Dr Rick Thorne

Dr Rick Thorne

HCRA Advanced Technical Support Officer

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Medical Biochemistry)

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Rick Thorne (PhD 1999) is a postdoctoral researcher sponsored by the HMRI Cancer Research Program and contracted lecturer in the School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy at the University of Newcastle.

His major interest involves different families of cell adhesion molecules and how these engage signalling pathways, particularly how these contribute to the development and progression of cancer. These interests overlap with CD36, another signalling molecule with disease functions outside cancer, particularly the metabolic syndrome and related disorders such as diabetes.

Dr. Thorne has over ten years postdoctoral experience beginning with the award of a two year competitive postdoctoral fellowship Brawn Postdoctoral Research Fellow undertaken at the UoN under Prof. Gordon Burns. During that period he was awarded two competitive overseas training schemes through the UICC, an International Cancer Technology Transfer Fellowships undertaken at the ICRF in London, UK (2000) and a Cancer Research Training Course held in Toronto, Canada (2001). Pursing further training he then relocated the UK to take up a three year post as a Postdoctoral Fellow in Training (2002-2004) at the 5* Institute of Cancer Research (ICR, London).

This appointment also led to a number of quality publications and first-hand experience as a PhD supervisor and supervisor of graduate student projects for Imperial College (honours equivalent). Following the ICR appointment he returned to UoN under an ARC Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship awarded from 2004-2007 in connection with an ARC Discovery Project. Subsequent to this award he received a three year Cancer Institute NSW fellowship for the period 2008-2010. After a number of years acting as laboratory manager for the Cancer Research Unit, Dr. Thorne inherited the facilities’ of Prof. Burns and now runs this laboratory on an independent basis.

Over the last five years Dr. Thorne has contributed 27 original research articles and one review article. For ten of these publications he is the first, equal contributory or senior author. Within this body of work there is a strong indication of productive collaborations with local, national and international colleagues.

Research Expertise
I have been working in laboratory-based science for nearly twenty years with direct hands on experience in vast array of techniques. I have a strong interest in the technical aspects of science, and have been instrumental in obtaining key equipment for my own research work and for the greater benefit of my research colleagues.

A summary of my technical skills and experience is as follows:

Molecular Biology: All DNA manipulations associated with the construction of expression vectors including epitope tagged molecules, fusion proteins, mutants and chimeras, recombinant adenoviruses. DNA and RNA preparation and analysis by southern and northern blotting, PCR, screening assays for cDNA libraries, yeast-2-hybrid assays etc.

Protein analysis and biochemistry: SDS-PAGE, 2D gels, immunoprecipitation, GST-pulldown, immunoblotting, use of radioisotopes, kinase assays, metabolic labeling studies, N-glycan analysis, chromatographic and related biochemical methods, flow cytometry, ELISA assays, protein and enzyme assays.

Imaging: I have developed and manage a microscope facility consisting of a trio of three Zeiss microscopes freely available to all subject to appropriate training.

All utilise a common software package (Axiovision) that helps in training of users. I have a great deal of experience in immunofluorescence and confocal microscopic imaging. The Axioplan 2 is a standard upright miscroscope equipped with colour and monochrome cameras, Apotome imaging device, Colibri 2 illumination system. This is powerful system fitted with a large number of epifluorescence filter sets and high performance objectives. This system is adaptable to almost any specimen on a slide. The Axiovert 200 is a manual inverted fluorescence microscope fitted with a high resolution monochrome camera. Suitable for general work using cultured cells. The Cell Observer System is for live cell imaging and more complex scanning tasks. It consists of an automated inverted microscope with scanning stage and an integrated incubator system. Cell culture and in vitro assays: derivation and maintenance of cell lines, cryopreservation, mycoplasma screening, cell transfection methods, cloning and cell sorting, production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies, cell adhesion, migration and chemotaxis assays, drug toxicity, apoptosis, phagocytosis and cell-mediated immunity assays. In vivo models: I have developed experimental models for cancer metastasis and immunoscintography in human xenograft models of melanoma, and experimental chemotherapy protocols for an rodent model of acquired drug-resistance in mammary cancer.

Teaching Expertise
Research Higher Degree Completions Mr. George Tzircotis (PhD 2005, University of London, UK) co-supervisor Ms. Kristy Shipman (PhD 2009, University of Newcastle, Australia) co-supervisor Mr. Mohammad Alkhatatbeh (thesis accepted December, 2012) primary supervisor Current Research Higher Degree Students As primary supervisor Ms. Camila Oliveira (enrolment confirmed, thesis submission due November 2012) Mr. Alireza Arjmand (enrolment confirmed, thesis submission due February 2012) Ms. Elham Sadeqzadeh (enrolment confirmed, thesis submission due February 2012) Mr. Abdulrzag Ahmed (enrolment confirmed, thesis submission due February 2014) As co-supervisor Ms. Jiao Li (other supervisors A/Prof. Derek Laver and A/Prof. Dirk Van Helden)

Additionally I have sat on a number of RHD confirmation panels for students from both the School of Biological Sciences and the School of Medicine and Public Health. Honours (and equivalent) supervision Ms. Ka Man Emily Chu (Final Year Project, Imperial College London, 2003) Ms. Dale Anne Boyce (Honours, Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle, 2005) Mr. Andrew James William Weir (Honours, Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle, 2007) Mr. Simon Bone (Honours, Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle, 2007) Mr. Steven Alley (Honours, Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle, 2009) Mr. Tim Kelso (Honours, Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle, 2010) Ms. Anna Timofeeva (Final Year Project, Karolinska Institute, Sweden, 2011) Undergraduate Teaching experience Contracted 0.5 lecturing appointment for undergraduate teaching in the School of Biomedical Sciences Bachelor’s program in 2001 and 2012 where I lectured major components of HUBS 2206 (Human Biochemistry and Cell Biology), HUBS 2209 (Human Molecular Science) and supervised associated Laboratory Practical Classes Course coordinator of HUBS 3409 (Project in Biomedical Sciences) in 2011 and 2012

