Dr Peter Sanderson

Dr Peter Sanderson

Research Associate

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

Peter has worked in soil chemistry related research for over six years. The focus of his research has been in the area of environmental assessment and remediation. He completed a Bachelor of Environmental Science in 2005 at Adelaide University and later completed Honours at UniSA examining the Ecotoxicity of Lead using a Multispecies Soil System. He received first class honours and a UniSA medal for academic achievement.

In 2009 Peter received a Scholarship from CRC CARE to undertake PhD studies, supervised by Professor Ravi Naidu. His thesis topic was 'Chemical stabilization of lead in shooting range soils'. The project examined in situ management of heavy metals in soil, examining the role of soil properties and soil amendments on bioavailability. After being awarded his doctorate in 2013 he went on to do further research on optimisation of chemical stabilisation of heavy metals in soil. He has published several papers on aspects of this work including site characterisation, ecotoxicity and bioaccessibility investigations. 

In 2015 Peter commenced a position at the University of Newcastle as a Research Associate. The focus of his current research is on assessment and management of metal contaminated soils using a risk-based approach.



Qualifications

  • PhD, University of South Australia
  • Bachelor of Environmental Science, University of Adelaide

Keywords

  • Bioavailability
  • Chemical stabilization
  • Lead
  • Soil chemistry

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050207 Environmental Rehabilitation (excl. Bioremediation) 35
050304 Soil Chemistry (excl. Carbon Sequestration Science) 30
050206 Environmental Monitoring 35

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
2/09/2013 - 2/04/2015 Post Doctoral Resarch

Post Doctor Research on Optimising the Application of Phosphorus for Chemical Stabilisation of Shooting Range Soil - Funded by CRC CARE

University of South Australia
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Basak BB, Sarkar B, Biswas DR, Sarkar S, Sanderson P, Naidu R, 'Bio-Intervention of Naturally Occurring Silicate Minerals for Alternative Source of Potassium: Challenges and Opportunities 115-145 (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Soil needs simultaneous replenishment of various nutrients to maintain its inherent fertility status under extensive cropping systems. Replenishing soil nutr... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Soil needs simultaneous replenishment of various nutrients to maintain its inherent fertility status under extensive cropping systems. Replenishing soil nutrients with commercial fertilizer is costly. Among various fertilizers, deposits of potassium (K) ore suitable for the production of commercial K fertilizer (KCl) are distributed in few northern hemisphere countries (Canada, Russia, Belarus, and Germany) which control more than 70% of the world's potash market. Naturally occurring minerals, particularly silicate minerals, could be used as a source of K, but not as satisfactorily as commercial K fertilizers. In this context, bio-intervention (in combination with microorganisms and/or composting) of silicate minerals has been found quite promising to improve plant K availability and assimilation. This is an energy efficient and environmentally friendly approach. Here we present a critical review of existing literature on direct application of silicate minerals as a source of K for plant nutrition as well as soil fertility enhancement by underpinning the bio-intervention strategies and related K solubilization mechanisms. An advancement of knowledge in this field will not only contribute to a better understanding of the complex natural processes of soil K fertility, but also help to develop a new approach to utilize natural mineral resources for sustainable and environmental friendly agricultural practices.

DOI 10.1016/bs.agron.2016.10.016
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Naidu R, Sanderson P, 'Novel risk-based approaches to derelict mine management', Journal of Health, Safety and Environment, 33 (2017)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'Application of a biodegradable chelate to enhance subsequent chemical stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils', JOURNAL OF SOILS AND SEDIMENTS, 17 1696-1705 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11368-016-1608-x
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2017 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Sanderson P, Wang H, et al., 'Potential value of phosphate compounds in enhancing immobilization and reducing bioavailability of mixed heavy metal contaminants in shooting range soil', Chemosphere, 184 197-206 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Shooting range soils contain mixed heavy metal contaminants including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). Phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobi... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Shooting range soils contain mixed heavy metal contaminants including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). Phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobilize these metals, particularly Pb, thereby reducing their bioavailability. However, research on immobilization of Pb's co-contaminants showed the relative importance of soluble and insoluble P compounds, which is critical in evaluating the overall success of in situ stabilization practice in the sustainable remediation of mixed heavy metal contaminated soils. Soluble synthetic P fertilizer (diammonium phosphate; DAP) and reactive (Sechura; SPR) and unreactive (Christmas Island; CPR) natural phosphate rocks (PR) were tested for Cd, Pb and Zn immobilization and later their mobility and bioavailability in a shooting range soil. The addition of P compounds resulted in the immobilization of Cd, Pb and Zn by 1.56¿76.2%, 3.21¿83.56%, and 2.31¿74.6%, respectively. The reactive SPR significantly reduced Cd, Pb and Zn leaching while soluble DAP increased their leachate concentrations. The SPR reduced the bioaccumulation of Cd, Pb and Zn in earthworms by 7.13¿23.4% and 14.3¿54.6% in comparison with earthworms in the DAP and control treatment, respectively. Bioaccessible Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations as determined using a simplified bioaccessibility extraction test showed higher long-term stability of P-immobilized Pb and Zn than Cd. The differential effect of P-induced immobilization between P compounds and metals is due to the variation in the solubility characteristics of P compounds and nature of metal phosphate compounds formed. Therefore, Pb and Zn immobilization by P compounds is an effective long-term remediation strategy for mixed heavy metal contaminated soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.05.172
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2016 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'The effect of environmental conditions and soil physicochemistry on phosphate stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils', Journal of Environmental Management, 170 123-130 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied. Stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined in four soils under different environmental conditions.The effect of soil moisture and temperature on stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined by measurement of water extractable and bioaccessible Pb, sequential fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The addition of humic acid, ammonium nitrate and chloride was also examined for inhibition or improvement of Pb stability with phosphate treatment.The effect of moisture level varied between soils. In soil MB and DA a soil moisture level of 50% water holding capacity was sufficient to maximise stabilisation of Pb, but in soil TV and PE reduction in bioaccessible Pb was inhibited at this moisture level. Providing moisture at twice the soil water holding capacity did not enhance the effect of phosphate on Pb stabilisation. The difference of Pb stability as a result of incubating phosphate treated soils at 18 °C and 37 °C was relatively small. However wet-dry cycles decreased the effectiveness of phosphate treatment. The reduction in bioaccessible Pb obtained was between 20 and 40% with the most optimal treatment conditions. The reduction in water extractable Pb by phosphate was substantial regardless of incubation conditions and the effect of different temperature and soil moisture regimes was not significant.Selective sequential extraction showed phosphate treatment converted Pb in fraction 1 (exchangeable, acid and water soluble) to fraction 2 (reducible). There were small difference in fraction 4 (residual) Pb and fraction 1 as a result of treatment conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of stabilised PE soil revealed small differences in Pb speciation under varying soil moisture and temperature treatments. The addition of humic acid and chloride produced the greatest effect on Pb speciation in phosphate treated soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.01.017
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2015 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, Lim JE, Ok YS, 'Chemical stabilisation of lead in shooting range soils with phosphate and magnesium oxide: Synchrotron investigation', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 299 395-403 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.06.056
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2015 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'Effectiveness of chemical amendments for stabilisation of lead and antimony in risk-based land management of soils of shooting ranges', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8942-8956 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1918-0
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2014 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'Ecotoxicity of chemically stabilised metal(loid)s in shooting range soils', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 100 201-208 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2013.11.003
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2013 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'Effectiveness of chemical amendments for stabilisation of lead and antimony in risk-based land management of soils of shooting ranges', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 1-15 (2013)

