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Professor Rosalind Smith

Acting Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research & Innovation)

Office - DVC (Research and Innovation) (English)

Unraveling the tales of the past

Associate Professor Ros Smith examines the contribution of female writers to the culture of the early modern era.

Unraveling the Tales of the PastFrom the hallowed halls of Oxford University came the inspiration to study early modern women's writing. Surrounded by the world's top Renaissance scholars, Professor Ros Smith began to explore the world of women's writing from the 16th and17th centuries.

"It's a strange world with some recognisable and some very unfamiliar elements - that's what encapsulates the oddness of studying the past. I find that tension very interesting. You think you understand something but then you dig deeper and find there's lots more to explore," Professor Smith said.

At that time, research into early modern women's writing was in its infancy. Today it's a burgeoning field with over 100 scholars working in the area. New appointments in 2019 means there is now a group of seven early modern literature specialists based at the University of Newcastle – the largest concentration in Australia. Professor Smith has led international teams of researchers to ARC DP success in 2012 and 2016, and currently holds an ARC Future Fellowship (2019-2022) on early modern women’s marginalia.

As part of her Future Fellowship, Professor Smith will partner with the Centre for Early Modern Studies at the University of Oxford and the Folger Shakespeare library in Washington.

"When I started researching in this field, it was exciting and cutting-edge work because there was hardly anyone doing it. I wanted to understand, from a feminist perspective, what early modern women's writing can tell us about gender and culture in the Renaissance and across the ages."

"Women have always been half the population, but their contribution to the literature of the past was once thought to be negligible. My work, alongside that of others in the field, has discovered that women did write an enormous amount in the early modern period, in a variety of forms from private letters to major published romances."

"Through their writing, they also contributed to literary, religious and political cultural life in important ways. Understanding the active literary roles that women had in the past changes the way we think about women's literary agency and ability in the present. It also reconfigures the way we think about the early modern period – it is not just a period dominated by men but one in which women had vital roles in shaping the culture," Professor Smith said.

A career turning point came with the co-founding of the Early Modern Women's Research Network (EMWRN) at the University of Newcastle in 2008, with her colleague Professor Patricia Pender.

"Prior to the establishment of the network, scholars working in the field of early modern women's writing in Australia were quite isolated and disconnected," Professor Smith said.

"But we've been able to bring together a broad range of well-known scholars from across Australia, as well as international scholars who are at the top of their field and run similar networks internationally."

"This joining of the minds has allowed us to become a really effective network and we have built our reputation in the field to become one of its most dynamic and generative research groups nationally and internationally," Professor Smith said.

In addition to her ongoing research, Professor Smith will take up a senior leadership role as the Acting Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research and Innovation) for a six month period.

“This unique opportunity will extend my capacity to lead research, to understand research strategy across disciplines and faculties, as well as to mentor and train the next generation of researchers at my university” Professor Smith said.

Unraveling the Tales of the Past

Unraveling the tales of the past

Ros Smith examines the contribution of female writers to the culture of the early modern era.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
My primary field of research is Renaissance literature, specialising in women's poetry, and the relationships between genre, politics and history in the period. My secondary field is in true crime writing in Australia, examining a neglected but increasingly central popular genre and its relationship to constructions of Australian nationalism.

Teaching Expertise
My teaching expertise, developed at the Universities of Newcastle, Oxford and London, is in the fields of Renaissance literature and contemporary Australian literature, with a special interest in women's writing and true crime. I have taught at all levels in both fields, developing a number of new courses and majors.

Administrative Expertise
In 2019 I was appointed Acting Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research and Innovation) at the University of Newcastle. Prior to this, my administrative experience is as Assistant Dean Research (2016-17) and Assistant Dean Research Training (2014-17) for the Faculty of Education and Arts, Deputy Head of School Teaching and Learning for the School of Humanities and Social Science (2013), BA Programme Convenor (2012) and Discipline Convenor for English (2008-12)

I am also co-convenor of the Early Modern Women Research Network, and directed the Centre for 21st Century Humanities in 2018. I was a member of the ARC College of Experts, HCA panel (2015-17).


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Oxford - UK
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Australian women's writing
  • Australian literature
  • Material cultures
  • Popular culture
  • Renaissance literature
  • Renaissance women's writing
  • True Crime
  • marginalia
  • material histories of the book

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
200599 Literary Studies not elsewhere classified 50
190499 Performing Arts and Creative Writing not elsewhere classified 25
200299 Cultural Studies not elsewhere classified 25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2008 -  Editor - Australian Humanities Review Australian Humanities Review
Australia
1/01/2006 - 31/12/2006 Editor - Artemis Artemis
Australia
1/01/2005 -  Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
1/01/2004 -  Membership - ASAL ASAL
Australia
1/01/2001 - 31/12/2004 Editor - HEAT HEAT
Australia
1/01/2000 - 1/12/2004 Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia
1/07/1996 - 1/01/2000 Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
1994 ORS Bursary Award
Oxford University, UK
1994 Eleanor Sophia Wood and Woolley Travelling Scholarship
University of Sydney
1990 University Medal
University of Sydney
1990 Australian Postgraduate Research Award
University of Sydney
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Pender PJ, Smith R, Material Cultures of Early Modern Women's Writing, Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills, Basingstoke, 232 (2014) [A3]
Co-authors Patricia J Pender
2005 Smith RL, Sonnets and the English Woman Writer, 1560-1621: The Politics of Absence, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, 169 (2005) [A1]

Chapter (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Smith RL, 'The material cultures of early modern women's translations: Margaret Roper, Mary Basset and Mary Tudor', Trust and Proof: Translators in Renaissance Print Culture, Brill, Leiden, Netherlands 185-209 (2018) [B1]
2018 Smith RL, O'Callaghan M, Ross SCE, 'Complaint', The Blackwell Companion to Renaissance Poetry, Blackwell, Oxford, UK 339-354 (2018) [B1]
2017 Smith RL, 'Paratextual marginalia, early modern women, and collaboration', Gender, Authorship and Collaboration in Early Modern Women's Writing, Palgrave, Basingstoke, UK 175-201 (2017) [B1]
2017 Smith RL, 'Prosopopoeia, gender and religion: the poetry of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots [Forthcoming]', The Routledge Companion to Women, Sex and Gender in Early Modern Anglophone Literature, Routledge, London (2017)
2016 Smith RL, Pender P, 'Editing early modern women in the digital age', Editing Early Modern Women, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK 255-269 (2016) [B1]
Co-authors Patricia J Pender
2014 Pender PJ, Smith R, 'Introduction: Early Modern Women¿s Texts: Production, Transmission and Reception', Material Cultures of Early Modern Women¿s Writing, Palgrave Macmillan, New York 1-13 (2014) [B1]
Co-authors Patricia J Pender
2014 Smith RL, ''Le pouvoir de faire dire': Marginalia in Mary Queen of Scots' Book of Hours', Material Cultures of Early Modern Women's Writing, Palgrave, Basingstoke, UK 55-75 (2014) [B1]
2013 Smith RL, 'Lost in the Media: Evil Angels and twentieth-century Australian true crime', Telling Stories: Australian life and literature 1935-2012, Monash University Press, Clayton, Vic 418-424 (2013) [B1]
2013 Smith RL, 'A 'goodly sample': exemplarity, female complaint and early modern women's poetry', Early Modern Women and the Poem, Manchester University Press, Manchester, UK 181-200 (2013) [B1]
2013 Pender PJ, Smith R, 'Afterword: Reading early modern women and the poem', Early Modern Women and the Poem, Manchester University Press, Manchester 244-252 (2013) [B1]
Co-authors Patricia J Pender
2010 Smith RL, 'Plaintes full of dissimulation: The casket sonnets, female complaint and true crime', Expanding the Canon of Early Modern Women's Writing, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle Upon Tyne 125-142 (2010) [B1]
2009 Smith R, 'Lady Mary Wroth's Pamphilia to Amphilanthus: the Politics of Withdrawal', Ashgate Critical Essays on Women Writers in England, 1550-1700, Ashgate Publishing, London, England 79-102 (2009) [B1]
2009 Smith R, ''In a mirrour clere': Protestantism and politics in Anne Lok's Miserere Mei Deus', Ashgate Critical Essays on Women Writers in England, 1550-1700, Ashgate Publishing, London, England 3-22 (2009) [B1]
2001 Smith R, 'Australie (Emily Manning)', , Gale Research, Detroit, (2001) [B2]
2000 Smith RL, ''In a mirrour clere': Protestantism and Politics in Anne Lok's Miserere mei Deus', 'This Double Voice': Gendered Writing in Early Modern England, Macmillan, Basingstoke 41-60 (2000) [B1]
Show 12 more chapters

