Dr Shafiq Syed

Dr Shafiq Syed

Associate Lecturer

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy

Career Summary

Biography

Shafiq Syed obtained a Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine and Master of Biotechnology and Immunology from India before moving to the University of Newcastle, Australia, where he obtained his PhD degree in 2018. During his PhD, he discovered, for the first time, the biomarker for the much elusive uterine stem cells and detailed their functional characterisation during uterine homeostasis, regeneration and cancer, which further lead to the identification of the cell of origin for endometrial cancer. Dr Syed published his PhD research as a lead author in Cell Stem Cell. The exceptional quality of this research work was also recognised at several international platforms including a featured interview by Technology Networks, USA, and won several awards. In 2020, Research Australia featured his work in their INSPIRE magazine as one of the top 15 innovations nationwide

Dr Syed is currently an Associate Lecturer at the University of Newcastle. His research work has focused on defining the molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of gynecological cancers, for which he has developed several models including cancer patient-derived-xenograft and -organoid models, and genetically modified mouse-models of cancer progression and metastasis. Using these cancer models along with uterus (the most regenerative organ) as the robust model organ for adult stem cell biology and tissue regeneration, his group employs a wide range of advanced sophisticated techniques including quantitative biology, cell-lineage tracing, high-throughput RNA-sequencing, proteomics, genomics, and advanced 3D-imaging to identify the basic principles involved in the regulation of growth and development and then extend these investigations to cancer and injury repair.

In his short career, Dr Syed has 21 refereed journal articles and book chapters, with an accompanying 123 citations and H-index of 7 and has published in top journals like Cell Stem Cell x1, Cell Reports x2, Development x1 and Developmental Biology x2. The innovative nature of his research is evidenced by being the first to identify novel endometrial stem cell markers and discover endometrial cancer-cell-of-origin. He has presented at over 15 national and international conferences and has been invited to write several chapters and review articles by renowned publishers including Nova Science Publishers, Inc., Springer, Developmental Biology, Molecular and Cellular Oncology. Also a member of the Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA) and Australian Society of Reproductive Biology, Syed is specialized in Cancer and Stem Cell Biology.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Cancer Genetics
  • Cancer biology
  • Cancer stem cells
  • Endometrial cancer
  • Endometrial stem cells
  • Endometriosis
  • Gynecologic oncology
  • Ovarian cancer

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/1/2019 - 31/12/2019 Associate Lecturer The University of Newcastle - School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health
Australia
1/1/2012 - 1/7/2012 Lecturer G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, India
India

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/1/2014 - 31/12/2018 Casual Academic School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2020 Future Leaders Group Award
HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
2019 Highly Commended Rapid Reflection Oral Presentation Award
HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
2019 Stem Cells Australia Retreat Travel Grant
The University of Melbourne
2017 Society of Reproductive Biology Travel Grant
Australian Society of Reproductive Biology
2014 Beautiful Science Award
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
2012 Young Scientist Award
Indian Veterinary Research Institute
2012 University of Newcastle Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
2012 University of Newcastle Research Scholarship Central (UNRSC)
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Distinction

Year Award
2012 CSIR Fellowship
Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of India
2009 ICAR Junior Research Fellowship
Indian Council of Agricultural Research, India
2009 DBT Fellowship
Department of Biotechnology, Ministry of Science and Technology, India

Thesis Examinations

Year Level Discipline Thesis
2019 Honours Health Calcium imaging of a spinal cord amplifier circuit: in vitro analysis of calretinin neuron activity in the spinal dorsal horn
2019 Honours Health In vitro efficacy of ONC201 in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG)

