Mr Michael Donovan

Mr Michael Donovan

Senior Lecturer

Indigenous Education and Research (Indigenous Education)

In our own backyard

Using student voices as evidence, Michael Donovan is looking to improve the schooling experience for all Indigenous Australians.

Michael Donovan's work is as valuable as it is value-laden. Simply focused on finding the best ways to engage Aboriginal children and adolescents in education, the early career researcher's qualitative studies are also as interdisciplinary as they are innovative, straddling the pedagogical and professional development arenas and dovetailing into leadership.

"I concentrate on the compulsory schooling years," he elaborates.

"The aim is to make learning easy, fun and worthwhile."

At the same time concerned about the inequalities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, Michael is committed to formally addressing disadvantage and its deep, underlying causes too.

“There is one population within our society that sits at the negative end of all the social indicators – education being no different to health or housing ownership or heart disease,” he affirms.

"While policies like 'Close the Gap' have resulted in some improvements, there is still a long way to go."

"I recently presented data at the United Nations, for example, which demonstrates that apparent retention rates through secondary school are only on the increase because the government has upped the leaving age."

"There is no point in painting half a picture."

From all angles

Fuelled by this perceived need for "systemic change," Michael commenced a PhD in 2006 at the University of Newcastle. Originally pinned as a fastidious exploration of quality teaching, the ongoing probe has since morphed into an inquiry of sorts, seeking to ask – and answer – what it means for schools to be "positive learning environments" for Aboriginal students.

"I spoke to local communities before pushing ahead with the idea," he recalls.

"Working with this cohort and being an Aboriginal person myself, I felt cultural protocols were very important."

"I sought the advice of the Aboriginal Education Consultative Group as well."

Taking a targeted approach to his research project, Michael proceeded to contact several schools in the area.

"I ended up picking eight sites and 50 students," he comments.

"Four schools were selected from a specific region that had significant numbers of Aboriginal students that covered urban and rural communities"

"The other half very much related to Aboriginal society, with low socioeconomic statuses, regional locations and multiple linguistic features - with one school selected being considered an elite school that has strong mentoring program to support the Aboriginal students in residence."

Straight to the source

Armed with just three questions, Michael spent twelve months conducting interviews with his young participants across NSW schools. Wanting to find out what makes good teachers, good curriculums and good schools, the Wollotuka Institute affiliate has been busy comparing student perspectives with those of pedagogical theorists too.

"The experts have had their say, Indigenous communities have had their say, and now kids are finally getting a turn," he smiles.

"Yarning circles allowed us all to sit down as equals and informally discuss our understandings of schooling."

Finding there to be "a lot" of common ground where views on teaching and learning are concerned, Michael is now in the process of firming up conclusions for his long-awaited thesis.

"Cultural responsiveness, close relationships and a focus on interactivity are so far sticking out as key," he shares.

"Something that really surprised me though is that creative arts and performance-making are what students most enjoy and identify with."

"It's also appreciated when educators are able to be flexible and adapt to different classroom situations."

"Good pedagogical practice should be teachers' bread and butter."

Bold and bright

A passionate academic, Michael is keen to pursue more research opportunities in the not-so-distant future. The multitasking lecturer already has a handful of proposals in mind, hoping to make each a profitable offshoot of his near-complete doctoral dissertation.

"Some follow-up questions are big and others are small," he describes.

"What Aboriginal people say about good educational practices hasn't changed much over the last three or so decades, however."

"The Western world is just starting to catch up and learn these ideas."

Dually interested in human rights, Michael is planning to take on some comparative work too.

"I want to study other Indigenous populations," he asserts.

"A lot has been done in New Zealand and the United States in this regard."

Michael Donovan

In our own backyard

Using student voices as evidence, Michael Donovan is looking to improve the schooling experience for all Indigenous Australians.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

I am a Gumbaynggir man from the north coast of NSW, but I grew up in the western suburbs of Sydney. I have a mixed academic history starting with completing my HSC then training to be an Enrolled Nurse at Concorde Repatriation Hospital, from enjoying health I studied Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). After moving to the Hunter valley after a few years practcing TCM I worked in a primary school as an Aboriginal Education Assistant (AEA) and began a teaching degree through a residential program.

My Bachelor of Teaching (Primary) and Bachelor of Teaching (Honours) at the University of Western Sydney (UWS) were completed through an Aboriginal identified residential program, AREP. This meant that my studies were completed in an away-from-base mode but also I was away from the University setting and distanced from my academic support and my academic supervision. These issues did make some aspects of studies difficult and slowed my progress. I am also the first male Aboriginal Honours graduate at UWS. I am also the only graduate to complete an Honours program through the AREP or away-from-base mode.

I started working in higher education as a short term change from schools in Wollotuka at the University of Newcastle and primarily focussed on teaching, including across all the courses in the Bachelor Of Aboriginal Studies and the mandatory Aboriginal studies course within all education programs at University of Newcastle. 

In 2004 I started my journey in research particularly Aboriginal educational research through winning a position as an Academic Partner for the Australian Government Quality Teacher Program (AGQTP) in 2004, this project included, providing professional learning about the NSW Quality Teaching model, supporting teaching practice and identifying means of developing teaching perspectives, reflecting on and analysing actions resulting from professional development and supporting the preparation of the final action research report. This project was with the Nyngan schools cluster. These schools were introducing to the Quality Teaching Framework and I supported their understandings and worked with them to incorporate this into various key learning areas across the Primary and High School curriculum. 

I enrolled as a part-time student in a Doctorate of Education in late 2006 investigating "WHat form(s) of pedagogy are necessary for increasing the engagement of Aboriignal school students?".

