Professor Matthew Taylor

Professor Matthew Taylor

Conjoint Professor

School of Environmental and Life Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Following an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship, I commenced an academic career as a Lecturer in Applied Marine Ecology at the University of NSW, coordinating several late stage and postgraduate courses, and two coursework Masters programs. Wanting to be closer to the "management coal face", I joined DPI in 2011 as a Scientific Officer, before being appointed as a Senior Research Scientist in 2012, and Principal Research Scientist in 2015. My core research vision centres on the scientific development and subsequent application of innovative approaches to improve both fisheries productivity and sustainability. This vision is realised the several internationally significant, collaborative research programs, most notably in the study of fish habitat, recruitment and population processes, and the application of this knowledge to the development of approaches that address recruitment and habitat bottlenecks. I have 108 scientific publications, have supervised 17 Honours students and 12 PhD students to completion, and have eight current PhD students. I am a Conjoint Professor with the University of Newcastle, and an Adjunct Professor at Murdoch University. I am an inaugural member of NSW DPI Senior Scientist Group, a departmental representative on the NSW PFAS Expert Panel, the PFAS Taskforce and the NSW IMOS Scientific Reference Group, Associate Editor positions with several international journals including Estuaries and Coasts, a state representative on the IMOS Animal Tracking Facility Scientific Committee and Data Committee, and Chair of the International Scientific Committee for the 6th ISSESR.

For a publication list please visit my Google scholar profile at scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=zj5I8MwAAAAJ&hl=en

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of New South Wales
  • Bachelor of Science (Biochemistry), University of New South Wales
  • Bachelor of Science (Marine Science)(Honours), University of New South Wales

Keywords

  • Crabs
  • Ecotoxicology
  • Estuaries
  • PFAS
  • Prawns
  • Trawl Fisheries

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050207 Environmental Rehabilitation (excl. Bioremediation) 20
111506 Toxicology (incl. Clinical Toxicology) 20
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology) 60

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
19/04/2018 -  Conjoint Professor School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/01/2010 - 30/06/2011 Lecturer in Applied Marine Ecology University of New South Wales
School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/2015 -  Principal Research Scientist - Estuarine Fisheries Port Stephens Fisheries Institute
Fisheries Research Branch
Australia
1/07/2011 - 30/06/2015 Senior Research Scientist Port Stephens Fisheries Institute
Fisheries Research Branch
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (108 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Taylor MD, 'Survey design for quantifying perfluoroalkyl acid concentrations in fish, prawns and crabs to assess human health risks', Science of the Total Environment, 652 59-65 (2019)

© 2018 Per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are emerging contaminants that have potential implications for human health. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorohexane... [more]

© 2018 Per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are emerging contaminants that have potential implications for human health. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) are perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) that commonly bioaccumulate in aquatic species exposed to PFAS contaminant sources. Sampling programs aimed at measuring PFAA concentrations in free ranging aquatic animals to assess human health risk are not yet supported by any quantitative analyses to refine sampling effort required to provide a reasonable estimate of summary statistics for a species in a particular area. Here, an extensive, multi-species PFOS and PFHxS data set measured in free-ranging fish and crustaceans is employed to examine the effect of sample size on summary statistics estimated from sample data which are commonly employed in dietary exposure assessments. A unifying, cross-species model suggested that sample sizes between 20 and 40 individuals per species per location should provide a reasonable estimate of mean PFOS concentrations in free-ranging fish or crustaceans, but slightly larger sample sizes (30¿50 individuals) may be required if sample medians are to be used in dietary exposure assessments. PFHxS concentrations were highly variable, so larger sample sizes should also be considered if this contaminant is of interest. The results are discussed in light of the levels of sampling effort reported in recent manuscripts, and other important considerations for designing sampling programs.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.117
Citations Scopus - 1
2019 Camp EV, Lorenzen K, Taylor MD, 'Impacts of habitat repair on a spatially complex fishery', Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, (2019)

© 2019 Restoring juvenile habitat remains a key fisheries management action, but a persistent challenge is identifying the areas likely to most efficiently improve fishery outcome... [more]

© 2019 Restoring juvenile habitat remains a key fisheries management action, but a persistent challenge is identifying the areas likely to most efficiently improve fishery outcomes. A spatial simulation model is presented that estimates the anticipated improvement in harvest of the Eastern King Prawn fishery in New South Wales, Australia, following potential restoration. By integrating environmental, biological and fisheries information gleaned from previous studies, this model suggests zones with ample larval settlement but greatly diminished habitat for juvenile life stages (recruitment), and that are in close proximity to the main fishery grounds, are likely to provide the greatest anticipated improvements in harvest. Uncertainty analyses demonstrated the particular sensitivity of these outcomes to assumptions of larval dispersal, and zone-specific recruitment at unfished conditions. The work emphasizes the utility of spatial models for restoration planning, but also the dependence of these models on information provided from empirical studies. This work also highlights the implications of input-controlled fisheries in which total effort is regulated, as this will determine the form of, and to whom, benefits of potential restoration actions will accrue.

DOI 10.1016/j.ecss.2019.02.007
2019 Becker A, Smith JA, Taylor MD, McLeod J, Lowry MB, 'Distribution of pelagic and epi-benthic fish around a multi-module artificial reef-field: Close module spacing supports a connected assemblage', Fisheries Research, 209 75-85 (2019)

© 2018 The deployment of artificial reef systems is rapidly increasing, typically using modules constructed from concrete or steel in a ¿reef-field¿ configuration. Such reefs prov... [more]

© 2018 The deployment of artificial reef systems is rapidly increasing, typically using modules constructed from concrete or steel in a ¿reef-field¿ configuration. Such reefs provide habitat for a range of pelagic and benthic reef-associated fish species, yet little is understood of how the configuration of reef fields may affect the distribution of fish. Observations of fish from 930 camera deployments were used to model the assemblage distribution over a distance of 500 m from the reef field. Differences existed between fish assemblages within the water column to those observed near the bottom. Modelled distributions showed a clear effect of distance from the reef for fish both in the water column and the bottom, where there was generally a close association with the reef. Clusters of modules were spaced 50 m apart which appears to have created a contiguous fish assemblage across the reef field, yet there was evidence some species favoured certain regions of the reef, which may be related to feeding on allochthonous food sources. Based upon a threshold of 10% of maximum modelled spatial abundance, the reef layout created a biological footprint of 17,500 m2, three times the size of the reef itself.

DOI 10.1016/j.fishres.2018.09.020
2019 Taylor MD, Nilsson S, Bräunig J, Bowles KC, Cole V, Moltschaniwskyj NA, Mueller JF, 'Do conventional cooking methods alter concentrations of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in seafood?', Food and Chemical Toxicology, 127 280-287 (2019)

© 2019 Per-and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are bioaccumulative chemicals of emerging concern. Some PFASs accumulate in seafood, and can contribute to dietary exposure. Pre... [more]

© 2019 Per-and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are bioaccumulative chemicals of emerging concern. Some PFASs accumulate in seafood, and can contribute to dietary exposure. Previous work has suggested cooking seafood decreases concentrations of neutral organic contaminants, however, previous studies dealing with PFASs have shown conflicting results. In this study, the potential changes of PFAS concentrations as a result of boiling, frying and baking are systematically examined. Blue Swimmer Crab (Portunus armatus), Dusky Flathead (Platycephalus fuscus) and School Prawn (Metapenaeus macleayi) were obtained from near a known PFAS point source and a reference location (affected by diffuse sources). Raw and cooked samples were analysed for commonly found PFASs. Of 23 target analytes, PFOS was the most frequently detected compound. PFOS, PFHxS and PFOA concentrations in School Prawn effectively doubled after boiling, and PFOS increased when Dusky Flathead was baked. There was no significant difference in PFOS concentration when Dusky Flathead was fried, or when the Blue Swimmer Crab was boiled. PFHxS and PFOA concentrations in Blue Swimmer Crab effectively halved after boiling. Increase in PFAS concentrations possibly arise from mass loss during the cooking process. Our data show that cooking does not consistently reduce PFAS concentrations, and cannot mitigate dietary exposure.

DOI 10.1016/j.fct.2019.03.032
Co-authors Natalie Moltschaniwskyj
2019 Taylor MD, Moltschaniwskyj NA, Crompton MJ, Dunstan RH, 'Environmentally Driven Changes in Fatty Acid Profiles of a Commercially Important Penaeid Prawn', Estuaries and Coasts, 42 528-536 (2019) [C1]

© 2018, Crown. Rainfall, runoff and estuary inflow link catchment conditions to the physical, chemical and biological properties of estuaries. Commercially exploited penaeid prawn... [more]

© 2018, Crown. Rainfall, runoff and estuary inflow link catchment conditions to the physical, chemical and biological properties of estuaries. Commercially exploited penaeid prawn species often rely on estuarine nurseries, and thus, the productivity of penaeid fisheries can be enhanced or diminished by catchment conditions. We conducted an initial investigation into changes in the fatty acid composition of school prawn Metapenaeus macleayi following freshwater inflow, under natural environmental conditions. Juvenile school prawns were collected from two south-eastern Australian estuaries during non-flood (normal) and post-flood conditions, and fatty acid concentrations quantified. Total fatty acid concentrations were significantly higher during post-flood conditions, and constrained ordination showed clear separation of samples collected under normal and post-flood conditions on the basis of their fatty acid composition. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and linoleic acid made a significant contribution to the dissimilarity among these groups. There was a significant negative relationship between salinity and linoleic acid concentrations post-flood. Changes observed in fatty acid profiles likely reflect both changes in the estuarine food web, as well as physiological responses to stress. These changes have implications for prawn condition, growth and survival.

DOI 10.1007/s12237-018-0461-0
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan, Natalie Moltschaniwskyj
2018 Hoenner X, Huveneers C, Steckenreuter A, Simpfendorfer C, Tattersall K, Jaine F, et al., 'Data Descriptor: Australia's continental-scale acoustic tracking database and its automated quality control process', Scientific Data, 5 (2018)

© 2018 The Author(s). Our ability to predict species responses to environmental changes relies on accurate records of animal movement patterns. Continental-scale acoustic telemetr... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Our ability to predict species responses to environmental changes relies on accurate records of animal movement patterns. Continental-scale acoustic telemetry networks are increasingly being established worldwide, producing large volumes of information-rich geospatial data. During the last decade, the Integrated Marine Observing System's Animal Tracking Facility (IMOS ATF) established a permanent array of acoustic receivers around Australia. Simultaneously, IMOS developed a centralised national database to foster collaborative research across the user community and quantify individual behaviour across a broad range of taxa. Here we present the database and quality control procedures developed to collate 49.6 million valid detections from 1891 receiving stations. This dataset consists of detections for 3,777 tags deployed on 117 marine species, with distances travelled ranging from a few to thousands of kilometres. Connectivity between regions was only made possible by the joint contribution of IMOS infrastructure and researcher-funded receivers. This dataset constitutes a valuable resource facilitating meta-analysis of animal movement, distributions, and habitat use, and is important for relating species distribution shifts with environmental covariates.

DOI 10.1038/sdata.2017.206
Citations Scopus - 9
2018 Taylor MD, Creighton C, 'Estimating the Potential Fishery Benefits from Targeted Habitat Repair: a Case Study of School Prawn (Metapenaeus macleayi) in the Lower Clarence River Estuary', Wetlands, 38 1199-1209 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s13157-018-1022-9
2018 Taylor MD, Becker A, Moltschaniwskyj NA, Gaston TF, 'Direct and Indirect Interactions Between Lower Estuarine Mangrove and Saltmarsh Habitats and a Commercially Important Penaeid Shrimp', ESTUARIES AND COASTS, 41 815-826 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12237-017-0326-y
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Troy Gaston, Natalie Moltschaniwskyj
2018 Thiem JD, Wooden IJ, Baumgartner LJ, Butler GL, Forbes J, Taylor MD, Watts RJ, 'Abiotic drivers of activity in a large, free-ranging, freshwater teleost, Murray cod (Maccullochella peelii)', PLoS ONE, 13 (2018)

© 2018 Thiem et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and repro... [more]

© 2018 Thiem et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. The allocation of time and energy to different behaviours can impact survival and fitness, and ultimately influence population dynamics. Intrinsically, the rate at which animals expend energy is a key component in understanding how they interact with surrounding environments. Activity, derived through locomotion and basic metabolism, represents the principal energy cost for most animals, although it is rarely quantified in the field. We examined some abiotic drivers of variability in locomotor activity of a free-ranging freshwater predatory fish, Murray cod (Maccullochella peelii), for six months using tri-axial accelerometers. Murray cod (n = 20) occupied discrete river reaches and generally exhibited small-scale movements (<5 km). Activity was highest during crepuscular and nocturnal periods when water temperatures were warmest (19¿30C; January¿March). As water temperatures cooled (9¿21C; April¿June) Murray cod were active throughout the full diel cycle and dormant periods were rarely observed. Light level, water temperature and river discharge all had a significant, nonlinear effect on activity. Activity peaked during low light levels, at water temperatures of ~20C, and at discharge rates of ~400 ML d-1. The temporal changes observed in the behaviour of Murray cod likely reflect the complex interactions between physiological requirements and prey resource behaviour and availability in driving activity, and highlight the importance of empirical field data to inform bioenergetics models.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0198972
2018 Brodie S, Lédée EJI, Heupel MR, Babcock RC, Campbell HA, Gledhill DC, et al., 'Continental-scale animal tracking reveals functional movement classes across marine taxa', Scientific Reports, 8 (2018)

© 2018 The Author(s). Acoustic telemetry is a principle tool for observing aquatic animals, but coverage over large spatial scales remains a challenge. To resolve this, Australia ... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Acoustic telemetry is a principle tool for observing aquatic animals, but coverage over large spatial scales remains a challenge. To resolve this, Australia has implemented the Integrated Marine Observing System's Animal Tracking Facility which comprises a continental-scale hydrophone array and coordinated data repository. This national acoustic network connects localized projects, enabling simultaneous monitoring of multiple species over scales ranging from 100 s of meters to 1000 s of kilometers. There is a need to evaluate the utility of this national network in monitoring animal movement ecology, and to identify the spatial scales that the network effectively operates over. Cluster analyses assessed movements and residency of 2181 individuals from 92 species, and identified four functional movement classes apparent only through aggregating data across the entire national network. These functional movement classes described movement metrics of individuals rather than species, and highlighted the plasticity of movement patterns across and within populations and species. Network analyses assessed the utility and redundancy of each component of the national network, revealing multiple spatial scales of connectivity influenced by the geographic positioning of acoustic receivers. We demonstrate the significance of this nationally coordinated network of receivers to better reveal intra-specific differences in movement profiles and discuss implications for effective management.

DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-21988-5
Citations Scopus - 8
2018 Taylor MD, 'First reports of per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in Australian native and introduced freshwater fish and crustaceans', Marine and Freshwater Research, 69 628-634 (2018)

© CSIRO 2018. Per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are persistent organic pollutants that have been extensively used in commercial and industrial applications, such as aqu... [more]

© CSIRO 2018. Per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are persistent organic pollutants that have been extensively used in commercial and industrial applications, such as aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) formulations. Widespread use of AFFFs has led to an increasing number of reports documenting PFAS contamination around civilian and military airports. However, research on the presence and distribution of PFASs in Australia is lacking. This study presents the first report of PFASs in Australian native and introduced freshwater species, sampled from a watercourse adjacent to the regional airport and colocated fire training ground near Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia. Perfluorooctane sulfonate was the most abundant PFAS compound in biota samples from this area, and both introduced common carp Cyprinus carpio and native Murray cod Maccullochella peelii had average concentrations higher than the Australian trigger value of 5.2 µg kg-1. Common yabby Cherax destructor and golden perch Macquaria ambigua carried low concentrations, and common yabby also had low concentrations of perfluorohexane sulfonate. Differences in foraging habits provided some potential explanations of the differences observed among species. There is a clear and pressing need to better understand potential toxicological and reproductive effects of PFASs on Australian freshwater species.

DOI 10.1071/MF17242
Citations Scopus - 4
2018 Taylor MD, Lowry MB, Becker A, 'Evaluating potential competitive interactions following stocking through trophic niche breadth', MARINE AND FRESHWATER RESEARCH, 69 1614-1625 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/MF17329
2018 Taylor MD, Becker A, Lowry MB, 'Investigating the Functional Role of an Artificial Reef Within an Estuarine Seascape: a Case Study of Yellowfin Bream (Acanthopagrus australis)', Estuaries and Coasts, 41 1782-1792 (2018)

© 2018, Crown. Estuaries contain mosaic habitats which support fish across different life stages. Artificial reefs represent a form of habitat enhancement which can provide additi... [more]

© 2018, Crown. Estuaries contain mosaic habitats which support fish across different life stages. Artificial reefs represent a form of habitat enhancement which can provide additional structure for fishes and improve fishing opportunities, but the role of artificial reefs within the broader estuarine seascape has not been extensively studied. We used a VEMCO Positioning System (VPS) to monitor the fine-scale movements of yellowfin bream (Acanthopagrus australis, referred to as Bream), an estuarine predator and important recreational species. Fish were implanted with acoustic tags with accelerometer sensors (to measure relative fish activity), and their movements monitored on an artificial reef and adjacent habitats. Elevated activity patterns during crepuscular periods indicated that foraging was likely occurring over a large seagrass bed adjacent to the artificial reef system. Alternatively, lower activity was observed when fish were on the artificial reef, which may reflect the role of this habitat as a refuge, or that alternative foraging strategies were being employed. All fish exhibited a high degree of fidelity to the artificial reef on which they were tagged, and there was minimal movement among other reef groups within the array. There was extensive overlap in space use contours for smaller fish on the seagrass edge, but no overlap for larger fish that also tended to forage further afield. These findings have implications for the way in which artificial reefs support fish production, especially the importance of connectivity with other key habitats within the estuarine seascape.

DOI 10.1007/s12237-018-0395-6
Citations Scopus - 1
2018 Taylor MD, van der Meulen DE, Brodie S, Cadiou G, Knott NA, 'Applying acoustic telemetry to understand contaminant exposure and bioaccumulation patterns in mobile fishes', Science of the Total Environment, 625 344-354 (2018)

© 2017 Contamination in urbanised estuaries presents a risk to human health, and to the viability of populations of exploited species. Assessing animal movements in relation to co... [more]

© 2017 Contamination in urbanised estuaries presents a risk to human health, and to the viability of populations of exploited species. Assessing animal movements in relation to contaminated areas may help to explain patterns in bioaccumulation, and assist in the effective management of health risks associated with consumption of exploited species. Using polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/Fs) contamination in Sydney Harbour estuary as a case study, we present a study that links movement patterns resolved using acoustic telemetry to the accumulation of contaminants in mobile fish on a multi-species basis. Fifty-four individuals across six exploited species (Sea Mullet Mugil cephalus; Luderick Girella tricuspidata; Yellowfin Bream Acanthopagrus australis; Silver Trevally Pseudocaranx georgianus; Mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus; Yellowtail Kingfish Seriola lalandi) were tagged with acoustic transmitters, and their movements tracked for up to 3 years. There was substantial inter-specific variation in fish distribution along the estuary. The proportion of distribution that overlapped with contaminated areas explained 84¿98% of the inter-specific variation in lipid-standardised biota PCDD/F concentration. There was some seasonal variation in distribution along the estuary, but movement patterns indicated that Sea Mullet, Yellowfin Bream, Silver Trevally, and Mulloway were likely to be exposed to contaminated areas during the period of gonadal maturation. Acoustic telemetry allows examination of spatial and temporal patterns in exposure to contamination. When used alongside biota sampling and testing, this offers a powerful approach to assess exposure, bioaccumulation, and potential risks faced by different species, as well as human health risks associated with their consumption.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.12.177
Citations Scopus - 3
2018 Raoult V, Gaston TF, Taylor MD, 'Habitat¿fishery linkages in two major south-eastern Australian estuaries show that the C4 saltmarsh plant Sporobolus virginicus is a significant contributor to fisheries productivity', Hydrobiologia, 811 221-238 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10750-017-3490-y
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Troy Gaston, Vincent Raoult
2018 Taylor MD, Gaston TF, Raoult V, 'The economic value of fisheries harvest supported by saltmarsh and mangrove productivity in two Australian estuaries', ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS, 84 701-709 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecolind.2017.08.044
Co-authors Troy Gaston, Vincent Raoult
2018 Adams KR, Fetterplace LC, Davis AR, Taylor MD, Knott NA, 'Sharks, rays and abortion: The prevalence of capture-induced parturition in elasmobranchs', Biological Conservation, 217 11-27 (2018)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd The direct impacts of fishing on chondrichthyans (sharks, rays and chimeras) are well established. Here we review a largely unreported, often misinterpreted an... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd The direct impacts of fishing on chondrichthyans (sharks, rays and chimeras) are well established. Here we review a largely unreported, often misinterpreted and poorly understood indirect impact of fishing on these animals ¿ capture-induced parturition (either premature birth or abortion). Although direct mortality of discarded sharks and rays has been estimated, the prevalence of abortion/premature birth and subsequent generational mortality remains largely unstudied. We synthesize a diffuse body of literature to reveal that a conservative estimate of > 12% of live bearing elasmobranchs (n = 88 species) show capture-induced parturition. For those species with adequate data, we estimate capture-induced parturition events ranging from 2 to 85% of pregnant females (average 24%). To date, capture-induced parturition has only been observed in live-bearing species. We compile data on threat-levels, method of capture, reproductive mode and gestation extent of premature/aborted embryos. We also utilise social media to identify 41 social-media links depicting a capture-induced parturition event which provide supplementary visual evidence for the phenomenon. The mortality of embryos will have implications for elasmobranch populations, and there are limited options to deal with this problem. This review is the first to synthesize available data on capture-induced parturition in sharks and rays, and highlights an important ethical and management issue for fishers and managers deserving of much greater attention.

DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2017.10.010
Citations Scopus - 9
2018 O'Connor WA, Zammit A, Dove MC, Stevenson G, Taylor MD, 'First observations of perfluorooctane sulfonate occurrence and depuration from Sydney Rock Oysters, Saccostrea glomerata, in Port Stephens NSW Australia', Marine Pollution Bulletin, 127 207-210 (2018)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Following the discovery of potential chronic perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination of Tilligerry Creek, Port Stephens (New South Wales Australia), sam... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Following the discovery of potential chronic perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination of Tilligerry Creek, Port Stephens (New South Wales Australia), sampling was undertaken to confirm the presence, extent and levels of contamination in commercial oyster crops of Sydney Rock Oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) and Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) grown within the estuary. Among a range of PFAS tested, only perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was detected. Concentrations of PFOS in oyster tissues for S. glomerata ranged from 1.6 µg kg- 1 ww (wet weight) to below the limit of reporting of 0.3 µg kg- 1 ww, with concentrations generally decreasing toward the lower reaches of the estuary. The sample of C. gigas tested had a PFOS concentration of 0.71 µg kg- 1 ww that was consistent with concentrations observed in nearby S. glomerata. For harvest size (50¿60 g) S. glomerata, both holding contaminated oysters in a depuration system, and relocation to a non-contaminated area, saw significant reductions in the tissue PFOS concentrations. For oysters held in a depuration system, PFOS depurated at a rate of 0.008 h- 1 (0.004¿0.019 h- 1; 90% CI), which corresponded with a depuration half-life of 87 h (35¿155 h; 90%). A more conservative model (fitted to data that assumed concentrations < LOR were equal 0.5·LOR) predicted a depuration half-life of 131 h. PFOS concentrations had fallen to below detectable limits within 162 h. Similar decreases were observed in relocated oysters.

DOI 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.11.058
Citations Scopus - 2
2018 Taylor MD, Beyer-Robson J, Johnson DD, Knott NA, Bowles KC, 'Bioaccumulation of perfluoroalkyl substances in exploited fish and crustaceans: Spatial trends across two estuarine systems', Marine Pollution Bulletin, 131 303-313 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Spatial patterns in perfluoroalkyl substances were quantified for exploited fish and crustaceans across two contrasting Australian estuaries (Port Stephens and Hunter River... [more]

© 2018 Spatial patterns in perfluoroalkyl substances were quantified for exploited fish and crustaceans across two contrasting Australian estuaries (Port Stephens and Hunter River). Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was detected in 77% of composites from Port Stephens and 100% of composites from Hunter River. Most species from Port Stephens showed a clear trend with distance to source. In contrast, only a subset of species showed this trend in the Hunter River, potentially due to species movement patterns and differing hydrology. Spatial modelling showed that PFOS concentrations were expected to exceed the relevant trigger value up to ~13,500 m from the main point source for Port Stephens and ~9000 m for the Hunter River. These results represent the first major investigation of bioaccumulation of PFASs in exploited species in Australian estuaries, and highlight various factors that can contribute to spatial patterns in bioaccumulation.