Administrative Expertise
Membership of the Steering committee of the HMRI Cancer Research Program (2005-current) Organising committee member and session chairs for the HMRI Translational Cancer Conferences held in 2006 and 2008 Convener of the HMRI CRP seminar program from 2005-2009 HMRI Grant Review Panel Member 2009 Ad hoc representation on various committees at the School and Faculty level acting on behalf of Cancer Researchers and/or the discipline of Medical Biochemistry Reviewer of project grant applications in Research Infrastructure Block Grant (RIBG) Scheme (2006) Peer reviewer for both ARC Discovery and NHMRC Project grants since 2007 Peer reviewer for a number of scientific journals including Biochemical Journal, Journal of Lipid Research, Experimental Cell Research, Immunology and Cell Biology, Journal of Signal Transduction, Stem Cell Reviews & Reports and the British Journal of Cancer Member of the NHMRC GRPs in 2011 and 2012 assessing grants for Cancer Biology & Oncology


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • apoptosis
  • cell adhesion
  • cell signaling

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110199 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics not elsewhere classified 30
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 30
060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2010 - 1/12/2012 Postdoctoral Fellow and Contracted Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
1/01/2009 -  Membership - American Association of Cancer Research American Association of Cancer Research
United States
1/01/2008 - 1/12/2010 CI NSW Career Development Postdoctoral Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
1/06/2004 - 1/06/2007 ARC Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
1/05/2001 - 1/05/2004 Postdoctoral Fellow in Training Insititute of Cancer Research, London
Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre
United States
1/01/2000 - 1/04/2001 Fellowship - Gladys M Brawn Memorial Fellowship University of Newcastle
1/01/2000 - 1/05/2001 Gladys M. Brawn Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Lifetime Fellow of the UICC Organisation The Union for International Cancer Control (UICC)
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2007
Unknown

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2006 Dr. A. Obaidat, Department of Pharmacy
Organisation: Jordan University of Science and Technology, King Abdullah II Hospital
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (68 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Alkhatatbeh MJ, Lincz LF, Thorne RF, 'Low simvastatin concentrations reduce oleic acid-induced steatosis in HepG2 cells: An in vitro model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease', Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 11 1487-1492 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Spandidos Publications. All rights reserved.Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an inflammatory condition caused by hepatic lipid accumulation that is associated... [more]

© 2016, Spandidos Publications. All rights reserved.Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an inflammatory condition caused by hepatic lipid accumulation that is associated with insulin resistance, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Although statins should be used with caution in liver diseases, they are increasingly investigated as a possible treatment for NAFLD. The present study recreated an in vitro model of NAFLD using HepG2 cells exposed to oleic acid (OA), which was used to quantify OA-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells treated with various concentrations of simvastatin. In addition, the effect of simvastatin on HepG2 cell morphology and microparticle generation as a marker of cell apoptosis was assessed. OA-induced lipid accumulation was quantified by Oil Red O staining and extraction for optical density determination. Stained lipid droplets were visualized using phase contrast microscopy. Furthermore, HepG2 cell-derived microparticles were counted by flow cytometry subsequent to staining for Annexin V. HepG2 cells treated with 0-1 mM OA showed dose-dependent lipid accumulation. Treatment of HepG2 cells with increasing concentrations of simvastatin followed by treatment with 1 mM OA showed that low simvastatin concen- trations (4-10 µM) were able to reduce lipid accumulation by ~40%, whereas high simvastatin concentrations (20 and 30 µM) induced apoptotic changes in cell morphology and increased the production of Annexin V+ microparticles. This suggests that low simvastatin doses may have a role in preventing NAFLD. However, further investigations are required to confirm this action in vivo and to determine the underlying mechanism by which simvastatin reduces hepatic steatosis.

DOI 10.3892/etm.2016.3069
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Lisa Lincz
2016 Guo ST, Chi MN, Yang RH, Guo XY, Zan LK, Wang CY, et al., 'INPP4B is an oncogenic regulator in human colon cancer.', Oncogene, 35 3049-3061 (2016)
DOI 10.1038/onc.2015.361
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Lei Jin, Chenchen Jiang, Stephen Ackland, Hubert Hondermarck, Xu Zhang
2016 de Bock CE, Thorne RF, 'Cell biology: A mitochondrial brake on vascular repair.', Nature, 539 503-505 (2016)
DOI 10.1038/nature20476
2015 Zouikr I, Ahmed AF, Horvat JC, Beagley KW, Clifton VL, Ray A, et al., 'Programming of formalin-induced nociception by neonatal LPS exposure: Maintenance by peripheral and central neuroimmune activity', Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 44 235-246 (2015) [C1]

© 2014.The immune and nociceptive systems are shaped during the neonatal period where they undergo fine-tuning and maturation. Painful experiences during this sensitive period of... [more]

© 2014.The immune and nociceptive systems are shaped during the neonatal period where they undergo fine-tuning and maturation. Painful experiences during this sensitive period of development are known to produce long-lasting effects on the immune and nociceptive responses. It is less clear, however, whether inflammatory pain responses are primed by neonatal exposure to mild immunological stimuli, such as with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we examine the impact of neonatal LPS exposure on inflammatory pain responses, peripheral and hippocampal interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß), as well as mast cell number and degranulation in preadolescent and adult rats. Wistar rats were injected with LPS (0.05 mg/kg IP, Salmonella enteritidis) or saline on postnatal days (PNDs) 3 and 5 and later subjected to the formalin test at PNDs 22 and 80-97. At both time-points, and one-hour after formalin injection, blood and hippocampus were collected for measuring circulating and central IL-1ß levels using ELISA and Western blot, respectively. Paw tissue was also isolated to assess mast cell number and degree of degranulation using Toluidine Blue staining. Behavioural analyses indicate that at PND 22, LPS-challenged rats displayed enhanced flinching (p<.01) and licking (p<.01) in response to formalin injection. At PNDs 80-97, LPS-challenged rats exhibited increased flinching (p<.05), an effect observed in males only. Furthermore, neonatal LPS exposure enhanced circulating IL-1ß and mast cell degranulation in preadolescent but not adult rats following formalin injection. Hippocampal IL-1ß levels were increased in LPS-treated adult but not preadolescent rats in response to formalin injection. These data suggest neonatal LPS exposure produces developmentally regulated changes in formalin-induced behavioural responses, peripheral and central IL-1ß levels, as well as mast cell degranulation following noxious stimulation later in life. These findings highlight the importance of immune activation during the neonatal period in shaping immune response and pain sensitivity later in life. This is of clinical relevance given the high prevalence of bacterial infection during the neonatal period, particularly in the vulnerable population of preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units.

DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2014.10.014
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Deborah Hodgson, Philip Hansbro, Jay Horvat
2015 Phang M, Thorne RF, Alkhatatbeh MJ, Garg ML, Lincz LF, 'Circulating CD36+ microparticles are not altered by docosahexaenoic or eicosapentaenoic acid supplementation', Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine a... [more]

© 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Background and aims: Circulating microparticles (MP) are the source of a plasma derived form of the scavenger receptor CD36, termed soluble (s)CD36, the levels of which correlate with markers of atherosclerosis and risk of cardiovascular disease. Long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have cardioprotective effects that we have previously reported to be gender specific. The aim of this study was to determine if dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and/or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation affect circulating CD36 + MP levels, and if this occurs differentially in healthy men and women. Methods and results: Participants (43M, 51F) aged 39.6 ± 1.7 years received 4 weeks of daily supplementation with DHA rich (200 mg EPA; 1000 mg DHA), EPA rich (1000 mg EPA; 200 mg DHA), or placebo (sunola) oil in a double-blinded, randomised, placebo controlled trial. Plasma CD36 + MP were enumerated by flow cytometry and differences between genders and treatments were evaluated by Student's or paired t-test and one way ANOVA.Males and females had similar levels of CD36 + MP at baseline (mean = 1018 ± 325 vs 980 ± 318; p = 0.577) and these were not significantly changed after DHA (M, p = 0.571; F, p = 0.444) or EPA (M, p = 0.361; F, p = 0.901) supplementation. Likewise, the overall percent change in these levels were not different between supplemented cohorts compared to placebo when all participants were combined (% change in CD36 + MP: DHA = 5.7 ± 37.5, EPA = -3.4 ± 35.4, placebo = -11.5 ± 32.9; p = 0.158) or stratified by gender (M, DHA = -2.6 ± 30.6, EPA = -15.1 ± 20.1, placebo = -21.4 ± 28.7, p = 0.187; F, DHA = 11.7 ± 41.5, EPA = 6.8 ± 42.9, placebo = -2.8 ± 34.7, p = 0.552). Conclusion: The cardioprotective effects of DHA and EPA do not act through a CD36 + MP mechanism.

DOI 10.1016/j.numecd.2015.12.003
Co-authors Manohar Garg, Lisa Lincz
2015 Pundavela J, Roselli S, Faulkner S, Attia J, Scott RJ, Thorne RF, et al., 'Nerve fibers infiltrate the tumor microenvironment and are associated with nerve growth factor production and lymph node invasion in breast cancer', Molecular Oncology, 9 1626-1635 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.molonc.2015.05.001
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Phillip Jobling, Hubert Hondermarck, John Forbes, Marjorie Walker, Rodney Scott, John Attia
2015 Ahmed AF, De Bock CE, Lincz LF, Pundavela J, Zouikr I, Sontag E, et al., 'FAT1 cadherin acts upstream of Hippo signalling through TAZ to regulate neuronal differentiation', Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, 72 4653-4669 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Springer Basel.The Hippo pathway is emerging as a critical nexus that balances self-renewal of progenitors against differentiation; however, upstream elements in vertebrat... [more]

© 2015 Springer Basel.The Hippo pathway is emerging as a critical nexus that balances self-renewal of progenitors against differentiation; however, upstream elements in vertebrate Hippo signalling are poorly understood. High expression of Fat1 cadherin within the developing neuroepithelium and the manifestation of severe neurological phenotypes in Fat1-knockout mice suggest roles in neurogenesis. Using the SH-SY5Y model of neuronal differentiation and employing gene silencing techniques, we show that FAT1 acts to control neurite outgrowth, also driving cells towards terminal differentiation via inhibitory effects on proliferation. FAT1 actions were shown to be mediated through Hippo signalling where it activated core Hippo kinase components and antagonised functions of the Hippo effector TAZ. Suppression of FAT1 promoted the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of TAZ leading to enhanced transcription of the Hippo target gene CTGF together with accompanying increases in nuclear levels of Smad3. Silencing of TAZ reversed the effects of FAT1 depletion thus connecting inactivation of TAZ-TGFbeta signalling with Hippo signalling mediated through FAT1. These findings establish FAT1 as a new upstream Hippo element regulating early stages of differentiation in neuronal cells.

DOI 10.1007/s00018-015-1955-6
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Hubert Hondermarck, Estelle Sontag, Lisa Lincz
2014 Pundavela J, Demont Y, Jobling P, Lincz LF, Roselli S, Thorne RF, et al., 'ProNGF correlates with Gleason score and is a potential driver of nerve infiltration in prostate cancer', American Journal of Pathology, 184 3156-3162 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.Nerve infiltration is essential to prostate cancer progression, but the mechan... [more]

© 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.Nerve infiltration is essential to prostate cancer progression, but the mechanism by which nerves are attracted to prostate tumors remains unknown. We report that the precursor of nerve growth factor (proNGF) is overexpressed in prostate cancer and involved in the ability of prostate cancer cells to induce axonogenesis. A series of 120 prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) samples were analyzed by IHC for proNGF. ProNGF was mainly localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells, with marked expression in cancer compared with BPH. Importantly, the proNGF level positively correlated with the Gleason score (n = 104, tB = 0.51). A higher level of proNGF was observed in tumors with a Gleason score of =8 compared with a Gleason score of 7 and 6 (P < 0.001). In vitro, proNGF was detected in LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3 prostate cancer cells and BPH-1 cells but not in RWPE-1 immortalized nontumorigenic prostate epithelial cells or primary normal prostate epithelial cells. Co-culture of PC12 neuronal-like cells or 50B11 neurons with PC-3 cells resulted in neurite outgrowth in neuronal cells that was inhibited by blocking antibodies against proNGF, indicating that prostate cancer cells can induce axonogenesis via secretion of proNGF. These data reveal that ProNGF is a biomarker associated with high-risk prostate cancers and a potential driver of infiltration by nerves.