Research Expertise
I have worked within Aboriginal education since the early 1990's from an Aboriginal education worker in schools through to doing a PhD in pedagogical practices to support Aboriginal students. Key areas of expertise and interest in my work include: * Engagement of Aboriginal Cultural Knowledge (ACK) in supporting Aboriginal students * Aboriginal education * Aboriginal pedagogical practices * Working with Aboriginal communities * Engaging ACK into teaching practices * NSW Quality Teaching framework * Comparative Indigenous cultures * Use of Information Communication Tools (ICT) in supporting education Peer Reviewed Journal Publication Donovan, M., & Heitmeyer, D. (2000) “To Get the Black Point Across: Linking Technology to Aboriginal Voices” Edited G. Partington in online journal and conference articles. Perth, Edith Cowan University Press. Donovan, M. (2002) “Outcamps: Education Centres to Suit the Needs of Indigenous Communities” Common Ground Publishing, Altona, Victoria. Donovan. M., (2003) “To Watch, Hear and Re-Learn: Electronic Revitalisation Tools for the Gumbaynggir Aboriginal Language. “ Common Ground Publishing, Altona, Victoria. Donovan, M., (2007) “Do Aboriginal Knowledge and Western Education Mix? (To get Aboriginal Cultural Knowledge in schools to make all the kids smile)” In The International Journal of the Humanities, edited by Tom Nairn & Mary Kalantzis, Common Ground Publishing, Melbourne. 5 (5), 99-104. Donovan, M., (2009) Quality Teaching and Aboriginal students, a NSW model, in the Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues, edited by Andrew Gunstone, Monash University, Churchill, Victoria. 12 (1-4),104-115. Donovan, M., (2011) Aboriginal landscapes and their place in the classroom, In The International Journal of Science in Society, edited by Bill Cope and Michael Peters, Common Ground Publishing, Melbourne, 12 (3), 243-252. Donovan, M., (in press) Aboriginal Cultural Knowledge it lives in my town. Urban communities and engagement of Aboriginal students, Aboriginal Studies Press, Canberra. Peer Reviewed Book Chapter Donovan, M., (2007) “Can Information Communication Technological Tools Be Used to Suit Aboriginal Learning Pedagogies?” edited by Laurel Evelyn Dyson, Max Hendriks and Stephen Grant, in Indigenous People and Information Technology, Idea Publishers Research Grants Assoc. Prof James Ladwig; Mr Michael Donovan; Dr Wendy Amosa, 2006-2007, “Quality teaching and the cultural knowledge of Aboriginal students in NSW”. NSW Department of Education and Training, Research Grant $50,000 Michael Donovan, 2007-2008 “Analysis of the effectiveness of the NSW Quality Teaching framework in increasing Aboriginal students' educational outcomes”. Australian Research Council, Research Grant $60,000 Michael Donovan, 2007, “Travel to the 5th International Conference on the New Directions in Humanities at the American University, Paris France” University of Newcastle, Umuliko Research Grant $7000 Michael Donovan, 2008 “When Aboriginal language comes to Schools does Aboriginal culture follow?” University of Newcastle Equity Research Fund $23,000 Dr Wendy Elsworth, Michael Donovan, 2010-2011 “Regional Partner Research Team of Stronger Smarter Learning Communities; NSW Hunter Central Coast Region Evaluation Case Study, The Stronger Smarter Institute, Research Grant $170,011 Dr Wendy Elsworth, Michael Donovan, 2010-2011, “Regional Partner Research Team of Stronger Smarter Learning Communities; North & Western Regional NSWEvaluation Case Study, The Stronger Smarter Institute, Research Grant $121,856 Michael Donovan, 2010- 2011 , “Situational analysis of key aspects of the well being of Aboriginal residents in the Upper Hunter Valley” Analysis Case Study, Coal & Allied, Rio Tinto Coal Australia, Research Grant $46,300

Teaching Expertise
I teach across a variety of Aboriginal Studies areas and have taught in the entire program presented by Wollotuka School of Aboriginal Studies. Currently I teach across a series of course within Aboriginal Studies including education, human rights, traditional Aboriginal society and comparative Indigenous cultures. I am also teaching in the Masters Coursework program. These courses include, " ABOR1370 Working with Aboriginal Communities " ABOR3120 Contemporary Aboriginal Society " ABOR2380 Interpreting the law: Aboriginal customary law & Western law " ABOR3500 Aboriginal education policy & issues " ABOR1330 Traditional Aboriginal society " ABOR3250 Comparative Indigenous culture 2 " ABOR3380 Human rights & the worlds Indigenous Communities " ABOR1110 Introduction to Aboriginal society " ABOR6006 Switching Black power back on in Indigenous learning

Administrative Expertise
I have worked in many various administrative roles within the Wollotuka School of Aboriginal Studies in the academic and Aboriginal support roles within the school. Academically I have been a course coordinator across a series of courses within the school in both undergraduate and course Masters Courses. I have been the academic coordinator within the School and have organised the academic course and staff workloads to maintain these course. I have re-established the Aboriginal research centre within Wollotuka and co-ordinated the research arm of the school including establishing the schools confirmation process and various Aboriginal student and staff research workshops. I have been the Indigenous Support Coordinator this position manager the Indigenous support staff within Wollotuka and support the social and academic needs of the 300 to 350 Indigenous students at the University of Newcastle. I have also worked as the promotional officer for Wollotuka which included visiting schools and career expos to engage Indigenous students into considering applying to the University of Newcastle. I coordinate the schools Aboriginal education course that includes approximately 1000 education students per each year across 3 campuses. This course in a mandatory element for all education students including 2nd year Primary school education students, 4th year Early childhood and secondary education students and Masters of Teaching students. 


Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Teaching (Honours), University of Western Sydney
  • Bachelor of Teaching (Primary), University of Western Sydney

Keywords

  • Pedagogy
  • Quality Teaching
  • Aboriginal Studies
  • Aboriginal pedagogy
  • Aboriginal education
  • Aboriginal communities and ICT
  • Comparative Indigenous cultures
  • Working with Aboriginal communities
  • Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples
  • Working with Aboriginal communities

Languages

  • Aboriginal English, so described (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
080601 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Information and Knowledge Systems 30
130299 Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified 25
130301 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education 45

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
Indigenous Education and Research
Australia
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
The Wollotuka Institute
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2007 - 1/12/2008 Fellowship

ARC - Discovery - Indigenous Researchers' Development

ARC
Australia
1/08/1996 -  Aboriginal Education Assistant Windale Primary School
The Wollotuka Institute
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Aboriginal Community Representative NSW Board Of Studies Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
ABOR3500 Aborignal Education Policy and Issues
University of Newcastle
This course is primarily designed for students wishing to undertake a teaching career. The course addresses Aboriginal education and social policies that have impacted on Aboriginal communities, particularly in NSW; cultural differences and related pedagogues; teaching strategies, including anti racism strategies; and the inclusion of the Aboriginal community in the delivery of knowledge within the schooling system
Course coordinator 1/07/1997 - 22/07/2017
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Donovan MJ, Cordon-Cardo C, 'Predicting high-risk disease using tissue biomarkers', Active Surveillance for Localized Prostate Cancer: A New Paradigm for Clinical Management 23-34 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/978-1-61779-912-9_3
Citations Scopus - 1
2007 Donovan MJ, 'Can Information Communication Technological Tools be Used to Suit Aboriginal Learning Pedagogies', Information Technology and Indigenous People, IGI Global, Hershey 93-104 (2007) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 10

Journal article (20 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Donovan M, 'Local collaboration to grow the seeds of STEM investment from school and beyond', International Journal of Innovation in Science and Mathematics Education, 26 3-13 (2018)

© 2018, Institute for Innovation in Science and Mathematics Education. How to engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students with Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathe... [more]

© 2018, Institute for Innovation in Science and Mathematics Education. How to engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students with Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) curriculum and disciplines is a question being argued across many educational forums. From the examination of the opinions of Aboriginal high school students in a PhD thesis, Aboriginal students stated that they follow teachers, not content. Relationship is one of the key foundations of working with Aboriginal students. Many educational pedagogical theorists argue the significance of the teacher-student relationship and the gaining of an understanding about all students to engage students to their education. So, what is important or different about the relationship between Aboriginal students and their teachers? The Aboriginal student participants in this study reinforced the importance of relationship in context to an Aboriginal student standpoint. Where the Aboriginal student and their Indigeneity is at the centre of the relationship and mandating that the teachers' pedagogical practices need to embrace them. Aboriginal high school students from a variety of diverse socio-economic, cultural and geographical areas across New South Wales (NSW) were asked about what aspects of their schools, teachers and curriculum that engaged them to their education. The Aboriginal students stated that connecting with teachers, engaging with their culture and basing their learning in real world understandings are key to initiating their learning including engaging with STEM. The Aboriginal students' standpoint was based on their Aboriginality and for many non-Aboriginal teachers gaining an understanding from an Aboriginal standpoint was culturally foreign. Through teachers embedding aspects of Aboriginal cultural practice into their curriculum and engaging with examples of cultural relevance will allow for seeds of scientific inquiry so Aboriginal students' STEM discoveries can be nurtured into STEM careers and fields of study.