DOI 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.04.029
Citations Scopus - 5
2018 Smith JA, Miskiewicz AG, Beckley LE, Everett JD, Garcia V, Gray CA, et al., 'A database of marine larval fish assemblages in Australian temperate and subtropical waters', Scientific Data, 5 180207-180207 (2018)
DOI 10.1038/sdata.2018.207
2018 Becker A, Lowry MB, Taylor MD, 'Response of estuarine consumer communities following the stocking of a juvenile penaeid (Penaeus plebejus) over two consecutive years', Fisheries Management and Ecology, 25 54-65 (2018)

© 2017 Commonwealth of Australia. Fisheries Management and Ecology© 2017 John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd Research programmes that monitor and evaluate the impact of stocking activitie... [more]

© 2017 Commonwealth of Australia. Fisheries Management and Ecology© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Research programmes that monitor and evaluate the impact of stocking activities are essential to quantify effects of stocking and provide information for adaptive management of future releases. The consumer communities in two estuaries stocked with 5.8 million post-larvae eastern king prawn Penaeus plebejus (Hess) were monitored, both before and after stocking, and relative to two similar reference estuaries. Following stocking, there was evidence of increases in the abundances of prawns within stocked estuaries. Communities in all four estuaries showed significant levels of variation over time as well as among the systems themselves. Changes in overall diversity were similarly observed. The presence or absence of vegetation and other seasonal effects were found to explain most of the observed variation in the community assemblage, while prawn stocking appeared to have a little detectable influence. While this study points to minimal impacts of prawn stocking on the consumer community at the densities used, research into potential shifts in resource use by competitors and the growth and survival of prawns is required to fully understand post-release changes in stocked systems.

DOI 10.1111/fme.12267
2018 Udyawer V, Dwyer RG, Hoenner X, Babcock RC, Brodie S, Campbell HA, et al., 'A standardised framework for analysing animal detections from automated tracking arrays', Animal Biotelemetry, 6 (2018)

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Over the past 15 years, the integration of localised passive telemetry networks into centralised data repositories has greatly enhanced our abili... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Over the past 15 years, the integration of localised passive telemetry networks into centralised data repositories has greatly enhanced our ability to monitor the presence and movements of highly mobile and migratory species. These large-scale networks are now generating big data, allowing meta-analyses across multiple species, locations, and temporal scales. Broad-scale comparisons of animal movement metrics are constrained by the use of diverse analytical techniques among researchers. Accordingly, there is a need for a tool-set to assist in calculating animal movement metrics that can be easily applied to datasets from local studies to large-scale cooperative networks. Results: We present a standardised framework and an associated analysis tool-set that facilitates the calculation of a range of activity space and movement metrics for passive telemetry datasets. Application of the tool-set is demonstrated using data from the Integrated Marine Observing System continental-scale network of underwater acoustic receivers. We show how the metrics can: (1) be directly compared among multiple species monitored at multiple sites; (2) be compared among multiple species tagged at a single study site; and (3) assess changes in activity space metrics over time. Conclusions: Establishing a framework and tool-set to analyse data from large-scale networks progresses the field of passive telemetry beyond the traditional individual-, species-, or location-centric approaches to facilitate national- or international-scale outputs that better address important questions in the field of movement ecology.

DOI 10.1186/s40317-018-0162-2
2018 Hart C, Gaston TF, Taylor MD, 'Utilisation of a recovering wetland by a commercially important species of penaeid shrimp', WETLANDS ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT, 26 665-675 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11273-018-9599-6
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Troy Gaston
2018 Becker A, Taylor MD, Folpp H, Lowry MB, 'Managing the development of artificial reef systems: The need for quantitative goals', Fish and Fisheries, 19 740-752 (2018)

© 2018 John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd Fisheries enhancement initiatives are a potentially useful tool for managers to supplement traditional approaches. Habitat-based enhancements of... [more]

© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Fisheries enhancement initiatives are a potentially useful tool for managers to supplement traditional approaches. Habitat-based enhancements often deploy artificial reefs with the aim to increase the available structure to augment local production, yet current assessment approaches make it difficult to assess whether these reefs achieve pre-deployment goals. This makes it hard for managers to determine whether artificial reefs could improve their fishery outputs, potentially leading to missed opportunities and reduced production. We reviewed 270 research articles to determine whether existing monitoring studies identify whether artificial reefs meet their pre-deployment goals, thereby providing some evidence of their suitability for certain fisheries. We found only 62% of these studies clearly articulated the original goals of the reef. Goals were qualitative, and most studies were conducted over insufficient time frames to allow for ecological communities to stabilize and mature. It is therefore difficult to determine the success or failure of many artificial reefs in addressing the management issues for which they were deployed. In the light of these findings, we think the setting of explicit quantitative goals (which may be biological, social or economic), and monitoring the performance of reefs against these goals, could stimulate the broader application of artificial reefs in fisheries management strategies. Such an approach has been successfully adopted in aquaculture-based fisheries enhancement, and we explain how current evaluation methods such as harvest strategies can be easily adapted to quantitatively monitor artificial reef performance.

DOI 10.1111/faf.12288
Citations Scopus - 4
2018 Bino G, Kingsford RT, Grant T, Taylor MD, Vogelnest L, 'Use of implanted acoustic tags to assess platypus movement behaviour across spatial and temporal scales', Scientific Reports, 8 (2018)

© 2018 The Author(s). The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is an evolutionarily distinct mammal, endemic to Australian freshwaters. Many aspects of its ecology and life-history... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is an evolutionarily distinct mammal, endemic to Australian freshwaters. Many aspects of its ecology and life-history, including detailed understanding of movements, are poorly known, hampered by its cryptic and mainly nocturnal habits and small numbers. We effectively trialled intraperitoneal implanted acoustic transmitters in nine platypuses in the Severn River (NSW), Australia, as a potential approach for studying movements in this challenging species. We tracked platypus movements over six months, at fine and broad spatial scales, using an array of acoustic sensors. Over six months (March-August 2016), four of five adult platypuses (two females\three males) maintained localized movements (average monthly maximums 0.37 km ± 0.03 sd), while one adult, one sub-adult, and one juvenile (males) moved further: average monthly maxima 1.2 km ± 2.0 sd, 0.9 km ± 0.6 sd, 4.5 km ± 5.9 sd, respectively. The longest recorded movement was by a male adult, covering 11.1 km in three days and travelling a maximum distance of about 13 km between records. Only one implanted animal was not detected immediately after release, indicative of transmission failure rather than an adverse event. High cumulative daily movements (daily 1.9 km ± 0.8 sd) indicated high metabolic requirements, with implications for previous estimates of platypus abundances and carrying capacities, essential for effective conservation. This novel approach offers new avenues to investigate relating to mating, nesting, and intraspecific competition behaviours and their temporal and spatial variation.

DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-23461-9
2017 Taylor MD, Bowles KC, Johnson DD, Moltschaniwskyj NA, 'Depuration of perfluoroalkyl substances from the edible tissues of wild-caught invertebrate species', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 581 258-267 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.12.116
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Natalie Moltschaniwskyj
2017 Taylor MD, Fry B, Becker A, Moltschaniwskyj N, 'Recruitment and connectivity influence the role of seagrass as a penaeid nursery habitat in a wave dominated estuary', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 584 622-630 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.01.087
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Natalie Moltschaniwskyj
2017 Taylor MD, Laffan SW, Fairfax AV, Payne NL, 'Finding their way in the world: Using acoustic telemetry to evaluate relative movement patterns of hatchery-reared fish in the period following release', Fisheries Research, 186 538-543 (2017)

© 2016 Patterns in space use and activity were compared for wild and hatchery-reared Mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus) using acoustic telemetry. Acoustic tags were implanted in fou... [more]

© 2016 Patterns in space use and activity were compared for wild and hatchery-reared Mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus) using acoustic telemetry. Acoustic tags were implanted in four wild (42 ± 2 cm; mean ± SE), and four hatchery-reared (42 ± 1 cm; mean ± SE) Mulloway, and movements were simultaneously monitored for up to 288 h in an 11 km section of river. Across all fish, space utilisation contours developed from weighted kernel density estimates ranged between 2¿51 ha (90% or total area) and 1¿28 ha (50% or core area), and contained up to 99% optimal habitat area. Hatchery-reared fish used significantly larger total and core areas, and activity rates of hatchery-reared fish were consistently higher than wild fish. A period of settlement or acclimation appeared to occur during the first 5 days following release for hatchery-reared fish, and their movement tended to contract back to within the habitat patch into which they were released from the 6¿12th day following release. The movement ranges of wild fish were largely invariant between the two periods. The relevance of this research to understanding broader ecological processes is discussed. Acoustic telemetry presents a useful approach for studying post-release dynamics of hatchery-reared fish and their wild counterparts.

DOI 10.1016/j.fishres.2016.07.003
Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Blount C, O'Donnell P, Reeds K, Taylor MD, Boyd S, Van derWalt B, et al., 'Tools and criteria for ensuring estuarine stock enhancement programs maximise benefits and minimise impacts', Fisheries Research, 186 413-425 (2017)

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. New South Wales (NSW) is the first jurisdiction in Australia to approve and implement an ongoing marine stock enhancement program. As part of the development ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. New South Wales (NSW) is the first jurisdiction in Australia to approve and implement an ongoing marine stock enhancement program. As part of the development and consent process an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) was prepared, and a management strategy developed to govern the activity in estuaries and control for risks outlined in the EIS. Initially, the EIS developed and used novel tools and criteria to determine which of 158 NSW estuaries were most appropriate to achieve the program's goals for the seven recreationally-targeted species (4 fish, 2 crab and 1 prawn species). Estuaries within three release regions were selected and ranked using a multi-criteria analysis of 20 factors considered important to the success of stock enhancement. Estimation of the trophic impact of released species and estimates of the productivity of the selected estuaries were used to determine release rates at various sizes for the target species. Criteria were established to: (1) ensure best practice broodstock management and genetic quality of released recruits; (2) minimise disease risk through stock enhancement; and, (3) maximise social and economic benefits from stock enhancement. These tools and criteria fed into the risk assessment in the EIS and guided further controls outlined in the management arrangements for the program. In this paper, we outline this novel approach to development and assessment of stock enhancement activities. We discuss the potential application of this framework to marine stock enhancement activities in other jurisdictions.

DOI 10.1016/j.fishres.2016.08.019
Citations Scopus - 4
2017 Taylor MD, 'Preliminary evaluation of the costs and benefits of prawn stocking to enhance recreational fisheries in recruitment limited estuaries', Fisheries Research, 186 478-487 (2017)

© 2016 Hatchery-based fisheries enhancement involves supplementing natural recruitment through releases of cultured individuals to increase the productivity of wild harvest fisher... [more]

© 2016 Hatchery-based fisheries enhancement involves supplementing natural recruitment through releases of cultured individuals to increase the productivity of wild harvest fisheries. The responsible approach to marine stock enhancement recommends economic assessment of enhancement endeavours be undertaken, but such assessments are difficult for recreational fisheries and consequently examples of such analyses are rare. This paper describes a bioeconomic assessment of hatchery releases to enhance a recreational Eastern King Prawn fishery in a recruitment limited coastal lake. Sensitivity analysis on the model indicated that parameters estimating growth and economic impact were the most important drivers of the model. A full Monte-Carlo Analysis of Uncertainty indicated that a scenario releasing 3,000,000 Eastern King Prawn postlarvae is most likely to yield over 5000 kg of harvest. Cost-Benefit results indicated that such a scenario would most likely generate AUD5.48 benefit for every AUD1.00 invested in releasing Eastern King Prawn. Achieving a benefit of less than AUD2.37 was extremely unlikely. This study indicates a favorable assessment of the potential economic benefits derived from a release of 3,000,000 Eastern King Prawns into Wallagoot Lake. Also, the simple approach presented provides a framework which may be useful for assessing other recreational fishery enhancement projects. Bioeconomic modelling is an important tool for understanding the potential benefits and risks of enhancement or sea ranching projects.

DOI 10.1016/j.fishres.2016.05.030
Citations Scopus - 13
2017 Taylor MD, Chick RC, Lorenzen K, Agnalt AL, Leber KM, Blankenship HL, et al., 'Fisheries enhancement and restoration in a changing world', Fisheries Research, 186 407-412 (2017)

© 2016 Fisheries enhancement is an important strategy for maintaining and improving fisheries productivity, and addressing some of the other contemporary challenges facing marine ... [more]

© 2016 Fisheries enhancement is an important strategy for maintaining and improving fisheries productivity, and addressing some of the other contemporary challenges facing marine ecosystems. Aquaculture-based enhancement includes stock enhancement, restocking, and sea ranching. Developments in aquaculture techniques, tagging, genetics, modelling and ecology have underpinned growth in this field in the 21st century, particularly in the context of marine recreational fisheries. Marine enhancement practice has now matured to the point that quantitative tools are frequently applied before any fish or shellfish are released into the natural environment, and pilot-scale enhancement scenarios and release strategies are evaluated before full implementation. Social and economic studies are also increasingly important components of this assessment. Here, several case studies from diverse geographic areas exemplify the union of aquaculture technology, quantitative modelling, social science, physiology and ecology to estimate enhancement potential, improve enhancement strategies, assess enhancement outcomes, and support adaptive management. Integrating aquaculture-based enhancement with habitat enhancement presents a remarkable opportunity for future research and development, and offers the potential to further increase the opportunities and associated socio-economic benefits that are available to a broad range of fisheries stakeholders.

