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Associate Professor Peter Howley

Associate Professor

School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences (Statistics)

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise

Dr Howley is Assistant Dean (Outreach) for Faculty of Science, Science and Technology Australia STEM Ambassador, and an Associate Professor in Statistics who is nationally and internationally recognised as a leader and award winning academic in Statistics and Education and broader fields of statistical application.

Dr Howley's primary research focuses on Bayesian hierarchical modeling and its application to foster quality improvement activity in health care, through improved methods for analysing, reporting and monitoring clinical indicator data. Dr Howley’s research addresses performance measurement and systems improvement which also extends beyond the health care field, with publications, grants and consulting spanning the fields of education, business, management and industry. This has involved collaborative work with the Australian Council on Health Care Standards, Health Services Research Group, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan Health and other universities resulting in many invited conference presentations nationally and internationally.

Dr Howley is a 2018 Statistical Society of Australia Service Award winner, 2018 Science and Technology Australia STEM Ambassador, 2017 International Statistical Institute's Best Cooperative Project Award Winner, 2015 National Award Winner (Office for Learning and Teaching Citation) and 2014 UoN Vice-Chancellor’s Award Winner for Teaching Excellence and Contribution to Student Learning (University-wide). Dr Howley leads the Statistical Education Section of the National Statistical Society of Australia, coordinates the national delivery of a schools and undergraduate poster competition enhancing statistics and data science, and sits on the International Advisory Boards for the International Statistical Literacy Project and the Data Science in Schools Project.

Dr Howley is a member of the Priority Research Centre CARMA, as well as NIER and HMRI, at The University of Newcastle and serves on international editorial boards and conference committees.

Teaching Expertise
Dr Howley has taught all levels of undergraduate Statistics courses and courses for Master of Statistics and MBA programs, both on-campus and online. His expertise lies with teaching statistical courses (including introductory courses, regression, experimental and questionnaire design, quality improvement courses, Total Quality Management, integrated STEM), particularly to non-statistically minded people, and has resulted in a National Teaching Award from the Office of Learning and Teaching in 2015.

Dr Howley's expertise covers Statistics, STEM, Total Quality Management, Statistical Quality Control, Business Statistics and Business Research Methods. Dr Howley designed and presented two-day seminars on Continuous Improvement to organisations as well as creating and coordinating the inaugural delivery of the Statistic's Disciplines first online (web-based) course, Total Quality Management.

Administrative Expertise

  • Section Chair in Statistical Society of Australia Inc
  • International Advisory Board
  • Executive Board Hunter Innovation in Science Hub
  • Assistant Dean (Faculty of Science)
  • Conference committee.
  • Editorial Board of International Journals.
  • Coordinator and chair of conference sessions.
  • Head of Discipline.
  • Membership of School and Faculty Boards.
  • Statistics' Honours and Research Higher Degree Programme Coordinator. 
  • Large course coordination (on-campus and web-based).

Collaborations

  • Health Services Research Group and Australian Council on Healthcare Standards - Bayesian Modelling, Measuring and Reporting on Clinical Indicators
  • Taipei Medical University (Dr Sheuwen Chuang) - Systems thinking and Total Quality Management in Health Care
  • UQ, USyd, JCU, UoW, UTas, and School of Education, UoN (Dr Elena Prieto) - Enhancing the Training of Mathematics and Science Teachers
  • Schools of Education and Engineering, UoN - Building STEM students' numeracy for success in higher education
  • School of Education, UoN (A/Prof Ruth Reynolds, Dr Erica Southgate) - Reflecting upon and assessing education programs

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Mathematics, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Mathematics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Statistics
  • Research Methods
  • Business Statistics
  • Clinical indicators
  • Quality Improvement
  • Statistical Education
  • Statistical modelling
  • Performance indicators
  • Total Quality Management
  • Bayesian hierarchical models

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
010401 Applied Statistics 60
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 20
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
27/12/2016 - 27/01/2020 Associate Professor Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Australia
1/01/2007 -  Co-Section Chair of Statistical Education Statistical Society of Australia Inc.
Australia
1/01/2003 - 1/12/2005 Section Chair of Medical Statistics Statistical Society of Australia Inc.
Australia
1/01/2002 -  Editorial Board - Statistical Society of Australia Inc. Statistical Society of Australia Inc.
Australia
1/01/2000 - 1/11/2001 Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Australia
1/01/1999 - 1/12/1999 Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
Business and Law
Australia
1/01/1995 - 1/02/1998 Research Statistician Health Services Research Group
Statistics Department
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Section Chair of Medical Statistics Statistical Society of Autralia Inc.
Australia
1/10/2016 -  Section Chair - Statistical Education

Creator and Annual Coordinator - www.ssaipostercomp.info/" target="_blank">National Schools Poster Competition; from 2018 expanding to include Undergraduate Division

Statistical Society of Australia Inc.
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/1994 - 1/02/1994 Assistant to Group Quality Manager AmpControl Pty Ltd
Quality Management- Consultant

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 International Statistical Institute's Best Cooperative Project Award
International Statistical Institute
2017 Faculty of Science Collaboration Excellence Award
Faculty of Science and Information Technology
2015 Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning
Office for Learning and Teaching

Distinction

Year Award
2014 VC Award for Teaching Excellence and Contributions to Student Learning
Unknown

Recognition

Year Award
2014 Faculty S&IT Service Teaching Award
Unknown
2004 Peter Reizenstein Prize
Unknown
2004 Faculty of Science and IT's teaching award
Unknown

Research Award

Year Award
2000 Conference poster award
Unknown

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2004 Australian Statistical Conference 2004
Organisation: Statistical Society of Australia Inc. Description: Invited Speaker at XXIInd International Biometric Conference/Australian Statistical Conference, Cairns, Australia, July 2004. Australian Statistical Conference Invited Session "Surveillance & Monitoring in Health Care"

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2014 International Conference Australian Statistics Conference 2014 - Statistics Education
Organisation: Statistical Society of Australia Inc
2011 Combined Taiwan Department of Health and Taipei Medical University Conference on national health quality indicators, Taiwan
Organisation: Taiwan Department of Health and Taipei Medical University Description: Systems approaches to improving healthcare using clinical indicators, Conference on national health quality indicators, Taiwan, Nov, 2011. Invited (and funded travel) as part of the Department of Health, Taiwan, and Taipei Medical University integration program of national health quality indicators
2010 Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan - Experiences south of the equator
Organisation: Taichung University Description: Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan, Nov, 2010
2009 Australian Teaching and Learning Council National Forum: Building networks in statistics education
Organisation: Australian Teaching and Learning Council Description: Australian Teaching and Learning Council National Forum: Building networks in statistics education, February, 2009, QUT, Brisbane, Aust.
2008 NSW SSAI's 'Workshop on integrating statistical ideas in mathematics'
Organisation: NSW SSAI Description: NSW Branch of the SSAI's Workshop on integrating statistical ideas in mathematics, Macquarie Graduate School of Management Conference Centre, NSW, Aust, August, 2008, discussing professional development of mathematics teachers in statistics
2008 Combined QUT - St Andrew's Medical Institute collaborative industry/academic workshop, Driving excellence in clinical outcomes: methods for monitoring and influencing change workshop
Organisation: St Andrew's Medical Institute and QUT Description: Combined Queensland University of Technology - St Andrew's Medical Institute collaborative industry/academic workshop, Driving excellence in clinical outcomes: methods for monitoring and influencing change workshop
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Gibberd RW, Howley PP, Hancock S, Bichel-Findlay J, O'Connor L, Maxwell C, et al., Australasian Clinical Indicator Report: 2001-2009. Determining the Potential to Improve Quality of Care: 11th Edition., The Australian Council on Healthcare Standards, Sydney, Australia (2010)
Co-authors Robert Gibberd
2006 Howley PP, Gerlach R, Business Statistics in Australia: Methods & Applications, Print National, Gosford, Australia (2006) [A2]