Journal article (47 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Smith R, 'Narrow confines: Marginalia, devotional books and the prison in early modern Women¿s writing', Women's Writing, 26 35-52 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This essay examines sixteenth-century women¿s marginalia in devotional books as a mode of transmission, particu... [more]

© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This essay examines sixteenth-century women¿s marginalia in devotional books as a mode of transmission, particularly in circumstances of where early modern women themselves were in circumstance of limited circulation, under house arrest or imprisoned. Recent work on prison literature has highlighted the importance of the prison as a crucible for writing in early modern England. However, it has focused less on the material cultures through which such texts were circulated, which for women writers in particular included marginal annotations to texts then circulated through domestic and coterie circles to a broader world. Anne Boleyn, Jane Dudley, Elizabeth Tudor and Mary Stuart all circulated writing as marginalia while under forms of imprisonment, providing a means of political engagement through lamentation, critique and protest. This essay uncovers the ways in which such texts constructed and disguised their political objectives, as well as the material means through which these prison poems were transmitted, showing the ways in which material and rhetorical cultures operated together to make meaning in this neglected group of texts.

DOI 10.1080/09699082.2019.1534581
2018 Smith R, 'Cultures of Complaint: Protest and Redress in the Age of #Metoo', AUSTRALIAN HUMANITIES REVIEW, 172-179 (2018) [C1]
2018 Palmer L, Levett-Jones T, Smith R, 'First year students¿ perceptions of academic literacies preparedness and embedded diagnostic assessment', Student Success, 9 49-61 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.5204/ssj.v9i2.417
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Lorinda Palmer
2016 Collins-Gearing B, Smith R, 'Burning Off: Indigenising the Discipline of English', Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, 45 159-169 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/jie.2016.6
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Brooke Collins-Gearing
2014 Palmer L, Levett-Jones T, Smith R, McMillan M, 'Academic literacy diagnostic assessment in the first semester of first year at university', The International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education, 5 67-78 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.5204/intjfyhe.v5i1.201
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Lorinda Palmer
2012 Smith RL, 'The case of Mary Queen of Scots, Lord Darnley and Lord Bothwell: Initiating the literature of husband-murder in sixteenth-century England', Notes and Queries, 59 498-501 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2012 Smith RL, 'The case of Frederick Deeming: The true crime archive as publication event', Southerly, 72 56-73 (2012) [C1]
2012 Pender PJ, Smith RL, 'From paratext to epitext: Mapping the authorial apparatus in early modern women's writing', Parergon, 29 193-201 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Patricia J Pender
2012 Smith RL, 'Reading Mary Stuart's casket sonnets: Reception, authorship, and early modern women's writing', Parergon, 29 149-173 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2012 Ross SCE, Pender PJ, Smith RL, 'Guest editorial: Early modern women and the apparatus of authorship', Parergon, 29 (2012) [C6]
Co-authors Patricia J Pender
2010 Smith RL, 'Babysitter killers and daughters of death: Women, true crime and the media in 1970s Australia', Australian Feminist Studies, 25 325-336 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/08164649.2010.504296
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2009 Glastonbury KA, Smith RL, 'Introduction: The Art of the Real', Australian Humanities Review, 39-41 (2009) [C2]
Co-authors Keri Glastonbury
2009 Glastonbury KA, Smith RL, 'Introduction: The art of the real', Text: Journal of Writing and Writing Courses, - 1-4 (2009) [C2]
Co-authors Keri Glastonbury
2008 Smith RL, 'Dark places: True crime writing in Australia', Journal of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature: JASAL, 8 17-30 (2008) [C1]
2001 Smith RL, '"Clara Morison: The Politics of Feminine Heterotopia."', Southerly, 61:3 40-51 (2001) [C1]
2001 Smith RL, '"Lindamira's Complaint."', Meridian, 18:1 73-85 (2001) [C1]
2000 Smith RL, 'Lady Mary Wroth's Pamphilia to Amphilanthus: The Politics of Withdrawal', English Literary Renaissance, 30 408-431 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
1997 Smith R, '"On Speaking Positions," Vol 30, pp.248-250. 248-250 (1997) [C1]
1997 Smith R, '"Celebrity: A Construction Manual," Continuum Vol 11, pp.150-152.', Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, 114 150-152 (1997) [C1]
1996 Hara E, Smith R, Parry D, Tahara H, Stone S, Peters G, 'Regulation of p16

p16CDKN2 specifically binds to and inhibits the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6, which function as regulators of cell cycle progression in G1 by contributing to the phospho... [more]

p16CDKN2 specifically binds to and inhibits the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6, which function as regulators of cell cycle progression in G1 by contributing to the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB). Human cell lines lacking functional pRB contain high levels of p16 RNA and protein, suggesting a negative feedback loop by which pRB might regulate p16 expression in late G1. By a combination of nuclear run-on assays and promoter analyses in human fibroblasts expressing a temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 T antigen, we show that p16 transcription is affected by the status of pRB and define a region in the p16 promoter that is required for this response. However, the effect is not sufficient to account for the differences in p16 RNA levels between pRB-positive and -negative cells. Moreover, p16 RNA is extremely stable, and the levels do not change appreciably during the cell cycle. Primary human fibroblasts express very low levels of p16, but the RNA and protein accumulate in late-passage, senescent cells. The apparent overexpression of p16 in pRB-negative cell lines is therefore caused by at least two factors: loss of repression by pRB and an increase in the number of population doublings.

DOI 10.1128/MCB.16.3.859
Citations Scopus - 596
1995 Wellstein A, Sale EE, Chung HH, Fang WW, Smith RR, Colley KK, Czubayko F, 'Growth factors as targets in tumor therapy', Pharmaceutical Biology, 33 35-47 (1995)

Sustained growth of solid tumors and their metastasis requires paracrine signals between the tumor cells and the normal surrounding host tissue. One crucial function of these sign... [more]

Sustained growth of solid tumors and their metastasis requires paracrine signals between the tumor cells and the normal surrounding host tissue. One crucial function of these signals is to recruit endothelial cells and thus new blood vessels for the nourishment of the expanding tumor mass. In addition, the newly recruited blood vessels serve as routes for metastasis of the primary tumor. The proliferation and migration of endothelial cells in the vicinity of progressing tumors contrasts with a low turn-over rate of endothelial cells in the healthy adult. The only physiologic exception to this rule is the female reproductive cycle. Based on the selective angiogenesis in tumors in contrast to normal tissues, a blockade of this process should be feasible with few adverse effects. We present data on angiogenesis factor gene expression in tumors and discuss different methods of targeting these gene products. Furthermore, we discuss the potential to combine conventional cytotoxic treatments with this new therapeutic approach. © 1995 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.