DOI 10.1016/j.fishres.2016.10.004
Citations Scopus - 16
2017 Becker A, Fielder DS, Lowry MB, Taylor MD, 'Development of a Calcein Marking Technique for Juvenile Mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus to Be Used in Stock Enhancement Programs', North American Journal of Fisheries Management, 37 207-210 (2017)

© American Fisheries Society 2017. Mulloway (also known as Japanese Meagre) Argyrosomus japonicus is an important recreational species targeted by anglers across southern Australi... [more]

© American Fisheries Society 2017. Mulloway (also known as Japanese Meagre) Argyrosomus japonicus is an important recreational species targeted by anglers across southern Australia. This marine-spawned species recruits into estuaries as juveniles; however, there is some evidence for potential recruitment limitation arising from variable freshwater flows, which are characteristic of temperate Australian estuaries. Consequently, juvenile Mulloway are being stocked in a number of estuarine systems, and a suitable marking technique is required to distinguish stocked individuals from wild fish upon recapture. Calcein is widely used to mark the otoliths of freshwater fish species, yet there is little evidence of its suitability to mark marine species. We evaluated the suitability of calcein as a marking method using a combination of immersion times (6, 12, and 24 h) and calcein concentrations (0 [control], 100, 150, and 200 mg/L). Mulloway otoliths were found to autofluoresce at the same wavelengths as calcein, but despite this, a combination of the longest immersion time and highest concentration (24 h and 200 mg/L) produced marks that were significantly stronger than unmarked control otoliths. Assuming the intensity of calcein marks does not decline over time, such a combination would be suitable for marking Mulloway for release into marine waters and may be suitable for other marine species. Received May 15, 2016; accepted October 23, 2016 Published online January 12, 2017

DOI 10.1080/02755947.2016.1254126
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Brodie S, Hobday AJ, Smith JA, Spillman CM, Hartog JR, Everett JD, et al., 'Seasonal forecasting of dolphinfish distribution in eastern Australia to aid recreational fishers and managers', Deep-Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography, 140 222-229 (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Seasonal forecasting of environmental conditions and marine species distribution has been used as a decision support tool in commercial and aquaculture fisheri... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Seasonal forecasting of environmental conditions and marine species distribution has been used as a decision support tool in commercial and aquaculture fisheries. These tools may also be applicable to species targeted by the recreational fisheries sector, a sector that is increasing its use of marine resources, and making important economic and social contributions to coastal communities around the world. Here, a seasonal forecast of the habitat and density of dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus), based on sea surface temperatures, was developed for the east coast of New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Two prototype forecast products were created; geographic spatial forecasts of dolphinfish habitat and a latitudinal summary identifying the location of fish density peaks. The less detailed latitudinal summary was created to limit the resolution of habitat information to prevent potential resource over-exploitation by fishers in the absence of total catch controls. The forecast dolphinfish habitat model was accurate at the start of the annual dolphinfish migration in NSW (December) but other months (January - May) showed poor performance due to spatial and temporal variability in the catch data used in model validation. Habitat forecasts for December were useful up to five months ahead, with performance decreasing as forecast were made further into the future. The continued development and sound application of seasonal forecasts will help fishery industries cope with future uncertainty and promote dynamic and sustainable marine resource management.

DOI 10.1016/j.dsr2.2017.03.004
Citations Scopus - 6
2017 Becker A, Taylor MD, Lowry MB, 'Monitoring of reef associated and pelagic fish communities on Australia's first purpose built offshore artificial reef', ICES Journal of Marine Science, 74 277-285 (2017)

© 2016 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. All rights reserved. Artificial reefs now form part of an integrated approach to enhance fisheries around the world. A... [more]

© 2016 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. All rights reserved. Artificial reefs now form part of an integrated approach to enhance fisheries around the world. A responsible approach to artificial reef deployment calls for clear, well defined goals prior to any reef being placed in the field, followed by subsequent monitoring to assess whether these goals are being achieved. In this study, to evaluate if an artificial reef off Sydney was meeting its goal of providing quality fishing opportunities through the establishment of a complex fish assemblage, a 4-year monitoring program was designed. This program examined the response of reef-associated and pelagic fishes to the deployment of a purpose built offshore reef, relative to control reefs. Fish were observed immediately following deployment, but the artificial reef fish assemblage remained distinct from the three natural control reefs throughout the monitoring period. Also, the artificial reef displayed inter-annual variability associated with successional processes, which was not evident on the natural reefs. Fish length data indicated that the artificial reef was providing resources for both juvenile and adults of a number of species. This study demonstrates artificial reefs can provide habitats for a diverse group of fish, but the assemblages are unlikely to mimic those on natural reefs. We have also shown that longer term monitoring periods, covering multiple years are required to gain a robust understanding of the response of fish to reef deployment. This information can be used to understand the benefits and limitations of future artificial reef deployments.

DOI 10.1093/icesjms/fsw133
Citations Scopus - 13
2017 Taylor MD, Payne NL, Becker A, Lowry MB, 'Feels like home: Homing of mature large-bodied fish following translocation from a power-station canal', ICES Journal of Marine Science, 74 301-310 (2017)

© 2016 Crown Copyright. Fish translocation is a common method of conservation and fisheries enhancement. Monitoring post-translocation movements and migration provides useful info... [more]

© 2016 Crown Copyright. Fish translocation is a common method of conservation and fisheries enhancement. Monitoring post-translocation movements and migration provides useful information to inform translocation strategies. Three species of large-bodied fish (Yellowfin Bream Acanthopagrus australis, Luderick Girella tricuspidata, and Tarwhine Rhabdosargus sarba) impounded in a cooling water canal at a power station were translocated into the adjacent estuary (Lake Macquarie, New South Wales). Translocated fish were tagged with acoustic tags (n = 34) equipped with accelerometer sensors (providing a relative measure of fish activity) and released on either an artificial reef or a natural reef. In addition, 8 free-ranging Yellowfin Bream were captured and tagged on the artificial reef. Fish were tracked throughout Lake Macquarie on a dispersed array of 18 VemcoVR2W receivers, and on the artificial reef using a VR4-UWM Vemco Positioning System, for up to 11 months. Yellowfin Bream and Luderick rapidly migrated back to the power station, whereas Tarwhine remained near the release location. Translocated Yellowfin Bream showed divergent behavioural patterns to free-ranging Yellowfin Bream on the artificial reef, with much higher activity levels, elevated nocturnal activity, and different patterns of habitat usage, possibly reflecting divergent foraging behaviour. This study presents a rare example of non-natal homing to an artificial habitat in several large-bodied marine fish species. The role of low frequency sound in the homing of translocated fish, and factors contributing to the observed behavioural patterns are discussed. The presence of a homing signal which can facilitate return migration may decrease the efficacy of translocation efforts for adult marine fishes; however, these responses are species-specific and will require evaluation on a case-by-case basis.

DOI 10.1093/icesjms/fsw168
Citations Scopus - 5
2017 Everett JD, van Sebille E, Taylor MD, Suthers IM, Setio C, Cetina-Heredia P, Smith JA, 'Dispersal of Eastern King Prawn larvae in a western boundary current: New insights from particle tracking', Fisheries Oceanography, 26 513-525 (2017)

© 2017 John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd Patterns in larval transport of coastal species have important implications for species connectivity, conservation, and fisheries, especially in... [more]

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Patterns in larval transport of coastal species have important implications for species connectivity, conservation, and fisheries, especially in the vicinity of a strengthening boundary current. An Ocean General Circulation Model for the Earth Simulator particle tracking model was used to assess the potential dispersal of Eastern King Prawn (EKP) larvae Melicertus (Penaeus) plebejus, an important commercial and recreational species in Eastern Australia. Particles were exposed to a constant natural mortality rate, and temperature-dependent growth (degree-days) was used to determine the time of settlement. Forward and backward simulations were used to identify the extent of larval dispersal from key source locations, and to determine the putative spawning regions for four settlement sites. The mean dispersal distance for larvae was extensive (~750¿1,000¿km before settlement), yet the northern spawning locations were unlikely to contribute larvae to the most southern extent of the EKP range. There was generally great offshore dispersal of larvae, with only 2%¿5% of larvae on the continental shelf at the time of settlement. Our particle tracking results were combined with existing site-specific reproductive potentials to identify the relative contributions of larvae from key source locations. Although mid-latitude sites had only moderate reproductive potential, they delivered the most particles to the southern coast and are probably the most important sources of larval EKP for the two southern estuaries. Our modelling suggests that mesoscale oceanography is a strong determinant of recruitment success of the EKP, and highlights the importance of both larval dispersal and reproductive potential for understanding connectivity across a species¿ range.

DOI 10.1111/fog.12213
Citations Scopus - 4
2017 Becker A, Taylor MD, 'Nocturnal sampling reveals usage patterns of intertidal marsh and subtidal creeks by penaeid shrimp and other nekton in south-eastern Australia', Marine and Freshwater Research, 68 780-787 (2017)

© CSIRO 2017. The life cycle of most penaeid prawns includes a juvenile phase in protected coastal environments such as estuaries and embayments. In the tropics, some penaeids are... [more]

© CSIRO 2017. The life cycle of most penaeid prawns includes a juvenile phase in protected coastal environments such as estuaries and embayments. In the tropics, some penaeids are known to utilise intertidal habitats, yet in temperate regions of Australia the use of marshes has not been investigated. We focused on determining the extent to which Melicertus plebejus and Metapenaeus macleayi directly utilise intertidal marsh habitat using fyke nets. Using cast nets, we also assessed the abundance of the two focal species in middle and edge habitat of adjacent subtidal creeks. Despite collecting 8300 crustaceans and 4259 teleosts, only 8M. plebejus were sampled on the marsh. Abundances of M. macleayi were greater with 90 individuals collected. Within the subtidal creeks larger M. macleayi were collected in the middle habitat and the abundance of both penaeids varied among different creeks. The nekton community as a whole also differed among creeks within marshes. This study has demonstrated that juvenile M. plebejus and M. macleayi do not directly utilise intertidal marsh habitats. Despite this, marshes may provide important resources for prawns through the export of carbon. Future isotope studies would provide valuable information in this regard, providing a broader understanding of penaeids and specific estuarine habitats.

DOI 10.1071/MF15325
Citations Scopus - 6
2017 Lowry M, Becker A, Folpp H, McLeod J, Taylor MD, 'Residency and movement patterns of yellowfin bream (Acanthopagrus australis) released at natural and artificial reef sites', Marine and Freshwater Research, 68 1479-1488 (2017)

© 2017 CSIRO . The present study investigated the long-term (&gt;2 years) site fidelity, residency and movement patterns of Acanthopagrus australis (Sparidae) at artificial (AR) a... [more]

© 2017 CSIRO . The present study investigated the long-term (>2 years) site fidelity, residency and movement patterns of Acanthopagrus australis (Sparidae) at artificial (AR) and natural reef (NR) sites. Acoustic telemetry was used to assess movement patterns of 39 fish released at NR and AR locations and other habitat types within the study area. Detection periods ranged from 1 day to a maximum of 912 days, with 36% of fish detected by the array for >1 year and a further 7% detected for >2 years. Results indicate that tagged fish tended to remain associated with the release site; however, AR fish were detected for considerably longer periods with greater numbers of fish identified as resident within the AR system. AR-released fish were also identified more frequently across the entire array, with the majority (90%) of detections between receiver stations located within the AR system. Results were affected by short detection periods (<6 days) of a relatively high proportion of fish released at the NR, possibly indicating differential rates of fishing mortality between locations. Longer range movements of >200km were also detected, but there was no obvious trend with release location. The results of the present study indicate interactions between existing and introduced artificial habitat are more complex than a 'draw-down' effect and provide further evidence that AR systems provide suitable habitat for a variety of species, as well as further support for the use of AR systems in fisheries enhancement initiatives. The results also have important implications for understanding the effect of AR systems and indicate that the size of the reef system may be an important factor in controlling for levels of fishing-related mortality.

DOI 10.1071/MF16351
Citations Scopus - 8
2017 Taylor MD, Babcock RC, Simpfendorfer CA, Crook DA, 'Where technology meets ecology: Acoustic telemetry in contemporary Australian aquatic research and management', Marine and Freshwater Research, 68 1397-1402 (2017)

© 2017 CSIRO . Acoustic telemetry is used to investigate a diverse suite of questions regarding the biology and ecology of a range of aquatic species, and is an important tool for... [more]

© 2017 CSIRO . Acoustic telemetry is used to investigate a diverse suite of questions regarding the biology and ecology of a range of aquatic species, and is an important tool for fisheries and conversation management. Herein we present a brief review of the Australian acoustic telemetry literature in the context of key areas of progress, drawing from several recent studies and identifying areas for future progress. Acoustic telemetry has been increasingly used in Australia over the past decade. This has included substantial investment in a national acoustic array and the associated development of a national acoustic telemetry database that enables tag deployment and detection data to be shared among researchers (the Integrated Marine Observing System Animal Tracking Facility). Acoustic telemetry has contributed to important areas of management, including public safety, design and management of marine protected areas, the use of closures in fisheries management, informing environmental flow regimes and the impacts of fisheries enhancements, and is most powerful when used as a complementary tool. However, individual variability in movement often confounds our ability to draw general conclusions when attempting to characterise broad-scale patterns, and more work is required to address this issue. This overview provides insight into the important role that acoustic telemetry plays in the research and management of Australian aquatic ecosystems. Application of the technology transcends aquatic environments and bureaucracies, and the patterns revealed are relevant to many of the contemporary challenges facing decision makers with oversight of aquatic populations or ecosystems.