2018 Donovan MJ, 'Local Collaboration to Grow the Seeds of Stem Investment from School and Beyond', International Journal of Innovation in Science and Mathematics Education, 26 3-13 (2018)
2015 Donovan MJ, 'Aboriginal student stories, the missing voice to guide us towards change', Australian Educational Researcher, 42 613-625 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, The Australian Association for Research in Education, Inc. Despite decades of policy and practice oriented at improving educational outcomes for Aboriginal students in Aus... [more]

© 2015, The Australian Association for Research in Education, Inc. Despite decades of policy and practice oriented at improving educational outcomes for Aboriginal students in Australia, achievements on most measures indicate that there is a long way to go in this endeavour. One avenue for improving Aboriginal education that has received little attention is accessing the views of Aboriginal students themselves about best practice in engaging Aboriginal students. While there is a body of research in education that attempts to privilege ¿student voices,¿ little work has explicitly focussed on accessing the voices of Aboriginal students. This paper reports on my study that involved asking Aboriginal students their views on schools, teachers and the curriculum in culturally safe discussion spaces. The Aboriginal students highlighted the need for their culture to be represented at schools and the recognition of their Aboriginality in safe environments at school. These findings reinforce the importance of engaging with Aboriginal people in the development of best practice so as to build Aboriginal understandings within a Western educational system.

DOI 10.1007/s13384-015-0182-3
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2012 Graversen JA, Suh LK, Mues AC, Korets R, Donovan MJ, Khan FM, et al., 'Independent diagnostic and post-treatment prognostic models for prostate cancer demonstrate significant correlation with disease progression end points', Journal of Endourology, 26 451-456 (2012)

Background and Purpose: A major advance in the standard practice of tissue-based pathology is the new discipline of systems pathology (SP) that uses computational modeling to comb... [more]

Background and Purpose: A major advance in the standard practice of tissue-based pathology is the new discipline of systems pathology (SP) that uses computational modeling to combine clinical, pathologic, and molecular measurements to predict biologic activity. Recently, a SP-based prostate cancer (PCa) predictive model for both preoperative (Px+) and postoperative (Px) prostatectomy has been developed. The purpose of this study is to calculate the percent agreement and the concordance between the Px+ and Px end points. Patients and Methods: Fifty-three patients underwent robot-assisted prostatectomy for PCa, and had Px+ and Px testing performed. Data were collected on Px+ end points and Px end points along with pathologic specimen results. The percent agreement and the degree of correlation between the Px+ and Px end points were then calculated. Results: The percent agreement (PA) between Px+ end points and Px end points ranged from 77% to 87%. The PA between a high Px+ favorable pathology (FP) classification and dominant Gleason score =3 and Gleason sum =6 was 71.7% and 37.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis, Px+ disease progression (DP) score significantly correlated with Px prostate-specific antigen recurrence (PSAR) score (P < 0.001), while Px+ DP probability significantly correlated with PxPSAR probability (P < 0.001). Px+ FP probability significantly correlated with postprostatectomy dominant Gleason grade =3 (P < 0.001) and Gleason sum (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The PA between Px+ and Px testing end points for radical prostatectomy patients was very good. Furthermore, there was a direct cor relation between most Px+ and Px end points. While the Px+FP classification and Gleason sum demonstrated a poor PA, Px+FP score still maintained a direct correlation to prostatectomy Gleason sum. © Copyright 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

DOI 10.1089/end.2011.0192
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Donovan MJ, Khan FM, Powell D, Bayer-Zubek V, Cordon-Cardo C, Costa J, et al., 'Postoperative systems models more accurately predict risk of significant disease progression than standard risk groups and a 10-year postoperative nomogram: Potential impact on the receipt of adjuvant therapy after surgery', BJU International, 109 40-45 (2012)

Objective: To compare the performance of a systems-based risk assessment tool with standard defined risk groups and the 10-year postoperative nomogram for predicting disease progr... [more]

Objective: To compare the performance of a systems-based risk assessment tool with standard defined risk groups and the 10-year postoperative nomogram for predicting disease progression, including biochemical relapse and clinical (systemic) failure. Patients and Methods: Clinical variables, biometric profiles and outcome Results from a training cohort comprising 373 patients in a published postoperative systems-based prognostic model were obtained. Patients were stratified according to D'Amico standard risk groups, Kattan 10-year postoperative nomogram and prognostic scores from the postoperative tissue model. The association of pathological variables and calculated risk groups with biochemical recurrence and clinical (systemic) failure was assessed using the concordance index (C-index) and hazard ratio (HR). Results: Systems-based post-prostatectomy models to predict significant disease progression (post-treatment clinical failure) were more accurate than the D'Amico defined risk groups and the Kattan 10-year postoperative nomogram (systems model: C-index, 0.84; HR, 17.46; P < 0.001 vs D'Amico: C-index, 0.73; HR, 11; P= 0.001; 10-year nomogram: C-index, 0.79; HR, 5.06; P < 0.001). The systems models were also more accurate than standard risk groups for predicting prostate-specific antigen recurrence (systems model: C-index, 0.76; HR, 8.94; P < 0.001 vs D'Amico C- index, 0.70; HR, 4.67; P < 0.001) and showed incremental improvement over the 10-year postoperative nomogram (C-index, 0.75; HR, 5.83; P < 0.001). The postoperative tissue model provided additional risk discrimination over surgical margin status and extracapsular extension for predicting disease outcome, and was most significant for the clinical (systemic) failure endpoint (surgical margin: C-index, 0.58; HR, 1.57; P= 0.2; extracapsular extension: C-index, 0.62; HR, 2.06; P= 0.04). Conclusions: Risk assessment models that incorporate characteristics from the patient's own tumour specimen are more accurate than clinical-only nomograms for predicting significant disease outcome. Systems-based tools should provide useful information concerning the appropriate receipt of adjuvant therapy in the post-surgical setting. © 2011 The Authors.