DOI 10.3109/13880209509067086
1995 Peters G, Fantl V, Smith R, Brookes S, Dickson C, 'Chromosome 11q13 markers and D-type cyclins in breast cancer', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 33 125-135 (1995)

One in six primary human breast cancers has DNA amplification centered on the cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) on chromosome 11q13. This genetic abnormality is preferentially associated wit... [more]

One in six primary human breast cancers has DNA amplification centered on the cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) on chromosome 11q13. This genetic abnormality is preferentially associated with estrogen-receptor positive tumors and may define a sub-class of patients with an adverse prognosis. Although CCND1 has the credentials of a cellular oncogene, being a target for chromosomal translocation and retroviral integration, the 11q13 amplicon encompasses several other markers and CCND1 is not the only candidate for the key gene on the amplified DNA. To assess their relative importance, we have constructed a physical map of the amplified DNA and compared the extent and frequency of amplification across the region. Since it is likely that the gene providing the selective force for amplification will be expressed at elevated levels, we have also examined expression of both RNA and protein. By these criteria, cyclin D1 remains the strongest candidate for the key oncogene on the amplicon and we are currently investigating the functional consequences of its over-expression. © 1995 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

DOI 10.1007/BF00682720
Citations Scopus - 66
1995 Dickson C, Fantl V, Gillett C, Brookes S, Bartek J, Smith R, et al., 'Amplification of chromosome band 11q13 and a role for cyclin D1 in human breast cancer', Cancer Letters, 90 43-50 (1995)

In this paper we describe how research on the mouse mammary tumor virus model of breast cancer resulted in the identification of an amplified region of DNA on human chromosome 11 ... [more]

In this paper we describe how research on the mouse mammary tumor virus model of breast cancer resulted in the identification of an amplified region of DNA on human chromosome 11 band q13. This amplification occurs in approximately 15% of primary breast cancers. Several candidate oncogenes map within the amplicon but by analysing expression of these genes a strong case can be made for a role for cyclin D1 in tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical staining indicates that cyclin D1 is expressed at elevated levels in around 40% of breast cancers, including those with the 11q13 amplification. The potential function of cyclin D1 as a regulator of early cell division cycle events would be consistent with a role in neoplasia. © 1995.

DOI 10.1016/0304-3835(94)03676-A
Citations Scopus - 138
1995 Smith R, Peters G, Dickson C, 'Genomic organization of the mouse cyclin D1 gene (Cyl-1)', Genomics, 25 85-92 (1995)

To determine the genomic organization of the mouse cyclin D1 locus (Cyl-1), a series of cosmids and cDNAs were recovered by hybridization with a genomic probe representing the 5&a... [more]

To determine the genomic organization of the mouse cyclin D1 locus (Cyl-1), a series of cosmids and cDNAs were recovered by hybridization with a genomic probe representing the 5' end of the homologous human gene, CCND1. Primer extension indicated that transcripts originate from one of three adjacent nucleotides at a single start site. Two overlapping cDNA clones that essentially accounted for the complete sequence of the larger 4.0-kb Cyl-1 transcript were characterized. A combination of RNase protection and sequencing across intron-exon boundaries established that the gene is organized into five coding exons with a long 3' untranslated region. Repeated attempts to isolate clones corresponding to the minor 3.5-kb RNA were compromised by the presence of an internal poly(A) domain. However, hybridization with specific probes revealed that the minor transcript lacks approximately 800 nucleotides from the 3' end of the major transcript and may be generated by a novel mechanism or by RNA processing. © 1995 Academic Press, Inc.

DOI 10.1016/0888-7543(95)80112-Y
Citations Scopus - 16
1994 Gillett C, Fantl V, Smith R, Fisher C, Bartek J, Dickson C, et al., 'Amplification and Overexpression of Cyclin D1 in Breast Cancer Detected by Immunohistochemical Staining', Cancer Research, 54 1812-1817 (1994)

Immunohistochemical staining with a monoclonal antibody against human cyclin D1 can be used to identify breast cancers that have an amplification of the q13 region of chromosome 1... [more]

Immunohistochemical staining with a monoclonal antibody against human cyclin D1 can be used to identify breast cancers that have an amplification of the q13 region of chromosome 11. In general, the intensity of staining is directly proportional to the degree of DNA amplification. In two unusual tumors, in which the CCND1 locus is highly amplified but staining is relatively weak, it appears that the DNA has undergone rearrangement and that the amplified/rearranged CCND1 allele may have reduced transcriptional activity. More significantly, the immunohistochemical technique identifies additional tumors in which the cyclin D1 gene is overexpressed with only marginal or undetectable increases in copy number, implying that other mechanisms can lead to deregulated expression. These results suggest that the frequency of overexpression is much higher than previously concluded from DNA-based analyses and that more than one-third of human breast cancers may contain excessive levels of cyclin D1. The technique we describe should facilitate the detection of this abnormality in a clinical setting and clarify its prognostic significance. © 1994, American Association for Cancer Research. All rights reserved.

Citations Scopus - 602
1994 Mason IJ, Fuller-Pace F, Smith R, Dickson C, 'FGF-7 (keratinocyte growth factor) expression during mouse development suggests roles in myogenesis, forebrain regionalisation and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions', Mechanisms of Development, 45 15-30 (1994)

We have isolated cDNA and genomic clones for the murine FGF-7 gene and examined its expression throughout development. Transcripts were transiently detected in the developing myoc... [more]

We have isolated cDNA and genomic clones for the murine FGF-7 gene and examined its expression throughout development. Transcripts were transiently detected in the developing myocardium, differentially regulated between the atrium and ventricle. The gene was also expressed in the myotomes of the somites, coincident with FGF-4 and FGF-5 transcripts, and was detected transiently in cleaved muscles. Regional expression was detected in the ventricular zone of the developing forebrain at 14.5 d.p.c. Later in development, FGF-7 RNA was detected in mesenchymal tissues suggesting a role in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and in the dermis consistent with its proposed role as a keratinocyte mitogen. Our results suggest that FGF-7 is likely to have diverse roles during development. © 1994.

DOI 10.1016/0925-4773(94)90050-7
Citations Scopus - 245
1994 Smith R, 'The sonnets of the countess of Oxford and Elizabeth I: Translations from desportes', Notes and Queries, 41 446-450 (1994)
DOI 10.1093/nq/41.4.446
Citations Scopus - 1
1994 SMITH R, 'THE SONNETS OF THE OXFORD,COUNTESS AND ELIZABETH-I + SOOWTHERN,JOHN 'PANDORA' ATTRIBUTIONS - TRANSLATIONS FROM DESPORTES', NOTES AND QUERIES, 41 446-450 (1994)
DOI 10.1093/nq/41-4-446
Citations Web of Science - 2
1993 Clausse N, Smith R, Calberg-Bacq C, Peters G, Dickson C, 'Mouse mammary-tumor virus activates Fgf-3/Int-2 less frequently in tumors from virgin than from parous mice', International Journal of Cancer, 55 157-163 (1993)

Tumorigenesis by mouse mammary-tumor virus (MMTV) involves proviral disruption and transcriptional activation of a number of cellular oncogenes, generically termed Int. The freque... [more]