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
HUBS2107 Mammalian Growth and Development
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
This course will provide students with an overview of the biomolecular, cellular, genetic, physiological and anatomical aspects of reproductive growth and development, from the creation of the germ cells in the developing embryo to reproductive senescence in the ageing adult. The course will examine how sperm and eggs (gametes) are made; fertilisation achieved; and successful pregnancy initiated, maintained and stopped at birth. Developmental principles will be studied. The course will focus only on mammals with an emphasis on humans. Current research findings and techniques will be a key focus of this course.
Course Coordinator 7/1/2020 - 7/1/2021
HUBS2107 Mammalian Growth and Development
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
This course will provide students with an overview of the biomolecular, cellular, genetic, physiological and anatomical aspects of reproductive growth and development, from the creation of the germ cells in the developing embryo to reproductive senescence in the ageing adult. The course will examine how sperm and eggs (gametes) are made; fertilisation achieved; and successful pregnancy initiated, maintained and stopped at birth. Developmental principles will be studied. The course will focus only on mammals with an emphasis on humans. Current research findings and techniques will be a key focus of this course.
Lecturer 7/1/2019 - 7/1/2020
HUBS3412 Work Integrated Learning in Biomedical Science 1
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
This course is a research or industry placement course, which provides an opportunity for a student to work as part of a research laboratory, or within industry.
Examiner/Evaluator 7/1/2019 - 7/1/2021
HUBS3413 Work Integrated Learning in Biomedical Science 2
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
This course is a research or industry placement course, which provides an opportunity for a student to work as part of a research laboratory, or within industry
Examiner/Evaluator 7/1/2019 - 7/1/2021
VPB112 Veterinary Physiology and Biochemistry
G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, India
Lecturer 1/1/2012 - 1/7/2012
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Minakshi P, Shafiq M, Alisha A, Ranjan K, Kumar P, Anshul B, et al., 'Animal forensics and applications', Biotechnology: Prospects and Applications 265-286 (2013)

© 2013 Springer India. All rights reserved. Forensic science is the application of a broad spectrum of sciences and technologies to investigate situations after getting the facts ... [more]

© 2013 Springer India. All rights reserved. Forensic science is the application of a broad spectrum of sciences and technologies to investigate situations after getting the facts and to establish what occurred based on collected evidence. This is especially important in law enforcement where forensics is done in relation to criminal or civil law. In civil actions, forensics can help resolve a broad spectrum of legal issues through the identification, analysis, and evaluation of physical evidence. The field of forensic science covers document examination, DNA analysis using electronic or digital media, fingerprinting, autopsy techniques, forensic engineering, forensic anthropology, pathology, economics, accounting, biology, entomology, toxicology, and much more. In this chapter we have described different materials such as hair, blood, bone, teeth, saliva, nails, feathers, skin, leather, sperm, feces, and urine and different methods for extracting DNA from different sources. The applications of animal forensics can be broadly viewed in the following four categories such as animals can be the victim, can be the perpetrator, and can be the witness and wildlife forensics. Molecular animal forensics provides different genetic tools such as DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), PCR-RFLP, and microsatellite analysis for species identification and for characterization or identification of a sample recovered from a crime scene or illegal wildlife traders and black markets involved in wildlife trade. The genetic identification can be done as species identification, identification of geographic origin, individual identification, etc. Mitochondrial and nuclear markers can be used for genetic identification of the species. Identification of geographic origin is done by phylogeography and population assignment methods. To summarize, various techniques of individual identification, sexing, and parentage can be used. These techniques involve the microsatellite genotyping, DNA nucleotide sequencing, SNP typing, RAPD, and AFLP.

DOI 10.1007/978-81-322-1683-4_20
2013 Minakshi P, Ranjan K, Dahiya S, Pawan K, Rupinder, Shafiq, et al., 'Restriction enzyme analysis based differentiation of Indian isolates of Bluetongue Virus-1 isolated from Northern and Southern States of India', Microbial, Plant and Animal Research 219-223 (2013)

Bluetongue (BT) is an economically important viral disease of sheep and goat causing high morbidity and mortality. In the present study, eight Bluetongue virus (BTV) isolates from... [more]

