Mr Prince Atorkey

Mr Prince Atorkey

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

Prince is currently pursuing a PhD in Behavioral Science In Relation to Medicine in the School of Medicine and Public Health and Hunter New England-Population Health. His PhD thesis is focused on multiple health risk behaviours among vocational education students. Prince has an interest in conducting researches that translates into the modification of individual, community, and organizational  health risk behaviours.

Prince is a Clinical psychologist and previously was an adjunct lecturer at the Department of Psychology, Regent University College of Science and Technology, Accra teaching undergraduate courses in psychology. He was also a Graduate Teaching and Research Assistant at the Department of Psychology, University of Ghana, Legon where he assisted Lecturers in teaching numerous undergraduate courses in Psychology.

Prior to commencing his PhD, Prince completed a Master of Philosophy degree in Clinical Psychology with the University of Ghana, Legon and a Bachelor of Science degree (Honours) in Psychology with the University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast.

His previous research work have been in the area of illness perception and medication adherence among adolescents with sickle cell patients and adults with diabetes.

Teaching Expertise

Prince has taught first and final year undergraduate students Introduction to General Psychology and Criminal Psychology respectively at the Regent University College of Science and Technology. In his role as a graduate teaching and research assistant, he assisted in teaching courses such as Statistics for Psychologist, Psychology for everyday living, Social psychology, Applied Social Psychology, Biological psychology, Test and Measurement, Experimental psychology and Cognitive psychology.


Keywords

  • Behavioural Science
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Epidemiology
  • Health Psychology
  • Medication adherence
  • chronic conditions
  • health promotion
  • illness Perception
  • implementation science
  • mental health
  • multiple health risk behaviours
  • nutrition
  • obesity
  • physical activity
  • public health
  • risky alcohol consumption
  • smoking

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/2016 - 6/11/2017 Lecturer Regent University College of Science and Technology
Department of Psychology and Human Development
Ghana
1/8/2015 - 9/11/2017 Graduate Teaching and Research Assistant University of Ghana
Department of Psychology
Ghana

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
4/3/2020 -  Tutor School of Medicine & Public Health, Faculty of Health & Medicine, University of Newcastle | Australia
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
SOPS 1513 Introduction to General Psychology
Regent University College of Science and Technology
The course introduces the psychological study of human behavior and experience. The history, scope and methods of contemporary psychology are described. Topics include: schools of psychology, goals of psychology, principles of learning and memory, applied areas of psychology.
Lecturer 9/1/2017 - 7/8/2017
SOPS 4683 Criminal Psychology
Regent University College of Science and Technology
This course examines the interaction of psychology and the legal system. The course focuses on the use of psychological assessments in court issues of criminal responsibility and predicting dangerousness, insanity, eyewitness testimony, police interrogation, lie detection, offender rehabilitation, jury decision making, and criminal profiling. In addition the course will equip students to be in a position to evaluate the relationship between mental health and criminal behaviour and effective techniques for rehabilitating offenders.
Teaching Undergraduate Students Criminal Pschology 1/11/2016 - 7/11/2017
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Atorkey P, Akwei M, Asare-Doku W, 'Consumption of carbonated soft drinks among Ghanaian adolescents: associations with socio-demographic factors, health risk factors and psychological distress', Nutrition and Health, (2021)

Background: Carbonated soft drinks consumption is associated with weight gain and other chronic diseases. Aim: To examine whether socio-demographic factors, health risk factors an... [more]