Journal article (49 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Howley D, Howley P, Oxenham MF, 'Estimation of sex and stature using anthropometry of the upper extremity in an Australian population', FORENSIC SCIENCE INTERNATIONAL, 287 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.forsciint.2018.03.017
2017 Paterson MA, Smart CEM, Lopez PE, Howley P, McElduff P, Attia J, et al., 'Increasing the protein quantity in a meal results in dose-dependent effects on postprandial glucose levels in individuals with Type 1 diabetes mellitus', Diabetic Medicine, 34 851-854 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Diabetes UK Aim: To determine the glycaemic impact of increasing protein quantities when consumed with consistent amounts of carbohydrate in individuals with Type 1 diabete... [more]

© 2017 Diabetes UK Aim: To determine the glycaemic impact of increasing protein quantities when consumed with consistent amounts of carbohydrate in individuals with Type 1 diabetes on intensive insulin therapy. Methods: Participants with Type 1 diabetes [aged 10¿40 years, HbA1c= 64 mmol/mol (8%), BMI = 91st percentile] received a 30-g carbohydrate (negligible fat) test drink daily over 5 days in randomized order. Protein (whey isolate 0 g/kg carbohydrate, 0 g/kg lipid) was added in amounts of 0 (control), 12.5, 25, 50 and 75 g. A standardized dose of insulin was given for the carbohydrate. Postprandial glycaemia was assessed by 5 h of continuous glucose monitoring. Results: Data were collected from 27 participants (15 male). A dose¿response relationship was found with increasing amount of protein. A significant negative relationship between protein dose and mean excursion was seen at the 30- and 60-min time points (P = 0.007 and P = 0.002, respectively). No significant relationship was seen at the 90- and 120-min time points. Thereafter, the dose¿response relationship inverted, such that there was a significant positive relationship for each of the 150¿300-min time points (P < 0.004). Mean glycaemic excursions were significantly greater for all protein-added test drinks from 150 to 300 min (P < 0.005) with the 75-g protein load, resulting in a mean excursion that was 5 mmol/l higher when compared with the control test drink (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Increasing protein quantity in a low-fat meal containing consistent amounts of carbohydrate decreases glucose excursions in the early (0¿60-min) postprandial period and then increases in the later postprandial period in a dose-dependent manner.

DOI 10.1111/dme.13347
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Carmel Smart, Bruce King, Patrick Mcelduff, John Attia
2017 Chuang S, Howley PP, 'Strategies for integrating clinical indicator and accreditation systems to improve healthcare management', International Journal of Healthcare Management, 10 265-274 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/20479700.2017.1300396
2016 Reynolds R, Howley P, Southgate E, Brown J, 'Just add hours? An assessment of pre-service teachers¿ perception of the value of professional experience in attaining teacher competencies', Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, 44 455-469 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Australian Teacher Education Association. This study compared pre-service teachers¿ perceptions of their professional competencies at two campuses of a large regional teach... [more]

© 2015 Australian Teacher Education Association. This study compared pre-service teachers¿ perceptions of their professional competencies at two campuses of a large regional teacher education university, where one campus provided students 22% more hours of professional placement in schools and related educational settings. Students who had experienced more hours in schools and such settings were more positive about their, ability to apply their knowledge of students and how they learn, classroom management, professional knowledge and practice, and community engagement; however, when students felt well supported during professional experience, such differences diminished. Additional hours were not associated with pre-service teachers¿ perceptions of their ability to apply subject content and teaching; plan, assess and report; and effective student communication. Researchers argued that this pointed to the crucial role of good classroom mentors in teacher professional experience but also the value of students¿ tertiary teacher education in preparing them for classroom teaching.

DOI 10.1080/1359866X.2015.1086971
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Joanna Brown, Ruth Reynolds, Erica Southgate
2016 Tuyl FA, Howley PP, 'Simplifying Life Through Bayes: Hints for Practitioners New to Bayesian Inference', Quality Management Journal, 23 22-28 (2016) [C1]
Co-authors Frank Tuyl
2016 Howley P, Reynolds R, Southgate E, 'The Teaching Discipline doesn't Matter? An Assessment of Preservice Teachers' Perception of the Value of Professional Experience in attaining Teacher Competencies', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF TEACHER EDUCATION, 41 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.14221/ajte.2016v41n10.3
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Erica Southgate, Ruth Reynolds
2016 Buckley C, Howley P, O Donoghue C, Kilgarriff P, 'Willingness to pay for achieving good status across rivers in the Republic of Ireland', Economic and Social Review, 47 425-445 (2016)

© 2016, Economic and Social Studies. All rights reserved. The Water Framework Directive mandates EU Member States to achieve good status across all surface waters. Derogations fro... [more]

© 2016, Economic and Social Studies. All rights reserved. The Water Framework Directive mandates EU Member States to achieve good status across all surface waters. Derogations from this have to be proven based on infeasibility or disproportionate cost. This study explores public preference for water quality objectives and assesses willingness to pay (WTP) for achieving good status across all rivers in the Republic of Ireland using contingent valuation. Mean WTP for achieving full good status across rivers was estimated at ¿19 per respondent per annum. WTP was influenced by social class, subjective perceptions relating to household financial status, education, recreational use, environmental values and river basin district.

2016 Howley P, 'Subsidy streams versus a CAP bond: An assessment of farmers' preferences', Land Use Policy, 51 184-190 (2016)

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Some commentators have put forward the idea of paying farmers a one-off lump sum (commonly referred to as a CAP bond), in lieu of annual single farm payments.... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Some commentators have put forward the idea of paying farmers a one-off lump sum (commonly referred to as a CAP bond), in lieu of annual single farm payments. This would bring about real reform of the CAP, but at the same time compensate farmers for the elimination of support and give them the capacity to adjust to an unsupported world. Through the development of a contingent valuation scenario, we ascertained the types of farmers who would be most likely to voluntarily switch to this reform measure at specified payment levels. We found that older farmers and those more motivated by business related objectives are relatively more attracted to a CAP bond. Those with greater household financial security and those characterised as being more risk-averse were less likely to prefer a one-off lump sum. Overall our analysis suggests there would be a general reluctance among farm operators to take up a CAP bond even at very high payment levels.

DOI 10.1016/j.landusepol.2015.11.007
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Wang X, Howley P, Boxall AB, Rudd MA, 'Behavior, preferences and willingness to pay for measures aimed at preventing pollution by pharmaceuticals and personal care products in China', Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management, (2016)

© 2015 SETAC. The release of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) into the environment has been held up as a potential threat to ecosystem and human health. Using a ... [more]

© 2015 SETAC. The release of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) into the environment has been held up as a potential threat to ecosystem and human health. Using a custom-designed survey of residents living in Xiamen, China, this paper examines individuals' disposal practices, awareness of the environmental impact of PPCPs, and willingness to pay for measures aimed at reducing the likelihood of PPCPs being released into the environment. The vast majority of respondents report that they dispose of PPCPs through the thrash. The results of a contingent valuation experiment suggest a substantial willingness to pay (WTP) for policy measures aimed at reducing PPCP pollution. Income as well as subjective perceptions relating to overall financial health, expenditure on PPCPs, and overall concern with environmental issues emerged as significant predictors of respondents' WTP. Our results should be of interest to policymakers looking for ways to mitigate the introduction of PPCPs in the environment. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;9999:XX-XX.