DOI 10.1071/MF17054
Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Keller K, Smith JA, Lowry MB, Taylor MD, Suthers IM, 'Multispecies presence and connectivity around a designed artificial reef', Marine and Freshwater Research, 68 1489-1500 (2017)

© 2017 CSIRO . A goal of designed artificial reefs (ARs) is to enhance fish abundance, species diversity and fishing opportunities by providing food and refuge for fish. Quantifyi... [more]

© 2017 CSIRO . A goal of designed artificial reefs (ARs) is to enhance fish abundance, species diversity and fishing opportunities by providing food and refuge for fish. Quantifying the contribution of ARs to coastal ecosystems and fisheries productivity requires an understanding of fish presence at the structure and connectivity with surrounding habitats. In the present study, the movements and presence of 10 eastern fiddler rays (Trygonorrhina fasciata), 17 Port Jackson sharks (Heterodontus portusjacksoni) and 18 bluespotted flathead (Platycephalus caeruleopunctatus) were monitored using acoustic telemetry around a designed AR in 38-m depth near Sydney, Australia. Fiddler rays exhibited an average short-term presence of 43% at the AR, and 26% over the ~20-month monitoring period, which was significantly higher than the other two species. Fish tagged at the AR showed high affinity to the site at which they were tagged compared with fish tagged on natural reef. All three species moved frequently between the AR and the other reefs in the area, indicating that the AR may increase the connectivity between adjacent habitats and aid the dispersion of benthic species. The moderate presence at the AR suggests that these species may contribute to some biomass production at this AR by incorporating this reef in their natural range.

DOI 10.1071/MF16127
Citations Scopus - 5
2017 Taylor MD, Fry B, Becker A, Moltschaniwskyj N, 'The role of connectivity and physicochemical conditions in effective habitat of two exploited penaeid species', ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS, 80 1-11 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecolind.2017.04.050
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Natalie Moltschaniwskyj
2017 Park JM, Coburn E, Platell ME, Gaston TF, Taylor MD, Williamson JE, 'Diets and Resource Partitioning among Three Sympatric Gurnards in Northeastern Tasmanian Waters, Australia', MARINE AND COASTAL FISHERIES, 9 305-319 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/19425120.2017.1320342
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Margaret Platell, Troy Gaston
2017 Tyler KJ, Becker A, Moltschaniwskyj NA, Taylor MD, 'Rapid salinity changes affect the survival and physiology of a penaeid prawn: Implications of flood events on recruitment to the fishery', Fisheries Management and Ecology, 24 478-487 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/fme.12256
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Natalie Moltschaniwskyj
2016 Taylor MD, Johnson DD, 'Preliminary investigation of perfluoroalkyl substances in exploited fishes of two contaminated estuaries', Marine Pollution Bulletin, 111 509-513 (2016)

© 2016 Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are being increasingly detected in a range of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, often resulting from the use of legacy fire-fighting foa... [more]

© 2016 Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are being increasingly detected in a range of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, often resulting from the use of legacy fire-fighting foams. This study conducted an initial investigation of the concentrations of PFASs in the commercially and recreationally exploited species Dusky Flathead, Mud Crab, School Prawn, Sea Mullet, Yellowfin Bream, Eastern King Prawn and Sand Whiting, across two contaminated estuaries. All samples contained perfluoro-n-octane sulfonate (PFOS) except four Yellowfin Bream samples (two from each estuary). Perfluoro-n-octanoic acid (PFOA) was detected only in School Prawn samples from Fullerton Cove, while perfluoro-n-hexane sulfonate (PFHxS) was detected in prawn muscle and in fish liver samples from both estuaries. This study presents one of the first surveys of PFAS in a range of edible saltwater fish and crustaceans in Australia, and these baseline levels of contamination will prove useful for informing future surveys of these emerging contaminants.

DOI 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.06.023
Citations Scopus - 13
2016 Payne NL, Smith JA, van der Meulen DE, Taylor MD, Watanabe YY, Takahashi A, et al., 'Temperature dependence of fish performance in the wild: Links with species biogeography and physiological thermal tolerance', Functional Ecology, 30 903-912 (2016)

© 2015 The Authors. 1. Temperature strongly regulates the distribution and fitness of ectotherms, and many studies have measured the temperature dependence of physiological perfor... [more]

© 2015 The Authors. 1. Temperature strongly regulates the distribution and fitness of ectotherms, and many studies have measured the temperature dependence of physiological performance in controlled laboratory settings. In contrast, little is known about how temperature influences ectotherm performance in the wild, so the ecological significance of physiological performance as measured in the laboratory is unclear. 2. Our aim was to measure the temperature dependence of performance in the wild for several species of fishes and to explore how temperatures that maximize performance in the wild (ToptE) are related to species biogeographies. 3. We gathered body activity and growth data from the wild for nine tropical and temperate fish species, and by fitting thermal performance curves to these data, compared ToptE to species- specific warm range boundary temperatures (the average temperature of the warmest month at equatorward range limits). To explore the degree to which trends in the wild reflect trends in physiological performance measured in the laboratory, we also compiled published data on the temperature dependence of aerobic metabolic scope in fishes and compared these to our wild fish data. 4. We found ToptE in the wild was strongly correlated with warm range boundary temperatures, and that the difference between these two temperatures (the ¿environmental heating tolerance¿) was smaller for more-tropical species. Comparison with laboratory data revealed that ToptE approaches warm boundary temperatures in the wild at the same rate that the optimal temperature for aerobic scope (ToptAS) approaches upper critical temperatures (upper Tcrit) for aerobic scope in the laboratory, meaning that environmental heating tolerances in wild fishes closely mirror physiological heating tolerance (i.e. upper Tcrit ¿ ToptAS) in captive fishes. 5. Our comparison of field- and laboratory-derived data highlights the ecological significance of aerobic metabolic scope in fishes and suggests wild fish species tend to perform best near the highest temperatures encountered in their range while maintaining a safety margin from the deleterious effects of upper critical temperatures.

DOI 10.1111/1365-2435.12618
Citations Scopus - 37
2016 Barnes TC, Junge C, Myers SA, Taylor MD, Rogers PJ, Ferguson GJ, et al., 'Population structure in a wide-ranging coastal teleost (Argyrosomus japonicus, Sciaenidae) reflects marine biogeography across southern Australia', Marine and Freshwater Research, 67 1103-1113 (2016)

© CSIRO 2016. Population structure in marine teleosts is often investigated to aid conservation and fisheries management (e.g. to assess population structure to inform restocking ... [more]

© CSIRO 2016. Population structure in marine teleosts is often investigated to aid conservation and fisheries management (e.g. to assess population structure to inform restocking programs). We assessed genetic population structure of the important estuary-associated marine fish, mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus), within Australian waters and between Australia and South Africa. Genetic variation was investigated at 13 polymorphic microsatellite markers. FST values and Bayesian estimates in STRUCTURE suggested population differentiation of mulloway within Australia and confirm strong differentiation between South Africa and Australia. The 12 Australian sample sets fell into one of four spatially separated genetic clusters. Initially, a significant signal of isolation-by-distance (IBD) was evident among Australian populations. However, further investigation by decomposed-pairwise-regression (DPR) suggested five sample sets were influenced more by genetic-drift, rather than gene-flow and drift equilibrium, as expected in strong IBD cases. Cryptic oceanographic and topographical influences may isolate mulloway populations from south-Western Australia. The results demonstrate that DPR is suitable to assess population structure of coastal marine species where barriers to gene flow may be less obvious than in freshwater systems. Information on the relative strengths of gene flow and genetic drift facilitates a more comprehensive understanding of the evolutionary forces that lead to population structure, which in turn informs fisheries and assists conservation management. Large-bodied predatory scale-fish may be under increasing pressure on a global scale, owing to a variety of anthropogenic reasons. In southern Australia, the iconic sciaenid A. japonicus (mulloway, jewfish or kob) is no exception. Despite the species supporting important fisheries, much of its ecology is poorly understood. It is possible that a greater understanding of their genetic population structure can help ensure a sustainable future for the only southern Australian sciaenid.

DOI 10.1071/MF15044
Citations Scopus - 4
2016 Taylor MD, Smith JA, Boys CA, Whitney H, 'A rapid approach to evaluate putative nursery sites for penaeid prawns', JOURNAL OF SEA RESEARCH, 114 26-31 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.seares.2016.05.004
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2016 Fetterplace LC, Davis AR, Neilson JM, Taylor MD, Knott NA, 'Active acoustic tracking suggests that soft sediment fishes can show site attachment: A preliminary assessment of the movement patterns of the blue-spotted flathead (Platycephalus caeruleopunctatus)', Animal Biotelemetry, 4 (2016)

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: It is generally considered that on relatively homogenous marine soft sediment habitats, such as sand, fish are unlikely to show site attachment. ... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: It is generally considered that on relatively homogenous marine soft sediment habitats, such as sand, fish are unlikely to show site attachment. This poses challenges for management and the evaluation of the efficacy of marine protected areas, in which soft sediments often make up more than 70 % of habitats. The blue-spotted flathead is a commercially and recreationally targeted species found on soft sediments in coastal marine waters of south-eastern Australia. There are no published data on its movement patterns. Here, using active acoustic telemetry, we aim to (a) quantify movement and habitat use of blue-spotted flathead, (b) compare area usage to no-take sanctuary zone size and (c) obtain data to aid in the design of a large passive receiver array to be used in long-term comprehensive tracking of soft sediment fish. Results: Three of five blue-spotted flathead that were tagged exhibited strong site attachment and were detected close to their release points for the entire 60-day study period. The two other fish were not detected after 4 and 25 days and were likely to have moved out of the study area (search radius ¿ 3 km). For the three fish tracked over 60 days, the area used was compact (mean ± SE = 0.021 km2 ± 0.037) and two patterns of movement were apparent: (1) a small activity space used in its entirety each day (two fish) and (2) a larger activity space in which a separate area is utilised each day (one fish). Conclusions: Our study is the first to document the movement of blue-spotted flathead, and these preliminary results demonstrate two broad movement patterns shown by this species on soft sediments in Jervis Bay. Over the course of 60 days, a majority of fish in this study showed strong site attachment; however, a number of fish also made larger-scale movements. Finally, our study suggests that a tightly spaced, passive acoustic array would provide meaningful results for this species, although strategically placed receivers outside this array would be required to detect any longer range movements.

DOI 10.1186/s40317-016-0107-6
Citations Scopus - 8
2016 Brodie S, Taylor MD, Smith JA, Suthers IM, Gray CA, Payne NL, 'Improving consumption rate estimates by incorporating wild activity into a bioenergetics model', Ecology and Evolution, 6 2262-2274 (2016)

© 2016 Published by John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd. Consumption is the basis of metabolic and trophic ecology and is used to assess an animal&apos;s trophic impact. The contribution ... [more]

© 2016 Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Consumption is the basis of metabolic and trophic ecology and is used to assess an animal's trophic impact. The contribution of activity to an animal's energy budget is an important parameter when estimating consumption, yet activity is usually measured in captive animals. Developments in telemetry have allowed the energetic costs of activity to be measured for wild animals; however, wild activity is seldom incorporated into estimates of consumption rates. We calculated the consumption rate of a free-ranging marine predator (yellowtail kingfish, Seriola lalandi) by integrating the energetic cost of free-ranging activity into a bioenergetics model. Accelerometry transmitters were used in conjunction with laboratory respirometry trials to estimate kingfish active metabolic rate in the wild. These field-derived consumption rate estimates were compared with those estimated by two traditional bioenergetics methods. The first method derived routine swimming speed from fish morphology as an index of activity (a "morphometric" method), and the second considered activity as a fixed proportion of standard metabolic rate (a "physiological" method). The mean consumption rate for free-ranging kingfish measured by accelerometry was 152 J·g-1·day-1, which lay between the estimates from the morphometric method (µ = 134 J·g-1·day-1) and the physiological method (µ = 181 J·g-1·day-1). Incorporating field-derived activity values resulted in the smallest variance in log-normally distributed consumption rates (s = 0.31), compared with the morphometric (s = 0.57) and physiological (s = 0.78) methods. Incorporating field-derived activity into bioenergetics models probably provided more realistic estimates of consumption rate compared with the traditional methods, which may further our understanding of trophic interactions that underpin ecosystem-based fisheries management. The general methods used to estimate active metabolic rates of free-ranging fish could be extended to examine ecological energetics and trophic interactions across aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The contribution of activity to an animal's energy budget is an important parameter when estimating consumption, yet activity is usually measured in captive animals. We calculated the consumption rate of a free-ranging marine predator (yellowtail kingfish, Seriola lalandi) by integrating the energetic cost of free-ranging activity into a bioenergetics model. Incorporating field-derived activity into bioenergetics models probably provided more realistic estimates of consumption rate compared with the traditional methods, which may further our understanding of trophic interactions that underpin ecosystem-based fisheries management.