Tumorigenesis by mouse mammary-tumor virus (MMTV) involves proviral disruption and transcriptional activation of a number of cellular oncogenes, generically termed Int. The frequencies with which different Int genes are activated in different mouse strains can be quite variable, and previous surveys have suggested that insertions at int-2/Fgf-3 occur primarily in strains that develop pregnancy-dependent mammary tumors. To address this issue, we have determined the relative contributions of 5 known Int genes (Wnt-1, Wnt-3, Fgf-3, Fgf-4 and Int-3) in mammary tumors from virgin BR6 and multiparous BR6, BALB/cfBR6 and RIII mice. Whereas Fgf-3 was implicated in 66%, 80% and 92% of the tumors from the respective parous animals, only 20% of the tumors from virgin mice expressed Fgf-3. This reduced involvement of Fgf-3 was compensated by proviral insertions in Fgf-4, Int-3 and Wnt-3, but the frequency of Wnt-1 activation was relatively constant. These data strengthen the link between Fgf-3 and a pregnancy-dependent phenotype and suggest that, in the strains analyzed, the frequency of Int-gene activation was influenced more by the hormonal status than by the genetic background. © 1993 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright © 1993 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company

DOI 10.1002/ijc.2910550128
Citations Scopus - 11
1993 Fantl V, Smith R, Brookes S, Dickson C, Peters G, 'Chromosome 11q13 abnormalities in human breast cancer', Cancer Surveys, 18 77-94 (1993)

Amplification of markers centred on band q13 of human chromosome 11 is a consistent feature in a subset of oestrogen receptor positive breast cancers. Although the amplification w... [more]

Amplification of markers centred on band q13 of human chromosome 11 is a consistent feature in a subset of oestrogen receptor positive breast cancers. Although the amplification was initially scored via FGF3/INT2, which has strong credentials as a mammary oncogene, current data suggest that some other gene on 11q13 provides the driving force for amplification. Here we have reviewed our understanding of the amplified DNA, the genes it encompasses and the evidence in favour of two candidate oncogenes, CCND1 and EMS1. As well as being among the most frequently amplified markers in the region, these genes are expressed at elevated levels as a consequence of amplification, and their predicted functions would be consistent with a role in tumorigenesis. Irrespective of the final conclusions regarding their biological relevance, the overexpression of CCND1 or EMS1 should provide a more amenable assay for the amplification and help to clarify its clinical significance.

Citations Scopus - 82
1992 Lammie GA, Smith R, Silver J, Brookes S, Dickson C, Peters G, 'Proviral insertions near cyclin D1 in mouse lymphomas: a parallel for BCL1 translocations in human B-cell neoplasms', Oncogene, 7 2381-2387 (1992)

By isolating genomic DNA clones that encompass the mouse Cyl-1 (cyclin D1) locus, we have identified a putative CpG island close to the 5' end of the gene. Pulsed-field gel e... [more]

By isolating genomic DNA clones that encompass the mouse Cyl-1 (cyclin D1) locus, we have identified a putative CpG island close to the 5' end of the gene. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with probes derived from either the 5' or 3' side of the CpG island established physical linkage to two independent markers on mouse chromosome 7, in a region that is syntenic with human chromosome 11q13. On the 3' side, Cyl-1 is approximately 75 kb from Hst-1 and Int-2, although there is an additional CpG island in the intervening DNA, while on the 5' side, Cyl-1 is less than 300 kb from Fis-1, an integration site for Friend murine leukaemia virus. As there is no intervening CpG island, proviral insertions at Fis-1 could influence the expression of Cyl-1 and we describe two virally induced tumours in which this appears to be the case. The data suggest that proviral insertions near Cyl-1 in mouse lymphomas are functionally equivalent to the BCL1 translocations that activate cyclin D1 expression in human B-cell malignancies.

Citations Scopus - 43
1992 Stamp G, Fantl V, Poulsom R, Jamieson S, Smith R, Peters G, Dickson C, 'Nonuniform expression of a mouse mammary tumor virus-driven int-2/Fgf-3 transgene in pregnancy-responsive breast tumors.', Cell growth & differentiation : the molecular biology journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, 3 929-938 (1992)

We have developed transgenic mice in which expression of the mouse int-2/Fgf-3 gene is regulated by a single long terminal repeat from mouse mammary tumor virus. Such mice contain... [more]

We have developed transgenic mice in which expression of the mouse int-2/Fgf-3 gene is regulated by a single long terminal repeat from mouse mammary tumor virus. Such mice contain and transmit a replica of the activated int-2/Fgf-3 allele present in a spontaneous mammary tumor from a BR6 mouse. Although free of infectious mouse mammary tumor virus and with a different genetic background, the transgenic mice develop pregnancy-responsive mammary epithelial proliferations that are similar to the early stages of tumorigenesis in the BR6 strain. Histological examination revealed that most of these tumors showed pronounced tubular and acinar structures, features usually associated with morphological differentiation. In some cases, the tumors were locally invasive, causing disruption of the dermis which manifested itself as local hair loss. In situ hybridization showed that patterns of transgene expression in the abnormal glands were markedly nonuniform. In contrast, mouse mammary tumor virus-induced neoplasms showed more uniform expression of int-2/Fgf-3, as did the urogenital epithelial proliferations that occur among males of this transgenic line. These data suggest that mammary tumors in virally infected animals may depend primarily on autocrine stimulation by the int-2/Fgf-3 gene product, whereas both autocrine and paracrine mechanisms may contribute to tumors and hyperplasias found in transgenic animals.

Citations Scopus - 34
1991 Grinberg D, Thurlow J, Watson R, Smith R, Peters G, Dickson C, 'Transcriptional regulation of the int-2 gene in embryonal carcinoma cells.', Cell growth & differentiation : the molecular biology journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, 2 137-143 (1991)

The int-2 gene, which encodes a member of the fibroblast growth factor family, is expressed at specific sites and times during mouse development. In certain embryonal carcinoma ce... [more]

The int-2 gene, which encodes a member of the fibroblast growth factor family, is expressed at specific sites and times during mouse development. In certain embryonal carcinoma cell lines, multiple int-2 transcripts accumulate when the cells are induced to differentiate with retinoic acid and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Nuclear run-on analyses indicate that the apparent induction of int-2 expression results from an increase in the rate of transcription initiation. Six distinct types of RNA have been delineated, originating from three promoters and terminating at either of two polyadenylation sites. Since each transcript appears to encode the same protein, this complexity may reflect the need for lineage-specific or differentiation-dependent control of expression. By comparing the kinetics of induction and turnover of the different RNA species, we show that the choice of promoter or length of the 3'-untranslated region has no significant effect on the half-lives of the various mRNAs. To further evaluate control at the transcriptional level, we have shown that a 1.7-kilobase fragment of int-2 genomic DNA, when fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, can act as a regulated promoter(s) in differentiated versus undifferentiated embryonal carcinoma cells. This segment of DNA encompasses the three promoter regions previously delineated by RNase mapping plus about 900 base pairs of additional upstream sequences.

Citations Scopus - 19
1990 Dickson C, Smith R, Brookes S, Peters G, 'Proviral insertions within the int-2 gene can generate multiple anomalous transcripts but leave the protein-coding domain intact', Journal of Virology, 64 784-793 (1990)

We examined the effects of mouse mammary tumor virus integration on the multiple RNA transcripts expressed from the int-2 proto-oncogene in virally induced breast tumors. Proviral... [more]

We examined the effects of mouse mammary tumor virus integration on the multiple RNA transcripts expressed from the int-2 proto-oncogene in virally induced breast tumors. Proviral insertion either upstream or downstream of the gene could simultaneously activate transcription from three dissimilar int-2 promoters. In some tumors, the activating provirus lies within the transcription unit and disrupts the structures of the various RNAs. Insertions in the 5' region of the gene had complex effects depending on the orientation and position of the provirus relative to the three promoters and intron-exon boundaries. RNase protection experiments identified transcripts initiated in the viral long terminal repeat, at normal and cryptic sites in the int-2 sequences, and from cryptic promoters in an inverted provirus. At the 3' end, insertions occurred within the untranslated trailer and provided alternative termination signals that substituted for one or both of the normal the poly(A) addition sites. However, in no instance, of the 20 tumors analyzed in detail, did a provirus perturb the presumed open reading frame of the gene. These data strongly implicate the normal product of the int-2 gene, which is related to the fibroblast growth factor family, as a contributory factor in virally induced mammary tumors.