Bluetongue (BT) is an economically important viral disease of sheep and goat causing high morbidity and mortality. In the present study, eight Bluetongue virus (BTV) isolates from Utter Pradesh (UP), four BTV isolates from Andhra Pradesh (AP) and one isolate each from Haryana, Rajasthan and Tamil Nadu (TN) states were adapted in BHK- 21 cell line. All the isolates were confirmed as bluetongue virus (BTV) based on amplification of 366bp amplicon with group specific ns1 gene based RT-PCR. All the isolates were then confirmed as BTV serotype-1 based on segment 2 (vp2 gene) specific RT-PCR amplifying a specific amplicon of 605bp size. The isolates were further confirmed as BTV-1 by nucleotide sequencing of partially amplified products of vp2 gene. The sequencing data thus generated was analysed to seek for any intraserotypic variations among these various Indian isolates of BTV-1 which originated from different states of India. For this purpose, restriction map for various restriction enzymes (RE) was constructed after carrying out in silico restriction enzyme analysis using Restriction Mapper V 3.0. software. In silico restriction enzyme analysis (REA) with restriction enzyme (RE) HindII, of two samples NRT35 (JQ037810) and NRT39 (JQ037809) from AP revealed a single RE site at nt1250. One isolate each from UP (MKD25 (JQ037807)), Rajasthan (AY559058) and Haryana (AY559060) also revealed a single RE site at nt1531, whereas remaining isolates revealed presence of two RE sites at nt1250 and nt1531. In case of TN (AY559061) and BT1 (JQ037811) isolate, REA with RE TaqI revealed one extra RE site at nt1244 in addition to the one at nt1513 in remaining isolates, where as one isolate each from UP (MKD22 (JQ037804)) and AP (NRT35 (JQ037810)) revealed one additional RE site at nt1285 and nt1685 respectively, with RE NdeII. A little genetic diversity was observed within BTV1 isolates of adjoining states such as Haryana, Rajasthan, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu due to point mutations. The presence of a common culicoides vector species C. oxystoma has been reported in all these states and could be the possible cause for spread of virus in these parts of India. © 2013 by Nova Science Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.

2013 Shafiq M, Minakshi P, Ranjan AK, Ravinder P, Prasad G, 'Restriction enzyme analysis based differentiation of Indian and global isolates of BTV21', Microbial, Plant and Animal Research 91-96 (2013)

One of the most important vector borne diseases of ruminants worldwide is causedby bluetongue (BT) virus, an orbivirus of the Reoviridae family. Bluetongue (BT) is aneconomically ... [more]

One of the most important vector borne diseases of ruminants worldwide is causedby bluetongue (BT) virus, an orbivirus of the Reoviridae family. Bluetongue (BT) is aneconomically important viral disease of ruminant species especially sheep and goatcausing high morbidity and mortality.The BT virus has segmented genome and is thus prone to frequent mutations andgene reassortment following the co-infection of two or more viruses in the host cell,leading to emergence of new genetic variants. For the present study, vp2 gene of Indianisolate KMNO-7 of BTV21, adapted in BHK-21 cell line, was sequenced full lengthutilising piecemeal approach after designing 7 primer pairs for the same and in silicorestriction enzyme analysis (REA) was done.The Restriction enzyme profile of the vp2 gene of the Indian isolate was thencompared with that of the other global isolates of BTV21 namely BTV21/ japan/TO2-1(AB686218.1), BTV21/japan/ ON89-1 (AB686215.1) and BTV21/SA-ref (AJ585142.1).Such comparison revealed certain restriction sites which were unique to the isolates andthus could help in differentiating Indian isolate from the global isolates. It was found thatthe restriction site for the enzyme EcoRV was present exclusively in the Indian isolateKMNO-7 while other isolates lacked the site for the enzyme. Similarly restriction site forthe enzyme Xbal1 was present exclusively in the BTV21/japan/ON89-1 isolate and not inthe other isolates. BTV21/SA-ref (AJ585142.1) lacked the restriction sites for theenzymes Sal1, Sca1 and BamH1 whereas other isolates possessed the restriction sites forthese enzymes. The restriction site for the enzyme Hind111 was absent inBTV21/japan/ON89-1isolate but was present in the remaining three isolates. Although there are various nucleotide sequence based methods for the differentiation of variousstrains of bluetongue virus, however, REA can serve as a quick method of differentiatingglobal isolates of a particular bluetongue virus serotype which can be furthercharacterised after deducing the nucleotide sequence of the vp2 gene. © 2013 by Nova Science Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.


