Dr Sam Evans

Dr Sam Evans

Lecturer

School of Engineering

Career Summary

Biography

Samuel is an early career researcher and Lecturer in the School of Engineering. He has over ten years' experience as a mechanical engineer in both industry and academia. He was awarded his PhD in 2017 on the topic of small wind turbine aeroelasticity, and continues to be active in this research field. This work has led to improved methodologies for predicting blade fatigue life and quantifying design loads as specified in the small wind turbine design standard (IEC 61400.2).

Samuel's secondary research interest focuses on computational biomechanics. This exciting field combines the application of computer aided engineering, medical imaging, and biology. Samuel initiated collaborative research on the feeding behaviour of the endangered sawfish species with biologists at Murdoch University. This resulting journal article received national and international media coverage in; New Scientist, Australian Geographic, Fairfax media, and Nine Network news. He has also undertaken collaborative research into the application of finite element analysis for modelling the biomechanics of bone tissue with colleagues at the University of New England.

Samuel is a co-founder of Diffuse Energy Pty Limited. This company is currently in the process of commercialising novel highly-efficient wind turbine technology developed within the University of Newcastle. Diffuse Energy have successfully completed both the CSIRO ON Prime and ON Accelerate programs (Australia’s national innovation accelerator program).

Research interests:

  • Aeroelastic modelling of wind turbines (FAST)
  • Classification of the built environment wind resource
  • Wind turbine design standards (IEC 61400.2-2013)
  • Computational biomechanics
  • Finite element analysis

Collaborations:

  • Murdoch University - Optimising the operation of small wind turbines in urban environments
  • University of New England - Developing computational models of bony structures  

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Engineering (Mechanical) (Hons), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Wind turbines
  • Renewable energy
  • Finite element analysis
  • Computational biomechanics

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
091399 Mechanical Engineering not elsewhere classified 50
090608 Renewable Power and Energy Systems Engineering (excl. Solar Cells) 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Engineering
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
MECH4580 Computer Aided Engineering and Manufacturing
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment - The University of Newcastle (Australia)
Course coordinator 1/01/2017 - 30/06/2018
MECH1110 Mechanical Drawing/CAD and Workshop Practice
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment - The University of Newcastle (Australia)
Course coordinator 1/07/2017 - 31/12/2018
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Evans SP, Bradney DR, Clausen PD, 'Assessing the IEC simplified fatigue load equations for small wind turbine blades: How simple is too simple?', Renewable Energy, 127 24-31 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 It is well known that wind turbine blades are fatigue critical, with much literature and methodologies available for assessing fatigue loading of large wind turbine blades.... [more]

© 2018 It is well known that wind turbine blades are fatigue critical, with much literature and methodologies available for assessing fatigue loading of large wind turbine blades. Little research effort has been directed at assessing the fatigue life of small wind turbines which operate at higher rotational speeds and are subject to highly unsteady aerodynamic loading. In this paper the simplified load model proposed in IEC 61400.2 is used to determine the fatigue life of a small 5 kW wind turbine blade. This estimated life is compared to that determined from both measured operational data and aeroelastic simulations. Fatigue life was estimated by the standard at 0.09 years, compared to 9.18 years from field measurements and 3.26 years found via aeroelastic simulations. All methods fell below the 20 year design life, with the standard over-conservative by a factor of 102 and 36 for measurements and simulations respectively. To the best of the authors¿ knowledge these three fatigue methods specified in the standard have not been quantitatively compared and assessed for small wind turbines. Results are of importance to small wind turbine developers as they seek best practice for determining blade fatigue life. Shortcomings of the IEC methodology are detailed and discussed.

DOI 10.1016/j.renene.2018.04.041
Co-authors Philip Clausen
2018 Wroe S, Parr WCH, Ledogar JA, Bourke J, Evans SP, Fiorenza L, et al., 'Computer simulations show that neanderthal facial morphology represents adaptation to cold and high energy demands, but not heavy biting', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 285 (2018)

© 2018 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved. Three adaptive hypotheses have been forwarded to explain the distinctive Neanderthal face: (i) an improve... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved. Three adaptive hypotheses have been forwarded to explain the distinctive Neanderthal face: (i) an improved ability to accommodate high anterior bite forces, (ii) more effective conditioning of cold and/or dry air and, (iii) adaptation to facilitate greater ventilatory demands. We test these hypotheses using three-dimensional models of Neanderthals, modern humans, and a close outgroup (Homo heidelbergensis), applying finiteelement analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is the most comprehensive application of either approach applied to date and the first to include both. FEA reveals few differences between H. heidelbergensis, modern humans, and Neanderthals in their capacities to sustain high anterior tooth loadings. CFD shows that the nasal cavities of Neanderthals and especially modern humans condition air more efficiently than does that of H. heidelbergensis, suggesting that both evolved to better withstand cold and/or dry climates than less derived Homo. We further find that Neanderthals could move considerably more air through the nasal pathway than could H. heidelbergensis or modern humans, consistent with the propositions that, relative to our outgroup Homo, Neanderthal facial morphology evolved to reflect improved capacities to better condition cold, dry air, and, to move greater air volumes in response to higher energetic requirements.