DOI 10.1002/ieam.1746
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Chuang S, Howley PP, Lin S-H, 'Implementing systems thinking for infection prevention: The cessation of repeated scabies outbreaks in a respiratory care ward', American Journal of Infection Control, (2015) [C1]

Background: Root cause analysis (RCA) is often adopted to complement epidemiologic investigation for outbreaks and infection-related adverse events in hospitals; however, RCA has ... [more]

Background: Root cause analysis (RCA) is often adopted to complement epidemiologic investigation for outbreaks and infection-related adverse events in hospitals; however, RCA has been argued to have limited effectiveness in preventing such events. We describe how an innovative systems analysis approach halted repeated scabies outbreaks, and highlight the importance of systems thinking for outbreaks analysis and sustaining effective infection prevention and control. Methods: Following RCA for a third successive outbreak of scabies over a 17-month period in a 60-bed respiratory care ward of a Taiwan hospital, a systems-oriented event analysis (SOEA) model was used to reanalyze the outbreak. Both approaches and the recommendations were compared. Results: No nosocomial scabies have been reported for more than 1975days since implementation of the SOEA. Previous intervals between seeming eradication and repeat outbreaks following RCA were 270days and 180days. Achieving a sustainable positive resolution relied on applying systems thinking and the holistic analysis of the system, not merely looking for root causes of events. Conclusion: To improve the effectiveness of outbreaks analysis and infection control, an emphasis on systems thinking is critical, along with a practical approach to ensure its effective implementation. The SOEA model provides the necessary framework and is a viable complementary approach, or alternative, to RCA.

DOI 10.1016/j.ajic.2015.02.002
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2015 Howley P, 'Thehappy farmer:The effect of nonpecuniary benefits on behavior', American Journal of Agricultural Economics, 97 1072-1086 (2015)

© The Author 2015. I test empirically the relationship between farmers&apos; perceptions of the nonpecuniary benefits from farming with a variety of field behaviors such as disinv... [more]

© The Author 2015. I test empirically the relationship between farmers' perceptions of the nonpecuniary benefits from farming with a variety of field behaviors such as disinvestment, production, diversification, and off-farm labor market participation. Results suggest that nonpecuniary benefits have an important influence on a wide range of farmer activities. While costs and returns are clearly important, I suggest that nonpecuniary benefits may make some choices more attractive than others which may be more rewarding financially.

DOI 10.1093/ajae/aav020
Citations Scopus - 12
2015 Howley P, O Neill S, Atkinson R, 'Who needs good neighbors?', Environment and Planning A, 47 939-956 (2015)

© 2015, Pion Limited. All rights reserved. Due to the increasing spatial dispersion of social networks, the association between neighbor relationships and quality of life has beco... [more]

© 2015, Pion Limited. All rights reserved. Due to the increasing spatial dispersion of social networks, the association between neighbor relationships and quality of life has become more uncertain. Our analysis used instrumental variable modelling to reduce bias associated with residual confounding and reverse causation, in order to provide a more reliable examination of the effect of interaction with neighbors on subjective well-being than previous work. While the frames of reference for individuals¿ socialising may have shifted outside the neighborhood, our analysis provides robust evidence that interaction with neighbors still matters a great deal for subjective well-being. A further important question to ask is if neighboring does affect well-being, then are there certain groups in society for whom contact with neighbors matters more? Our analysis suggests that there are, namely for those in a relationship, unemployed or retired. This means that while fostering contact with neighbors has the potential to significantly improve individual well-being, such policy efforts are likely to matter a good deal more in neighborhoods with relatively large numbers of geographically constrained social groups, such as the elderly and the unemployed.

DOI 10.1068/a140214p
Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Howley P, Buckley C, O'Donoghue C, Ryan M, 'Explaining the economic 'irrationality' of farmers' land use behaviour: The role of productivist attitudes and non-pecuniary benefits', Ecological Economics, 109 186-193 (2015)

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. Although the physical conditions of a farm and farming system will to some extent predispose a farmer towards converting land to alternative agricultural uses... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. Although the physical conditions of a farm and farming system will to some extent predispose a farmer towards converting land to alternative agricultural uses such as forestry, results presented in this paper suggest that differences in underlying farming motivations can also play an important role in explaining farmers' decision-making. Our findings suggest that even in the face of higher economic returns, some farmers may be reluctant to convert land to forestry as to do so would not be in keeping with their productivist attitudes. Other farmers may fear losing the non-pecuniary benefits derived from 'working the land'. We conclude that economic incentives alone are unlikely to encourage certain cohorts of farmers to consider alternative land uses such as farm forestry and that policy ought to be guided by a better understanding of the differing farming motivations of farm operators.

DOI 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.11.015
Citations Scopus - 19
2015 Howley P, 'Addressing endogeneity in estimating the effect of social capital on psychological health', Applied Economics Letters, 22 76-79 (2015)

© 2014, © 2014 Taylor &amp; Francis. This study examines the relationship between social capital and psychological health. Endogeneity concerns are addressed through the develop... [more]

© 2014, © 2014 Taylor & Francis. This study examines the relationship between social capital and psychological health. Endogeneity concerns are addressed through the development of a two-stage residual inclusion (2SRI) model. I provide robust evidence that levels of social trust and support from friends significantly affect self-reported psychological health. Estimates obtained relating to the effect of these variables using the 2SRI method as well as two-stage least squares greatly exceed those obtained through standard ordered logit and OLS models. This illustrates the importance of controlling for endogeneity bias in any future studies of the relationship between social capital and psychological health.

DOI 10.1080/13504851.2014.927561
Citations Scopus - 3
2015 Prieto-Rodriguez E, Howley P, Holmes K, Osborn J, Roberts M, Kepert A, 'Quality Teaching Rounds in Mathematics Teacher Education', Mathematics Teacher Education and Development (MTED), 17 98-110 (2015) [C1]
Co-authors Andrew Kepert, Elena Prieto, Judy-Anne Osborn, Malcolm Roberts
2015 Howley PP, Hancock SJ, Gibberd RW, Chuang S, Tuyl FA, 'Bayesian methods in reporting and managing Australian clinical indicators', World Journal of Clinical Cases, 3 625-634 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.12998/wjcc.v3.i7.625
Co-authors Frank Tuyl, Robert Gibberd
2014 Chuang S, Howley P, 'International comparison of hospital accreditation development', Journal of Health Quality, 8 54-63 (2014) [C1]
2014 Howley P, Yadav L, Hynes S, Donoghue CO, Neill SO, 'Contrasting the attitudes of farmers and the general public regarding the 'multifunctional' role of the agricultural sector', Land Use Policy, 38 248-256 (2014)

Using separate nationally representative surveys, this study compared the views and perspectives of farmers towards agricultural related conservation issues with that of the gener... [more]