Citations Scopus - 22
1990 Fantl V, Richards MA, Smith R, Lammie GA, Johnstone G, Allen D, et al., 'Gene amplification on chromosome band 11q13 and oestrogen receptor status in breast cancer', European Journal of Cancer and Clinical Oncology, 26 423-429 (1990)

We have analysed DNA from 183 primary breast cancers for amplification or rearrangement of a number of cellular proto-oncogenes, focusing primarily on a cluster of markers on the ... [more]

We have analysed DNA from 183 primary breast cancers for amplification or rearrangement of a number of cellular proto-oncogenes, focusing primarily on a cluster of markers on the long arm of chromosome 11. Two of these oncogenes, INT2 and HST1, both of which encode members of the fibroblast growth factor family, are implicated in the generation of virally induced mammary tumours in mice. Here we confirm earlier reports that the q13 region of chromosome 11, in which these genes are tandemly linked, is modestly amplified in approximately 15% of primary human breast cancers. This amplification is confined, with one exception, to cases in which the oestrogen receptor (ER) levels are in excess of 20 fmol/mg protein (P = 0.001). However, DNA amplification does not usually result in detectable expression of either the INT2 or HST1 gene. The data imply that some other gene in the vicinity must contribute to the development of a subset of ER-positive tumours and that assessing the amplification of this region of DNA may be of value in defining a separate category of ER-positive tumour. © 1990.

DOI 10.1016/0277-5379(90)90009-I
Citations Scopus - 114
1989 Peters G, Brookes S, Smith R, Placzek M, Dickson C, 'The mouse homolog of the hst/k-FGF gene is adjacent to int-2 and is activated by proviral insertion in some virally induced mammary tumors', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 86 5678-5682 (1989)

The fibroblast growth factor-related protooncogenes, int-2 and hst/k-FGF, are within 17 kilobase pairs of one another on mouse chromosome 7 and are in the same transcriptional ori... [more]

The fibroblast growth factor-related protooncogenes, int-2 and hst/k-FGF, are within 17 kilobase pairs of one another on mouse chromosome 7 and are in the same transcriptional orientation. Approximately 70% of tumors induced in BR6 mice by mouse mammary tumor virus have proviral insertions adjacent to the int-2 gene. We find that the murine homolog of the hst/k-FGF gene can also be transcriptionally activated by the insertion of mouse mammary tumor virus DNA either upstream or downstream of the gene. In most tumors, only one of these adjacent genes is activated, but in some cases both genes are expressed. One of the hst-expressing tumors also has a virally activated int-3 gene. At least five distinct cellular genes (int-1, -2, -3, -4, and hst/k-FGF) can therefore contribute, either singly or in concert, to the development of histologically indistinguishable mammary tumors in mice infected by mouse mammary tumor virus.

DOI 10.1073/pnas.86.15.5678
Citations Scopus - 127
1989 Brookes S, Smith R, Casey G, Dickson C, Peters G, 'Sequence organization of the human int-2 gene and its expression in teratocarcinoma cells', Oncogene, 4 429-436 (1989)

We report the genomic organization and DNA sequence of the human homologue of int-2, a proto-oncogene implicated in virally induced mammary tumours in the mouse, and expressed at ... [more]

We report the genomic organization and DNA sequence of the human homologue of int-2, a proto-oncogene implicated in virally induced mammary tumours in the mouse, and expressed at specific sites and times during embryogenesis. Direct comparisons with the coding domains of mouse int-2 allowed us to delineate the intron-exon boundaries of the human gene. These boundaries were subsequently confirmed by ribonuclease protection analyses of the single 1.7 kilobase (kb) int-2 transcript detectable in the human teratocarcinoma cell line, Tera-2. The data suggest that human int-2 may also function in embryonic lineages but that its transcription may be less complex than in the mouse. The predicted human protein comprises 239 amino acids and is 89% homologous to its murine counterpart, except at the carboxy terminus. This divergence occurs distal to the region of int-2 that shows homology to other members of the FGF family of growth modulators and oncogenes.

Citations Scopus - 47
1988 Smith R, Peters G, Dickson C, 'Multiple RNAs expressed from the int-2 gene in mouse embryonal carcinoma cell lines encode a protein with homology to fibroblast growth factors.', The EMBO journal, 7 1013-1022 (1988)

Mouse embryonal carcinoma cell lines that differ in their patterns of expression of the potential oncogene int-2 have been exploited in a structural analysis of the multiple RNA t... [more]

Mouse embryonal carcinoma cell lines that differ in their patterns of expression of the potential oncogene int-2 have been exploited in a structural analysis of the multiple RNA transcripts characteristic of this gene. Ribonuclease protection experiments indicate that four major classes of int-2 RNA initiate at heterogeneous cap sites within two distinct promoter regions, P1 and P2, spanning approximately 50 and 150 bp respectively. The more downstream promoter P2 is located in a region of the DNA that constitutes an intron in RNA transcripts that initiate at the upstream promoter P1. Otherwise, all four RNA structures share the same splice donor and acceptor sites that define the boundaries of the second and third exons. Further complexity arises through usage of two distinct polyadenylation signals, both variants of the normal consensus, that are separated by 1100 bp. Despite these structural variations, the results suggest that all four major classes of RNA encode the same protein product which shows significant homology to the family of heparin-binding proteins typified by basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF).

Citations Scopus - 83
1987 Moore R, Dixon M, Smith R, Peters G, Dickson C, 'Complete nucleotide sequence of a milk-transmitted mouse mammary tumor virus: Two frameshift suppression events are required for translation of gag and pol', Journal of Virology, 61 480-490 (1987)

We sequenced two recombinant DNA clones constituting a single provirus of the milk-transmitted mouse mammary tumor virus characteristic of BR6 mice. The complete provirus is 9,901... [more]

We sequenced two recombinant DNA clones constituting a single provirus of the milk-transmitted mouse mammary tumor virus characteristic of BR6 mice. The complete provirus is 9,901 base pairs long, flanked by 6 base-pair duplications of cellular DNA at the site of integration. Five extensive blocks of open reading frame corresponding to the gag gene, the presumed protease, the pol and env genes, and the open reading frame orf within the long terminal repeat of the provirus were readily discernible. Translation of gag, protease, and pol involved three different translational reading frames to produce the three overlapping polyprotein precursors Pr77, Pr110, and Pr160 found in virus-infected cells. Synthesis of the reverse transcriptase and endonuclease therefore required two separate frameshifts to suppress the termination codons at the ends of the Pr77 and Pr110 domains. Direct evidence is presented for translational readthrough of both stop codons in an in vitro protein synthesis system.

Citations Scopus - 171
1986 Smith RKW, Johnson MH, 'Analysis of the third and fourth cell cycles of mouse early development', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 76 393-399 (1986)

The third (4-cell) and fourth (8-cell) cell cycles of early mouse development have been analysed in populations of blastomeres synchronized to the preceding cleavage division. DNA... [more]

The third (4-cell) and fourth (8-cell) cell cycles of early mouse development have been analysed in populations of blastomeres synchronized to the preceding cleavage division. DNA content was measured microdensitometrically. The entry of blastomeres into these cell cycles showed considerable heterogeneity both within and between individual embryos. This heterogeneity was greater in the fourth than in the third cell cycle. The component phases of the third cell cycle were estimated as G 1 = 1h, S = 7h, and G 2 + M = 2-5h, and those of the fourth cell cycle as G 1 = 2h, S = 7h, and G 2 + M = 1-3h.