Background: Carbonated soft drinks consumption is associated with weight gain and other chronic diseases. Aim: To examine whether socio-demographic factors, health risk factors and psychological distress are associated with carbonated soft drink consumption among adolescents in selected senior high schools in Ghana. Methods: Data were obtained from the 2012 Ghana Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS). Participants consisted of 1756 school-going adolescents sampled using a two-stage cluster sampling method. Binomial logistic regression was used to determine whether socio-demographic factors, health risk factors and psychological distress were associated with consumption of soft drinks. Results: The prevalence of carbonated soft drinks consumption was 34.9%. Males (odds ratio (OR) = 0.73 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59¿0.92); p = 0.007), and participants with high socio-economic status (OR = 0.76 (95% CI 0.48¿0.97); p = 0.033) had smaller odds for consumption of soft drinks. Also, adolescents in Senior High School (SHS) 3 (OR = 0.72 (95% CI 0.53¿0.97); p = 0.034) and SHS 4 (OR = 0.63 (95% CI 0.43¿0.91); p = 0.014) had smaller odds for soft drinks intake compared to those in SHS 1. Health risk factors associated with greater odds of high soft drink consumption were tobacco use (OR = 1.68, (95% CI 1.07¿2.65); p = 0.025), fast food consumption (OR = 1.88, (95% CI 1.47¿2.41); p = 0.011) and alcohol consumption (OR = 1.43, (95% CI 1.02¿1.99); p = 0.039). Consuming adequate fruit (OR = 0.19 (95% CI 0.15¿0.24); p = 0.000) and adequate vegetable (OR = 0.55 (95% CI 0.34¿0.87); p = 0.011) were associated with lower odds for soft drink consumption. Adolescents who reported feeling anxious had smaller odds for soft drink intake (OR = 0.65, (95% CI 0.47¿0.91); p = 0.011). Conclusions: The findings from this study show that socio-demographic characteristics, health risk factors and psychological distress are associated with the soft drink consumption among adolescents in Ghana. Interventions aimed at reducing soft drink consumption and other health risk factors are needed.

DOI 10.1177/0260106021996933
Co-authors Winifred Asaredoku Uon
2021 Atorkey P, Paul C, Bonevski B, Wiggers J, Mitchell A, Byrnes E, et al., 'Uptake of Proactively Offered Online and Telephone Support Services Targeting Multiple Health Risk Behaviors Among Vocational Education Students: Process Evaluation of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.', J Med Internet Res, 23 e19737 (2021)
DOI 10.2196/19737
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski, John Wiggers
2021 Atorkey P, Asante KO, 'Clustering of multiple health risk factors among a sample of adolescents in Liberia: a latent class analysis', Journal of Public Health (Germany), (2021)

Aim: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are associated with modifiable health risk factors. There is a lack of evidence regarding clusters of health-related behaviours among school-... [more]

Aim: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are associated with modifiable health risk factors. There is a lack of evidence regarding clusters of health-related behaviours among school-going adolescents from sub-Saharan Africa. This study was conducted to identify clustering patterns of health risk factors (i.e. smoking tobacco, inadequate fruit intake, inadequate vegetable intake, physical inactivity, sedentary behaviour, anxiety and depression) and association with sociodemographic factors among school-going adolescents in Liberia. Subject and methods: The 2017 Liberian Global School-based Student Health Survey on 2774 adolescents aged 11¿years and above (52.5% females) sampled with a two-stage cluster sample design was used. Latent class analysis was used to generate the clusters and latent class regression assessed the associations between sociodemographic factors and the clusters. Results: We identified three clusters labelled as (1) ¿low substance use, moderately active cluster¿ (34.8%); (2) ¿inadequate fruit and vegetable cluster¿ (48.9%) and (3) ¿risk taking cluster¿ (16.3%)¿. Compared to cluster 1, adolescent boys [AOR = 1.71, 1.29¿2.27, p < 0.001], and those in grade 10¿12 [AOR = 1.51, 1.13¿2.02, p < 0.001] were more likely to belong to cluster 2. Participants aged 15¿years and above [AOR = 0.60, 0.39¿0.91, p = 0.018] were less likely to belong to cluster 2. Compared to cluster 1, adolescents aged 15¿years and above [AOR = 3.58, 1.33¿9.62, p = 0.011] and those with low socio-economic status [AOR = 1.83, 1.22¿2.73, p = 0.003] were more likely to belong to cluster 3. Conclusion: These results underscore the need for interventions that address adolescent multiple health risk factors, especially considering sociodemographic differences.