Using separate nationally representative surveys, this study compared the views and perspectives of farmers towards agricultural related conservation issues with that of the general public. Results suggest that both the general public and farmers expressed similar levels of concern regarding the environment as a whole. This is an encouraging sign when it comes to environmental protection, as it indicates a certain level of agreement between farmers as the group whose activities largely shape the quality of the rural environment, with the views of the general public who are the major consumers of landscape related environmental public goods. The analysis did, however, reveal important differences in attitudes in relation to certain environmental issues such as the relative importance of maintaining wildlife and habitats and having wild flora and fauna in the countryside. These activities could be seen as in conflict with farmers' productivist attitudes. We found no significant difference in environmental attitudes between farmers who have participated in voluntary agri-environmental schemes and those who did not. Results also suggest that there is significant heterogeneity in public attitudes towards environmental issues. Specifically, age, income, place of residence and presence of children were all significantly associated with environmental preferences. The study concludes that consideration needs to be given to the different views and perspectives of farmers and the general public in formulating policy aimed at providing an optimal mix of agricultural related environmental public goods and services. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.landusepol.2013.11.020
Citations Scopus - 12
2014 Howley P, Dillon E, Hennessy T, 'It's not all about the money: Understanding farmers' labor allocation choices', Agriculture and Human Values, 31 261-271 (2014)

Using a nationally representative survey of farm operators in Ireland, this study examines the effect of non-pecuniary benefits from farm work on labor allocation choices. Results... [more]

Using a nationally representative survey of farm operators in Ireland, this study examines the effect of non-pecuniary benefits from farm work on labor allocation choices. Results suggest that non-pecuniary benefits affect both the decision to enter the off-farm labor market and also once that decision is made, the amount of time spent working off-farm. We find our derived variable representing non-monetary benefits associated with farm work to have a substantial impact similar to the effect of other more widely reported personal and farm structural variables such as the age of the farm operator, farm size, and farming system. The existence of these non-pecuniary benefits serves to increase the implied wage to farmers for their farm work. This in turn can lead to allocations of labor that would seem suboptimal from a purely financial point of view. Rural development policies aimed at creating off-farm opportunities could fail unless returns to off-farm work are high enough to compensate the farmer for losing the benefits associated with the farming lifestyle. From a methodological perspective, our analysis indicates that failure to model off-farm labor allocation choices as a two-part process may lead to some incorrect conclusions regarding the effect of certain explanatory variables. Outside of explaining farmers' off-farm labor supply it would be useful to incorporate farmer perceptions regarding the non-pecuniary benefits from farming in economic models of farm behavior across a range of activities as this could lead to much more accurate predictions of farmers' responses to policy changes. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

DOI 10.1007/s10460-013-9474-2
Citations Scopus - 10
2013 Southgate EL, Reynolds RM, Howley PP, 'Professional experience as a wicked problem in initial teacher education', Teaching and Teacher Education, 31 13-22 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Erica Southgate, Ruth Reynolds
2013 Chuang S, Howley PP, 'Beyond Root Cause Analysis: An Enriched System Oriented Event Analysis Model for Wide Application', SYSTEMS ENGINEERING, 16 427-438 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/sys.21246
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2013 Chuang S, Howley PP, Hancock S, 'Using clinical indicators to facilitate quality improvement via the accreditation process: an adaptive study into the control relationship', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR QUALITY IN HEALTH CARE, 25 277-283 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/intqhc/mzt023
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2013 Howley P, 'Examining farm forest owners' forest management in ireland: The role of economic, lifestyle and multifunctional ownership objectives', Journal of Environmental Management, 123 105-112 (2013)

Using a nationally representative survey of 263 farm operators in Ireland, this study develops a typology of private forest landowners&apos; objectives for forest ownership. It is... [more]

Using a nationally representative survey of 263 farm operators in Ireland, this study develops a typology of private forest landowners' objectives for forest ownership. It is important to understand farmers' forest ownership objectives as this will enhance economic analysis in general, but also to formulate more effective policies that take into account the range of motivational profiles of landowners. Using principal component analysis, three core motivations for forest ownership are identified representing economic, lifestyle and multifunctional benefits. Using a binary logistic regression model these ownership objectives were found to have a significant impact on farmers' forest management. For instance, farmers with relatively stronger economic motivations for forest ownership were found to be much more likely to harvest thinnings whereas the opposite was true of those with more lifestyle orientated objectives. In order to tailor policy at groups with different forest ownership objectives it will be important to be able to identify them through more easily observable owner and property characteristics. This study through multivariate regression analysis found factors such as age of the farm operator, land quality, system of farming, off farm employment and environmental attitudes were related to farm forest owners' ownership objectives. The study concludes that a better understanding of the heterogeneity in farmers' forest ownership objectives will enable policymakers to tailor incentives that more closely align with the diverse motivational profiles of different groups of landholders. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2013.03.013
Citations Scopus - 8
2012 Howley P, Dillon E, 'Modelling the effect of farming attitudes on farm credit use: A case study from Ireland', Agricultural Finance Review, 72 456-470 (2012)

© Emerald Group Publishing Limited Purpose ¿ By examining the role of farming attitudes and motivations, the aim of this paper is to provide a framework for better understanding f... [more]

© Emerald Group Publishing Limited Purpose ¿ By examining the role of farming attitudes and motivations, the aim of this paper is to provide a framework for better understanding farmers¿ behaviour in relation to the decision to obtain credit. Design/methodology/approach ¿ Using a nationally representative survey of farm operators in Ireland, this paper derives explanatory variables (based on a factor analysis of respondents mean ratings of 13 attitudinal statements) representing three different farming motivations. An ordered logit model is then formulated to examine the effect of farming attitudes as well as personal characteristics and farm structural variables on the degree of indebtedness. Findings ¿ Personal characteristics of the farmer such as age and education as well as farm structural variables such as farm size and farm system were all found to strongly affect decisions in relation to credit use. The study identified how farmers are not just driven by business related goals such as maximising profits but are also strongly motivated by productivist tendencies and perceived lifestyle benefits associated with farm work. These underlying farming motivations were, in turn, found to have a differential impact on credit use. Specifically, business orientated attitudes were found to provide a prime incentive for farmers to borrow funds. On the other hand, farmers who strongly value the benefits associated with the farming lifestyle were less likely to look for credit. Originality/value ¿ Past research has focused on the effect of socio-demographic characteristics and farm structural variables in examining differences in farm indebtedness. This study extends this literature by specifically examining the role of farming attitudes. Obtaining a deeper understanding of the factors that affect the level of farming debt will be important as the degree of indebtedness has been found to affect farmers¿ management decisions. Outside of explaining farm credit use, farming attitudes and motivations may have an important impact on farmers¿ behaviour in relation to a variety of farm activities.

DOI 10.1108/00021461211277286
Citations Scopus - 9
2012 Howley P, Hynes S, Donoghue CO, 'Countryside Preferences: Exploring Individuals' Willingness to Pay for the Conservation of the Traditional Farm Landscape', Landscape Research, 37 703-719 (2012)

This paper explored individuals&apos; attitudes towards the traditional farm landscape and using the contingent valuation method (CVM) their willingness to pay (WTP) for agricultu... [more]

This paper explored individuals' attitudes towards the traditional farm landscape and using the contingent valuation method (CVM) their willingness to pay (WTP) for agricultural activities aimed at its protection. Analysis of consumer attitudes towards the countryside can provide information from which policy-makers can ascertain if policy measures aimed at enhancing and protecting the rural landscape are in line with citizens' views and expectations. Results from a Generalized Tobit Interval model suggest that attitudes regarding the importance of particular landscape attributes have a differential impact on WTP. A variety of background variables and whether individuals live in the countryside were also found to strongly influence WTP. More generally, the results would indicate broad public support for second pillar objectives under the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) such as the protection of the traditional farm landscape. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/01426397.2011.637619
Citations Scopus - 10
2012 Howley P, Donoghue CO, Hynes S, 'Exploring public preferences for traditional farming landscapes', Landscape and Urban Planning, 104 66-74 (2012)

