Miss Rhanee Rego

Miss Rhanee Rego

Casual Academic

Newcastle Law School

Career Summary

Biography

Rhanee joined Newcastle Law School as a sessional academic in early 2020. She has taught in the areas of property and tort law, legal system and method, and has been a guest lecturer on matters involving criminal law and ethics.

Rhanee is a solicitor of the Supreme Court of New South Wales and the High Court of Australia. Rhanee works for a private firm working on a pro bono basis in the area of criminal law. She has also worked previously in the areas of personal injury and workers compensation, insurance and superannuation, employment and industrial relations, administrative law and dealt with a range of novel contractual disputes. Rhanee also previously worked for the Older Persons Legal Clinic at Newcastle Law School where she provided free legal advice and representation to older people in the Newcastle and Central Coast regions. 

Rhanee is a PhD candidate at the University of Newcastle. She was awarded a Commonwealth Scholarship to undertake her doctoral studies. Her PhD research is a critical analysis of post-conviction review mechanisms in New South Wales. As a result of Rhanee’s direct involvement in post-conviction review as a solicitor, she is evaluating the effectiveness of existing post-conviction review mechanisms and considering proposals for reform. Rhanee has assisted Kathleen Folbigg for a number of years, including acting for her in an Inquiry into her convictions in 2019. In March 2021 (and separately to her work with Newcastle Law School), Rhanee co-authored a petition calling on the Governor of NSW to pardon Kathleen Folbigg based on the fact there are natural causes of death for each of Folbigg children and new genetic evidence revealed a lethal cardiac mutation in the two Folbigg girls. 

Outside of Rhanee’s doctoral research, she has varied scholarly interests that span across multiple areas of the law, including research into the impact of investigative genetic genealogy on due process in criminal investigations. 


Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Laws (Honours) / Diploma of Legal Practice, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Social Science, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Criminal Law
  • Miscarriages of Justice
  • Post-Conviction Review

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
Newcastle Law School
Australia
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
Newcastle Law School
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
LAWS6000 Legal System and Method I
Newcastle Law School, University of Newcastle, Australia
Co-Lecturer and Course Assistant 16/6/2020 - 20/7/2020
LAWS1003A Torts - Part A
Newcastle Law School, University of Newcastle, Australia
Workshop Teacher 1/3/2020 - 1/7/2020
LAWS4011 Property
Newcastle Law School, University of Newcastle, Australia
Workshop Teacher 1/8/2020 - 31/12/2020
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Rego R, Anderson J, 'Due process implications of law enforcement agencies using Investigative Genetic Genealogy to solve serious crimes', Alternative Law Journal, (2021)

Investigative Genetic Genealogy (IGG) has opened up new frontiers in the search for the perpetrators of serious crimes. The pool of data held by consumer DNA databases has enabled... [more]

Investigative Genetic Genealogy (IGG) has opened up new frontiers in the search for the perpetrators of serious crimes. The pool of data held by consumer DNA databases has enabled law enforcement agencies to undertake database matching to find biological relatives of an unknown perpetrator. This relatively new forensic practice is not, however, without concerns when benchmarked against established norms of investigative practice and criminal procedure. The critical questions emerge: how should IGG be used and in what circumstances? In this article, we contend that the current laws in Australia are not capable of regulating IGG appropriately and legislative reform is required.

DOI 10.1177/1037969X211007239
Co-authors John Anderson

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Rego R, Anderson J, 'Thinking of giving your DNA to a genealogy company? You might want to think again', (2020) [O1]
Co-authors John Anderson
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Miss Rhanee Rego

Positions

Casual Academic
Newcastle Law School
College of Human and Social Futures

Casual Project Officer/Legal Practitioner
Newcastle Law School
College of Human and Social Futures

Contact Details

Email rhanee.rego@newcastle.edu.au
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