DOI 10.1007/s10389-020-01465-y
2021 Atorkey P, Byaruhanga J, Paul C, Wiggers J, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, 'Multiple Health Risk Factors in Vocational Education Students: A Systematic Review.', Int J Environ Res Public Health, 18 (2021)
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18020637
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, John Wiggers, Billie Bonevski
2021 Atorkey P, Owiredua C, 'Clustering of multiple health risk behaviours and association with socio-demographic characteristics and psychological distress among adolescents in Ghana: A latent class analysis', SSM - Population Health, 13 (2021)

This study examined the prevalence of multiple health risk behaviours, the clustering patterns of health risk behaviours, the association between socio-demographic characteristics... [more]

This study examined the prevalence of multiple health risk behaviours, the clustering patterns of health risk behaviours, the association between socio-demographic characteristics, psychological distress and clusters and the relationship between number of health risk behaviours and psychological distress among adolescents in Ghana. Participants were senior high school (SHS) students aged 11¿19 years who participated in the 2012 Global School-based Students Health Survey (n = 1763). Five health risk behaviours (smoking tobacco, inadequate fruit intake, inadequate vegetable intake, alcohol intake and physical inactivity) were measured. Participants were classified to be at risk if they indicated they smoked tobacco, did not eat fruit = 2 times a day and vegetables = 5 a day, drank alcohol during the past 30 days and did not engage in physical activity for = 60 min per day during the past 7 days. Latent class analysis and latent regression were used to identify the clusters and factors associated with the clusters respectively. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between number of health risk behaviours and psychological distress. The prevalence of multiple health risk behaviours (2 or more) was 94.8%. Two clusters emerged: Cluster 1 (¿Poor nutrition, inactive, low substance use cluster¿; 91%); Cluster 2 (¿High Risk Cluster¿; 9%). Using cluster 1 as a reference group, adolescents in the 11¿15 years category had lower odds of belonging to cluster 2 (OR = 0.21 CI 0.05¿0.91, ¿ = 0.036) while those experiencing symptoms of depression had higher odds of belonging to cluster 2 (OR = 2.45 CI 1.45¿4.14, ¿ = 0.001). No significant relationship was found between number of health risk behaviour and psychological distress. Health risk behaviours cluster among adolescents with age and depression associated with the identified clusters. Early interventions that target these clusters are needed at the individual, school and community level to mitigate the burden of non-communicable diseases.

DOI 10.1016/j.ssmph.2020.100707
2020 Byaruhanga J, Atorkey P, McLaughlin M, Brown A, Byrnes E, Paul C, et al., 'Effectiveness of individual real-time video counseling on smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity, and obesity health risks: Systematic review', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22 1-17 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/18621
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, John Wiggers
2019 Atorkey P, Owiredua C, Mohammed Z, Gyimah FT, 'Physical activity and sedentary behaviour research in Ghana: A systematic review protocol', Global Epidemiology, 1 100010-100010 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.gloepi.2019.100010
2018 Owiredua C, Quarshie EN-B, Atorkey P, Lam LT, 'Living with diabetes: An exploratory study of illness representation and medication adherence in Ghana', Cogent Medicine, 5 1463599-1463599 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/2331205x.2018.1463599
Byaruhanga J, Atorkey P, McLaughlin M, Brown A, Byrnes E, Paul C, et al., 'Effectiveness of Individual Real-Time Video Counseling on Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical Activity, and Obesity Health Risks: Systematic Review (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.18621
Co-authors Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Chris Paul, John Wiggers
Atorkey P, Paul C, Bonevski B, Wiggers J, Mitchell A, Byrnes E, et al., 'Uptake of Proactively Offered Online and Telephone Support Services Targeting Multiple Health Risk Behaviors Among Vocational Education Students: Process Evaluation of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.19737
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, John Wiggers, Chris Paul
Show 7 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Atorkey P, Tzelepis F, Paul C, Bonevski B, Wiggers J, Mitchell A, Byrnes E, 'Uptake of Proactively Offered Online and Telephone Interventions Targeting Health Risk Behaviours amongst Technical and Further Education (TAFE) Students', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, John Wiggers, Flora Tzelepis
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $6,572

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20201 grants / $4,072

Acceptace of Proactively offered Online and Telephone Support Services Targeting Multiple Health Risk Behaviours Among Vocational Education Students$4,072

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Beharviour (PRCHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Beharviour (PRCHB)
Project Team

Prince Atorkey

Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20191 grants / $2,500

Barriers and facilitators to the uptake of online and telephone support services targeting multiple health risk behaviours: A qualitative study $2,500

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviors

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviors
Project Team

Prince Atorkey, A/Prof. Flora Tzelepis, Prof. Christine Paul, Prof, Billie Bonevski, Prof. John Wiggers

Scheme the university of newcastle
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
Edit

Mr Prince Atorkey

Contact Details

Email prince.atorkey@uon.edu.au
Edit