DOI 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2011.10398.x
Citations Scopus - 3
2011 Donovan MJ, 'Aboriginal landscapes and their place in the classroom', The International Journal of Science in Society, 2 243-252 (2011) [C1]
2010 Donovan MJ, Costa J, Cordon-Cardo C, 'Personalized approach to prostate cancer prognosis', Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica, 62 231-239 (2010)

Personalized medicine in the management of patients with prostate cancer is limited to the integration of patient attributes such as age, genetic risk and comorbidities with speci... [more]

Personalized medicine in the management of patients with prostate cancer is limited to the integration of patient attributes such as age, genetic risk and comorbidities with specific clinical-pathologic variables including serum prostate specific antigen (PSA), imaging and features from the diagnostic prostate needle biopsy or prostatectomy specimen including tumor differentiation (i.e. Gleason), volume and extent of disease (i.e. tumor length and / or percentage, number of positive cores at diagnosis or pathologic stage post surgery including margin status). Although the development of various clinical statistical instruments such as nomograms have provided a mechanism to interrogate such variables, most urologists rely on basic prognostic features of stage, grade and PSA along with clinical judgment to define and understand individual risk and predict health outcomes. Furthermore, unlike other tumor types such as breast cancer, there are no routine ancillary diagnostic studies performed on the prostate needle biopsy or prostatectomy specimen to support and refine the treatment decision process for the individual patient. In this review we will provide a summary of the current practice of predictive statistical modeling in prostate cancer and explore how technical advances in functional histology have played a role in the development and incorporation of a systems based platform for providing a patient-specific risk profile useful for clinical decision making.

2010 Donovan MJ, Osman I, Khan FM, Vengrenyuk Y, Capodieci P, Koscuiszka M, et al., 'Androgen receptor expression is associated with prostate cancer-specific survival in castrate patients with metastatic disease', BJU International, 105 462-467 (2010)

Study Type - Aetiology (case series) Level of Evidence 4 Objective To investigate whether baseline (before treatment) clinical variables and tumour specimen characteristics (inclu... [more]

Study Type - Aetiology (case series) Level of Evidence 4 Objective To investigate whether baseline (before treatment) clinical variables and tumour specimen characteristics (including the androgen receptor, AR) from patients with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer can be used to predict the time to prostate cancer-specific mortality and overall survival, as AR levels in prostate cancer have been associated with disease progression, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence and systemic metastasis. Patients and Methods Haematoxylin and eosin (H & E) slides/blocks and outcome data from a 104 castrate patients with metastatic disease (43 prostatectomy and 61 prostate needle biopsy samples), were independently reviewed; H & E morphometry and quantitative immunofluorescence were used to assess the samples. Sections were analysed with a multiplex quantitative immunofluorescence (IF) assay for cytokeratin-18 (epithelial cells), 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (nuclei), p63/high molecular weight keratin (basal cells), AR and a-methyl CoA-racemase. Images were acquired with spectral imaging software and processed for quantification with IF algorithms. Results The median follow-up was 12 years from diagnosis; 49 men (47%) baseline PSA levels of = 20 ng/mL, 55 (53%) had a Gleason sum of 8, 63 (60%) died from the disease and 40% were alive (censored). In all, 66 patients had evaluable IF features, and the association with outcome was evaluated by univariate Cox modelling and support-vector regression. PSA was the only clinical variable associated with outcome (concordance index, CoI, 0.41; P < 0.05, log-rank test). The amount of AR present within tumour nuclei (regardless of tissue provenance and primary treatment) significantly correlated with a greater risk of a shorter time to prostate cancer-specific mortality (CoI 0.36; P < 0.05 log-rank test). There were no H & E features that correlated with mortality. Conclusion By univariate analysis, increased nuclear AR expression in either the diagnostic biopsy and/or radical prostatectomy specimen, from patients with advanced disease, was associated with a reduced time to prostate cancer-specific mortality. © 2009 AUREON LABORATORIES.

DOI 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2009.08747.x
Citations Scopus - 52
2010 Donovan MJ, Costa J, Cordon-Cardo C, 'From systems biology to systems pathology: A new subspecialty in diagnostic and personalized medicine', Current Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine, 8 108-116 (2010)

There has been a fundamental shift in biopharmaceutical research from a linear, systematic investigation to a more whole organism, systems-oriented analysis program. The impetus b... [more]

There has been a fundamental shift in biopharmaceutical research from a linear, systematic investigation to a more whole organism, systems-oriented analysis program. The impetus behind this change is an acknowledgment that the current novel target and drug discovery model was flawed due in part to an overly simplified view of disease biology, i.e., a unidirectional path from one gene to one protein to one mechanism of action. Fortunately, recent technological advancements in whole genome analysis, DNA, RNA, proteome sequencing and mathematical modeling have permanently altered the target discovery landscape. These improvements in high throughput knowledge-creation have facilitated the multi-dimensional interrogation of disease in the context of the whole organism. One of the recently described mechanisms for helping to bridge these investigational studies with clinical medicine has been through the introduction of an analytic modeling platform known as "systems pathology". The derived systems-based pathology models use the patients' own clinical data and intact tissue specimens to construct a baseline phenotype for defining a clinical risk state. These biologic-quantitative models also provide a biomarker profile which can be linked to treatment and health outcomes. This paper presents the rationale and implementation of systems biology in the area of translational medicine and a practical clinical application, i.e., systems pathology. By incorporating high dimensional genome analysis and disease modeling efforts such as systems pathology, we illustrate how such advancements have helped bring systems biology to the clinic but have also served to make the medical decision and treatment algorithms a more patient-specific paradigm. © 2010 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

2009 Donovan MJ, 'Quality teaching and aboriginal students, a NSW model', Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues, 12 104-115 (2009) [C1]
2007 Donovan MJ, 'Do Aboriginal knowledge and western education mix?: To get Aboriginal cultural knowledge in schools to make all the kids smile', International Journal of the Humanities, 5 1-5 (2007) [C1]
2007 Cordon-Cardo C, Kotsianti A, Verbel DA, Teverovskiy M, Capodieci P, Hamann S, et al., 'Improved prediction of prostate cancer recurrence through systems pathology', Journal of Clinical Investigation, 117 1876-1883 (2007)

We have developed an integrated, multidisciplinary methodology, termed systems pathology, to generate highly accurate predictive tools for complex diseases, using prostate cancer ... [more]

We have developed an integrated, multidisciplinary methodology, termed systems pathology, to generate highly accurate predictive tools for complex diseases, using prostate cancer for the prototype. To predict the recurrence of prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy, defined by rising serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), we used machine learning to develop a model based on clinicopathologic variables, histologic tumor characteristics, and cell type-specific quantification of biomarkers. The initial study was based on a cohort of 323 patients and identified that high levels of the androgen receptor, as detected by immunohistochemistry, were associated with a reduced time to PSA recurrence. The model predicted recurrence with high accuracy, as indicated by a concordance index in the validation set of 0.82, sensitivity of 96%, and specificity of 72%. We extended this approach, employing quantitative multiplex immunofluorescence, on an expanded cohort of 682 patients. The model again predicted PSA recurrence with high accuracy, concordance index being 0.77, sensitivity of 77% and specificity of 72%. The androgen receptor was selected, along with 5 clinicopathologic features (seminal vesicle invasion, biopsy Gleason score, extracapsular extension, preoperative PSA, and dominant prostatectomy Gleason grade) as well as 2 histologic features (texture of epithelial nuclei and cytoplasm in tumor only regions). This robust platform has broad applications in patient diagnosis, treatment management, and prognostication.