Journal article (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Ali A, Syed SM, Jamaluddin MFB, Colino-Sanguino Y, Gallego-Ortega D, Tanwar PS, 'Cell Lineage Tracing Identifies Hormone-Regulated and Wnt-Responsive Vaginal Epithelial Stem Cells', Cell Reports, 30 1463-1477.e7 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 The Authors The intact vaginal epithelium is essential for women's reproductive health and provides protection against HIV and sexually transmitted infections. How thi... [more]

© 2020 The Authors The intact vaginal epithelium is essential for women's reproductive health and provides protection against HIV and sexually transmitted infections. How this epithelium maintains itself remains poorly understood. Here, we used single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to define the diverse cell populations in the vaginal epithelium. We show that vaginal epithelial cell proliferation is limited to the basal compartment without any obvious label-retaining cells. Furthermore, we developed vaginal organoids and show that the basal cells have increased organoid forming efficiency. Importantly, Axin2 marks a self-renewing subpopulation of basal cells that gives rise to differentiated cells over time. These cells are ovariectomy-resistant stem cells as they proliferate even in the absence of hormones. Upon hormone supplementation, these cells expand and reconstitute the entire vaginal epithelium. Wnt/ß-catenin is essential for the proliferation and differentiation of vaginal stem cells. Together, these data define heterogeneity in vaginal epithelium and identify vaginal epithelial stem cells.

DOI 10.1016/j.celrep.2020.01.003
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar, Muhammad Jamaluddin
2020 Syed SM, Tanwar PS, 'Axin2(+) endometrial stem cells: the source of endometrial regeneration and cancer', MOLECULAR & CELLULAR ONCOLOGY, 7 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/23723556.2020.1729681
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2020 Ali A, Syed SM, Tanwar PS, 'Protocol for
DOI 10.1016/j.xpro.2020.100088
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2020 Syed SM, Kumar M, Ghosh A, Tomasetig F, Ali A, Whan RM, et al., 'Endometrial Axin2 Cells Drive Epithelial Homeostasis, Regeneration, and Cancer following Oncogenic Transformation', Cell Stem Cell, 26 64-80.e13 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.stem.2019.11.012
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Manishkumar Jhamb, Pradeep Tanwar
2020 Ghosh A, Syed SM, Kumar M, Carpenter TJ, Teixeira JM, Houairia N, et al., 'In Vivo Cell Fate Tracing Provides No Evidence for Mesenchymal to Epithelial Transition in Adult Fallopian Tube and Uterus', CELL REPORTS, 31 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.celrep.2020.107631
Co-authors Manishkumar Jhamb, Pradeep Tanwar
2019 Al-Juboori AAA, Ghosh A, Bin Jamaluddin MF, Kumar M, Sahoo SS, Syed SM, et al., 'Proteomic Analysis of Stromal and Epithelial Cell Communications in Human Endometrial Cancer Using a Unique 3D Co-Culture Model', PROTEOMICS, 19 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pmic.201800448
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar, Muhammad Jamaluddin, Manishkumar Jhamb
2017 Goad J, Ko YA, Syed SM, Crossingham YJ, Tanwar PS, 'Data on the mRNA expression by in situ hybridization of Wnt signaling pathway members in the mouse uterus', Data in Brief, 12 208-212 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.dib.2017.03.047
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2017 Goad J, Ko YA, Kumar M, Syed SM, Tanwar PS, 'Differential Wnt signaling activity limits epithelial gland development to the anti-mesometrial side of the mouse uterus', Developmental Biology, 423 138-151 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2017.01.015
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Manishkumar Jhamb, Pradeep Tanwar
2017 Ghosh A, Syed SM, Tanwar PS, 'In vivo genetic cell lineage tracing reveals that oviductal secretory cells self-renew and give rise to ciliated cells', Development (Cambridge), 144 3031-3041 (2017) [C1]

© 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. The epithelial lining of the fallopian tube is vital for fertility, providing nutrition to gametes and facilitating their trans... [more]

© 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. The epithelial lining of the fallopian tube is vital for fertility, providing nutrition to gametes and facilitating their transport. It is composed of two major cell types: secretory cells and ciliated cells. Interestingly, human ovarian cancer precursor lesions primarily consist of secretory cells. It is unclear why secretory cells are the dominant cell type in these lesions. Additionally, the underlying mechanisms governing fallopian tube epithelial homoeostasis are unknown. In the present study, we showed that across the different developmental stages of mouse oviduct, secretory cells are the most frequently dividing cells of the oviductal epithelium. In vivo genetic cell lineage tracing showed that secretory cells not only self-renew, but also give rise to ciliated cells. Analysis of a Wnt reporter mouse model and various Wnt target genes showed that the Wnt signaling pathway is involved in oviductal epithelial homoeostasis. By developing two triple-transgenic mouse models, we showed that Wnt/ ß-catenin signaling is essential for self-renewal as well as the differentiation of secretory cells. In summary, our results provide mechanistic insight into oviductal epithelial homoeostasis.