Given that an increasing share of budgetary resources are now being spent on measures aimed at protecting the visual quality of agricultural landscapes it will be important to bet... [more]

Given that an increasing share of budgetary resources are now being spent on measures aimed at protecting the visual quality of agricultural landscapes it will be important to better understand individuals' landscape preferences and the factors that influence those preferences. Within this context, using a nationally representive survey of Irish residents, the central aim of this study was to gain more insight into people's preferences regarding traditional farming landscapes. Individuals rated agricultural landscapes in terms of beauty quite highly but given a choice prefer traditional more extensive farming landscapes over more modern intensive farming landscapes. Moreover, the results suggest that there are systematic differences in preferences for traditional farm landscapes between different demographic groupings and also depending on individuals' environmental value orientations. Accordingly, in studying preferences for agricultural landscapes in particular areas it will be necessary to consider the social and demographic characteristics of the population as well as the physical aspects of the landscape. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2011.09.006
Citations Scopus - 44
2012 Howley P, Doherty E, Buckley C, Hynes S, van Rensburg T, Green S, 'Exploring preferences towards the provision of farmland walking trails: A supply and demand perspective', Land Use Policy, 29 111-118 (2012)

Despite the potential benefits accruing from use of the rural landscape, access to farmland is a contentious issue with many landowners restricting public access. Within this cont... [more]

Despite the potential benefits accruing from use of the rural landscape, access to farmland is a contentious issue with many landowners restricting public access. Within this context, this paper first explores general public preferences and willingness to pay for farmland walking trails in the Irish countryside. Second this paper examines farmers' willingness to participate in a hypothetical walking scheme whereby the general public will be allowed access to specific trails. Results suggest that individuals are not a homogeneous group with regard to their preferences for farmland walking trails. From a supply perspective, this paper identified significant regional variations in farmers' attitudes relating to public access. More generally, the analysis presented here would suggest that there is significant scope for policy intervention to improve public access to the countryside. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.landusepol.2011.05.010
Citations Scopus - 9
2011 Hynes S, Campbell D, Howley P, 'A holistic vs. an attribute-based approach to agri-environmental policy valuation: Do welfare estimates differ?', Journal of Agricultural Economics, 62 305-329 (2011)

Different economic valuation methodologies can be used to value the non-market benefits of an agri-environmental scheme. In particular, the non-market value can be examined by ass... [more]

Different economic valuation methodologies can be used to value the non-market benefits of an agri-environmental scheme. In particular, the non-market value can be examined by assessing the public's willingness to pay for the policy outputs as a whole or by modelling the preferences of society for the component attributes of the rural landscape that result from the implementation of the policy. In this article we examine whether the welfare values estimated for an agri-environmental policy are significantly different between an holistic valuation methodology (using contingent valuation) and an attribute-based valuation methodology (choice experiment). It is argued that the valuation methodology chosen should be based on whether or not the overall objective is the valuation of the agri-environment policy package in its entirety or the valuation of each of the policy's distinct environmental outputs. © 2011 The Agricultural Economics Society.

DOI 10.1111/j.1477-9552.2010.00287.x
Citations Scopus - 20
2011 Howley P, Ryan M, Donoghue CO, 'Forestry in Ireland: An examination of individuals' preferences and attitudes towards the non-market benefits of forests', Irish Geography, 44 291-302 (2011)

In addition to their importance for timber production, Ireland&apos;s forests represent a multi-faceted resource that enhances the environment, promotes biodiversity, sequesters a... [more]

In addition to their importance for timber production, Ireland's forests represent a multi-faceted resource that enhances the environment, promotes biodiversity, sequesters atmospheric carbon and facilitates recreational activity. Within this context, the overall aim of this paper is to examine some of the non-market - or rather non-timber production related - benefits of forests. Forestry investment has been identified as a means of promoting economic development in rural areas. The survey results presented here suggest that there are likely to be substantial public good benefits to the promotion of the forestry sector. More specifically, given the frequency of visits nationally, forest parks are shown to be a recreational resource which is highly valued by the general public. Results suggest, however, that individuals are not a homogeneous group with regard to their use of forest parks as there are significant differences between likely users and non-users. In terms of visual amenity, the general public rated forest landscape elements quite highly relative to a variety of other landscape elements. For the most part, those surveyed did not feel that too much of the country's land area was currently in forestry use. Finally, respondents held the biodiversity and carbon sequestration benefits of forestry to be more important than benefits in terms of timber production. © 2011 Copyright Geographical Society of Ireland.

DOI 10.1080/00750778.2011.643392
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Howley P, 'Landscape aesthetics: Assessing the general publics' preferences towards rural landscapes', Ecological Economics, 72 161-169 (2011)

The central aim of this study was to gain greater insights into the factors that affect individuals&apos; preferences for a variety of landscape settings. Using a nationally repre... [more]

The central aim of this study was to gain greater insights into the factors that affect individuals' preferences for a variety of landscape settings. Using a nationally representative survey conducted in the summer of 2010 of 430 individuals living in Ireland, this paper derived dependent variables (based on a factor analysis of respondents mean ratings of 47 landscape images) representing 5 different landscape categories. These variables were then utilised in separate OLS regression models to examine the effect of personal characteristics, residential location and environmental value orientations on landscape preferences. First in terms of visual amenity the results suggest that the general public have the strongest preference for landscapes with water related features as its dominant attribute which was followed by cultural landscapes. Second the results also demonstrate how there is significant heterogeneity in landscape preferences as both personal characteristics and environmental value orientations were found to strongly influence preferences for all the landscape types examined. Moreover the effect of these variables often differed significantly across the various landscape groupings. In terms of land use policy, given the diversity of preferences a one size fits all approach will not meet the general publics' needs and desires. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2011.09.026
Citations Scopus - 55
2011 Howley P, Donnellan T, Hanrahan K, 'An Analysis of the Potential Impact of Decoupled Payments: An Irish Case Study', EuroChoices, 10 26-30 (2011)

Decoupled payments are in the World Trade Organisation&apos;s (WTO) &apos;green box&apos; of agriculture-related subsidies and thus must adhere to the fundamental requirement that... [more]

Decoupled payments are in the World Trade Organisation's (WTO) 'green box' of agriculture-related subsidies and thus must adhere to the fundamental requirement that the policy has no, or at most minimal, trade-distorting effects. The question as to whether decoupled payments affect production is an important issue in the context of international trade, as these payments can be exempt from WTO limits if they have none or at most, minimal, trade distorting effects. Using a dynamic multi-product partial equilibrium model, this article provides projections for cereal and beef production in Ireland between 2005 and 2020 under the alternate assumptions of full (decoupled payments have the same impact as output prices) and zero (decoupled payments have no impact on production) coupling. The projections from the model were then compared with actual real market data in Ireland. The results suggest that if decoupled payments are treated by farmers as being 'truly' decoupled then there is likely to be a substantial decline in agricultural production in Ireland. Our model results suggest, however, that grain and cattle farmers in Ireland do not consider these payments as fully decoupled which calls into question the appropriateness of decoupled payments being included as a 'green box' policy. © 2011 The Authors. EuroChoices © 2011 The Agricultural Economics Society and the European Association of Agricultural Economists.