DOI 10.1172/JCI31399
Citations Scopus - 89
2007 Donovan MJ, Paulino G, Raybould HE, 'CCK

Cholecystokinin (CCK), released by lipid in the intestine, initiates satiety by acting at cholecystokinin type 1 receptors (CCK 1 Rs) located on vagal afferent nerve terminals loc... [more]

Cholecystokinin (CCK), released by lipid in the intestine, initiates satiety by acting at cholecystokinin type 1 receptors (CCK 1 Rs) located on vagal afferent nerve terminals located in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, we determined the role of the CCK 1 R in the short term effects of a high fat diet on daily food intake and meal patterns using mice in which the CCK 1 R gene is deleted. CCK 1 R -/- and CCK 1 R +/+ mice were fed isocaloric high fat (HF) or low fat (LF) diets ad libitum for 18¿h each day and meal size, meal frequency, intermeal interval, and meal duration were determined. Daily food intake was unaltered by diet in the CCK 1 R -/- compared to CCK 1 R +/+ mice. However, meal size was larger in the CCK 1 R -/- mice compared to CCK 1 R +/+ mice when fed a HF diet, with a concomitant decrease in meal frequency. Meal duration was increased in mice fed HF diet regardless of phenotype. In addition, CCK 1 R -/- mice fed a HF diet had a 75% decrease in the time to 1st meal compared to CCK 1 R +/+ mice following a 6¿h fast. These data suggest that lack of the CCK 1 R results in diminished satiation, causing altered meal patterns including larger, less frequent meals when fed a high fat diet. These results suggest that the CCK 1 R is involved in regulating caloric intake on a meal to meal basis, but that other factors are responsible for regulation of daily food intake. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2007.07.003
Citations Scopus - 36
2007 Muss HB, Bunn JY, Crocker A, Plaut K, Koh J, Heintz N, et al., 'Cyclin D-1, interleukin-6, HER-2/neu, transforming growth factor receptor-II and prediction of relapse in women with early stage, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer treated with tamoxifen', Breast Journal, 13 337-345 (2007)

We hypothesized that amplification or overexpression of HER-2 (c-erbB-2), the Ki-67 antigen (Mib1), cyclin D-1 (CD1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), or the transforming growth factor beta ... [more]

We hypothesized that amplification or overexpression of HER-2 (c-erbB-2), the Ki-67 antigen (Mib1), cyclin D-1 (CD1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), or the transforming growth factor beta II receptor, (TGFßRII), would predict relapse in women with early stage, estrogen (ER) and/or progesterone receptor (PR) positive breast cancer treated with tamoxifen. Conditional logistic regression models and a new novel analytic method - support vector machines (SVM) were used to assess the effect of multiple variables on treatment outcome. All patients had stage I-IIIa breast cancer (AJCC version 5). We paired 63 patients who were disease-free on or after tamoxifen with 63 patients who had relapsed (total 126); both disease-free and relapsed patients were matched by duration of tamoxifen therapy and time to recurrence. These 126 patients also served as the training set for SVM analysis and 18 other patients used as a validation set for SVM. In a multivariate analysis, larger tumor size, increasing extent of lymph node involvement, and poorer tumor grade were significant predictors of relapse. When HER-2 or CD1 were added to the model both were borderline significant predictors of relapse. The SVM model, after including all of the clinical and marker variables in the 126 patients as a training set, correctly predicted relapse in 78% of the 18 patient validation samples. In this trial, HER-2 and CD1 proved of borderline significance as predictive factors for recurrence on tamoxifen. An SVM model that included all clinical and biologic variables correctly predicted relapse in > 75% of patients. © 2007 Copyright the Authors.

DOI 10.1111/j.1524-4741.2007.00440.x
Citations Scopus - 10
2003 Donovan MJ, 'To Watch, Hear and Re-Learn: Electronic Revitalisation Tools for the Gumbaynggir Aboriginal Language', International Journal of the Book, 1 423-431 (2003) [C1]
2002 Donovan M, 'Outcamps: Education Centres to Suit the Needs of Indigenous Communities', International Journal of Learning, 8 (2002) [C1]
1998 Takahashi K, Donovan MJ, Rogers RA, Ezekowitz RAB, 'Distribution of murine mannose receptor expression from early embryogenesis through to adulthood', Cell and Tissue Research, 292 311-323 (1998)

The mannose receptor is a 175-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that appears to be expressed on the surface of terminally differentiated macrophages and Langerhans cells. The ectodom... [more]

The mannose receptor is a 175-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that appears to be expressed on the surface of terminally differentiated macrophages and Langerhans cells. The ectodomain of the mannose receptor has eight carbohydrate recognition domains. The receptor recognizes the patterns of sugars that adorn a wide array of bacteria, parasites, yeast, fungi, and mannosylated ligands. Clearance studies in whole animals have localized radiolabeled ligands, such as mannosylated bovine serum albumen, not only to macrophages, but also to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. Hitherto, there has been no comprehensive analysis of expression of the mannose receptor in embryonic and adult mouse tissues. In this study, we have undertaken a systematic survey of the expression of the mannose receptor from early embryogenesis through to adulthood. The mannose receptor is expressed on tissue macrophages throughout the adult mouse as expected. However, the mannose receptor is first observed on embryonic day 9 on cells that line blood island vessel walls in the yolk sac. The mannose receptor is localized on sinusoidal endothelial cells in embryonic liver by embryonic day 11 and in bone marrow at embryonic day 17. This pattern persists in these organs throughout embryogenesis into adulthood when sinusoidal endothelial cells of lymph nodes also express the mannose receptor. The receptor is also found on lymphatic endothelial cells of small intestine. In contrast, sinusoids of spleen and thymus do not express mannose receptor antigen. This study demonstrates that the mannose receptor is expressed on tissue macrophages and on subsets of vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells. Thus, the mannose receptor maybe a marker of the so-called reticuloendothelial system.

DOI 10.1007/s004410051062
Citations Scopus - 73
1998 Kozakewich HPW, Perez-Atayde AR, Donovan MJ, Fletcher JA, Estroff JA, Shamberger RC, Diller L, 'Cystic neuroblastoma: Emphasis on gene expression, morphology, and pathogenesis', Pediatric and Developmental Pathology, 1 17-28 (1998)

Cystic neuroblastoma (CN) is an unusual variant of neuroblastoma characterized by a grossly visible cyst(s) and almost always distinctive microcysts on light microscopy. Rarely, C... [more]

Cystic neuroblastoma (CN) is an unusual variant of neuroblastoma characterized by a grossly visible cyst(s) and almost always distinctive microcysts on light microscopy. Rarely, CN will appear solid grossly, but microcystification will be present. We examined the clinical, pathologic, and biologic features of 17 cases of CN. The majority of CN had been detected by prenatal ultrasound. The tumors were favorable stage, stroma-poor, but with low or intermediate mitotic-karyorhectic indices and had favorable biologic markers reflected by aneuploidy and by an absence of N-myc amplification and chromosome 1p deletions. However, the high trk expression typically identified in good risk tumors was absent. Although the complete natural history of CN is not fully defined, our experience suggests that some tumors progress in size, whereas others may spontaneously regress or mature. The clinical outcome is excellent, as is expected in localized and stage 4S neuroblastoma in infancy.