This study aims to examine the effectiveness of amendments for risk-based land management of shooting range soils and to explore the effectiveness of amendments applied to sites w... [more]

This study aims to examine the effectiveness of amendments for risk-based land management of shooting range soils and to explore the effectiveness of amendments applied to sites with differing soil physiochemical parameters. A series of amendments with differing mechanisms for stabilisation were applied to four shooting range soils and aged for 1¿year. Chemical stabilisation was monitored by pore water extraction, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and the physiologically based extraction test (PBET) over 1¿year. The performance of amendments when applied in conditions reflecting field application did not match the performance in the batch studies. Pore water-extractable metals were not greatly affected by amendment addition. TCLP-extractable Pb was reduced significantly by amendments, particularly lime and magnesium oxide. Antimony leaching was reduced by red mud but mobilised by some of the other amendments. Bioaccessible Pb measured by PBET shows that bioaccessible Pb increased with time after an initial decrease due to the presence of metallic fragments in the soil. Amendments were able to reduce bioaccessible Pb by up to 50¿%. Bioaccessible Sb was not readily reduced by soil amendments. Soil amendments were not equally effective across the four soils. © 2013 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Australia.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1918-0
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, Bowman M, Mclure S, 'Effect of soil type on distribution and bioaccessibility of metal contaminants in shooting range soils', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 438 452-462 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.08.014
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2012 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, Bowman M, 'Critical review on chemical stabilization of metal contaminants in shooting range soils', Journal of Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste, 16 258-272 (2012)

Shooting ranges have come under increased scrutiny in recent years as a potential source of contamination owing to the high loading of lead in the soil. Stabilization by the addit... [more]

Shooting ranges have come under increased scrutiny in recent years as a potential source of contamination owing to the high loading of lead in the soil. Stabilization by the addition of chemical amendments has been examined as a viable risk-based approach to managing shooting range contamination. Amendments have been shown to immobilize metals to varying degrees, determined by the target contaminant, the amendment used, soil properties, and the reaction kinetics in the contaminated soil and amendment system. Field scale evaluation of the effectiveness of chemical amendments for the stabilization of metal contaminants in shooting range soil is limited. Doubt remains over effectiveness and long-term stability under the varying conditions found in the field, which affect the kinetics of immobilization and dissolution in amended soil. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers.

DOI 10.1061/(ASCE)HZ.2153-5515.0000113
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $208,042

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $95,077

Field scale research for parameter optimisation of shooting range remediation technology for strongly weathered clay rich tropical soils, - MSTA Townsville, Australia$95,077

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Peter Sanderson, Srinivasan Ranganathan
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700314
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

20162 grants / $112,965

Measurement, Bioavailability and Exposure Characterisation of Beryllium Sourced from the Little Forest Burial Ground Legacy Waste Site, Sydney$94,965

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Peter Sanderson, Doctor Morrow Dong
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700311
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

NSW Mine Rehabilitation$18,000

Funding body: NSW Minerals Council

Funding body NSW Minerals Council
Project Team Professor Richard Bush, Doctor Dane Lamb, Doctor Peter Sanderson
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600975
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Rehabilitation of Mining Impacted Farmland to Ensure Food Security in Thai Nguyen Province, Vietnam PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Peter Sanderson

Position

Research Associate
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email peter.sanderson@newcastle.edu.au
Links Research Networks
Research Networks

Office

Room ATC
Building Advanced Technology Centre.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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