DOI 10.1530/jrf.0.0760393
Citations Scopus - 39
1986 Peters G, Placzek M, Brookes S, Kozak C, Smith R, Dickson C, 'Characterization, chromosome assignment, and segregation analysis of endogenous proviral units of mouse mammary tumor virus', Journal of Virology, 59 535-544 (1986)

In the course of analyzing sites of proviral integration in tumors induced by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), we have isolated recombinant DNA clones corresponding to the 5&apos... [more]

In the course of analyzing sites of proviral integration in tumors induced by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), we have isolated recombinant DNA clones corresponding to the 5' and 3' ends of four endogenous MMTV proviruses present in BALB/c and BR6 mice. This has permitted the structural characterization of each locus by detailed restriction mapping and the preparation of DNA probes specific for the cellular sequences flanking each provirus. These probes have been used to trace the segregation patterns of the proviruses, designated Mtv-8, Mtv-9, Mtv-17, and Mtv-21, in a panel of inbred strains of laboratory mice and to map Mtv-17 and Mtv-21 to mouse chromosomes 4 and 8, respectively. The unambiguous resolution of these four proviruses on Southern blots has greatly facilitated the analysis of other endogenous MMTV proviruses in these inbred mice.

Citations Scopus - 39
1986 CASEY G, SMITH R, MCGILLIVRAY D, PETERS G, DICKSON C, 'CHARACTERIZATION AND CHROMOSOME ASSIGNMENT OF THE HUMAN HOMOLOG OF INT-2, A POTENTIAL PROTOONCOGENE', MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 6 502-510 (1986)
DOI 10.1128/MCB.6.2.502
Citations Scopus - 180Web of Science - 262
1985 Smith RKW, Johnson MH, 'DNA replication and compaction in the cleaving embryo of the mouse', Journal of Embryology and Experimental Morphology, VOL. 89 133-148 (1985)

The effects of aphidicolin, a reversible inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha, both on replication and on development of the mouse embryo from the 2- and 4-cell stages to the compact... [more]

The effects of aphidicolin, a reversible inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha, both on replication and on development of the mouse embryo from the 2- and 4-cell stages to the compacted late 8-cell stage have been assessed. The continuous presence of aphidicolin from G 1 of the 4-cell stage resulted in inhibition of DNA replication and prevention of division from 4 to 8 cells, but was without effect on the timing or incidence of cell flattening, surface polarization and cytoplasmic polarization. The continuous presence of aphidicolin from G 1 of the 2-cell stage resulted in inhibition of DNA replication, division, and polarization. Some slight intercellular flattening in a few embryos did occur. If addition of aphidicolin was delayed by 10 h to early in G 2 of the 2-cell stage, further rounds of replication were blocked and some embryos failed to cleave to 4-cells. Nevertheless, almost all embryos showed evidence of flattening and polarization regardless of cell number. In contrast, if aphidicolin was added in G 1 of th 2-cell stage and removed after 10h, the cells showed delayed DNA replication, little evidence of division, and no cell flattening or polarization. We conclude that DNA replication at the 2-cell stage may be essential for the components of compaction studied, but that DNA replication at the 4- and 8-cell stages is not.

Citations Scopus - 34
1984 Dickson C, Smith R, Brookes S, Peters G, 'Tumorigenesis by mouse mammary tumor virus: Proviral activation of a cellular gene in the common integration region int-2', Cell, 37 529-536 (1984)

Approximately 50% of tumors induced by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) contain an acquired provirus within a limited region of chromosomal DNA, termed int-2. We have extended our... [more]

Approximately 50% of tumors induced by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) contain an acquired provirus within a limited region of chromosomal DNA, termed int-2. We have extended our previous characterization of this locus and have mapped provirus integration sites in 21 independent tumors. Although integration occurs at multiple sites, proviruses within int-2 are distributed into two oppositely oriented groups whose transcription is directed away from a central domain. Provirus insertion in int-2 is accompanied by expression of RNA derived, at least in part, from this central domain. Since the RNA is not detected in normal mammary tissue, we conclude that MMTV integration activates the expression of a cellular gene within int-2 and that this event may contribute to tumorigenesis. © 1984.

DOI 10.1016/0092-8674(84)90383-0
Citations Scopus - 214
1983 Peters G, Brookes S, Smith R, Dickson C, 'Tumorigenesis by mouse mammary tumor virus: Evidence for a common region for provirus integration in mammary tumors', Cell, 33 369-377 (1983)

We have prepared specific probes for unique-sequence cellular DNA adjacent to each of the newly integrated proviruses in tumors induced by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). The us... [more]

We have prepared specific probes for unique-sequence cellular DNA adjacent to each of the newly integrated proviruses in tumors induced by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). The use of such probes to screen a large number of independent mammary tumors in the BR6 strain of mouse has indicated that in at least 17 out of the 40 tumors examined so far, an MMTV provirus has integrated into a common chromosomal domain. A 10 kb Eco RI fragment of single copy DNA from this region has been isolated and partially characterized by restriction enzyme mapping. Of the proviruses located within this fragment in different tumors, all but one are complete, in the same orientation, and clustered within about 3 kb of cellular DNA. These findings are consistent with an insertional mutagenesis model for tumorigenesis by MMTV, in which the integration of a provirus in a particular region of cellular DNA may activate a neighboring oncogene. The region we describe here appears to be different from that reported for mammary tumors in the C3H strain of mouse. © 1983.

DOI 10.1016/0092-8674(83)90418-X
Citations Scopus - 188
1982 Peters G, Smith R, Brookes S, Dickson C, 'Conservation of protein coding potential in the long terminal repeats of exogenous and endogenous mouse mammary tumor virus', Journal of Virology, 42 880-888 (1982)

In vitro protein synthesis and DNA sequence analysis indicate that mouse mammary tumor virus differs from other well-characterized retroviruses in that the long terminal repeat re... [more]

In vitro protein synthesis and DNA sequence analysis indicate that mouse mammary tumor virus differs from other well-characterized retroviruses in that the long terminal repeat region of the provirus has the capacity to encode proteins. Different exogenously transmitted mouse mammary tumor virus strains and endogenous proviral units conserved this open reading frame feature in the long terminal repeat despite a variation in nucleotide sequence. The proteins encoded by the different long terminal repeats were clearly related, but showed minor variations in size and tryptic peptide maps. In each case, the largest in vitro product had a molecular weight of about 36,000 to 37,000, suggesting that the open reading frame sequences must extend for approximately 1,000 nucleotides beginning at the extreme 5' end of the long terminal repeat. The fact that the reading frame was conserved among these viruses argues in favor of an in vivo function for the open reading frame protein.

Citations Scopus - 8
1981 Dickson C, Smith R, Peters G, 'In vitro synthesis of polypeptides encoded by the long terminal repeat region of mouse mammary tumour virus DNA', Nature, 291 511-513 (1981)

The integrated proviral DNA of RNA tumour viruses is bounded by long terminal repeat (LTR) segments of several hundred base pairs which result from duplication of sequences from b... [more]

The integrated proviral DNA of RNA tumour viruses is bounded by long terminal repeat (LTR) segments of several hundred base pairs which result from duplication of sequences from both the 5' and 3' ends of the viral genome RNA1-3. Recently, DNA sequence analysis of the LTRs of several retroviruses has indicated that this region of the provirus may contain regulatory functions for viral RNA transcription 4-8. In this connection, mouse mammary tumour virus (MuMTV) is of particular interest in that transcription of the viral RNA can be specifically modulated by glucocorticoid hormones, suggesting that the site of steroid action may be contained within the LTR9. Moreover, the LTR of MuMTV is unusually long, extending for about 1,300 base pairs. We now present data which suggest that, in contrast with other retroviruses, the MuMTV LTR includes approximately 1,000 nucleotides in an open reading frame, capable of encoding a series of polypeptides which are quite distinct from any of the known structural components of MuMTV virions. These proteins can be expressed in vitro from cloned, recombinant DNA in which the MuMTV LTR has been inserted into the ampicillin-resistance gene of a bacterial plasmid. Tryptic peptide mapping has confirmed that these products are identical to the analogous series of proteins identified by in vitro translation of polyadenylated fragments of MuMTV genome RNA10. © 1981 Nature Publishing Group.