DOI 10.1016/j.ajpath.2014.08.009
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Marjorie Walker, Hubert Hondermarck, Phillip Jobling, Lisa Lincz
2014 Sadeqzadeh E, De Bock CE, Wojtalewicz N, Holt JE, Smith ND, Dun MD, et al., 'Furin processing dictates ectodomain shedding of human FAT1 cadherin', Experimental Cell Research, 323 41-55 (2014) [C1]

Fat1 is a single pass transmembrane protein and the largest member of the cadherin superfamily. Mouse knockout models and in vitro studies have suggested that Fat1 influences cell... [more]

Fat1 is a single pass transmembrane protein and the largest member of the cadherin superfamily. Mouse knockout models and in vitro studies have suggested that Fat1 influences cell polarity and motility. Fat1 is also an upstream regulator of the Hippo pathway, at least in lower vertebrates, and hence may play a role in growth control. In previous work we have established that FAT1 cadherin is initially cleaved by proprotein convertases to form a noncovalently linked heterodimer prior to expression on the cell surface. Such processing was not a requirement for cell surface expression, since melanoma cells expressed both unprocessed FAT1 and the heterodimer on the cell surface. Here we further establish that the site 1 (S1) cleavage step to promote FAT1 heterodimerisation is catalysed by furin and we identify the cleavage site utilised. For a number of other transmembrane receptors that undergo heterodimerisation the S1 processing step is thought to occur constitutively but the functional significance of heterodimerisation has been controversial. It has also been generally unclear as to the significance of receptor heterodimerisation with respect to subsequent post-translational proteolysis that often occurs in transmembrane proteins. Exploiting the partial deficiency of FAT1 processing in melanoma cells together with furin-deficient LoVo cells, we manipulated furin expression to demonstrate that only the heterodimer form of FAT1 is subject to cleavage and subsequent release of the extracellular domain. This work establishes S1-processing as a clear functional prerequisite for ectodomain shedding of FAT1 with general implications for the shedding of other transmembrane receptors. © 2014.

DOI 10.1016/j.yexcr.2014.02.012
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Janet Holt, Matt Dun
2014 Sadeqzadeh E, de Bock CE, O'Donnell MR, Timofeeva A, Burns GF, Thorne RF, 'FAT1 cadherin is multiply phosphorylated on its ectodomain but phosphorylation is not catalysed by the four-jointed homologue', FEBS LETTERS, 588 3511-3517 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.febslet.2014.08.014
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 Sadeqzadeh E, De Bock CE, Thorne RF, 'Sleeping Giants: Emerging Roles for the Fat Cadherins in Health and Disease', Medicinal Research Reviews, 34 190-221 (2014) [C1]

The vertebrate Fat cadherins comprise a small gene family of four members, Fat1-Fat4, all closely related in structure to Drosophila ft and ft2. Over the past decade, knock-out mo... [more]

The vertebrate Fat cadherins comprise a small gene family of four members, Fat1-Fat4, all closely related in structure to Drosophila ft and ft2. Over the past decade, knock-out mouse studies, genetic manipulation, and large sequencing projects has aided our understanding of the function of vertebrate Fat cadherins in tissue development and disease. The majority of studies of this family have focused on Fat1, with evidence now showing it can bind enable (ENA)/Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), ß-catenin and Atrophin proteins to influence cell polarity and motility; HOMER-1 and HOMER-3 proteins to regulate actin accumulation in neuronal synapses; and scribble to influence the Hippo signaling pathway. Fat2 and Fat3 can regulate cell migration in a tissue specific manner and Fat4 appears to influence both planar cell polarity and Hippo signaling recapitulating the activity of Drosophila ft. Knowledge about the exact downstream signaling pathways activated by each family member remains in its infancy, but it is becoming clearer that they have tissue specific and redundant roles in development and may be lost or gained in cancer. In this review, we summarize the recent progress on understanding the role of the Fat cadherin family, integrating the current knowledge of molecular interactions and tissue distributions, together with the accumulating evidence of their changed expression in human disease. The latter is now beginning to promote interest in these molecules as both biomarkers and new targets for therapeutic intervention. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/med.21286
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 23
2014 Mhaidat NM, Bouklihacene M, Thorne RF, '5-Fluorouracil-induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells is caspase-9-dependent and mediated by activation of protein kinase C-d', Oncology Letters, 8 699-704 (2014) [C1]

Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms by which 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) induces apoptosis is required in order to understand the resistance of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells to 5-FU... [more]

Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms by which 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) induces apoptosis is required in order to understand the resistance of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells to 5-FU. In the current study, 5-FU-induced apoptosis was assessed using the propidium iodide method. Involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) was assessed by evaluating the extent of their activation in CRC, following treatment with 5-FU, using biochemical inhibitors and western blot analysis. The results revealed that 5-FU induces varying degrees of apoptosis in CRC cells; HCT116 cells were identified to be the most sensitive cells and SW480 were the least sensitive. In addition, 5-FU-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent as it appeared to be initiated by caspase-9. Furthermore, PKCe was marginally expressed in CRC cells and no changes were observed in the levels of cleavage or phosphorylation following treatment with 5-FU. The treatment of HCT116 cells with 5-FU increased the expression, phosphorylation and cleavage of PKCd. The inhibition of PKCd was found to significantly inhibit 5-FU-induced apoptosis. These results indicated that 5-FU induces apoptosis in CRC by the activation of PKCd and caspase-9. In addition, the levels of PKCd activation may determine the sensitivity of CRC to 5-FU.

DOI 10.3892/ol.2014.2211
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2014 Vuong QV, Sadeqzadeh E, Hirun S, Goldsmith CD, Zammitt N, Bowyer MB, et al., 'Phenolic Compounds, Antioxidant and Anti-Cancer Properties of the Australian Maroon Bush Scaevola spinescens (Goodeniaceae)', Journal of Bioanalysis & Biomedicine, S12 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/1948-593X.S12-002
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Judith Weidenhofer, C Scarlett, Jennette Sakoff, Michael Bowyer
2014 Wojtalewicz N, Sadeqzadeh E, Weiss JV, Tehrani MM, Klein-Scory S, Hahn S, et al., 'A Soluble Form of the Giant Cadherin Fat1 Is Released from Pancreatic Cancer Cells by ADAM10 Mediated Ectodomain Shedding', PLOS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0090461
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2014 Oliveira CS, de Bock CE, Molloy TJ, Sadeqzadeh E, Geng XY, Hersey P, et al., 'Macrophage migration inhibitory factor engages PI3K/Akt signalling and is a prognostic factor in metastatic melanoma', BMC Cancer, 14 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Oliveira et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.Background: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a widely expressed cytokine involved in a variety of cellular proc... [more]