DOI 10.1002/ece3.2027
Citations Scopus - 10
2016 Becker A, Whitfield AK, Cowley PD, Cole VJ, Taylor MD, 'Tidal amplitude and fish abundance in the mouth region of a small estuary', Journal of Fish Biology, 89 1851-1856 (2016)

© 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Using an acoustic underwater camera (Dual Frequency IDentification SONar, DIDSON), the abundance and direction of movement of fi... [more]

© 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Using an acoustic underwater camera (Dual Frequency IDentification SONar, DIDSON), the abundance and direction of movement of fishes¿>¿80¿mm total length (LT ) in the mouth of a small South African estuary during spring and neap tidal cycles were observed. While the sizes of fishes recorded were consistent across both tide cycles, the number of fishes passing the camera was significantly greater during the smaller neap tides. Schooling behaviour was more pronounced for fishes that were travelling into the estuary compared to fishes swimming towards the ocean.

DOI 10.1111/jfb.13056
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Stocks JR, Gray CA, Taylor MD, 'Intra-population trends in the maturation and reproduction of a temperate marine herbivore Girella elevata across latitudinal clines', Journal of Fish Biology, 86 463-483 (2015)

© 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Latitudinal variation in the reproductive characteristics of a temperate marine herbivore, rock blackfish Girella elevata, was e... [more]

© 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Latitudinal variation in the reproductive characteristics of a temperate marine herbivore, rock blackfish Girella elevata, was examined from three regions of the south-eastern Australian coast. Biological sampling covered 780 km of coastline, including the majority of the species distribution. The sampling range incorporated three distinct oceanographic regions of the East Australian Current, a poleward-flowing western boundary current of the Southern Pacific Gyre and climate-change hotspot. Girella elevata are a highly fecund, group synchronous (multiple batch)-spawner. Mean fork length (LF) and age at maturity were greater for females than males within all regions, with both male and female G. elevata of the southern region maturing at a greater size and age than those from the central region. Estimates of batch fecundity (FB) were greatest in the northern and southern regions, relative to the central region where growth rates were greatest. Significant positive relationships were observed between FB and LF, and FB and total fish mass. Gonado-somatic indices indicated latitudinal synchrony in spawning seasonality between G. elevata at higher latitudes, spawning in the late austral spring and summer. A late or prolonged spawning period is evident for G. elevata from the northern region. Juvenile recruitment to intertidal rock pools within the central and southern regions was synchronous with the spawning season, however, no juveniles were found within the northern region. The implications of latitudinal variation in reproductive characteristics are discussed in the context of climate and oceanographic conditions of south-east Australia.

DOI 10.1111/jfb.12563
Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Payne NL, Van Der Meulen DE, Suthers IM, Gray CA, Walsh CT, Taylor MD, 'Rain-driven changes in fish dynamics: A switch from spatial to temporal segregation', Marine Ecology Progress Series, 528 267-275 (2015)

© Inter-Research 2015. Niche segregation models underpin our understanding of speciation, population dynamics, and the evolution of foraging strategies. Many studies have evaluate... [more]

© Inter-Research 2015. Niche segregation models underpin our understanding of speciation, population dynamics, and the evolution of foraging strategies. Many studies have evaluated changes in niche segregation dynamics over seasonal and decadal scales, but the influence of short-term stochastic processes like weather are poorly understood. This represents a problem for predicting ecosystem-level responses to the changes in weather patterns that are anticipated to occur over the coming decades. By simultaneously monitoring spatial and temporal segregation in a large estuarine piscivore and smaller benthic carnivore (mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus and sand whiting Sillago ciliata, respectively) before and after rainfall, we tested for disturbance-driven changes in species segregation. During non-rain conditions, both species were diurnally active but spatially segregated in the vertical plane (i.e. water depth). After rainfall, mulloway encroached on the whiting's vertical habitat and reversed their activity rhythm, while whiting did the opposite, strengthening their diel activity rhythm. Long-term fishery catch data were broadly consistent with this pattern, with rain-associated increases in mulloway catchability contrasting a decrease in catchability of whiting. Our example suggests short-term stochastic disturbances can drive drastic changes in fish dynamics, and highlights the significance of future changes to rainfall regimes in structuring ecosystem processes.

DOI 10.3354/meps11285
Citations Scopus - 8
2015 Gannon R, Payne NL, Suthers IM, Gray CA, van der Meulen DE, Taylor MD, 'Fine-scale movements, site fidelity and habitat use of an estuarine dependent sparid', Environmental Biology of Fishes, 98 1599-1608 (2015)

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Space use and movement patterns are largely influenced by an animal¿s size, habitat connectivity, reproductive mode, and foragin... [more]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Space use and movement patterns are largely influenced by an animal¿s size, habitat connectivity, reproductive mode, and foraging behaviours; and are important in defining the broader population biology and ecology of an organism. Acoustic telemetry was used to investigate the home range, habitat use and relative movement patterns of an estuarine dependant sparid (Acanthopagrus australis, Günther). Ten fish were internally tagged with acoustic transmitters and manually tracked in a riverine estuary for four, 3-day periods. Positional data was converted into a relative index of fish movement (Minimum Activity Index, MAI), and also used to estimate kernel density distributions which approximated areas of core and total space use for each fish. Space use for A. australis was not related to fish size; although movement of each fish (MAI) increased with fish length and a reduction in water conductivity. The distance between tagged fish and mangrove habitat was correlated with time-of-day and tide level with yellowfin bream moving closer to mangroves during the daytime and on high tides. Fish movements, residency and site fidelity revealed the nature of decision-making for fish, and the conservation value of small patches of estuarine habitats.

DOI 10.1007/s10641-015-0385-5
Citations Scopus - 14
2015 Henschke N, Everett JD, Suthers IM, Smith JA, Hunt BPV, Doblin MA, Taylor MD, 'Zooplankton trophic niches respond to different water types of the western Tasman Sea: A stable isotope analysis', Deep-Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, 104 1-8 (2015)

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The trophic relationships of 21 species from an oceanic zooplankton community were studied using stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen. Zooplankton and suspe... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The trophic relationships of 21 species from an oceanic zooplankton community were studied using stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen. Zooplankton and suspended particulate organic matter (POM) were sampled in three different water types in the western Tasman Sea: inner shelf (IS), a cold core eddy (CCE) and a warm core eddy (WCE). d<sup>15</sup>N values ranged from 3.9¿ for the parasitic copepod Sapphirina augusta to 10.2¿ for the euphausiid, Euphausia spinifera. d<sup>13</sup>C varied from -22.6 to -19.4¿ as a result of the copepod Euchirella curticauda and E. spinifera. The isotopic composition of POM varied significantly among water types; as did the trophic enrichment of zooplankton over POM, with the lowest enrichment in the recently upwelled IS water type (0.5¿) compared to the warm core eddy (1.6¿) and cold core eddy (2.7¿). The WCE was an oligotrophic environment and was associated with an increased trophic level for omnivorous zooplankton (copepods and euphausiids) to a similar level as carnivorous zooplankton (chaetognaths). Therefore carnivory in zooplankton can increase in response to lower abundance and reduced diversity in their phytoplankton and protozoan prey. Trophic niche width comparisons across three zooplankton species: the salp Thalia democratica, the copepod Eucalanus elongatus and the euphausiid Thysanoessa gregaria, indicated that both niche partitioning and competition can occur within the zooplankton community. We have shown that trophic relationships among the zooplankton are dynamic and respond to different water types. The changes to the zooplankton isotopic niche, however, were still highly variable as result of oceanographic variation within water types.

DOI 10.1016/j.dsr.2015.06.010
Citations Scopus - 5
2015 Brodie S, Hobday AJ, Smith JA, Everett JD, Taylor MD, Gray CA, Suthers IM, 'Modelling the oceanic habitats of two pelagic species using recreational fisheries data', Fisheries Oceanography, 24 463-477 (2015)

© 2015 John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd. Defining the oceanic habitats of migratory marine species is important for both single species and ecosystem-based fisheries management, partic... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Defining the oceanic habitats of migratory marine species is important for both single species and ecosystem-based fisheries management, particularly when the distribution of these habitats vary temporally. This can be achieved using species distribution models that include physical environmental predictors. In the present study, species distribution models that describe the seasonal habitats of two pelagic fish (dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus and yellowtail kingfish, Seriola lalandi), are developed using 19 yr of presence-only data from a recreational angler-based catch-and-release fishing programme. A Poisson point process model within a generalized additive modelling framework was used to determine the species distributions off the east coast of Australia as a function of several oceanographic covariates. This modelling framework uses presence-only data to determine the intensity of fish (fish km<sup>-2</sup>), rather than a probability of fish presence. Sea surface temperature (SST), sea level anomaly, SST frontal index and eddy kinetic energy were significant environmental predictors for both dolphinfish and kingfish distributions. Models for both species indicate a greater fish intensity off the east Australian coast during summer and autumn in response to the regional oceanography, namely shelf incursions by the East Australian Current. This study provides a framework for using presence-only recreational fisheries data to create species distribution models that can contribute to the future dynamic spatial management of pelagic fisheries.

DOI 10.1111/fog.12122
Citations Scopus - 9
2015 Scott ME, Smith JA, Lowry MB, Taylor MD, Suthers IM, 'The influence of an offshore artificial reef on the abundance of fish in the surrounding pelagic environment', Marine and Freshwater Research, 66 429-437 (2015)

© CSIRO 2015. Artificial reefs are a popular fisheries management tool, but the effect of these reefs on the abundance of fish in the surrounding pelagic environment is uncertain.... [more]

© CSIRO 2015. Artificial reefs are a popular fisheries management tool, but the effect of these reefs on the abundance of fish in the surrounding pelagic environment is uncertain. Pelagic baited remote underwater video (PBRUV) was used to observe the fish assemblage surrounding an offshore artificial reef (OAR), near Sydney, Australia. PBRUVs were deployed at three distances (30, 100, 500m) from the OAR, and compared with a drop camera deployed directly over the OAR. There was a significantly greater abundance of fish on the OAR, but no significant difference in abundance at the 30-, 100- or 500-m distances. Two highly mobile non-resident species (Seriola lalandi, Pseudocaranx dentex) were significantly more abundant on the OAR, but this association was not detected 30m away. The lack of a significant difference in total fish abundance, or in assemblage composition, between the 30-, 100- and 500-m distances suggests that any association with the OAR is on a localised scale (<30m). One exception was the ocean leatherjacket (Nelusetta ayraudi), which had an association detected 100m from the OAR. This predominantly small-scale effect may be influenced by the proximity of this OAR to numerous natural reefs.

DOI 10.1071/MF14064
Citations Scopus - 22
2015 Stocks JR, Gray CA, Taylor MD, 'Out in the wash: Spatial ecology of a temperate marine shallow rocky-reef species derived using acoustic telemetry', Marine and Freshwater Research, 66 559-571 (2015)

© CSIRO 2015. Characterising the movement and habitat affinities of fish is a fundamental component in understanding the functioning of marine ecosystems. A comprehensive array of... [more]

© CSIRO 2015. Characterising the movement and habitat affinities of fish is a fundamental component in understanding the functioning of marine ecosystems. A comprehensive array of acoustic receivers was deployed at two near-shore coastal sites in south-eastern Australia, to examine the movements, activity-space size and residency of a temperate rocky-reef, herbivorous species Girella elevata. Twenty-four G. elevata individuals were internally tagged with pressure-sensing acoustic transmitters across these two arrays and monitored for up to 550 days. An existing network of coastal receivers was used to examine large-scale movement patterns. Individuals exhibited varying residency, but all had small activity-space sizes within the arrays. The species utilised shallow rocky-reef habitat, displaying unimodal or bimodal patterns in depth use. A positive correlation was observed between wind speed and the detection depth of fish, with fish being likely to move to deeper water to escape periods of adverse conditions. Detection frequency data, corrected using sentinel tags, generally illustrated diurnal behaviour. Patterns of habitat usage, residency and spatial utilisation highlighted the susceptibility of G. elevata to recreational fishing pressure. The results from the present study will further contribute to the spatial information required in the zoning of effective marine protected areas, and our understanding of temperate reef fish ecology.

