Ms Melissa McCarthy

Ms Melissa McCarthy

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

Melissa McCarthy is a PhD student in early childhood education at the University of Newcastle. 

Her research is focused on the use of telepractice to deliver early intervention services to children who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families. Melissa’s interest in this area began with her involvement in RIDBC Teleschool at The Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children.  Melissa was instrumental in developing this unique program that uses telepractice to provide specialist hearing support to children and families living in rural Australia. 

Melissa received her Bachelor’s degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders from the University of Vermont and her Master’s degree in Education of the Deaf from Smith College/Clarke School for the Deaf.  She is also a qualified Early Childhood Teacher and an LSLS Certified Auditory-Verbal Therapist. She has worked in a variety of educational settings in the United States and Australia.

Supervisors: Greg Leigh and Michael Arthur-Kelly


Keywords

  • Deaf/Hard of Hearing
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Telepractice

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
100502 Broadband and Modem Technology 25
130312 Special Education and Disability 45
130102 Early Childhood Education (excl. Maori) 30
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 McCarthy M, Leigh G, Arthur-Kelly M, 'Telepractice delivery of family-centred early intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing: A scoping review', Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 25 249-260 (2019) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2018. Introduction: The use of telepractice, a method of delivering services through telecommunications technologies that provides two-way, synchronous audio and v... [more]

© The Author(s) 2018. Introduction: The use of telepractice, a method of delivering services through telecommunications technologies that provides two-way, synchronous audio and video signals in real-time, is becoming increasingly commonplace in early childhood education and intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Although the use of telepractice has been validated in the health sector as a viable and effective alternative to in-person service provision, evidence to support its use in the delivery of family-centred early intervention is still emerging. The purpose of this scoping review was to describe the current use of telepractice in the delivery of family-centred early childhood intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing, and their families. Method: The review followed the framework outlined by the Joanna Briggs Institute (2015), including an iterative three-step search strategy. Specific inclusion criteria and data extraction fields were outlined in advance. Results: A total of 23 peer-reviewed publications were included in the review. Most publications (70%) provided anecdotal evidence of the challenges and benefits associated with telepractice. The remaining publications (30%) reported on research studies evaluating the effectiveness of early intervention delivered through telepractice. Of the 23 included papers, 18 viewed the use of telepractice positively while the remaining 5 reported mixed conclusions and the need for more data. Discussion: Current evidence in the literature indicates that telepractice can be an effective model for delivering family-centred early intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. However, more research is needed to substantiate the use of telepractice as a viable alternative to traditional in-person services, rather than being seen as supplemental to such services.

DOI 10.1177/1357633X18755883
Co-authors Greg Leigh, Michael Arthur-Kelly
2013 McCarthy M, 'The RIDBC Telepractice Training Protocol: A Model for Meeting ASHA Roles and Responsibilities', Perspectives on Telepractice, 3 49-49 (2013)
DOI 10.1044/teles3.2.49
2012 McCarthy M, 'RIDBC Teleschool (TM): A Hub of Expertise', VOLTA REVIEW, 112 373-381 (2012)
Citations Web of Science - 2
2012 McCarthy M, Duncan J, Leigh GR, 'Telepractice: The Australian experience in an international context', Volta Review, 112 297-312 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Jill Duncan, Greg Leigh
2011 McCarthy M, 'Using technology to support children with sensory disability in remote areas: The RIDBC teleschool model', Telecommunications Journal of Australia, 61 (2011)

The Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children (RIDBC) provides specialist support to children with a sensory disability, e.g., a vision or hearing impairment. Recent development... [more]

The Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children (RIDBC) provides specialist support to children with a sensory disability, e.g., a vision or hearing impairment. Recent developments in telecommunications technologies have enabled RIDBC to expand their services to better support families and children living in regional and remote areas of Australia. This paper outlines the challenges of accessing support in regional and remote areas, the innovative uses of telecommunications technologies, the specific technologies that have been trialled, the model of service delivery and the technologies currently in use.

DOI 10.7790/tja.v61i2.207
Citations Scopus - 3
2010 McCarthy M, Muñoz K, White KR, 'Teleintervention for infants and young children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing', Pediatrics, 126 (2010)

Advancements in videoconferencing equipment and Internet-based tools for sharing information have resulted in widespread use of tele-medicine for providing health care to people w... [more]

Advancements in videoconferencing equipment and Internet-based tools for sharing information have resulted in widespread use of tele-medicine for providing health care to people who live in remote areas. Given the limited supply of people trained to provide early-intervention services to infants and young children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, and the fact that many families who need such services live significant distances from each other and from metropolitan areas, such "teleintervention" strategies hold promise for providing early-intervention services to children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Unfortunately, little is known about the cost-effectiveness of such teleintervention services. In this article we outline the rationale for using teleintervention services for children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, describe a teleintervention program that has been serving relatively large numbers of children in Australia since 2002, and summarize what we know about the cost-effectiveness of such an approach. We conclude by summarizing the type of research needed to decide whether teleintervention should be used more frequently with children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and the potential relevance of the teleintervention approach for the development of intervention systems in the United States. Copyright © 2010 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

DOI 10.1542/peds.2010-0354J
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 24
2010 McCarthy M, 'Telehealth or tele-education? Providing intensive, Ongoing therapy to remote communities', Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 161 104-111 (2010)

The Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children (RIDBC) in Sydney, Australia has demonstrated an ongoing commitment to innovation in the field of hearing impairment. RIDBC has cre... [more]

The Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children (RIDBC) in Sydney, Australia has demonstrated an ongoing commitment to innovation in the field of hearing impairment. RIDBC has created a unique program known as RIDBC Teleschool which successfully utilises videoconferencing technology to provide specialist hearing support and associated therapies to children living in rural and remote areas of Australia, including children in Indigenous communities. The high rate of hearing loss in Indigenous communities has led to the implementation of hearing screening programs in many areas of Australia. However, access to therapy support after screening is a critical intervention component which is often lacking in screening programs. RIDBC Teleschool uses a telehealth model to address this unmet need. © 2010 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.3233/978-1-60750-659-1-104
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
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Ms Melissa McCarthy

Contact Details

Email melissa.mccarthy@uon.edu.au
Link Twitter
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