DOI 10.1007/s100249900003
Citations Scopus - 23
1997 Tessarollo L, Tsoulfas P, Donovan MJ, Palko ME, Blair-Flynn J, Hempstead BL, Parada LF, 'Targeted deletion of all isoforms of the trkC gene suggests the use of alternate receptors by its ligand neurotrophin-3 in neuronal development and implicates trkC in normal cardiogenesis', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 94 14776-14781 (1997)

We have generated null mutant mice that lack expression of all isoforms encoded by the trkC locus. These mice display a behavioral phenotype characterized by a loss of propriocept... [more]

We have generated null mutant mice that lack expression of all isoforms encoded by the trkC locus. These mice display a behavioral phenotype characterized by a loss of proprioceptive neurons. Neuronal counts of sensory ganglia in the trkC mutant mice reveal less severe losses than those in NT-3 null mutant mice, strongly suggesting that NT-3, in vivo, may signal through receptors other than trkC. Mice lacking either NT-3 or all trkC receptor isoforms die in the early postnatal period. Histological examination of trkC-deficient mice reveals severe cardiac defects such as atrial and ventricular septal defects, and valvular defects including pulmonic stenosis. Formation of these structures during development is dependent on cardiac neural crest function. The similarities in cardiac defects observed in the trkC and NT-3 null mutant mice indicate that the trkC receptor mediates most NT-3 effects on the cardiac neural crest.

DOI 10.1073/pnas.94.26.14776
Citations Scopus - 153
1997 Medina LS, Barnes PD, Donovan MJ, Taylor GA, 'Radiologic-pathologic Conference of Children's Hospital Boston: Intraconal mass in the orbit of an infant', Pediatric Radiology, 27 682-684 (1997)

A 16-month-old boy presented with left exophthalmos. He was found to have an enhancing intraconal soft-tissue mass. The differential diagnosis of the mass is discussed. The lesion... [more]

A 16-month-old boy presented with left exophthalmos. He was found to have an enhancing intraconal soft-tissue mass. The differential diagnosis of the mass is discussed. The lesion was proven to be a malignant ectomesenchymoma, a very unusual tumor.

DOI 10.1007/s002470050211
Citations Scopus - 6
Show 17 more journal articles

Conference (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Donovan MJ, 'Capacity building of Aboriginal researchers to get the inside standpoint ¿ asking Aboriginal students what they think', Capacity building of Aboriginal researchers to get the inside standpoint ¿ asking Aboriginal students what they think, Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne, VIC (2017)
2016 Scott R, Khan FM, Zeineh J, Donovan M, Fernandez G, 'Pathological Gleason prediction through gland ring morphometry in immunofluorescent prostate cancer images', Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (2016)

© 2016 SPIE. The Gleason score is the most common architectural and morphological assessment of prostate cancer severity and prognosis. There have been numerous quantitative techn... [more]

© 2016 SPIE. The Gleason score is the most common architectural and morphological assessment of prostate cancer severity and prognosis. There have been numerous quantitative techniques developed to approximate and duplicate the Gleason scoring system. Most of these approaches have been developed in standard H and E brightfield microscopy. Immunofluorescence (IF) image analysis of tissue pathology has recently been proven to be extremely valuable and robust in developing prognostic assessments of disease, particularly in prostate cancer. There have been significant advances in the literature in quantitative biomarker expression as well as characterization of glandular architectures in discrete gland rings. In this work we leverage a new method of segmenting gland rings in IF images for predicting the pathological Gleason; both the clinical and the image specific grade, which may not necessarily be the same. We combine these measures with nuclear specific characteristics as assessed by the MST algorithm. Our individual features correlate well univariately with the Gleason grades, and in a multivariate setting have an accuracy of 85% in predicting the Gleason grade. Additionally, these features correlate strongly with clinical progression outcomes (CI of 0.89), significantly outperforming the clinical Gleason grades (CI of 0.78). This work presents the first assessment of morphological gland unit features from IF images for predicting the Gleason grade.

DOI 10.1117/12.2217277
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Donovan MJ, '"It¿s not the subject it¿s the teacher!¿ What Aboriginal students say about their education', Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mathematics Alliance, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (2016)
2012 Donovan MJ, 'It's all in the way we connect, the importance of relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal teachers and students', International Indigenous Development Research Conference. Keynote Speakers: Biographies and Abstracts, Auckland, NZ (2012) [E3]
2012 Ajemba P, Scott R, Ramachandran J, Liu Q, Khan F, Zeineh J, et al., 'Iterative approach to joint segmentation of cellular structures', Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (2012)

Accurate segmentation of overlapping nuclei is essential in determining nuclei count and evaluating the sub-cellular localization of protein biomarkers in image Cytometry and Hist... [more]

Accurate segmentation of overlapping nuclei is essential in determining nuclei count and evaluating the sub-cellular localization of protein biomarkers in image Cytometry and Histology. Current cellular segmentation algorithms generally lack fast and reliable methods for disambiguating clumped nuclei. In immuno-fluorescence segmentation, solutions to challenges including nuclei misclassification, irregular boundaries, and under-segmentation require reliable separation of clumped nuclei. This paper presents a fast and accurate algorithm for joint segmentation of cellular cytoplasm and nuclei incorporating procedures for reliably separating overlapping nuclei. The algorithm utilizes a combination of ideas and is a significant improvement on state-of-the-art algorithms for this application. First, an adaptive process that includes top-hat filtering, blob detection and distance transforms estimates the inverse illumination field and corrects for intensity non-uniformity. Minimum-error-thresholding based binarization augmented by statistical stability estimation is applied prior to seed-detection constrained by a distance-map-based scale-selection to identify candidate seeds for nuclei segmentation. The nuclei clustering step also incorporates error estimation based on statistical stability. This enables the algorithm to perform localized error correction. Final steps include artifact removal and reclassification of nuclei objects near the cytoplasm boundary as epithelial or stroma. Evaluation using 48 realistic phantom images with known ground-truth shows overall segmentation accuracy exceeding 96%. It significantly outperformed two state-of-the-art algorithms in clumped nuclei separation. Tests on 926 prostate biopsy images (326 patients) show that the segmentation improvement improves the predictive power of nuclei architecture features based on the minimum spanning tree algorithm. The algorithm has been deployed in a large scale pathology application. © 2012 SPIE.