© 2014 Oliveira et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.Background: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a widely expressed cytokine involved in a variety of cellular processes including cell cycle regulation and the control of proliferation. Overexpression of MIF has been reported in a number of cancer types and it has previously been shown that MIF is upregulated in melanocytic tumours with the highest expression levels occurring in malignant melanoma. However, the clinical significance of high MIF expression in melanoma has not been reported. Methods: MIF expression was depleted in human melanoma cell lines using siRNA-mediated gene knockdown and effects monitored using in vitro assays of proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, clonogenicity and Akt signalling. In silico analyses of expression microarray data were used to correlate MIF expression levels in melanoma tumours with overall patient survival using a univariate Cox regression model. Results: Knockdown of MIF significantly decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis and decreased anchorage-independent growth. Effects were associated with reduced numbers of cells entering S phase concomitant with decreased cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression, increased p27 expression and decreased Akt phosphorylation. Analysis of clinical outcome data showed that MIF expression levels in primary melanoma were not associated with outcome (HR = 1.091, p = 0.892) whereas higher levels of MIF in metastatic lesions were significantly associated with faster disease progression (HR = 2.946, p = 0.003 and HR = 4.600, p = 0.004, respectively in two independent studies). Conclusions: Our in vitro analyses show that MIF functions upstream of the PI3K/Akt pathway in human melanoma cell lines. Moreover, depletion of MIF inhibited melanoma proliferation, viability and clonogenic capacity. Clinically, high MIF levels in metastatic melanoma were found to be associated with faster disease recurrence. These findings support the clinical significance of MIF signalling in melanoma and provide a strong rationale for both targeting and monitoring MIF expression in clinical melanoma.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-14-630
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2013 Li J, Imtiaz MS, Beard NA, Dulhunty AF, Thorne R, vanHelden DF, Laver DR, 'ß-Adrenergic stimulation increases RyR2 activity via intracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ regulation.', PLoS One, 8 e58334 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0058334
Co-authors Derek Laver, Dirk Vanhelden
2013 Mhaidat NM, Qandil AM, Al-Balas QA, Hassan MA, Jaradat SA, Matalkah AM, Thorne RT, 'Methoxyphenylcipro induces antitumor activity in human cancer cells', Archives of Pharmacal Research, 36 1023-1028 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12272-013-0087-5
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Guo ST, Jiang CC, Wang GP, Li YP, Wang CY, Guo XY, et al., 'MicroRNA-497 targets insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and has a tumour suppressive role in human colorectal cancer', ONCOGENE, 32 1910-1920 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/onc.2012.214
Citations Scopus - 98Web of Science - 82
Co-authors Chenchen Jiang, Xu Zhang, Lei Jin
2013 Ardjmand A, de Bock CE, Shahrokhi S, Lincz LF, Boyd AW, Burns GF, Thorne RF, 'Fat1 cadherin provides a novel minimal residual disease marker in acute lymphoblastic leukemia', HEMATOLOGY, 18 315-321 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1179/1607845413Y.0000000080
Co-authors Lisa Lincz
2013 Ye Y, Jin L, Wilmott JS, Hu WL, Yosufi B, Thorne RF, et al., 'PI(4,5)P2 5-phosphatase A regulates PI3K/Akt signalling and has a tumour suppressive role in human melanoma', NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 4 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ncomms2489
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Xu Zhang, Chenchen Jiang, Lei Jin
2013 Alkhatatbeh MJ, Enjeti AK, Acharya S, Thorne RF, Lincz LF, 'The origin of circulating CD36 in type 2 diabetes', NUTRITION & DIABETES, 3 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/nutd.2013.1
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Lisa Lincz
2012 De Bock CE, Ardjmand Ghahestani A, Molloy TJ, Bone SM, Johnstone DM, Campbell DM, et al., 'The Fat1 cadherin is overexpressed and an independent prognostic factor for survival in paired diagnosis-relapse samples of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia', Leukemia, 26 918-926 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Lisa Lincz
2012 Mhaidat NM, Abdul-Razzak KK, Alkofahi AS, Alsarhan AM, Aldaher AN, Thorne RF, 'Altholactone induces apoptotic cell death in human colorectal cancer cells', Phytotherapy Research, 26 926-931 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2012 Tay KH, Jin L, Tseng HY, Jiang CC, Ye Y, Thorne RF, et al., 'Suppression of PP2A is critical for protection of melanoma cells upon endoplasmic reticulum stress', Cell Death and Disease, 3 e337 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Xu Zhang, Nikki Verrills, Lei Jin, Chenchen Jiang
2011 Alkhatatbeh MJ, Mhaidat NM, Enjeti AK, Lincz L, Thorne RF, 'The putative diabetic plasma marker, soluble CD36, is non-cleaved, non-soluble and entirely associated with microparticles', Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 9 844-851 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1538-7836.2011.04220.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Lisa Lincz
2011 Jiang CC, Lai F, Thorne RF, Yang F, Liu H, Hersey P, Zhang XD, 'MEK-independent survival of B-RAFV600E melanoma cells selected for resistance to apoptosis induced by the RAF inhibitor PLX4720', Clinical Cancer Research, 17 721-730 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 65Web of Science - 62
Co-authors Xu Zhang, Chenchen Jiang
2011 Sadeqzadeh E, De Bock CE, Zhang XD, Shipman KL, Scott NM, Song C, et al., 'Dual processing of FAT1 cadherin protein by human melanoma cells generates distinct protein products', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 286 28181-28191 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1074/jbc.M111.234419
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2011 Jin L, Hu WL, Jiang CC, Wang JX, Han CC, Chu P, et al., 'MicroRNA-149*, a p53-responsive microRNA, functions as an oncogenic regulator in human melanoma', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108 15840-15845 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 80
