Mrs Pauletta Irwin

Mrs Pauletta Irwin

Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

Pauletta Irwin is a Nursing Lecturer and Simulated Learning Environment Coordinator at the School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle. She focusses on the learning experiences of the student to improve learning outcomes and ultimately translating this to improvements in healthcare practice outcomes. Pauletta has a strong history in various simulation platforms in her years of employment in the tertiary sector. Pauletta’s doctoral research considers the nature of learning in a virtual world for undergraduate nursing students. She has led several innovative projects where virtual simulation has been piloted to teach nursing students skills such as holistic assessments, post graduate mental health students home environment assessments, and an international study examining a shared learning space with international students. Leadership on these projects has led to sustained partnerships with tertiary (national and international) and healthcare sectors. A committee member of the Faculty of Health and Medicine’s Centre of Excellence in Simulation, Pauletta is developing several interdisciplinary simulations that seek to improve student learning and capacity in the workforce. Throughout her academic career Pauletta has maintained collaborative relationships with health industry partners also in various positions that have supported the goal of improved student learning. Pauletta still practices clinically and has had a diverse clinical career and acknowledges this as being invaluable in the classroom setting where she can share her experiences to assist in student learning.


Qualifications

  • Master of Professional Education &Training Systems, Deakin University
  • Graduate Certificate in Critical Care Nursing, NSW College of Nursing

Keywords

  • Adult education
  • Simulation
  • Reflection
  • Nursing
  • Qualitative research

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
30/06/2016 -  Simulation learning environment coordinator School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence and Contribution to Student Learning : Faculty of Health and Medicine
The University of Newcastle
2017 Teaching Excellence and Contribution to Student Learning:School of Nursing and Midwifery
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle

Recipient

Year Award
2017 World Teacher's Day Award
Australian College of Educators

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
NURS2202 Clinical Practice 2B
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle
Course Coordinator 5/06/2017 - 31/12/2017
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Irwin P, Coutts R, 'Learning through Reflection. SPROUT: A Schema to Teach Reflective Practice', Journal of Education and Practice, 8 1-8 (2017) [C1]
2015 Irwin P, Coutts R, 'A systematic review of the experience of using second life in the education of undergraduate nurses', Journal of Nursing Education, 54 572-577 (2015) [C1]

© SLACK Incorporated. BACKGROUND: The virtual world of Second Life® is an emerging technology that is being considered as a simulation methodology for the education of professiona... [more]

© SLACK Incorporated. BACKGROUND: The virtual world of Second Life® is an emerging technology that is being considered as a simulation methodology for the education of professionals. Particularly for nursing, the adoption of simulation, although a response to technological advancement, is occurring during changes in population health care needs, the resultant impact on the workforce, and also the changing profile of students. METHOD: This systematic review aimed to establish the current applications of Second Life in the education of undergraduate nursing students. Databases searched were CINAHL®, Medline®, Education Research Complete¿, ERIC¿, Computers and Applied Sciences Complete¿, and Library, Information Sciences and Technology¿. RESULTS: Fourteen studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Evidence identified included the themes of transferability from theory to practice, focus on learner centeredness, and evaluative processes. CONCLUSION: This review demonstrates that positive learning outcomes are achievable in Second Life. Evaluative research is in an early stage, and further investigation is warranted.

DOI 10.3928/01484834-20150916-05
Citations Scopus - 6
2014 Van de Mortel TF, Whitehair LP, Irwin PM, 'A whole-of-curriculum approach to improving nursing students' applied numeracy skills', Nurse Education Today, 34 462-467 (2014) [C1]

Background: Nursing students often perform poorly on numeracy tests. Whilst one-off interventions have been trialled with limited success, a whole-of-curriculum approach may provi... [more]

Background: Nursing students often perform poorly on numeracy tests. Whilst one-off interventions have been trialled with limited success, a whole-of-curriculum approach may provide a better means of improving applied numeracy skills. Objective: The objective of the study is to assess the efficacy of a whole-of-curriculum approach in improving nursing students' applied numeracy skills. Design: Two cycles of assessment, implementation and evaluation of strategies were conducted following a high fail rate in the final applied numeracy examination in a Bachelor of Nursing (BN) programme. Strategies included an early diagnostic assessment followed by referral to remediation, setting the pass mark at 100% for each of six applied numeracy examinations across the programme, and employing a specialist mathematics teacher to provide consistent numeracy teaching. Setting: The setting of the study is one Australian university. Participants: 1035 second and third year nursing students enrolled in four clinical nursing courses (CNC III, CNC IV, CNC V and CNC VI) were included. Methods: Data on the percentage of students who obtained 100% in their applied numeracy examination in up to two attempts were collected from CNCs III, IV, V and VI between 2008 and 2011. A four by two ¿ 2 contingency table was used to determine if the differences in the proportion of students achieving 100% across two examination attempts in each CNC were significantly different between 2008 and 2011. Results: The percentage of students who obtained 100% correct answers on the applied numeracy examinations was significantly higher in 2011 than in 2008 in CNC III (¿ 2 =272, 3; p < 0.001), IV (¿ 2 =94.7, 3; p < 0.001) and VI (¿ 2 =76.3, 3; p < 0.001). Conclusions: A whole-of-curriculum approach to developing applied numeracy skills in BN students resulted in a substantial improvement in these skills over four years. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2013.04.024
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Usher K, Woods C, Casella E, Glass N, Wilson R, Mayner L, et al., 'Australian health professions student use of social media', Collegian, 21 95-101 (2014) [C1]