DOI 10.1117/12.911319
Citations Scopus - 4
2012 Ramachandran J, Scott R, Ajemba P, Karvir H, Khan F, Zeineh J, et al., 'Adaptive epithelial cytoplasm segmentation and epithelial unit separation in immunoflurorescent images', Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (2012)

Tissue segmentation is one of the key preliminary steps in the morphometric analysis of tissue architecture. In multichannel immunoflurorescent biomarker images, the primary segme... [more]

Tissue segmentation is one of the key preliminary steps in the morphometric analysis of tissue architecture. In multichannel immunoflurorescent biomarker images, the primary segmentation steps consist of segmenting the nuclei (epithelial and stromal) and epithelial cytoplasm from 4',6-diamidino-2- phenylindole (DAPI) and cytokeratin 18 (CK18) biomarker images respectively. The epithelial cytoplasm segmentation can be very challenging due to variability in cytoplasm morphology and image staining. A robust and adaptive segmentation algorithm was developed for the purpose of both delineating the boundaries and separating thin gaps that separate the epithelial unit structures. This paper discusses novel methods that were developed for adaptive segmentation of epithelial cytoplasm and separation of epithelial units. The adaptive segmentation was performed by computing the non-epithelial background texture of every CK18 biomarker image. The epithelial unit separation was performed using two complementary techniques: a marker based, center-initialized watershed transform and a boundary initialized fast marching-watershed segmentation. The adaptive segmentation algorithm was tested on 926 CK18 biomarker biopsy images (326 patients) with limited background noise and 1030 prostatectomy images (374 patients) with noisy to very noisy background. The segmentation performance was measured using two different methods, namely; stability and background textural metrics. It was observed that the database of 1030 noisy prostatectomy images had a lower mean value (using stability and three background texture performance metrics) compared to the biopsy dataset of 926 images that had limited background noise. The average of all four performance metrics yielded 94.32% accuracy for prostatectomy images compared to 99.40% accuracy for biopsy images. © 2012 SPIE.

DOI 10.1117/12.911559
Citations Scopus - 3
2012 George RD, Nesbitt KV, Donovan MJ, Maynard JM, 'Evaluating indigenous design features using cultural dimensions', User Interfaces 2012: Proceedings of the Thirteenth Australasian User Interface Conference (AUIC2012), Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt, John Maynard
2011 Fogarasi SI, Khan FM, Pang HYH, Mesa-Tejada R, Donovan MJ, Fernandez G, 'Glandular object based tumor morphometry in H&E biopsy samples for prostate cancer prognosis', Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (2011)

Morphological and architectural characteristics of primary prostate tissue compartments, such as epithelial nuclei (EN) and cytoplasm, provide critical information for cancer diag... [more]

Morphological and architectural characteristics of primary prostate tissue compartments, such as epithelial nuclei (EN) and cytoplasm, provide critical information for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic response prediction. The subjective and variable Gleason grade assessed by expert pathologists in Hematoxylin and Eosin (H & E) stained specimens has been the standard for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. We propose a novel morphometric, glandular object-oriented image analysis approach for the robust quantification of H & E prostate biopsy images. We demonstrate the utility of features extracted through the proposed method in predicting disease progression post treatment in a multi-institution cohort of 1027 patients. The biopsy based features were univariately predictive for clinical response post therapy; with concordance indexes (CI) = 0.4 or = 0.6. In multivariate analysis, a glandular object feature quantifying tumor epithelial cells not directly associated with an intact tumor gland was selected in a model incorporating preoperative clinical data, protein biomarker and morphological imaging features. The model achieved a CI of 0.73 in validation, which was significantly higher than a CI of 0.69 for the standard multivariate model based solely on clinical features currently used in clinical practice. This work presents one of the first demonstrations of glandular object based morphological features in the H & E stained biopsy specimen to predict disease progression post primary treatment. Additionally, it is the largest scale study of the efficacy and robustness of the proposed features in prostate cancer prognosis. © 2011 SPIE.

DOI 10.1117/12.878142
Citations Scopus - 10
2011 George RD, Nesbitt KV, Donovan MJ, Maynard JM, 'Focusing on cultural design features for an Indigenous website', Proceedings of the Australiasian Conference on Information Systems ACIS 2011 -, Sydney, NSW (2011) [E1]
Co-authors John Maynard, Keith Nesbitt
2010 Sapir M, Khan FM, Vengrenyuk Y, Fernandez G, Mesa-Tejada R, Hamman S, et al., 'Improved automated localization and quantification of protein multiplexes via multispectral fluorescence imaging in heterogenous biopsy samples', 2010 7th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI 2010 - Proceedings (2010)

We present a novel improvement of our previously published image analysis system for the automated localization and quantification of protein biomarker expression in immunofluores... [more]

We present a novel improvement of our previously published image analysis system for the automated localization and quantification of protein biomarker expression in immunofluorescence (IF) microscopic images. The improvement has been developed primarily for biopsy based images which are by nature of variable quality and heterogeneous. The innovative method is employed for discriminating the biomarker signal from background, where signal may be the expression of multiple biomarkers or counterstains used in IF. The method is dynamic and it derives a threshold for a true biomarker signal based on the relationship between disease and non-disease tissue components. In addition, a new dynamic range feature construction is presented that is less affected by processing and other variations in tissue. The utility of the approach is demonstrated in predicting, based on the diagnostic biopsy tissue, prostate cancer disease progression within eight years after a radical prostatectomy. For this purpose, androgen receptor (AR) and Ki67 biomarker expression in prostate biopsy samples was quantified and features from the proposed approach were shown to be associated with disease progression in a univariate analysis and manifested improved performance over prior systems. Furthermore, AR and Ki67 features were selected in a multivariate model integrating clinical, histological, and biomarker features, proving their independent prognostic value. ©2010 IEEE.

DOI 10.1109/ISBI.2010.5490391
Citations Scopus - 7
2010 George R, Nesbitt KV, Gillard PM, Donovan MJ, 'Identifying cultural design requirements for an Australian Indigenous website', User Interfaces 2010: Proceedings of the Eleventh Australasian User Interface Conference, Brisbane, Australia (2010) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt
2009 Donovan MJ, 'Working together: The school, the teacher and the Aboriginal Community', Pedagogy in Practice 2009 Conference. Abstracts, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
2000 Donovan MJ, Heitmeyer DG, 'To get the Black point across: Linking technology to Aboriginal voices', To get the Black point across: Linking technology to Aboriginal voices, Fremantle, Perth (2000) [E1]
Show 10 more conferences

Report (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Donovan MJ, O'Brien K, Miller W, 'Gorokan High School Stronger Smarter Learning Communities Case Study', Stronger Smarter Institute of Queensland University of Technology, 29 (2012)
2012 Donovan MJ, Wenham S, Miller W, 'Callaghan College Wallsend Campus Stronger Smarter Learning Communities Case Study', Stronger Smarter Institute of Queensland University of Technology, 29 (2012)
2012 Donovan MJ, Macgregor J, Miller W, 'Brisbane Water Secondary College Stronger Smarter Learning Communities Case Study', Stronger Smarter Institute of Queensland University of Technology, 29 (2012)
2012 Donovan MJ, Burgess M, Miller W, 'Rutherford Technology High School Stronger Smarter Learning Communities Case Study', Stronger Smarter Institute of Queensland University of Technology, 29 (2012)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 11
Total funding $440,117

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $14,784

Humanising Mathematics and Statistics Education through Indigenous Methodologies$14,784

Good quality pedagogy addresses the needs and identities of the students.  In Australia a population of students whose needs and identities have not been well represented to date is that of Indigenous students, a problem that has deep and sorrowful roots in the last two centuries of Australia’s history. The issue at school level is mirrored and compounded by a similar problem at University, in particular amongst the pre-service teacher cohort. Hence there is a recognised need, moral requirement and imperative to “Indigenise the Curriculum” across all sectors in Australian Education. 