DOI 10.1071/MF14182
Citations Scopus - 4
2014 Payne NL, Taylor MD, Watanabe YY, Semmens JM, 'From physiology to physics: Are we recognizing the flexibility of biologging tools?', Journal of Experimental Biology, 217 317-322 (2014)

The remote measurement of data from free-ranging animals has been termed &apos;biologging&apos; and in recent years this relatively small set of tools has been instrumental in add... [more]

The remote measurement of data from free-ranging animals has been termed 'biologging' and in recent years this relatively small set of tools has been instrumental in addressing remarkably diverse questions-from 'how will tuna respond to climate change?' to 'why are whales big?'. While a single biologging dataset can have the potential to test hypotheses spanning physiology, ecology, evolution and theoretical physics, explicit illustrations of this flexibility are scarce and this has arguably hindered the full realization of the power of biologging tools. Here we present a small set of examples from studies that have collected data on two parameters widespread in biologging research (depth and acceleration), but that have interpreted their data in the context of extremely diverse phenomena: from tests of biomechanical and diving-optimality models to identifications of feeding events, Lévy flight foraging strategies and expanding oxygen minimum zones. We use these examples to highlight the remarkable flexibility of biologging tools, and identify several mechanisms that may enhance the scope and dissemination of future biologging research programs. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

DOI 10.1242/jeb.093922
Citations Scopus - 31
2014 Gannon R, Taylor MD, Suthers IM, Gray CA, Van Der Meulen DE, Smith JA, Payne NL, 'Thermal limitation of performance and biogeography in a free-ranging ectotherm: Insights from accelerometry', Journal of Experimental Biology, 217 3033-3037 (2014)

© 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. Theoretical and laboratory studies generally show that ectotherm performance increases with temperature to an optimum, and subs... [more]

© 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. Theoretical and laboratory studies generally show that ectotherm performance increases with temperature to an optimum, and subsequently declines. Several physiological mechanisms probably shape thermal performance curves, but responses of free-ranging animals to temperature variation will represent a compromise between these mechanisms and ecological constraints. Thermal performance data from wild animals balancing physiology and ecology are rare, and this represents a hindrance for predicting population impacts of future temperature change. We used internally implanted accelerometers near the middle of a species' geographical distribution and gill-net catch data near the species' latitudinal extremes to quantify temperature-related activity levels of a wild predatory fish (Platycephalus fuscus). We examined our data in the context of established models of thermal performance, and the relationship between thermal performance thresholds and biogeography. Acceleration data approximated a thermal performance curve, with activity peaking at 23° C but declining rapidly at higher temperatures. Gill-net catch data displayed a similar trend, with a temperature-associated increase and decrease in catch rates in temperate and tropical regions, respectively. Extrapolated estimates of zero activity (CTmin and CTmax) from the accelerometers were similar to the minimum and maximum mean monthly water temperatures experienced at the southern and northern (respectively) limits of the species distribution, consistent with performance-limited biogeography in this species. These data highlight the fundamental influence of temperature on ectotherm performance, and how thermal performance limits may shape biogeography. Biologging approaches are rarely used to examine thermal performance curves in freeranging animals, but these may be central to understanding the tradeoffs between physiology and ecology that constrain species' biogeographies and determine the susceptibility of ectotherms to future increases in temperature.

DOI 10.1242/jeb.104455
Citations Scopus - 25
2014 Payne NL, van der Meulen DE, Suthers IM, Gray CA, Taylor MD, 'Foraging intensity of wild mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus decreases with increasing anthropogenic disturbance', Marine Biology, 162 539-546 (2014)

© 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. The influence of anthropogenic disturbance on the behaviour of wild animals is increasingly recognised for terrestrial systems. Data on ... [more]

© 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. The influence of anthropogenic disturbance on the behaviour of wild animals is increasingly recognised for terrestrial systems. Data on free-ranging aquatic animals are comparatively scarce, and this represents a problem for estimating the consequences of human disturbance for organism fitness and therefore the functioning of aquatic systems. We used acoustic accelerometer and depth transmitters implanted in wild fish and archival stomach content data to test for relationships between the intensity of boating and the activity levels and foraging efficiency of an estuarine predatory fish, the mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus. Increasing boating activity (inferred from week-long trends in underwater noise and local maritime records) was associated with a reduction in activity levels and increased depth distributions of mulloway. Stomach content data from a nearby estuary revealed a far-lower feeding rate and altered diet composition on weekends (when boating activity is greatest) compared to weekdays for this species, and an inferred foraging success rate almost one-third that of weekdays. These data suggest the behaviour and foraging intensity of mulloway is significantly influenced by anthropogenic disturbance. The overall fitness costs of the reduction in foraging success will depend on how readily mulloway can reallocate foraging to less disturbed conditions, and the extent of stress-related responses to disturbance in this species. This study supports earlier predictions that anthropogenic disturbances like noise could have significant impacts on the behaviour and fitness of aquatic animals.

DOI 10.1007/s00227-014-2603-7
Citations Scopus - 14
2014 Stocks JR, Gray CA, Taylor MD, 'Testing the effects of near-shore environmental variables on acoustic detections: Implications on telemetry array design and data interpretation', Marine Technology Society Journal, 48 28-35 (2014)

Acoustic technology is a common means to study the movements and habitat utilization of aquatic organisms. This study simultaneously assesses the relative importance of a number o... [more]

Acoustic technology is a common means to study the movements and habitat utilization of aquatic organisms. This study simultaneously assesses the relative importance of a number of major environmental variables affecting the detection range and detection frequency of acoustic tracking technology in near-shore marine environments. Transmitter power output and diel index in order of relative importance were the most influential variables affecting detection range within a temperate reef habitat. Wave height, transmitter power output, and diel index in order of relative importance were the most influential variables affecting detection range within the wash zone. Similar models resulted when examining detection frequency at 100 m within the two habitat types. Attention is also drawn to the selection of transmitter power output based upon the habitat type and environmental conditions of the study site. This study demonstrates the importance of in situ range test studies in array design and interpretation of acoustic telemetry data.

DOI 10.4031/MTSJ.48.1.8
Citations Scopus - 9
2014 Harris BP, Young JW, Revill AT, Taylor MD, 'Understanding diel-vertical feeding migrations in zooplankton using bulk carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes', Journal of Plankton Research, 36 1159-1163 (2014)

We used bulk stable isotope analysis (SIA) to examine diel feeding activity in two vertically migrating krill species, Thysanoessa gregaria and Euphausia similis, off eastern Aust... [more]

We used bulk stable isotope analysis (SIA) to examine diel feeding activity in two vertically migrating krill species, Thysanoessa gregaria and Euphausia similis, off eastern Australia. SIA indicated feeding by both species above the thermocline at night, potentially on both particulate organic matter and microzooplankton. Our results support the use of SIA to investigate vertical migration and feeding in zooplankton. © 2014 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1093/plankt/fbu026
Citations Scopus - 6
2014 Chan JT, Sherwin WB, Taylor MD, 'A tool for tracking genetic contributions of wild Penaeus (Melicertus) plebejus broodstock to hatchery populations', Animal Genetics, 45 888-892 (2014)

© 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics. Stock enhancement, restocking and sea ranching are being increasingly applied in both fisheries and conservation. Th... [more]

© 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics. Stock enhancement, restocking and sea ranching are being increasingly applied in both fisheries and conservation. The contribution of hatchery stock to fishery harvest and the maintenance of the genetic structure of stocked populations are both important considerations when releasing captive-bred organisms into natural systems. Use of wild-caught broodstock generally overcomes some of the genetic problems associated with domesticated hatchery populations, but there is still a need to ensure that a sufficient proportion of the natural population contribute to production of the stocked cohort to realise the genetic benefits of using wild-caught broodstock. Releases of Penaeus (Melicertus) plebejus are under investigation as a means of increasing prawn production in recruitment-limited areas. We used the highly variable mitochondrial control region (mtCR) to assign post-larvae to maternal lineages in the hatchery and also to investigate the reproductive performance of female broodstock in terms of contribution to the production of the cohorts of post-larvae in the hatchery. Our data showed that mtCR can be a useful tool for tracking lineages and provided genetic evidence that unequal contribution and underproducing females can occur even in wild-caught broodstock. This work therefore highlights the importance of monitoring the genetic composition of pre-release hatchery stocks.

DOI 10.1111/age.12212
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Smith JA, Taylor MD, 'A peaked logistic-based selection curve', Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 71 351-355 (2014)

Length-based selection curves define the relative catchability of fish to specific types of fishing gear, with catchability often highest at intermediate fish lengths. Distributio... [more]

Length-based selection curves define the relative catchability of fish to specific types of fishing gear, with catchability often highest at intermediate fish lengths. Distributions such as the normal, lognormal, or gamma are often used to define "peaked" selection curves, but these have limited capabilities to describe strongly asymmetric selection relationships, such as those sometimes observed for hooks or gillnets. Another, more flexible, peaked selection curve is proposed, which is derived by combining multiple logistic distributions. While the logistic distribution is frequently used to describe monotonic selection curves, incorporating multiple logistic equations (that describe either the increasing or decreasing catchability) can define a large range of asymmetric peaked selection curves. This "peak-logistic" curve also allows nonzero asymptotic selection for the largest size classes, which may be the selection occurring in some hook-and-line fisheries. We demonstrate examples of selection in hook, haul net, and mixed hook fisheries, for which the peak-logistic curve is more appropriate than comparative lognormal and binormal selection curves. We also promote an alternative to the peak-logistic: the two-sided normal curve.

DOI 10.1139/cjfas-2013-0401
Citations Scopus - 4
2014 Pursche AR, Walsh CT, Taylor MD, 'Evaluation of a novel external tag-mount for acoustic tracking of small fish', Fisheries Management and Ecology, 21 169-172 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/fme.12051
Citations Scopus - 6
2014 Pursche AR, Suthers IM, Taylor MD, 'The effect of targeted stocking on behaviour and space utilization of a released finfish', ICES Journal of Marine Science, 71 1100-1106 (2014)

Targeted stocking involves the release of fish directly into high-quality habitat, however this is often time-consuming, expensive and difficult. Acoustically tagged hatchery-rear... [more]

Targeted stocking involves the release of fish directly into high-quality habitat, however this is often time-consuming, expensive and difficult. Acoustically tagged hatchery-reared juvenile mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus were released in groups directly into deep-hole habitat preferred by wild conspecifics (targeted stocking), or in a non-targeted fashion near easily accessible sites that lacked high-quality habitats in the direct vicinity. Fish were tracked continuously, 24 h d -1 , for 5 d following release. Fish released in a targeted fashion showed lower mean activity rates (50% less movement) and occupied higher quality habitats than fish released in a non-targeted fashion. Fish released in a non-targeted fashion also used a greater number of smaller habitat patches. The implications for improvements in behaviour and habitat usage patterns for fish released in a targeted fashion, such as improved growth and survival, are discussed. Identifying and releasing fish directly into the species' high-quality habitat may ultimately improve the success of stocking programs. © 2014 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1093/icesjms/fst209
Citations Scopus - 4
2014 Matis PA, Figueira WF, Suthers IM, Humphries J, Miskiewicz A, Coleman RA, et al., 'Cyclonic entrainment? The ichthyoplankton attributes of three major water mass types generated by the separation of the East Australian Current', ICES Journal of Marine Science, 71 1696-1705 (2014)

© International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 2014. All rights reserved. The relationship between larval fish assemblages and coastal oceanography is the basis for much o... [more]

© International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 2014. All rights reserved. The relationship between larval fish assemblages and coastal oceanography is the basis for much of our understanding of connectivity and productivity of fish populations. Larval fish assemblages were sampled from the upper mixed layer (<50 mdepth) at three prominent circulation features [separation of the East Australian Current (EAC), anticyclonic eddy, and cyclonic eddy] off the southeast Australian coast across three bathymetric zones (shelf, slope and ocean) for each feature. The separation of the EAC from the coast at ~ 32°S was characterized by warmer, less saline water compared with the cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies further to the south (~ 34 and ~ 35°S, respectively), which were both characterized by cooler Tasman Sea water and greater fluorescence. The anticyclonic eddy had separated from the EAC three months prior to sampling, which facilitated the movement of a cyclonic eddy from the Tasman Sea westwards to the shelf at ~ 34°S. The larval assemblage in the EAC had high numbers of fish of the families Labridae and Stomiidae. The cyclonic eddy was characterized by larval clupeids, carangids, scombrids and bothids, indicating recent entrainment of shelf waters and proximity to major spawning regions. In contrast, the anticyclonic eddy had fewer larval fish, with little evidence for entrainment of shelf assemblages into the near-surfacewaters. Myctophid swere found in high abundance across all oceanographic features and bathymetric zones. The evidence of selective entrainment of coastal larval fish into the near-surface waters of a cyclonic eddy compared with a similar anticyclonic eddy indicates a potential offshore nursery ground.