Co-authors Lei Jin, Chenchen Jiang, Xu Zhang
2011 Dong L, Jiang CC, Thorne RF, Croft A, Yang F, Liu H, et al., 'Ets-1 mediates upregulation of Mcl-1 downstream of XBP-1 in human melanoma cells upon ER stress', Oncogene, 30 3716-3726 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/onc.2011.87
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Xu Zhang, Chenchen Jiang
2010 Tseng H-Y, Jiang CC, Croft A, Croft A, Thorne RF, Yang F, et al., 'Contrasting effects of Nutlin-3 on TRAIL - and Docetaxel-induced Apoptosis due to upregulation of TRAIL-R2 and Mcl-1 in human melanoma cells', Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, 9 3363-3374 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-10-0646
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2010 Zhang X, Thorne RF, Wagner TE, Wei Y, 'Regulatory T cells and cancer therapy: An old story with a new hope', Current Cancer Therapy Reviews, 6 34-40 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.2174/157339410790596470
2010 Jiang CC, Lai F, Tay KH, Croft A, Rizos H, Becker TM, et al., 'Apoptosis of human melanoma cells induced by inhibition of B-RAF(V600E) involves preferential splicing of bim(S)', Cell Death & Disease, 1 e69 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/cddis.2010.48
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 52
Co-authors Xu Zhang, Chenchen Jiang
2010 Thorne RF, Ralston KJ, De Bock CE, Mhaidat NM, Zhang XD, Boyd AW, Burns GF, 'Palmitoylation of CD36/FAT regulates the rate of its post-transcriptional processing in the endoplasmic reticulum', Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Cell Research, 1803 1298-1307 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bbamcr.2010.07.002
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2010 Yang F, Tay KH, Dong L, Thorne RF, Jiang CC, Yang E, et al., 'Cystatin B inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis is associated with the protection of FLIPL from degradation by the E3 ligase itch in human melanoma cells', Cell Death and Differentiation, 17 1354-1367 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/cdd.2010.29
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Chenchen Jiang, Xu Zhang
2010 Mao ZG, Jiang CC, Thorne RF, Hersey P, Zhang XD, 'TRAIL-induced apoptosis of human melanoma cells involves activation of caspase-4', Apoptosis, 15 1211-1222 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10495-010-0513-9
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Chenchen Jiang, Xu Zhang
2009 Jiang CC, Yang F, Thorne RF, Zhu BK, Hersey P, Zhang XD, 'Human melanoma cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress acquire resistance to microtubule-targeting drugs through XBP-1-mediated activation of Akt', Neoplasia, 11 436-447 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1593/neo.09208
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Chenchen Jiang, Xu Zhang
2009 Zhang LJ, Chen S, Wu P, Hu CS, Thorne RF, Luo CM, et al., 'Inhibition of MEK blocks GRP78 up-regulation and enhances apoptosis induced by ER stress in gastric cancer cells', Cancer Letters, 274 40-46 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.canlet.2008.08.030
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2009 Mhaidat NM, Alali FQ, Matalqah SM, Matalka II, Jaradat SA, Al-Sawalha NA, Thorne RF, 'Inhibition of MEK sensitizes paclitaxel-induced apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells by downregulation of GRP78', Anti-Cancer Drugs, 20 601-606 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/cad.0b013e32832e3120
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
2008 Mhaidat NM, Thorne RF, Zhang XD, Hersey P, 'Involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress in Docetaxel-induced JNK-dependent apoptosis of human melanoma', Apoptosis, 13 1505-1512 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10495-008-0276-8
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2008 Chen LH, Jiang CC, Watts R, Thorne RF, Kiejda KA, Zhang XD, Hersey P, 'Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells by the ARC protein', Cancer Research, 68 834-842 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-07-5056
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Chenchen Jiang, Xu Zhang, Kelly Kiejda
2008 Jiang CC, Lucas K, Kiejda KA, Wade M, Debock CE, Thorne RF, et al., 'Up-regulation of Mcl-1 is critical for survival of human melanoma cells upon endoplasmic reticulum stress', Cancer Research, 68 6708-6717 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-08-0349
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 79
Co-authors Xu Zhang, Kelly Kiejda, Chenchen Jiang
2008 Mhaidat NM, Thorne RF, De Bock CE, Zhang XD, Hersey P, 'Melanoma cell sensitivity to docetaxal-induced apoptosis is determined by class III beta-tubulin levels', FEBS Letters, 582 267-272 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.febslet.2007.12.014
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2008 Zhang LJ, Hao YZ, Hu CS, Ye Y, Xie QP, Thorne RF, et al., 'Inhibition of apoptosis facilitates necrosis induced by cisplatin in gastric cancer cells', Anti-Cancer Drugs, 19 159-166 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/CAD.0b013e3282f30d05
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2007 Mhaidat NM, Thorne RF, Zhang XD, Hersey P, 'Regulation of docetaxel-induced apoptosis of human melanoma cells by different isoforms of protein kinase C', Molecular Cancer Research, 5 1073-1081 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1158/1541-7786.mcr-07-0059
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2007 Thorne RF, Mhaidat N, Ralston KJ, Burns GF, 'Shed gangliosides provide detergent-independent evidence for type-3 glycosynapses', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 356 306-311 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.02.139
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2007 Jiang CC, Li HC, Gillespie S, Kiejda KA, Mhaidat N, Yu FW, et al., 'Tunicamycin sensitizes human melanoma cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of TRAIL-R2 via the unfolded protein response', Cancer Research, 67 5880-5888 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-07-0213
Citations Scopus - 72Web of Science - 70
Co-authors Chenchen Jiang, Kelly Kiejda, Xu Zhang
2007 Thorne RF, Mhaidat N, Ralston KJ, Burns GF, 'CD36 is a receptor for oxidized high density lipoprotein: Implications for the development of atherosclerosis', FEBS Letters, 581 1227-1232 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.febslet.2007.02.043
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 40