 Concurrently, Mathematics and Statistics education is critically troubled by at least three factors: widespread “Math Phobia”, a lack of diversity in post-compulsory enrolments, and a lack of sufficient numbers of graduates to meet either career needs of individuals or the capacity needs of the nation.   The causes of all three problems are entwined with a persistent alienation of a substantial proportion of the population from Mathematics and Statistics, which a “Humanist” philosophy of Mathematical Thinking may remedy.

 The purpose of this project, in the context of a School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences commitment quality teaching and in particular to “Indigenising the Curriculum”, is to provide a depth of collaborative praxis between MAPS and Wollotuka that could not occur without the support of the project; our aim is to enrich tertiary mathematics and statistics education and educative scholarship in ways that are profoundly respectful of both Indigenous cultures and the cultures of Mathematics and Statistics.

Funding body: UON Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education

Funding body UON Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education
Project Team

Dr. Robert King, Assoc. Prof. Kathleen Butler, Dr. Michael Donovan, Dr. Judy-Anne Osborn

Scheme Excellence in Teaching for Equity in Higher Education
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N

20171 grants / $5,000

Umulliko Research Incentive scheme$5,000

Development of National and International educational research networks post-PhD. This will occur through the attendance of the Worlds Indigenous Peoples Conference in Education (WIPCE) in Toronto, Canada. This conference is the largest competitive International Indigenous education conference that occurs tri-annually attracting over 5000 participants. This forum will allow for the extension and development of external Indigenous educational research partnerships to be initiated and presentation of aspects of PhD thesis. The development of partnerships will be extended into national relationships through site visits at some other Indigenous educational research centres to discuss research opportunities.

Funding body: the Wollotuka institute

Funding body the Wollotuka institute
Project Team

Michael Donovan

Scheme Umulliko Research Incentive scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20161 grants / $5,000

Umulliko Research Incentive scheme$5,000

Attendance and participation at human rights and Indigenous peoples training workshop. Organised by the International Labor Organization (ILO) at the International Training Centre for the ILO in Turin, Italy. This workshop supported Indigenous non-government organisations (NGOs) better understandings of the United Nations and relevant systems, structures and conventions that Indigenous communities could engage with.

Funding body: the Wollotuka institute

Funding body the Wollotuka institute
Project Team

Michael Donovan

Scheme Umulliko Research Incentive scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20151 grants / $5,000

Umulliko Research Incentive scheme$5,000

Extending developed networks in Native American communities through conference attendance at National Indian Education Association and site visit

Funding body: the Wollotuka institute

Funding body the Wollotuka institute
Project Team

Michael Donovan

Scheme Umulliko Research Incentive scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20103 grants / $282,233

Stronger Smarter Learning Communities HCC Regional Partnership - Hunter Central Coast NSW$124,555

Funding body: Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

Funding body Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
Project Team Doctor Wendy Miller, Mr Michael Donovan
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000637
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Stronger Smarter Learning Communities HCC Regional Partnership - North & Western Regional NSW$110,778

Funding body: Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

Funding body Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
Project Team Doctor Wendy Miller, Mr Michael Donovan
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100604
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Situational analysis of key aspects of the well being of Aboriginal residents in the Upper Hunter Valley$46,900

This situational analysis is expected to inform the Indigenous employment strategy of Coal and Allied (CNA) and the funding priorities, communications strategy and engagement activities of CAN's Aboriginal Development Consultative Committee (ADCC) through increased
understanding of the needs, aspirations and perceptions of the Upper Hunter Aboriginal community in terms of:

-    needs, aspirations and perceptions of service gaps (particularly in health and education),

-    workforce aspirations and pathways to employment and training, particularly related to the mining industry,

-    relationships between health, education and employment/ training, and

-    awareness and perceptions of the mining industry.

-    needs, aspirations and perceptions of service gaps (particularly in health and education),

-    workforce aspirations and pathways to employment and training, particularly related to the mining industry,

-    relationships between health, education and employment/ training, and

-    awareness and perceptions of the mining industry.

The primary focus on health and education has been developed without the inclusion of housing due to BHP completing a research project focused on housing within the Upper Hunter Valley in 2010. The Aboriginal community was included In, but not the specific focus of this project.

Funding body: Coal & Allied, Rio Tinto Coal Australia

Funding body Coal & Allied, Rio Tinto Coal Australia
Project Team

Michael Donovan, Jenny Williams (Hunter Valley Resarch Foundation)

Scheme Community funding programs
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20091 grants / $16,400

ERF Teaching Relief - Donovan$16,400

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Maynard, Mr Michael Donovan
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189837
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20072 grants / $61,700

Analysis of the effectiveness of the NSW Quality Teaching framework in increasing Aboriginal students' education outcomes$60,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Mr Michael Donovan
Scheme Discovery Indigenous Researchers Development Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0186731
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

5th International conference on new directions in the humanities, American University, Paris, France, 17/7/2007 - 20/7/2007$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Mr Michael Donovan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187772
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20061 grants / $50,000

Quality teaching and the cultural knowledge of aboriginal students in NSW$50,000

Funding body: NSW Department of Education and Training

Funding body NSW Department of Education and Training
Project Team Associate Professor James Ladwig, Mr Michael Donovan, Doctor Wendy Miller
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186524
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current2

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.35

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 Masters Commencement Versus Retention: The Advancement of Indigenous Students in Higher Education Settings M Philosophy (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 Masters Knock 'Em Down Bowra: Looking Into the Life of Aboriginal People in Bowraville from a Koori's Point of View M Philosophy (Abor Studies), The Wollotuka Institute, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD The Development of Aboriginal Education Policy in Australia - Voices of the National Aboriginal Education Committee (NAEC) PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Capturing Cultural Requirements in the Design of a Website for an Aboriginal Community PhD (Information Technology), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
United States 18
Australia 6
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Mr Michael Donovan

Position

Senior Lecturer
The Wollotuka Institute
Indigenous Education and Research
Academic Division

Focus area

Indigenous Education

Contact Details

Email michael.donovan@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7381
Fax (02) 4921 6985

Office

Room SAS.07
Building Birabahn
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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