DOI 10.1111/j.1746-692X.2011.00189.x
Citations Scopus - 2
2010 Howley P, Hynes S, O'Donoghue C, 'The citizen versus consumer distinction: An exploration of individuals' preferences in Contingent Valuation studies', Ecological Economics, 69 1524-1531 (2010)

Contingent valuation has been used extensively in estimating the value of environmental goods. One criticism of this approach, however, is that respondents in referendum-style con... [more]

Contingent valuation has been used extensively in estimating the value of environmental goods. One criticism of this approach, however, is that respondents in referendum-style contingent valuation surveys may express citizen assessments that take into account benefits to others rather than benefits that accrue purely to the respondent themselves. Within this context, the aim of this paper is to examine to what extent individuals express different preferences when adopting a personal or a social/citizen perspective. While this paper provides some support for the hypothesis that individuals express different preferences when adopting collective as opposed to personal choices, reported willingness to pay (WTP) was found to be insensitive to whether or not the respondents were asked the WTP question from a personal or social perspective. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2010.02.012
Citations Scopus - 12
2010 Howley P, ''Sustainability versus liveability': An exploration of central city housing satisfaction', International Journal of Housing Policy, 10 173-189 (2010)

Issues surrounding central city residential housing have increased in prominence in recent times as a result of the onus on the planning systems of most Western countries to devel... [more]

Issues surrounding central city residential housing have increased in prominence in recent times as a result of the onus on the planning systems of most Western countries to develop a more sustainable development pattern. Similarly to many British and US cities, Dublin in recent times has been successful in attracting large numbers of residents back into new residential developments within the central city. This paper raises questions relating to the long-term sustainability of these areas as residents ultimately express a preference to reside in lower-density locations. In examining what lies behind these residential preferences, this paper focuses on one aspect of individuals' mobility behaviour: namely housing satisfaction. Results from a logistic model of housing satisfaction indicate that both background variables such as age and ethnicity as well as various design elements of the dwelling unit emerge as significant predictors of overall housing satisfaction within these newly regenerated residential areas. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/14616718.2010.480857
Citations Scopus - 10
2009 Howley P, 'New residential neighbourhoods within the inner city: An examination of neighbouring', Irish Geography, 42 85-99 (2009)

In recent times, similar to many other cities such as London, Manchester and New York, there has been a considerable population influx into Dublin&apos;s inner city. The attractio... [more]

In recent times, similar to many other cities such as London, Manchester and New York, there has been a considerable population influx into Dublin's inner city. The attraction of new residents back into the central area has resulted in economic and social restructuring and the creation of new 'social spaces', as new urban residents are often very different in demographic and socioeconomic terms than members of established communities (i.e. younger, more affluent and ethnically diverse). The overall aim of this paper is to examine the extent and significance of neighbourly ties in these new relatively high density residential environments in the central area of Dublin city. Findings in this paper demonstrate that these new residential neighbourhoods are characterised by a lack of 'neighbourliness' which call into question the long-term stability and cohesion of these new residential environments. Results from a binary logistic model indicate that background variables such as age, gender and ethnicity emerge as significant predictors of neighbourly interaction. The presence of friends and or relatives in the neighbourhood, the level of trust in neighbours and finally respondents' intended future mobility behaviour were further factors found to have a significant influence on the level of interaction with neighbours. © 2009 Geographical Society of Ireland.

DOI 10.1080/00750770902815638
Citations Scopus - 5
2009 Howley P, Clifford B, 'The transformation of inner Dublin: Exploring new residential populations within the inner city', Irish Geography, 42 225-243 (2009)

The recent policy emphasis towards promoting inner urban living has been successful in attracting large numbers of new residents back into Dublin&apos;s inner city. Utilising data... [more]

The recent policy emphasis towards promoting inner urban living has been successful in attracting large numbers of new residents back into Dublin's inner city. Utilising data from a household survey, focus groups and census data, this paper provides key insights into the changes that are occurring in the central area of Dublin city. In particular, this paper highlights how the recent population influx has not only led to a rapid physical redevelopment of the inner city but also helped to create a new social population, one that is much younger, affluent and ethnically diverse than members of older more established communities. In addition, this paper identifies possible problems relating to the long-term sustainability of these newly regenerated residential environments within the inner city. © 2009 Geographical Society of Ireland.

DOI 10.1080/00750770903112852
Citations Scopus - 5
2009 Howley P, Scott M, Redmond D, 'An examination of residential preferences for less sustainable housing: Exploring future mobility among Dublin central city residents', Cities, 26 1-8 (2009)

The onus on the planning systems of most advanced capitalist societies to develop a more sustainable urban development pattern has resulted in an ever-increasing emphasis on polic... [more]

The onus on the planning systems of most advanced capitalist societies to develop a more sustainable urban development pattern has resulted in an ever-increasing emphasis on policies to increase residential densities. As evident by rapidly sprawling development patterns which are now characteristic of most Western societies, individual residential preferences appear to be at variance with this policy agenda. Using quantitative and qualitative research data this paper examines the motives, behaviour and preferences of residents living in new relatively compact residential environments in the central area of Dublin city. This is a group who have made the choice to move into a relatively compact urban area and hence it will be revealing to assess the motives, preferences and future intentions of this residential population. Evidence presented in this paper would suggest that residential preferences are at variance with policy prescription emphasising the need for higher residential densities as, for example, even among those living in new compact urban environments in the central city, there is a clear aspiration for lower-density living. The preference of the majority of these residents to ultimately relocate to lower-density locations would suggest that urban planners and designers still have some way to go before they can claim to have created residential environments that meet liveability as well as sustainability criteria. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.cities.2008.10.001
Citations Scopus - 38
2009 Howley P, 'Attitudes towards compact city living: Towards a greater understanding of residential behaviour', Land Use Policy, 26 792-798 (2009)

Policy prescription in most Western societies has increasingly favoured urban intensification policies in order to ensure a more sustainable development pattern. In particular, it... [more]

Policy prescription in most Western societies has increasingly favoured urban intensification policies in order to ensure a more sustainable development pattern. In particular, it is now widely felt that residential decisions concerning where to live profoundly affect, among other things, environmental pollution, resource use and land and habitat loss. Using the central area of Dublin city as a case study, this paper focuses specifically on garnering a better understanding of the residential behaviour of residents who have moved into new relatively high-density residential environments. This is a group who have made the choice to move into a relatively high-density urban area and hence it will be revealing to assess the motives, preferences and future intentions of this residential population. Findings suggest that the ultimate residential preference of the majority of residents in these areas is for lower density locations which call into question the long term success of urban intensification efforts. Results from a logit model of residential mobility indicate that stage in their life cycle, satisfaction with both the dwelling and the neighbourhood emerge as significant predictors of respondents intended future mobility patterns. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.landusepol.2008.10.004
Citations Scopus - 42
2009 Howley P, Scott M, Redmond D, 'Sustainability versus liveability: An investigation of neighbourhood satisfaction', Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 52 847-864 (2009)

Recent years have witnessed an increasing emphasis placed on planning systems in most advanced capitalist societies to develop a more sustainable urban development pattern, result... [more]

Recent years have witnessed an increasing emphasis placed on planning systems in most advanced capitalist societies to develop a more sustainable urban development pattern, resulting in policies to increase residential densities. Although belief in the virtues of the compact city approach is now widespread among the policy community, questions remain relating to the 'sustainability versus liveability' implications of compact city environments. In this regard, while the public may support sustainability principles, there is a perception that high-density development poses too great a cost on individuals' quality of life. Combining both quantitative and qualitative research data, this paper evaluates the relationship between high-density living and neighbourhood satisfaction within the central city. Findings suggest that, in many instances, it is not high density per se that is the source of dissatisfaction for respondents, but rather other related factors such as environmental quality, noise, lack of community involvement, traffic and lack of services and facilities. © 2009 University of Newcastle upon Tyne.