Increased bandwidth, broadband network availability and improved functionality have enhanced the accessibility and attractiveness of social media. The use of the Internet by highe... [more]

Increased bandwidth, broadband network availability and improved functionality have enhanced the accessibility and attractiveness of social media. The use of the Internet by higher education students has markedly increased. Social media are already used widely across the health sector but little is currently known of the use of social media by health profession students in Australia. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to explore health profession students' use of social media and their media preferences for sourcing information. An electronic survey was made available to health profession students at ten participating universities across most Australian states and territories. Respondents were 637 first year students and 451 final year students. The results for first and final year health profession students indicate that online media is the preferred source of information with only 20% of students nominating traditional peer-reviewed journals as a preferred information source. In addition, the results indicate that Facebook ® usage was high among all students while use of other types of social media such as Twitter ® remains comparatively low.As health profession students engage regularly with social media, and this use is likely to grow rather than diminish, educational institutions are challenged to consider the use of social media as a validated platform for learning and teaching. © 2014 Australian College of Nursing Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2014.02.004
Citations Scopus - 26
2011 Irwin P, Warelow P, Wells S, 'Flexible delivery: On-line versus bottom-line', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 29 55-62 (2011) [C1]
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Conference (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Gregory S, Gregory B, Wood D, Grant S, Nikolic S, Hillier M, et al., 'Me, us and IT: Insiders views of the complex technical, organisational and personal elements in using virtual worlds in education', Towoomba, Australia (2017) [E1]
2017 Coutts R, Irwin P, 'SPROUT: An innovative schema to teach reflective practice', Coutts, R. & Irwin, P. (Showcase Presentation) SPROUT: An innovative schema to teach reflective practice, Southern Cross University (2017)
2017 Irwin P, O'Brien A, Browne G, Inder K, Williams C, Morris A, 'Using VR environmental simulation and case based learning to develop post graduate mental health nursing mental status assessment.', Sydney (2017)
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Tony Obrien
2012 Irwin P, Ellis A, Graham I, 'Virtual WIL: A Collaborative approach to Work Integrated Learning using a virtual world', Australian Collaborative Education Network National Conference, Geelong, Vic. (2012) [E1]
Show 1 more conference
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Research Projects

Me, Us and IT: Insiders views of the complex technical, organisational and personal elements in using virtual worlds in education 2017


Using VR environmental simulation and case based learning to develop post graduate mental health nursing mental status assessment 2017

This project aims to evaluate the use of virtual simulation technology delivered as part of course work within the post graduate offering of Therapeutic Engagement and Psychosocial Interventions (NURS6035). A mixed methods approach will be employed where student participants will be invited to complete a short questionnaire and provide written responses to open ended questions about their satisfaction and self-confidence in learning and participating in the simulation activity. Additional data collected from the device software will provide an overall view of decisions participants’ made during the simulation. Invited participants will be post graduate students enrolled in NURS6035 who are in attendance at the on campus workshop.


An exploration of undergraduate nursing and midwifery student's attitudes and views towards domestic violence. Stage 2 2017

It is a National low-risk survey study of pre-registration nursing and midwifery students’ self-reported attitudes and views towards domestic violence.   This study follows from an earlier study conducted with nursing students from Southern Cross University that validated a measurement instrument that will be employed in the study.  


Telehealth education for undergraduate and post graduate health students: exploring the role of simulation 2017


Learning through reflection. SPROUT: An innovative schema to teach reflective practice 2016 - 2018


Undergraduate nursing students' use of virtual simulation to develop decision making and prioritisation skills: a pilot 2017 - 2018


Developing empathy: undergraduate nursing students use of ALEX 2017 - 2018


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Mrs Pauletta Irwin

Position

Lecturer
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email pauletta.irwin@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 65816358
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