2007 Chen LH, Jiang CC, Kiejda KA, Wang YF, Thorne RF, Zhang XD, Hersey P, 'Thapsigargin sensitizes human melanoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of TRAIL-R2 through the unfolded protein response', Carcinogenesis, 28 2328-2336 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/carcin/bgm173
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Xu Zhang, Chenchen Jiang, Kelly Kiejda
2006 Tzircotis G, Thorne RF, Isacke CM, 'Directional sensing of a phorbol ester gradient requires CD44 and is regulated by CD44 phosphorylation', Oncogene, 25 7401-7410 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.onc.1209724
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2006 Thorne RF, Zhang XH, Song CJ, Jin BQ, Burns GF, 'Novel immunoblotting monoclonal antibodies against human and rat CD36/fat used to identify an isoform of CD36 in rat muscle', DNA and Cell Biology, 25 302-311 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1089/dna.2006.25.302
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2006 Thorne RF, Law E, Elith CA, Ralston KJ, Bates RC, Burns GF, 'The association between CD36 and Lyn protein tyrosine kinase is mediated by lipid', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 351 51-56 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.09.156
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
2005 Tzircotis G, Thorne RF, Isacke CM, 'Chemotaxis towards hyaluronan is dependent on CD44 expression and modulated by cell type variation in CD44-hyaluronan binding', Journal of Cell Science, 118 5119-5128 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/jcs.02629
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 61
2004 Ralston KJ, Hird S, Zhang X, Scott JL, Jin B, Thorne RF, et al., 'The LFA-1-associated molecule PTA-1 (CD226) on T cells forms a dynamic molecular complex with protein 4.1G and human discs large', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 279 33816-33828 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1074/jbc.M401040200
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 42
2004 Thorne RF, Legg JW, Isacke CM, 'The role of the CD44 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains in co-ordinating adhesive and signalling events', JOURNAL OF CELL SCIENCE, 117 373-380 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/jcs.00954
Citations Scopus - 123Web of Science - 112
2003 Sullivan A, Uff CR, Isacke CM, Thorne RF, 'PACE-1, a novel protein that interacts with the C-terminal domain of ezrin', EXPERIMENTAL CELL RESEARCH, 284 224-238 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0014-4827(02)00054-X
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2000 Gruarin P, Thorne R, Dorahy DJ, Burns G, Sitia R, Alessio M, 'CD36 is a Ditopic Glycoprotein with the N-Terminal Domain Implicated in Intracellular Transport', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 275 446-454 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 31
2000 Thorne R, Marshall J, Shafren D, Gibson PG, Hart I, Burns G, 'The Integrins a3B1 and a6B1 Physically and Functionally Associate with CD36 in Human Melanoma Cells', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 275 35264-35275 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 68Web of Science - 68
Co-authors Peter Gibson
2000 Thorne RF, Marshall J, Shafren D, Gibson P, Hart I, Burns GF, 'The Integrins (alpha)3(beta)1 Physically and functionally Associate with CD36 in Human Melanoma Cells', The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 275 No. 45 35264-35275 (2000) [C1]
2000 Shafren D, Dorahy DJ, Thorne R, Barry R, 'Cytoplasmic interactions between decay-accelerating factor and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 are not required for coxsackievirus A21 cell infection', Journal of General Virology, 81 889-894 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
2000 Gruarin P, Ulliers D, Thorne RF, Alessio M, 'Methionine 156 in the immunodominant domain on CD36 contributes to define the epitope recognized by the NL07 MoAb', Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, 214 89-95 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
1998 Gruarin P, Sitia R, Thorne RF, Burns GF, Alessio M, 'CD36 is a ditopic glycoprotein with both transmembrane domains implicated in intracellular transport.', MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE CELL, 9 456A-456A (1998)
1998 Bates RC, Elith CA, Thorne RF, Burns GF, 'Engagement of Variant CD44 confers resistance to anti-integrin antibody-mediated apoptosis in a colon carcinoma cell line', Cell Adhesion and Communication, 6 (1) 21-38 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 21
1998 Shafren DR, Dorahy DJ, Thorne RF, Kinoshita T, Barry RD, Burns GF, 'Antibody binding to individual short consensus repeats of decay-accelerating factor enhances enterovirus cell attachment and infectivity', The Journal of Immunology, 160 2318-2323 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 22
1997 Thorne RF, Meldrum CJ, Harris SJ, Dorahy DJ, Shafren DR, Berndt MC, et al., 'CD36 forms covalently associated dimers and multimers in platelets and transfected COS-7 cells', BIOCHEMICAL AND BIOPHYSICAL RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS, 240 812-818 (1997)
DOI 10.1006/bbrc.1997.7755
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Peter Gibson
1997 Dorahy DJ, Thorne RF, Fecondo JV, Burns GF, 'Stimulation of platelet activation and aggregation by a carboxyl-terminal peptide from thrombospondin binding to the integrin-associated protein receptor', JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 272 1323-1330 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 45
1997 Radford KJ, Thorne RF, Hersey P, 'Regulation of tumor cell motility and migration by CD63 in a human melanoma cell line', JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY, 158 3353-3358 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 70Web of Science - 69
1996 Radford KJ, Thorne RF, Hersey P, 'CD63 associates with transmembrane 4 superfamily members, CD9 and CD81, and with beta 1 integrins in human melanoma', BIOCHEMICAL AND BIOPHYSICAL RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS, 222 13-18 (1996)
DOI 10.1006/bbrc.1996.0690
Citations Scopus - 69Web of Science - 69
1989 SMART YC, STEVENSON KL, THORNE RF, THOMAS WD, HSU LH, BURTON RC, 'EXPRESSION OF NATURAL-KILLER (NK) CELL-SPECIFIC ALLOANTIGENS ON A MOUSE NK-LIKE CELL-LINE', IMMUNOLOGY AND CELL BIOLOGY, 67 239-242 (1989)
DOI 10.1038/icb.1989.36
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Show 65 more journal articles