DOI 10.1038/291511a0
Citations Scopus - 25
Show 44 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Smith R, 'Early modern women's marginalia as collaborative textual practice', Renaissance Society of America, Boston (2016)
2014 Smith RL, 'Heterogeneity, Materiality, and the Publication Event: Editing Mary Stuart's Poetry', Renaissance Society of America, Annual Meeting, New York, 2014 ABSTRACTS, New York (2014) [E3]
2010 Smith RL, ''A goodly sample': Exemplarity, Rhetoric, and Female Gallows Confessions', Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting 2010, Venice, Italy (2010) [E3]
2010 Collins-Gearing BM, Smith RL, 'Disciplining English: The challenge of Indigenising the discipline', A Scholarly Affair. Cultural Studies Association of Australasia National Conference. Program and Abstracts, Byron Bay, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Brooke Collins-Gearing
2009 Glastonbury KA, Smith RL, 'Conference editors', Text: The Art of the Real: Proceedings of the Art of the Real: National Creative Non-Fiction Conference, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E4]
Co-authors Keri Glastonbury
1990 Dickson C, Acland P, Smith R, Dixon M, Deed R, MacAllen D, et al., 'Characterization of int-2: A member of the fibroblast growth factor family', Journal of Cell Science (1990)

int-2 was discovered as a proto-oncogene transcriptionally activated by MMTV proviral insertion during mammary tumorigenesis in the mouse. Sequence analysis showed int-2 to be a m... [more]

int-2 was discovered as a proto-oncogene transcriptionally activated by MMTV proviral insertion during mammary tumorigenesis in the mouse. Sequence analysis showed int-2 to be a member of the fibroblast growth factor family of genes. In normal breast and most other adult mouse tissues, int-2 expression was not detected except for low levels in brain and testis. However, using in situ hybridization, expression was found at a number of sites during embryonic development, from day 7 until birth. An analysis of the int-2 transcripts found in embryonal carcinoma cells revealed six major classes of RNA initiating at three promoters and terminating at either of two polyadenylation sites. Despite the transcriptional complexities, all size classes of RNA encompass the same open reading frame. Using an SV40 early promoter to drive transcription of an int-2 cDNA in COS-1 cells, several proteins were observed. These were shown to be generated by initiation from either of two codons: One, a CUG, leads to a product which localizes extensively to the cell nucleus and partially to the secretory pathway. In contrast, initiation at a downstream AUG codon results in quantitative translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum and the accumulation of products ranging in size from 27.5 x 103M(r) to 31.5 x 103M(r) in organelles of the secretory pathway. These proteins represented glycosylated and non-glycosylated forms of the same primary product with or without the signal peptide removed. These findings suggest the potential for a dual role of int-2; an autocrine function acting at the cell nucleus, and a possible paracrine action through a secreted product.

Citations Scopus - 19
Show 3 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Smith R, Pender P, Pascoe WD, 'Early Modern Women's Research Network Digital Archive', . Newcastle: Center For 21st Century Humanities (2017)
Co-authors Bill Pascoe, Patricia J Pender
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 36
Total funding $2,362,462

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20194 grants / $1,024,740

Marginalia and the early modern woman writer, 1530-1660$793,240

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Future Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1701419
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Transforming the early modern archive: the Emmerson Collection at SLV$199,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith, Professor Paul Salzman, Associate Professor Trisha Pender, Mitchell Whitelaw, Dr Sarah Ross, Anna Welch
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1800921
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Faculty ARC LIEF Support$20,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Hugh Craig; Professor Deb Verhoeven; Professor Paul Arthur; Professor Andrew May; Professor Rosalind Smith; Professor Ning Gu; Professor Erik Champion; Associate Professor Mark Harvey; Professor Victoria Haskins; Professor Lyndall Ryan.

Scheme Faculty funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Faculty ARC Future Fellow Support$12,500

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Rosalind Smith

Scheme Faculty funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20181 grants / $100,000

Faculty matching funding for UON PRC Scheme - Centre for 21st Century Humanities$100,000

Funding body: Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr G Arrighi; Dr H Askland; Prof H Craig (Director); Prof P Dwyer; A/Prof J Gulddal; A/Prof M Harvey; Prof V Haskins; Prof M Johnson; Dr B Palmer; A/Prof T Pender; Prof L Ryan; Prof R Smith (Deputy Director).

Scheme Faculty funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20174 grants / $579,409

Woe is me: early modern women and the poetry of complaint$450,000

This grant investigates early modern women's participation in the mode of complaint, culminating in a symposium held in the final year of funding at VUW. It is a companion project to the ARC DP headed by A/Prof Rosalind Smith, Early Modern Women and the Poetry of Complaint, 1550-1640. 

Funding body: Marsden Fund, Royal Society of New Zealand

Funding body Marsden Fund, Royal Society of New Zealand
Project Team

A/Prof Sarah C E Ross, A/Prof Rosalind Smith, Prof Michelle O'Callaghan

Scheme Marsden Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

Early Modern Women and the Poetry of Complaint, 1540-1660$119,009

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith, Dr Sarah Ross, Professor Michelle O'Callaghan
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1600268
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The Emmerson Collection at State Library Victoria: Australia’s new early modern archive Stage 2$7,954

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith, Associate Professor Trisha Pender
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701288
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Woe is Me: Women and Complaint in the English Renaissance$2,446

Funding body: Royal Society of New Zealand

Funding body Royal Society of New Zealand
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith, Dr Sarah Ross
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701201
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON Y

20163 grants / $216,700

Faculty matching funding for UON PRC Scheme 2016/17 - Centre for 21st century Humanities$200,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team

Prof Hugh Craig; Prof Lisa Adkins; A/Prof Ros Smith; Prof Roland Boer; Prof Philip Dwyer; Dr Bill Palmer; A/Prof Mark Harvey; Prof Victoria Haskins; Prof Lyndall Ryan;; Dr Trisha Pender.