DOI 10.1242/dev.149989
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2016 Kumar M, Syed SM, Taketo MM, Tanwar PS, 'Epithelial Wnt/ßcatenin signalling is essential for epididymal coiling', Developmental Biology, 412 234-249 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Organ shape and size are important determinants of their physiological functions. Epithelial tubes are anlagen of many complex organs. How these tubes acquire... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Organ shape and size are important determinants of their physiological functions. Epithelial tubes are anlagen of many complex organs. How these tubes acquire their complex shape and size is a fundamental question in biology. In male mice, the Wolffian duct (WD; postnatally known as epididymis) undergoes an astonishing transformation, where a straight tube only a few millimetres long elongates to over 1000 times its original length and fits into a very small space, due to extensive coiling of epithelium, to perform the highly specialized function of sperm maturation. Defective coiling disrupts sperm maturation and leads to male infertility. Recent work has shown that epithelial cell proliferation is a major driver of WD coiling. Still, very little is known about the molecular signals involved in this process. Testicular androgens are known regulators of WD development. However, epithelial androgen receptor signalling is dispensable for WD coiling. In this study, we have shown that Wnt signalling is highly active in the entire WD epithelium during its coiling, and is limited to only a few segments of the epididymis in later life. Pharmacological and genetic suppression of Wnt signalling inhibited WD coiling by decreasing cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. Comparative gene expression analysis identified Fibroblast growth factor 7 (Fgf7) as a prime Wnt target gene involved in WD coiling and in vitro treatment with Fgf7 protein increased coiling of WDs. In summary, our work has established that epithelial canonical Wnt signalling is a critical regulator of WD coiling and its precise regulation is essential for WD/epididymal differentiation.

DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2016.02.025
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar, Manishkumar Jhamb
2014 Kumar R, Gupta M, Shafiq S, Balhara AK, Em S, Ghosh M, Singh I, 'Sequencing-based polymorphism in leptin receptor gene and lack of association with postpartum anestrus in Murrah buffaloes', Turkish Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, 38 670-674 (2014)

© 2014, TÜBITAK. In order to detect polymorphism in exon 20 of the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene and its possible association with postpartum anestrus (PPA), peripheral blood sample... [more]

© 2014, TÜBITAK. In order to detect polymorphism in exon 20 of the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene and its possible association with postpartum anestrus (PPA), peripheral blood samples were obtained from 40 Murrah buffaloes including 20 PPA (>120 days after parturition) and 20 normal cyclic (<60 days after parturition) buffaloes having similar postpartum estrous conditions over previous consecutive gestations. Genomic DNA was isolated, and PCR was standardized to amplify partial exon 20 of the LEPR gene of 413 bp. Amplified fragments of the gene were sequenced and sequence variation was detected by assessing multiple alignments. The LEPR gene showed polymorphism at A231G, C247A, and G347A. Chi-square test of these 3 polymorphism sites between the 2 groups did not reveal any significant association of polymorphism with PPA. Hence, polymorphism at exon 20 of the LEPR gene was found in Murrah buffaloes, but the role of these polymorphisms in PPA could not be established.

DOI 10.3906/vet-1404-15
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2013 Shafiq M, Minakshi P, Bhateja A, Ranjan K, Prasad G, 'Evidence of genetic reassortment between Indian isolate of bluetongue virus serotype 21 (BTV-21) and bluetongue virus serotype 16 (BTV-16)', Virus Research, 173 336-343 (2013)

The genome of bluetongue virus (BTV) consists of 10 segments. Of these seg-2 encoded VP2 is the major serotype determining protein, and seg-6 encoded VP5 protein enhances the prot... [more]