DOI 10.1080/09640560903083798
Citations Scopus - 69
2008 Howley PP, 'Keeping it real, keeping them interested and keeping it in their minds', Journal of Statistics Education, 16 1-16 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
2004 Ivanovic I, Howley PP, 'Examining the forward pricing function of the Australian equity index futures contract', Accounting and Finance, 44 57-73 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-629x.2004.00101.x
Citations Scopus - 1
2004 Gibberd RW, Hancock SJ, Howley PP, Richards K, 'Using indicators to quantify the potential to improve the quality of health care', International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 16 i37-i43 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/intqhc/mzh019
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Robert Gibberd
2003 Howley PP, Gibberd RW, 'Using hierarchical models to analyse clinical indicators: a comparison of the gamma-Poisson and beta-binomial models', International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 15 319-329 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/intqhc/mzg044
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Robert Gibberd
2003 Ivanovic I, Pinder S, Howley PP, 'An Examination of the Australian Wheat Futures Contract', Accounting Research Journal, 16 68-79 (2003) [C1]
2003 Howley PP, 'Teaching How to Calibrate a Process Using Experimental Design and analysis: The Ballistat', Journal of Statistics Education, 11 On line journal (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
2001 Parkinson L, Sanson-Fisher RW, Perkins JJ, Girgis A, Howley P, Schofield M, 'The effect of a community action intervention on adolescent smoking rates in rural Australian Towns: the CART project', Preventive Medicine, 32 332-340 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 18
Co-authors L Parkinson, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2001 Parkinson L, Sanson-Fisher RW, Perkins JJ, McClintock A, Howley P, Gibberd RW, 'Effect of a community action program on adult quit smoking rates in rural Australian towns: the CART project', Preventive Medicine, 32 118-127 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Robert Gibberd, L Parkinson, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2000 Bellamy S, Gibberd RW, Hancock L, Howley PP, Kenne, Klar N, et al., 'Analysis of dichotomous outcome data for community intervention studies', Statistical Methods in Medical Research, 9 135-159 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 38
Co-authors L Parkinson, Robert Gibberd
1999 Ryan T, Howley PP, 'Control charts based on medians', JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL STATISTICAL SOCIETY SERIES D-THE STATISTICIAN, 48 441-442 (1999)
DOI 10.1111/1467-9884.00203
Citations Web of Science - 2
1999 Ryan TP, Howley PP, 'Control Charts based on medians', The Statistician, 48 1 (1999) [C1]
Show 46 more journal articles

Conference (20 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Howley PP, Roberts T, 'Uniting Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Education, Industry and Statistics', Uniting Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Education, Industry and Statistics, Kyoto, Japan (2018)
Co-authors Tim Roberts
2018 Lin Y-F, Howley PP, Tuyl F, 'A Posterior Predictive Model-Based Control Chart for Monitoring Healthcare', Sydney, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Frank Tuyl
2018 Seckold R, Howley PP, King B, Bell K, Smart C, 'Dietary and mealtime behaviours of young children with type 1 diabetes who meet glycaemic targets', Newcastle, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Bruce King
2017 Alzahrani A, Stojanovski E, Howley P, 'Assessment Of Teaching Practices On Mathematics For Students In Qatar', Teaching Statistics in a Data Rich World. Proceedings of the Satellite conference of the International Association for Statistical Education (IASE), Rabat, Morocco (2017) [E1]
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2017 Howley PP, Bilgin A, Prieto E, 'Engaging Students, Teachers and Industry Through Statistics Towards Greater Connection and Social Responsibility', Teaching Statistics in a Data Rich World. Proceedings of the Satellite conference of the International Association for Statistical Education (IASE), Rabat, Morocco (2017) [E1]
Co-authors Elena Prieto
2017 Prieto-Rodriguez E, Howley P, Holmes K, 'An Evaluation of Online Resources Designed to Teach Mathematics for Equal Opportunity', An Evaluation of Online Resources Designed to Teach Mathematics for Equal Opportunity, Melbourne (2017)
Co-authors Elena Prieto
2017 Howley P, Prieto-Rodriguez E, 'Resources Promoting Statistical Threshold Concepts and Addressing Statistical Anxiety and Apathy', We provide an account of a new initiative, involving resources developed for a national statistics project designed to increase access and support within higher education. The resources comprised short animated videos, interactive exercises, and extension documents developing statistical threshold concepts, plus tools to assist teachers and student, Melbourne (2017)
Co-authors Elena Prieto
2016 Howley PP, 'D.A.T.A.: Data, Analysis, Then Action - National Statistics Initiative', Adelaide (2016)
2015 Howley PP, 'Breaking down Barriers', Sunshine Coast (2015) [E3]
2014 Howley PP, 'Total Quality Management in Teaching an Introductory Statistics Course: Know your customer', Sydney, Australia (2014)
2014 Howley PP, Martin M, 'How do we create the next generation of statisticians?', Sydney, Australia (2014)
2012 Howley PP, Chuang S, Hancock SJ, 'Systems theory and clinical indicators: Facilitating quality improvement via the accreditation process', Handbook. Australian Statistical Conference, Adelaide, SA (2012) [E3]
2011 Howley PP, Chang SW, 'Systems theory and improving healthcare', Proceedings of the 4th Applied Statistics Education and Research Collaboration (ASEARC) Conference, Parramatta, NSW (2011) [E1]
2011 Chuang S, Howley PP, Lin S-H, 'Beyond the root cause analysis: The cessation of scabies outbreaks by the application of an Enriched System-Oriented Events Analysis model', Proceedings of the International Society for Quality in Health Care 28th International Conference, Hong Kong (2011) [E3]
2010 Howley PP, Hancock SJ, 'Bayesian methods for monitoring clinical indicators', Australian Statistical Conference (ASC2010) - Statistics in the West: Understanding our World. Program and Abstracts, Fremantle, WA (2010) [E3]
2009 Howley PP, 'Winning them over', ASEARC: Proceedings of the Third Annual ASEARC Research Conference, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E1]
2009 Howley PP, Hancock SJ, Ford MC, 'Monitoring clinical indicators', ASEARC: Proceedings of the Third Annual ASEARC Research Conference, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E1]
2006 Howley PP, 'Statistics in Education - Keeping It Real, Keeping Them Interested and Keeping it in Their Minds', ASC/NZSA 2006 Statistical Connections: Abstract Book, Auckland, New Zealand (2006) [E3]
2004 Howley PP, Gibberd RW, 'Using Hierarchical Models to Analyse Clinical Indicators: A Comparison of the Gamma-Poisson and Beta-Binomial Models', Conference Handbook, Cairns, Qld (2004) [E3]
2000 Howley PP, 'Bayesian Hierarchical Models', Edmonton, Canada (2000)
Show 17 more conferences

Other (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Howley PP, 'The Future of Statistics in Australia', (2016) [O1]
2016 Howley PP, 'Using data to improve patient care', (2016) [O1]
2011 Howley PP, 'Systems approaches to improving healthcare using clinical indicators', (2011) [O1]
2010 Howley PP, 'Experiences south of the equator', (2010) [O1]
2009 Howley PP, 'Statistics Education in the NSW Statistics Society', (2009) [O1]
2008 Howley PP, 'Experiences South of the Border: Bayesian shrinkage estimators in healthcare', (2008) [O1]
2008 Howley PP, 'Statistics in Education', (2008) [O1]
Howley PP, 'Empirical Bayes Methods in Health', [O1]
Show 5 more others

