay audience', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY (2007)
2007 Patel K, Valasek P, Huang R, Evans D, 'The In-Out Mechanism of skeletal muscle translocation and its deployment in the formation of trunk and perineal musculature.', FASEB JOURNAL, Washington, DC (2007)
2007 Evans DJR, 'Communicating anatomy and development to a patient-centered audience', FASEB JOURNAL, Washington, DC (2007)
2007 Evans DJR, 'The role of the anatomist in communicating Anatomy to a lay audience', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ANATOMY (2007)
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
2006 Williams R, Dowthwaite GP, Evans DJ, Archer C, 'Notch family signalling and Notch signalling modulation during chondrogenesis', European Cells and Materials (2006)
Citations Scopus - 1
2005 Valasek P, Evans DJR, Maina F, Grim M, Elkabir J, Patel K, 'External urethral sphincter originates from leg musculature', JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, San Antonio, TX (2005)
2005 Williams R, Dowthwaite G, Evans D, Archer C, 'Expression of Notch receptors in the developing chick limb', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY, Univ Bristol, Bristol, ENGLAND (2005)
2005 Valasek PV, Evans DJRE, Maina FM, Grim MG, Elkabir JJE, Patel KP, 'Perineal external sphincters originate from leg musculature', BJU INTERNATIONAL (2005)
2004 Evans DJR, Crawford A, Shaw H, 'Contribution of avian neural crest cells to the myocardial cell lineage', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, Cord, UK (2004)
2003 Antoni L, Anakwe K, Hadley J, Evans DJR, Robson L, Francis-West P, 'Wnt regulation of myogenic differentiation in the developing avian limb and face.', DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, BOSTON, MA (2003)
2002 Evans DJR, Thomas IG, Thomas S, Prabhu A, Zhang M, 'Contributions of neural crest and paraxial mesoderm to craniofacial morphogenesis in the chick embryo', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, Dundee, UK (2002)
2002 Oldfield SF, Evans DJR, 'The plasticity of fetal tendon fibroblasts when implanted into developing avian limb buds', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, Dundee, UK (2002)
2002 Anakwe K, Robson L, Hadley J, Buxton P, Church V, Allen S, et al., 'Wnt regulation of limb muscle differentiation', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, Dundee, UK (2002)
2002 Dowthwaite G, Redman S, Bishop J, Rooney P, Evans D, Bowyer S, et al., 'The identification and partial characterisation of an articular cartilage progenitor/stem cell', Third Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Translating Tissue Engineering into Products (2002)

We have previously shown that articular cartilage grows by apposition from cells occupying the upper zones of the tissue (surface and transitional). Using the South American oppos... [more]

We have previously shown that articular cartilage grows by apposition from cells occupying the upper zones of the tissue (surface and transitional). Using the South American opposum as a model system, we showed that cells associated with the articular surface were immunopositive for PCNA, IGF I and II together with 3 isoforms of TGFß. Further, by repeated intra-articular injection of the thymidine analogue bromo-deoxyuridine and subsequent immunodetection, we showed initial incorporation into the transitional zone cells followed by incorporation into the flattened cells of the articular surface indicating that these cells were in extended cycle compared with transitional zone cells. Using 7-day bovine articular cartilage, we have isolated articular surface chondrocytes by scalpel dissection followed by sequential enzyme digestion. Isolated chondrocytes (4,000/ml) were then subjected to a differential adhesion assay on fibronectin coated dishes that is preferentially expressed in the articular surface. We found that cells that had high affinity for the ligand (20 min attachment time) represented 10% of the initial population compared with 4 % that adhered in the following 20 min and the remaining 75+% that adhered after 40 min. FACS analysis showed that the initial 10% cohort with high affinity for fibronectin had significantly elevated levels of a5ß1 integrins (fibronectin receptor) than the remaining two cohorts. In addition, it was found that the high affinity cohort had a 400% higher colony forming efficiency than the lower affinity cohorts. Taken together, these data suggest that there is a sub-population of cells that reside in the articular surface that show classical features of a progenitor/stem cell that has been described in other tissues.

2001 Evans DJR, 'Contribution of semitic cells to the avian axial skeleton and hypaxial musculature.', DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (2001)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2001 Oldfield SF, Ralphs JR, Benjamin M, Evans DJR, 'Morphogenesis of the muscle-tendon interface during avian hindlimb development', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, Egham, UK (2001)
2001 Rees E, Evans DJR, 'Temporal contribution of myoblasts to avian limb muscles', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, Egham, UK (2001)
2001 Hall SK, Rofe CJ, Lewis O, Evans DJR, 'Dynamic rearrangement of microtubules is an important component of the volume regulatory response in embryonic chick cardiac myocytes', JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-LONDON, UNIV BRISTOL, BRISTOL, ENGLAND (2001)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2000 Evans DJR, 'Distribution of somitic myoblasts within developing avian limb muscles', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, Cambridge, UK (2000)
1998 Evans DJR, Oldfield S, 'Topographical features act as strong guidance cues for myoblast alignment and formation of oriented myotubes in vitro.', DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (1998)
1994 EVANS DJR, WIGMORE PMC, 'RELATED MYOBLASTS FUSE WITH BOTH PRIMARY AND SECONDARY FIBERS DURING FETAL MUSCLE DEVELOPMENT', JOURNAL OF CELLULAR BIOCHEMISTRY (1994)
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Professor Darrell Evans

Position

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)
Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)
Academic Division

Contact Details

Email darrell.evans@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5114
Fax (02) 4921 7060

Office

Room CH310
Building The Chancellery
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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