Scheme Faculty funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Early Modern Women's Research Network (EMWRN)$14,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team

A Prof Ros Smith; Dr Trisha Pender; Ms Alexandra Day; E Prof Paul Salzman; A Prof Kate Lilley; Dr Sarah Ross; Prof Michelle O'Callaghan; Prof Lorna Hutson

Scheme FEDUA Strategic Networks and Pilot Projects Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Time-layered cultural map of Australia$2,200

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Emeritus Professor Hugh Craig, Professor Rosalind Smith, Associate Professor Mark Harvey
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601230
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20152 grants / $10,456

The Emmerson Collection at the State Library of Victoria: the early modern book in Australia$9,706

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith, Associate Professor Trisha Pender
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501167
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

ANZAMEMS (Australian and NewZeland Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies), Queensland AUS, 14-18 July 2015 $750

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500700
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20131 grants / $7,278

2013 International Visitor - O'Callaghan$7,278

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith, Professor Michelle O'Callaghan
Scheme DVCR International Visitor Support
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301147
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20121 grants / $210,000

The Material Cultures of Early Modern Women's Writing: Editing, Reception and Mediation$210,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith, Associate Professor Trisha Pender, Prof Paul Salzman, Dr Kate Lilley, Dr Sarah Ross, Professor Michelle O'Callaghan, Professor Susan Wiseman
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100291
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20112 grants / $58,000

CEF Teaching Relief - Smith$50,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Career Enhancement Fellowship for Academic Women
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100549
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Early modern women's writing and expansion of the Early Modern Women's Research Network (EMWRN)$8,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Career Enhancement Fellowship for Academic Women
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000926
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20103 grants / $77,500

Writing Centre$50,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team

Dr Rosalind Smith

Scheme Pilot Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Writing Cultures Research Group$25,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team

Dr Rosalind Smith

Scheme Pilot Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Early Modern Women's Writing$2,500

Funding body: Australian Academy of the Humanities

Funding body Australian Academy of the Humanities
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme ISL-HCA International Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900163
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20093 grants / $6,980

Performance Enhancement Initiative: Teaching Writing in the Disciplines$3,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team

Dr Rosalind Smith

Scheme Teaching and Learning Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

NEER Research Cluster - Early Modern Womens Writers$1,980

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Trisha Pender, Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Research Networks
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189725
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Early Modern Women's Poetry, London, 17-18 July 2009$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190244
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20082 grants / $10,673

Embedding Writing in the Curriculum$8,673

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Rosalind Smith

Scheme Teaching and Learning Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

NEER Research Cluster: Early Modern Women Writers$2,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith, Associate Professor Trisha Pender
Scheme Research Networks
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188553
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

20071 grants / $671

The Colonial Present, University of Queensland, 1/7/2007 - 4/7/2007$671

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0188007
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20061 grants / $25,000

Equity Research Fellowship Semester 1, 2006$25,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0185963
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20051 grants / $3,500

Dark places: True crime writing in Australia$3,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0184724
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20032 grants / $10,455

Mary Queen of Scots: sovereignty, gender and textual practice$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0182369
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Memory and Commemoration: Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies fourth conference). Melbourne, Victoria 5 - 8 Feb 2003$455

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0182700
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20001 grants / $6,500

Her Painted Words: Authenticity, Gender and Genre in Renaissance Women's Sonnet Sequences.$6,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2000
GNo G0178903
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19982 grants / $6,600

Nineteenth-century Australian Women's Poetry: An Anthology with a Critical Introduction.$5,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1998
GNo G0177336
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

English Renaissance Literature$1,600

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Dr Nancy Wright, Professor Rosalind Smith, Professor D Bevington
Scheme Special Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1998
GNo G0177491
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19972 grants / $8,000

Gender and Genre in Nineteenth Century Australian Women's Poetry$4,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1997
Funding Finish 1997
GNo G0177020
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Gender & Genre in Nineteenth Century Australian Women's Poetry$4,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rosalind Smith
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1997
Funding Finish 1997
GNo G0177682
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed10
Current8

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Writing about Aboriginal Australian Detective Fiction PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Aspects of Renaissance Studies in a Technological Society: Sixteenth-century Italian Writers and their Online Identities PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD What Women Wrote: Prison Poetry and the Early Modern Englishwoman, 1540-1660 PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Catalysts That Triggered Women's Awakenings in the Writings of Kate Chopin: Gender Perspectives. PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Collaboration and the Early Modern Woman Writer: Materiality, Authorship, Performance PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD The Valentine Wars PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2010 PhD A Mixed Methods Study of Academic Literacies Development within a Cohort of Undergraduate Nursing Students PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2009 PhD Negotiating Dark Matter: Trauma and Ecology in the Fiction of Contemporary Australian Women Writers PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD ‘“We reportin you for racism, man, you going down”’: Representing Male Youth in Contemporary British Asian Novels PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 Masters Still Digging: From Grunge to Post-Grunge in Australian Fiction M Philosophy (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Computational Stylistics, Cognitive Grammar, and the Tragedy of Mariam: Combining Formal and Contextual Approaches in a Computational Study of Early Modern Tragedy PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Reading the Self-Help Manual: Amazon.com Customer Reviews of Dating and Marriage Manuals for Heterosexual Women PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2010 PhD Rewriting Scapegoat Texts: Mimetic Desire and the Dynamics of Rivalry in Michael Ondaatje's In the Skin of a Lion and the English Patient, and Peter Careys, Jack Maggs and True History of the Kelly Gang PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2009 PhD "For Australia": Joseph Furphy and Australian Literary Culture, 1889-1912 PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor
2009 PhD The Triumphant Approach: Chasing the Unwritable Book PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2008 PhD Pound's Imponderabilia: Space and Community in the Poetry of Ezra Pound PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2006 PhD Intimate Ephemera: an investigation of life narratives in Australian zines PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2004 PhD Australian Women's Letters Between 1788 and 1840 PhD (English), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor
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News

Centre for 21st Century Humanities leads development of ground breaking software platform

April 15, 2019

The Centre for 21st Century Humanities is leading the development of a powerful software platform called the ‘Time-Layered Cultural Map of Australia’.

New ideas: Startup competition

September 18, 2018

This news story details a startup competition being held by the Centre for 21st Century Humanities.

Pitchfest: Connecting the humanities with industry

September 17, 2018

Pitchfest 2018 was held by the Centre for 21st Century Humanities in August and invited industry to partner with the centre.

ARC funding expands research in microbiology and the humanities

August 3, 2018

Two of our outstanding researchers have received almost $2 million in Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowships to advance their research discoveries in the fields of microbiology and the humanities.

Blacksmith Repair Day pushes back against consumer culture

July 2, 2018

This page contains a news story about the Blacksmith Repair Day supported by the Centre for 21st Century Humanities.

New Centre for early modern studies sparking Chinese collaboration

March 6, 2018

Deputy Director of the Centre for 21st Century Humanities and the Early Modern Women Research Network, Professor Ros Smith is leading the development of a new Centre bringing together Chinese and Australian early modern studies academics.

Mentor program supports Early Career Researchers

October 6, 2017

The Centre for 21st Century Humanities has kicked off a program to nurture early career researchers (ECR’s).

Software success for UoN’s Early Modern Women Research Network

October 6, 2017

A UON Research Network has been asked to share their digital archive software with leading Renaissance literature academics at Northwestern University, USA

New research project examines the complaints of a culture past

August 22, 2017

What does the poetry of the disadvantaged people of the Renaissance tell us about the culture of that time?

Humanities workshop kicks off design start-up

July 18, 2017

A Humanities Startup Workshop has assisted in the creation of a design service and research studio within the School of Creative Industries.

Centre for 21st Century Humanities leads funding bid to develop ground breaking software platform

May 9, 2017

C21CH is Humanities is leading a bid for funding to build a powerful software platform called the ‘Time-Layered Cultural Map of Australia’.

Leading Shakespeare Scholar wows audience in public lecture

March 10, 2017

The Centre for 21st Century Humanities had the privilege of hosting Merton Professor Lorna Hutson recently.

Mary, Queen of Scots was a poet - and you should know it

July 28, 2014

Think Mary, Queen of Scots and a few key facts probably come to mind: she was Catholic, she was imprisoned and she had her head chopped off.

Professor Rosalind Smith

Position

Acting Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research & Innovation)
Assistant Dean Research Training, Faculty of Education and Arts
Office - DVC (Research and Innovation)
Research and Innovation Division

Focus area

English

Contact Details

Email ros.smith@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5180
Mobile 0401 568283
Fax (02) 4921 6933

Office

Room CH335a
Building General Purpose
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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