Report (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
1997 Dolja-Gore X, Howley PP, Eckstein G, Gibberd RW, 'A study into the association between ethnic background, admission rates and length of stay', Multicultural Health Services ¿ Northern Sydney Area Health Service, Australia, 101 (1997)
Co-authors Robert Gibberd
1995 Hamilton J, Wilson R, Harrison B, Gibberd RW, Newby L, Howley PP, et al., 'Quality in Australian Health Care Study Final Report ¿ First Part', Commonwealth Department of Human Services and Health, Australia, 140 (1995)
Co-authors Robert Gibberd

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2005 Howley PP, Analysing and Reporting Clinical Indicators Using Hierarchical Models, The University of Newcastle (2005)
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 17
Total funding $2,199,382

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $567,574

Investigating the efficacy, complexity and sustainability of teacher change$567,574

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Jennifer Gore, Doctor Drew Miller, Doctor Jess Harris, Doctor Elena Prieto-Rodriguez, Professor David Lubans, Associate Professor Peter Howley, Doctor Julie Bowe
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1601525
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20175 grants / $761,654

Professional development in equity interventions for school teachers$599,984

Funding body: Department of Education and Training

Funding body Department of Education and Training
Project Team Laureate Professor Jennifer Gore, Professor Penny Jane Burke, Associate Professor Peter Howley, Associate Professor Maree Gruppetta, Doctor Jess Harris, Doctor Elena Prieto-Rodriguez, Doctor Leanne Fray, Doctor Adam Lloyd, Dr Andrew Harvey, Professor Jo Lampert
Scheme Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Programme (HEPPP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1701442
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Early engagement - Tertiary success: Sustainability meets Statistics and STEM$134,670

Funding body: Department of Education and Training

Funding body Department of Education and Training
Project Team Associate Professor Peter Howley, Emeritus Professor Tim Roberts, Associate Professor Maree Gruppetta
Scheme Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Programme (HEPPP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601034
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

National Science Week Grants, Inspiring Australia$10,000

Funding body: National Science Week

Funding body National Science Week
Project Team

Roberts T, Burns T, Wilcox S, Howley P, Pilgrim S, Taylor J

Scheme Inspiring Australia
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

National Science Week Grants, Inspiring Australia$10,000

Funding body: National Science Week

Funding body National Science Week
Project Team

Roberts T, Burns T, Wilcox S, Howley P, Pilgrim S, Taylor J

Scheme Inspiring Australia
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

year round engagement programs$7,000

Funding body: National Science Week

Funding body National Science Week
Project Team

Roberts T, Howley P, O’Connor J, Burns T

Scheme Year round engagement programs
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20161 grants / $161,151

Building statistical literacy for success in higher education$161,151

Funding body: Department of Education

Funding body Department of Education
Project Team Associate Professor Peter Howley, Doctor Elena Prieto-Rodriguez, Doctor Ali Eshragh, Doctor Elizabeth Stojanovski, Associate Professor Erica Southgate, Professor Michael Martin, Associate Professor Peter Dunn, Professor Kathryn Holmes
Scheme Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Programme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600141
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

20153 grants / $384,372

Building STEM students' numeracy for success in higher education$187,186

Funding body: Department of Education

Funding body Department of Education
Project Team Doctor Elena Prieto-Rodriguez, Professor Ljiljana Brankovic, Associate Professor Peter Howley, Professor Bill McBride, Associate Professor Kathryn Holmes, Doctor Rachel Buchanan, Associate Professor Erica Southgate
Scheme Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Programme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501424
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Building STEM students' numeracy for success in higher education$187,186

Funding body: Department of Education

Funding body Department of Education
Project Team

Dr Peter Howley

Scheme HEPP National Priorities Pool
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Office for Learning and Teaching Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning$10,000

Funding body: Commonwealth Office for Learning and Teaching

Funding body Commonwealth Office for Learning and Teaching
Scheme Citations for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20142 grants / $299,871

Inspiring Mathematics and Science in Teacher Education$297,871

Funding body: Office for Learning and Teaching

Funding body Office for Learning and Teaching
Project Team Doctor Judy-Anne Osborn, Associate Professor Kathryn Holmes, Doctor Elena Prieto-Rodriguez, Associate Professor Peter Howley, Doctor Andrew Kepert, Doctor Malcolm Roberts
Scheme Commissioned Strategic Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1301449
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Faculty PVC Conference Assistance Grant 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project Team Associate Professor Peter Howley
Scheme PVC Conference Assistance Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401216
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20061 grants / $1,500

Australian Statistical Conference/New Zealand Statistical Association Conference 2006 July 3-6$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Peter Howley
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186545
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20042 grants / $10,920

Testing the robustness of newly developed reporting and analyses methods for clinical indicator data$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Peter Howley, Conjoint Professor Robert Gibberd
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183404
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

ASC2004 Australian Statistical Conference in parallel with IBC2004 XXIInd International Biometric Conference, July 11-16, 2004$920

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Peter Howley
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0184164
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20032 grants / $12,340

Employee Attitude Surveys and Human Resource Strategies: A Survey of Businesses in the Hunter Region$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Mark Bray, Associate Professor Peter Howley, Conjoint Professor Kerrie Mengersen
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0182452
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

International Conference on Health Policy Research: Methodological Issues in Health Services and Outcomes Research$2,340

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Peter Howley
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0183723
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current7

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Identifying an Insulin Dosing Strategy for Mixed Meals in Children and Young People with Type 1 Diabetes Using Multiple Daily Injection Therapy PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Optimisation of Glycaemic Control During Exercise in Children with Type 1 Diabetes PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Multivariate Methods PhD (Statistics), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Analysis of Performance Indicators in Oman Higher Education PhD (Statistics), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Bayesian Interval Estimation and Performance Measurement PhD (Statistics), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Impact of Dietary Protein on Postprandial Blood Glucose Levels in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2007 PhD Measuring performance in hospitals and tertiary institutions Statistics, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2013 PhD Improved Estimation and Regression Techniques with the Generalised Lambda Distribution PhD (Statistics), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2010 Masters Statistical Techniques for Analysing and Reporting on Healthcare M Sc (Statistics) [R], Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2010 PhD The Role of Quality Gaps in Assessing the Performance of Management Programs PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 23
Ireland 20
United Kingdom 13
Taiwan, Province of China 5
United States 3
More...
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News

Putting science on the political agenda

September 18, 2018

Associate Professor Peter Howley, has been named as one of ten inaugural ambassadors who will help strengthen the understanding and importance of STEM at a federal level.

New postgraduate programs for jobs of the future

July 3, 2018

Three new postgraduate programs specially designed to prepare students for jobs of the future will be offered at the University of Newcastle (UON).

Statistical Cooperative Rewarded with International Accolade

July 28, 2017

Associate Professor Peter Howley's National Schools' Poster Competition – Australia, announced recipient of the Best Cooperative Project Award 2017

National Awards recognise teaching excellence at UON

September 28, 2015

Dr Peter Howley and Dr Tamara Young receive Citation Awards for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning

Vice-Chancellor's Awards Winners

December 9, 2014

The University of Newcastle celebrates the achievements of staff with the VC's Award Ceremony.

Associate Professor Peter Howley

Position

Associate Professor
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Statistics

Contact Details

Email peter.howley@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5518
Fax (02) 4921 6898

Office

Room V226
Building Mathematics Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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