DOI 10.1098/rspb.2018.0085
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Bradney DR, Davidson A, Evans SP, Wueringer BE, Morgan DL, Clausen PD, 'Sawfishes stealth revealed using computational fluid dynamics', JOURNAL OF FISH BIOLOGY, 90 1584-1596 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jfb.13255
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Clausen
2017 Evans SP, KC A, Bradney DR, Urmee TP, Whale J, Clausen PD, 'The suitability of the IEC 61400-2 wind model for small wind turbines operating in the built environment', Renewable Energy and Environmental Sustainability, 2 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1051/rees/2017022
Co-authors Philip Clausen
2015 Evans SP, Clausen PD, 'Modelling of turbulent wind flow using the embedded Markov chain method', Renewable Energy, 81 671-678 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Small wind turbines are usually installed to provide off-grid power and as such can be situated close to the load in a less-than-ideal wind resource. These wi... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Small wind turbines are usually installed to provide off-grid power and as such can be situated close to the load in a less-than-ideal wind resource. These wind regimes are often governed by low mean speeds and high wind turbulence. This can result in energy production less than that specified by the manufacturer's power curve. Wind turbulence is detrimental to the fatigue life of key components and overall turbine reliability and therefore must be considered in the design stage of small wind turbines. Consequently it is important to accurately simulate wind speed data at highly turbulent sites to quantify loading on turbine components. Here we simulate wind speed data using the Markov chain Monte Carlo process and incorporate long term effects using an embedded Markov chain. First, second and third order Markov chain predictions were found to be in good agreement with measured wind data acquired at 1Hz. The embedded Markov chain was able to predict site turbulent intensity with a reasonable degree of accuracy. The site exhibited distinctive peaks in wind speed possibly caused by diurnal heating and cooling of the earth's surface. The embedded Markov chain method was able to simulate these peaks albeit with a time offset.

DOI 10.1016/j.renene.2015.03.067
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Philip Clausen
2012 Evans SP, Parr WCH, Clausen PD, Jones A, Wroe S, 'Finite element analysis of a micromechanical model of bone and a new 3D approach to validation', Journal of Biomechanics, 45 2702-2705 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2012.08.003
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Philip Clausen
Show 3 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Evans SP, Bradney DR, Clausen PD, 'Aeroelastic measurements and simulations of a small wind turbine operating in the built environment', Journal of Physics: Conference Series, Munich, Germany (2016) [E1]
DOI 10.1088/1742-6596/753/4/042013
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Philip Clausen
2016 Bradney DR, Evans SP, Da Costa MSP, Clausen PD, 'Comparison of computational modelling and field testing of a small wind turbine operating in unsteady flows', Journal of Physics: Conference Series, Munich, Germany (2016) [E1]
DOI 10.1088/1742-6596/753/8/082029
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Philip Clausen
2014 Evans S, Clausen PD, 'High Resolution Wind Speed Modelling of Turbulent Flow using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation', Proceedings of the 52nd Annual Conference: Australian Solar Energy Society (Australian Solar Council), Melbourne (2014) [E1]
Co-authors Philip Clausen

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Evans SP, Evans SP, Aeroelastic measurements, simulations, and fatigue predictions for small wind turbines operating in highly turbulent flow, University of Newcastle (2017)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $112,996

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $10,000

CSIRO ON Accelerate - High Performing Team Grant$10,000

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Scheme Australia's National Innovation Accelerator Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20175 grants / $102,996

Develop and optimise a cement lined water based end pipe fitting technology$33,108

Funding body: Pipe Lining & Coating Pty Limited

Funding body Pipe Lining & Coating Pty Limited
Project Team Associate Professor Phil Clausen, Associate Professor Craig Wheeler, Doctor Sam Evans
Scheme Entrepreneurs’ Programme: Innovation Connections Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700887
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

Develop and optimise a cement lined water based end pipe fitting technology$33,108

Funding body: Department of Industry, Innovation and Science

Funding body Department of Industry, Innovation and Science
Project Team Associate Professor Phil Clausen, Associate Professor Craig Wheeler, Doctor Sam Evans
Scheme Entrepreneurs' Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700933
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Quantifying the turbulent built environment wind resource$18,780

Funding body: Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment - The University of Newcastle (Australia)

Funding body Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment - The University of Newcastle (Australia)
Scheme FEBE Strategic Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

CSIRO ON Accelerate 4$15,000

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Scheme Australia's National Innovation Accelerator Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

CSIRO On Prime Grant$3,000

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Scheme ON Prime
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current3

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.6

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Fluid Rotations and Power Efficiency of Wind Turbine PhD (Mechanical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Modelling the Structural Response of Small Wind Turbine Blades Subject to Unsteady Aerodynamic Loading PhD (Mechanical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Effect of Wind Gusts on Small Wind Turbines PhD (Mechanical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 7
Germany 1
United Kingdom 1
Italy 1
United States 1
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News

Wind turbine innovator wins Stanford University Scholarship

April 20, 2018

A University of Newcastle innovator who developed a small wind turbine with remarkable capacity, has won the inaugural Stanford Australia Foundation – CSIRO Scholarship.

Sawfish’s fearsome snout evolved to be undetectable to prey

March 29, 2017

The sawfish’s long, rigid snout – called a rostrum – looked oddly similar to some of the industrial wind turbine blades he had investigated as a professor of engineering at Australia’s University of Newcastle.

Sawfish are the ultimate stealth hunters, study finds

March 24, 2017

New research has shed light on the function of the distinctive 'saw' on sawfish – and how it enables the unusual species to sneak up on its prey.

Why the endangered sawfish is the ultimate stealth killer

March 23, 2017

Researchers at the University of Newcastle have shown that the water dynamics of the sawfish's weapon make it one of nature's deadliest stealth predators.

Dr Sam Evans

Position

Lecturer
School of Engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Contact Details

Email samuel.evans@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 8879
Links YouTube
Twitter
Facebook
Personal webpage

Office

Room ES402
Building Engineering Science
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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