Conference (21 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Laegdsgaard P, Nielsen S, Koegelenberg A, Goode S, Thorne R, Lund D, et al., 'A NEW VENTURE FOR THE HUNTER CANCER BIOBANK-ESTABLISHMENT OF SEQUENTIAL BLOOD COLLECTION FOR BRAIN CANCER RESEARCH', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Craig Gedye
2015 Nielsen S, Sulaiman B, Goode S, Young B, Koegelenberg A, Thorne R, et al., 'THE ESSENTIAL ROLE OF ANATOMICAL PATHOLOGISTS IN TISSUE BIOBANKING - A WIN- WIN SITUATION', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors John Forbes, Rodney Scott, Marjorie Walker
2015 Faulkner S, Lincz L, McElduff P, Scott R, Thorne R, Walker M, et al., 'COMPARING DIGITAL VERSUS VISUAL SCORING METHODS FOR IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL STAINING: A CASE STUDY IN THE HUNTER CANCER BIOBANK', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Hubert Hondermarck, Lisa Lincz, Rodney Scott, Marjorie Walker
2014 Faulkner S, Roselli S, Thorne RF, Scarlett CJ, Walker MM, Hondermarck H, 'PRONGF AND SORTILIN EXPRESSION AND FUNCTION IN PANCREATIC CANCER', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Hubert Hondermarck, C Scarlett, Marjorie Walker
2014 Sadeqzadeh E, Vuong QV, Goldsmith CD, Nguyen VT, Bhuyan DJ, Trung TD, et al., 'A NATURAL PRODUCT DRUG DISCOVERY PIPELINE FOR NOVEL PANCREATIC CANCER THERAPIES: A NEW CANCER RESEARCH HUB FOR THE HUNTER REGION OF NSW', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors C Scarlett, Judith Weidenhofer, Ian Vanaltena, Troy Gaston, Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer, Natalie Moltschaniwskyj, Anita Chalmers
2014 Guo ST, Chi MN, Yang RH, Guo XY, Wang CY, Zan LQ, et al., 'INOSITOL POLYPHOSPHATE 4-PHOSPHATASE II PROMOTES PI3K SIGNALING AND FUNCTIONS AS AN ONCOGENIC REGULATOR IN HUMAN COLON CANCER', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Xu Zhang, Chenchen Jiang, Stephen Ackland, Lei Jin
2013 Ahmed AF, De Bock CE, Sontag E, Hondermarck H, Thorne RF, 'The functional role of Fat1 cadherin in the differentiation and proliferation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells', - (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Hubert Hondermarck, Estelle Sontag
2012 Li J, Imtiaz MS, Beard NA, Dulhunty AF, Thorne RF, Van Helden DF, Laver DR, 'Adrenergic stimulation increases RYR2 activity via intracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ regulation', Sydney 2012 Joint AuPS/PSNZ/ASB Meeting. Programme (2012) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Dirk Vanhelden, Derek Laver
2012 Li J, Imtiaz MS, Beard NA, Dulhunty AF, Thorne RF, Van Helden DF, Laver DR, 'Adrenergic stimulation alters RyR2 regulation by Ca2+ and Mg2+', Heart, Lung and Circulation: Abstracts of ISHR Auckland Workshop (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Derek Laver, Dirk Vanhelden
2011 Ye Y, Jin L, Wilmott J, Hu WL, Thorne RF, Dong L, et al., 'Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate 5-Phosphatase A regulates PI3K/Akt signaling in human melanoma cells', Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1755-148X.2011.00909.x
Co-authors Xu Zhang, Chenchen Jiang
2011 Alkhatatbeh MJ, Mhaidat NM, Enjeti AK, Lincz LF, Thorne RF, 'Circulating plasma CD36+microparticles as a marker of type 2 diabetes and its complications', Clinical Biochemistry (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Lincz
2011 Ardjmand Ghahestani A, De Bock CE, Molloy TJ, Bone SM, Johnstone DM, Campbell DM, et al., 'Altered expression of Fat1 cadherin, a novel tumor marker for acute lymphoblastic leukemia', Clinical Biochemistry (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Lincz
2011 Sadeqzadeh E, Hersey P, Zhang XD, Debock C, Boyd A, Burns GF, Thorne RF, 'Aberrant processing of Fat1 Cadherin in human cancer', Clinical Biochemistry (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2010 Dong L, Jiang CC, Thorne RF, Yang F, Liu H, De Bock CE, et al., 'Transcriptional up-regulation of Mcl-1 by ETS1 down-stream of XBP-1 in melanoma cells upon ER stress', Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Chenchen Jiang, Xu Zhang
2010 Chen LH, Yang F, Tay KH, Dong L, Thorne RF, Jiang CC, et al., 'Cystatin B inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis is associated with protection of FLIPLfrom degradation by the E3 ligase itch human melanoma cells', Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1038/cdd.2010.29
Co-authors Xu Zhang, Chenchen Jiang
2010 Yang XM, Chen LH, Jiang CC, De Bock CE, Thorne RF, Hersey P, Zhang XD, '40p53 is up-regulated and plays a role in antagonizing p53-mediated apoptosis in human melanoma', Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Chenchen Jiang, Xu Zhang
2010 Zhang XD, Jiang CC, Lai F, Croft A, Tay KH, Thorne RF, et al., 'Apoptotic response of mutant B-RAF human melanoma cells to a B-RAF inhibitor involves increased splicing production of BimS', AACR 101st Annual Meeting 2010. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Chenchen Jiang, Xu Zhang
2010 Salum De Oliveira C, Yan XG, Hersey P, Zhang XD, Thorne RF, 'The role of MIF signaling in melanoma progression', AACR 101st Annual Meeting 2010. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Xu Zhang
2010 Jiang CC, Zhuang LQ, Dong L, Thorne RF, Lavis CJ, Hersey P, Zhang XD, 'Adaptation to ER stress as a driver of increased expression of Mcl-1 with melanoma progression', AACR 101st Annual Meeting 2010. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Xu Zhang, Chenchen Jiang
2010 Tseng HY, Jiang CC, Croft A, Tay KH, Yang F, Liu H, et al., 'Contrasting effects of nutlin-3 on TRAIL- and docetaxel-induced apoptosis in human melanoma cells', Melanoma 2010 Congress. Oral and Poster Abstracts (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-10-0646
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Chenchen Jiang, Xu Zhang
2001 Law E, Thorne RF, Zhang XY, Burns GF, Boyd A, 'Fat Protocadherin as a Mechanical Regulator of Melanoma Cell Migration', Melanoma Research (2001) [E3]
Show 18 more conferences
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed8
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2007 Honours A novel adhesive target involved in acute lympohoblastic leukemia
Biochemistry & Cell Biology, University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2007 Honours Role of Fat1 cadherin in melanoma progression
Biochemistry & Cell Biology, University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Role of FAT1 Cadherin in Neuronal Differentiation
PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Analysis of Fat1 Cadherin and Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Acute Leukemia
PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Analysis of Post-Translational Modifications of Fat1 Cadherin
PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD The Role of MIF in Melanoma Progression
PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Biogenesis of Plasma CD36+Microparticles in Human Diabetes and the Metabolic Syndrome
PhD(Experimental Pharmacology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2008 PhD Characterisation of the Multifunctional Protein, CREAP
PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2005 Honours Role of Fat1 cadherin in breast cancer metastasis
Biochemistry & Cell Biology, University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2002 PhD TBA
Medical Science, Unknown
Co-Supervisor
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News

brain cancer biobank

Brain cancer biobank

October 29, 2014

A new "biobank" for brain cancer is being established at the Hunter Medical Research Institute courtesy of funding from the Mark Hughes Foundation (MHF).

Molecule may hold key to melanoma progression

Molecule may hold key to melanoma progression

February 27, 2013

The search for new pathways to treat melanoma has unearthed a molecular target that may play an important activation role in tumour growth, according to University of Newcastle researchers.

Dr Rick Thorne

Position

HCRA Advanced Technical Support Officer
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Medical Biochemistry

Contact Details

Email rick.thorne@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4349 4926
Fax (02) 4042 0030

Office

Room W3-025
Building HMRI - Level 3 West
Location JHH site

,
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