The genome of bluetongue virus (BTV) consists of 10 segments. Of these seg-2 encoded VP2 is the major serotype determining protein, and seg-6 encoded VP5 protein enhances the protective neutralizing activity of VP2 protein inducing higher serotype specific antibody titer than the VP2 alone. Out of the twenty-six BTV serotypes found worldwide, 22 were reported from different states of India. These include serotype 21 which was recently isolated from Andhra Pradesh, and was involved in a severe outbreak of bluetongue in Indian native sheep. BTV21 (KMNO-7) and BTV16 were circulating at the same time. This co-circulation, along with the fact that the virus genome is segmented, provides an opportunity for these two isolates of different serotypes to simultaneously infect the same animal, and even the same cell or a same vector with the potential for generation of reassortant viruses. This study was carried out to provide some insights into the outbreak. We carried out full length sequencing of genome seg-2 and seg-6 of Indian isolates VJW64 (BTV16) and KMNO-7 (BTV21). Detailed phylogenetic analysis revealed that genome seg-6 of Indian isolate KMNO-7 (BTV21) clusters with isolates of BTV16 showing maximum nucleotide similarity of 97.6% with TUR/2000/02 isolate of BTV16, which is much more than it shows with any isolate of BTV21. KMNO-7 (BTV21) significantly diverged from original strain of BTV21, and is a reassortant strain having acquired seg-6 from an isolate of BTV16. This study provides some useful insights into the epidemiology of the bluetongue disease, and undermines serotyping on genome seg-6 basis. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.virusres.2013.01.009
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
Show 9 more journal articles

Conference (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Syed S, Lombard J, Mandaliya H, Nahar P, Ius Y, O'Sullivan R, et al., 'Axin2 Marks the Cell of Origin for Endometrial Cancer', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2019 Jamaluddin M, Ko Y-A, Syed S, Ius Y, O'Sullivan R, Netherton J, et al., 'Understanding the basis of intra-tumour heterogeneity in human endometrial cancer', Newcastle City Hall, Newcastle, NSW, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Muhammad Jamaluddin, Mark Baker, Pradeep Tanwar
2017 Syed SM, Tanwar PS, 'Ignore no more: Role of uterine aging in fertility', Perth (2017)
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2016 Jhamb M, Syed SM, Tanwar PS, 'Developing shapes: Epithelial Wnt signaling is required for epididymal coiling', Newcastle (2016)
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2016 goad J, kumar M, Syed SM, Tanwar PS, 'Molecular mechanisms of endometrial gland development', Gold Coast, QLD, Australia (2016) [E3]
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2015 Kumar M, Goad J, Syed S, Tanwar PS, 'Twists and Turns: Balanced Wnt signalling is essential for epididymal coiling', Adelaide, SA, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2015 Goad J, Kumar M, Syed S, Tanwar PS, 'Gone with the Wnt: Unopposed oestrogen leads to endometrial cancer by regulating Wnt signaling', Adelaide, SA, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2015 Goad J, Syed S, Tanwar PS, 'Synergistic effect of unopposed oestrogen and overactive Wnt signalling in endometrial cancer', Newcastle, NSW, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2015 Syed S, Goad J, Sahoo S, Cardona J, Kumar J, Tanwar P, 'Endometrial hyperplasia and cancer: Side effects of miscommunication', Adelaide, SA, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
2015 Syed S, Goad J, Sahoo S, Cardona J, Tanwar PS, 'Influence of bad neighborhood: Stromal contribution to endometrial cancer development', Newcastle, NSW, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar
Show 7 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $102,858

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20202 grants / $6,858

HCRA Biomarkers and Targeted Therapies Flagship Program-2020 Infrastructure Support$4,998

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Scheme Infrastructure Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON N

Axin2 marks the cell of origin for endometrial cancer$1,860

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Project Team

Dr Shafiq Syed, Associate Professor Pradeep Tanwar

Scheme Statistical support
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON N

20191 grants / $96,000

Endometrial Cancer Research Project$96,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Pradeep Tanwar, Doctor Shafiq Syed, Doctor Muhammad Fairuz Jamaluddin
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1900346
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD A Nanotechnology-Based Diagnostic Approach for Endometriosis PhD (Medical Biochemistry), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 Honours Endometrial stem cells and their role in endometriosis, infertility and cancer Biochemistry & Cell Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 Unknown Understand the basis of menses: how uterus performs scarless repair Biochemistry & Cell Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 Honours The role of endometrial stem cells in the origin of ovarian cancer Biochemistry & Cell Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 Unknown Role of Stem cells in ovarian cancer development Biochemistry & Cell Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Shafiq Syed

Position

Associate Lecturer
Associate Prof Pradeep Tanwar Group
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email shafiq.syed@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7280
Links Twitter
Research Networks
Research Networks

Office

Room LS-348
Building Life Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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