DOI 10.1093/icesjms/fsu062
Citations Scopus - 9
2014 Van Der Meulen DE, Walsh CT, Taylor MD, Gray CA, 'Habitat requirements and spawning strategy of an estuarine-dependent fish, Percalates colonorum', Marine and Freshwater Research, 65 218-227 (2014)

Determining the links among estuarine hydrography, habitat and spawning of estuarine-dependent fish is essential for understanding reproductive dynamics, recruitment processes and... [more]

Determining the links among estuarine hydrography, habitat and spawning of estuarine-dependent fish is essential for understanding reproductive dynamics, recruitment processes and directing conservation efforts. Acoustic tracking was used to evaluate fine-scale spatial and temporal patterns in spawning activity of Percalates colonorum (estuary perch) within the Shoalhaven River, south-eastern Australia. Plankton tows were used to determine the timing of spawning events. Tagged P. colonorum exhibited movements restricted to areas of structurally complex large wooden debris and a concrete ferry landing. Egg counts confirmed that spawning events coincided with adult aggregations, whereas egg abundances peaked at night during the first 2h of the run-out tide. We postulate that spawning and recruitment success of P. colonorum is attributable to its selective spawning habitats that are (1) structurally complex to provide refuge and protection from predation, as well as congregate prey items, (2) adjacent to deep water of high velocities to maximise egg dispersal and (3) in close proximity to river entrance to facilitate coastal dispersal of eggs and inter-estuarine connectivity of larvae.

DOI 10.1071/MF13060
Citations Scopus - 9
2014 Stocks JR, Gray CA, Taylor MD, 'Synchrony and variation across latitudinal gradients: The role of climate and oceanographic processes in the growth of a herbivorous fish', Journal of Sea Research, 90 23-32 (2014)

Spatial and temporal variation in the growth of a widely distributed temperate marine herbivore, Girella elevata, was examined using length-at-age data and multi-decadal otolith i... [more]

Spatial and temporal variation in the growth of a widely distributed temperate marine herbivore, Girella elevata, was examined using length-at-age data and multi-decadal otolith increment growth chronologies. In total 927 G. elevata were collected from three regions of the Australian south-east coast, extending 780. km and covering the majority of the East Australian Current, a poleward-flowing western boundary current of the Southern Pacific Gyre and climate change hotspot. A validated ageing method using sectioned sagittal otoliths was developed to enumerate both daily (juvenile fish) and annual otolith increments. G. elevata exhibited great longevity with a maximum recorded age of 45. +. yrs. Spatial variation in growth from length-at-age data was observed with the highest growth rates within the centre of the species distribution. Analysis of otolith growth chronologies of 33. yrs showed a positive relationship with the Southern Oscillation Index. Identifying links between life-history characteristics and variation in oceanographic conditions across latitudinal gradients may shed light on potential impacts of expected climate shifts on fish productivity. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.seares.2014.03.002
Citations Scopus - 7
2014 Taylor MD, Van Der Meulen DE, Ives MC, Walsh CT, Reinfelds IV, Gray CA, 'Shock, stress or signal? Implications of freshwater flows for a top-level estuarine predator', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014)

Physicochemical variability in estuarine systems plays an important role in estuarine processes and in the lifecycles of estuarine organisms. In particular, seasonality of freshwa... [more]

Physicochemical variability in estuarine systems plays an important role in estuarine processes and in the lifecycles of estuarine organisms. In particular, seasonality of freshwater inflow to estuaries may be important in various aspects of fish lifecycles. This study aimed to further understand these relationships by studying the movements of a top-level estuarine predator in response to physicochemical variability in a large, temperate south-east Australian estuary (Shoalhaven River). Mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus , 47-89 cm total length) were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters, and their movements and migrations monitored over two years via fixed-position VR2W acoustic receivers configured in a linear array along the length of the estuary. The study period included a high degree of abiotic variability, with multiple pulses (exponentially high flows over a short period of time) in fresh water to the estuary, as well as broader seasonal variation in flow, temperature and conductivity. The relative deviation of fish from their modal location in the estuary was affected primarily by changes in conductivity, and smaller fish (n = 4) tended to deviate much further downstream from their modal position in the estuary than larger fish (n = 8). High-flow events which coincided with warmer temperatures tended to drive mature fish down the estuary and potentially provided a spawning signal to stimulate aggregation of adults near the estuary mouth; however, this relationship requires further investigation. These findings indicate that pulse and press effects of freshwater inflow and associated physicochemical variability play a role in the movements of mulloway, and that seasonality of large freshwater flows may be important in spawning. The possible implications of river regulation and the extraction of freshwater for consumptive uses on estuarine fishes are discussed. © 2014 Taylor et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0095680
Citations Scopus - 14
2013 Smith JA, Baumgartner LJ, Suthers IM, Fielder DS, Taylor MD, 'Density-dependent energy use contributes to the self-thinning relationship of cohorts', American Naturalist, 181 331-343 (2013)

In resource-limited populations, an increase in average body size can occur only with a decline in abundance. This is known as self-thinning, and the decline in abundance in food-... [more]

In resource-limited populations, an increase in average body size can occur only with a decline in abundance. This is known as self-thinning, and the decline in abundance in food-limited populations is considered proportional to the scaling of metabolism with body mass. This popular hypothesis may be inaccurate, because selfthinning populations can also experience density-dependent competition, which could alter their energy use beyond the predictions of metabolic scaling. This study tested whether density-dependent competition has an energetic role in self-thinning, by manipulating the abundance of the fish Macquaria novemaculeata and tank size to partition the effects of competition from metabolic scaling. We found that self-thinning can be density dependent and that changes in intraspecific competition may be more influential than metabolic scaling on self-thinning relationships. The energetic mechanism we propose is that density-dependent competition causes variation in the allocation of energy to growth, which alters the energetic efficiency of self-thinning cohorts. The implication is that food-limited cohorts and populations with competitive strategies that encourage fast-growing individuals will have less body mass at equilibrium and higher mortality rates. This finding sheds light on the processes structuring populations and can be used to explain inconsistencies in the mass-abundance scaling of assemblages and communities (the energetic-equivalence rule). © 2013 by The University of Chicago. 0003-0147/2013/18103-53402$15.00. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1086/669146
Citations Scopus - 7
2013 Taylor MD, Baker J, Suthers IM, 'Tidal currents, sampling effort and baited remote underwater video (BRUV) surveys: Are we drawing the right conclusions?', Fisheries Research, 140 96-104 (2013)

Estuaries are hydrographically dynamic environments, and such variability can affect the distribution and abundance of estuarine fish. Baited remote underwater video (BRUV) can be... [more]

Estuaries are hydrographically dynamic environments, and such variability can affect the distribution and abundance of estuarine fish. Baited remote underwater video (BRUV) can be used to quantify estuarine species, but BRUV-derived data may be confounded by variable bait plume area and the associated effect on relative sampling effort. This study investigated the potential effects of current velocity on estuarine fish abundance data, and whether associated changes in bait plume size are important for benthic BRUV surveys in estuaries. BRUV sampling was conducted across two zones in two adjacent estuaries, and current velocity measured with a drogue during each BRUV deployment. Current velocity ranged from 0.02 to 0.65ms-1, resulting in potential bait plume areas that varied by orders of magnitude. The maximum number of each species (MaxN) was processed to produce a standardised (by bait plume area) and unstandardised multivariate species data set. The two data sets, whilst developed from identical video footage, yielded contrasting results. Unstandardised data was more variable, but produced a stronger correlation between abiotic variables and community structure. In addition, repeated sampling at some sites revealed significant temporal variance in community structure when data was standardised by bait plume area. Variability in sampling effort resulting from variable current velocity and associated bait plume area may confound interpretation of BRUV data. © 2013.

DOI 10.1016/j.fishres.2012.12.013
Citations Scopus - 26
2013 Payne NL, van der Meulen DE, Gannon R, Semmens JM, Suthers IM, Gray CA, Taylor MD, 'Rain reverses diel activity rhythms in an estuarine teleost', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 280 (2013)

Activity rhythms are ubiquitous in nature, and generally synchronized with the day-night cycle. Several taxa have been shown to switch between nocturnal and diurnal activity in re... [more]

Activity rhythms are ubiquitous in nature, and generally synchronized with the day-night cycle. Several taxa have been shown to switch between nocturnal and diurnal activity in response to environmental variability, and these relatively uncommon switches provide a basis for greater understanding of the mechanisms and adaptive significance of circadian (approx. 24 h) rhythms. Plasticity of activity rhythms has been identified in association with a variety of factors, from changes in predation pressure to an altered nutritional or social status. Here, we report a switch in activity rhythm that is associated with rainfall. Outside periods of rain, the estuarine-associated teleost Acanthopagrus australis was most active and in shallower depths during the day, but this activity and depth pattern was reversed in the days following rain, with diurnality restored as estuarine conductivity and turbidity levels returned to pre-rain levels. Although representing the first example of a rain-induced reversal of activity rhythm in an aquatic animal of which we are aware, our results are consistent with established models on the trade-offs between predation risk and foraging efficiency. © 2012 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1098/rspb.2012.2363
Citations Scopus - 39
2013 Pursche AR, Suthers IM, Taylor MD, 'Post-release monitoring of site and group fidelity in acoustically tagged stocked fish', Fisheries Management and Ecology, 20 445-453 (2013)

Understanding post-release dynamics of stocked fish is essential to successful stock enhancement. This study aimed to match existing life history knowledge to optimise productivit... [more]

Understanding post-release dynamics of stocked fish is essential to successful stock enhancement. This study aimed to match existing life history knowledge to optimise productivity of releases of mulloway, Argyrosomus japonicus (Temminck & Schlegel) into an urban estuary. Passive acoustic telemetry was used to monitor the movement of juvenile mulloway in the Georges River, New South Wales, Australia, and assess the effect of release site and abiotic factors on broad-scale movements of individuals for 26¿weeks. This study found that release site primarily determines the location within the estuary where individuals reside. Water temperature, atmospheric pressure and rainfall did not correlate with fish distribution, although a flood drove fish stocked from upper and mid-river sites down the estuary in February 2008. Fish gradually returned to these sites over the following 9¿weeks. Emigration rates showed an initial downstream migration and an overall egression of ~50% of fish from the release site over 26¿weeks. Fish released in this study showed a degree of site- and group-fidelity, with fish distributing according to release site. It is recommended that future releases of mulloway are undertaken directly into nursery habitat in upper estuarine regions to minimise emigration and maximise efficiency of stocking programmes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/fme.12031
Citations Scopus - 6
2013 Taylor MD, Fairfax AV, Suthers IM, 'The Race for Space: Using Acoustic Telemetry to Understand Density-Dependent Emigration and Habitat Selection in a Released Predatory Fish', Reviews in Fisheries Science, 21 276-285 (2013)

The dynamics of fish behavior, migration, and habitat use following stock enhancement will influence the outcome of recovery programs and indicate the ecological limits of the sys... [more]

The dynamics of fish behavior, migration, and habitat use following stock enhancement will influence the outcome of recovery programs and indicate the ecological limits of the system. This study tested the effect of release density on emigration, activity patterns, and space utilization by releasing juvenile mulloway (Sciaenidae: Argyrosomus japonicus) at low and high densities and monitoring movement intensively for 336 h post release. Mulloway released at high densities had faster emigration and greater overall emigration rates than low density releases. Also, mulloway released at high densities used sub-optimal habitats at a greater frequency. Released fish dispersed into habitat patches at densities proportional to the quality of the habitat patch, consistent with density-dependent habitat selection. Targeting releases of small numbers of fish to the carrying capacity of individual patches of habitat will contribute to the success and economic viability of release programs in open systems. Releases of high densities of individuals or repeated releases at the same site may lead to increased emigration and losses from the stocked system. The capacity of a target habitat to support released fish can be rapidly assessed using pilot releases and intensive monitoring of acoustically tagged fish, prior to the implementation of large-scale release programs. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/10641262.2013.796813
Citations Scopus - 10
2013 Lorenzen K, Agnalt AL, Blankenship HL, Hines AH, Leber KM, Loneragan NR, Taylor MD, 'Evolving Context and Maturing Science: Aquaculture-Based Enhancement and Restoration Enter the Marine Fisheries Management Toolbox', Reviews in Fisheries Science, 21 213-221 (2013)

Aquaculture-based enhancement of marine fisheries includes sea ranching, stock enhancement, and restocking. A rapidly evolving context and maturing science base have effectively p... [more]

Aquaculture-based enhancement of marine fisheries includes sea ranching, stock enhancement, and restocking. A rapidly evolving context and maturing science base have effectively put these approaches into the fisheries management toolbox. Among the contextual factors are (1) a rapid expansion of captive breeding and domestication to new marine species, (2) fisheries governance systems that address the common dilemma, and (3) global environmental change impacts on coastal fisheries that increasingly call for active approaches to maintaining or increasing fisheries yields and ecosystem services. The science base of marine restocking, stock enhancement, and sea ranching continues to advance rapidly and has now reached a point where it is becoming possible to assess the likely contribution of such approaches to fisheries management goals prior to major investments being undertaken and to design enhancement programs effectively and responsibly where good potential is judged to exist. This signifies an important transition of marine fisheries enhancement from an exploratory, research-oriented endeavor to a tool in the fisheries management tool box. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/10641262.2013.837358
Citations Scopus - 26
2013 Loneragan NR, Jenkins GI, Taylor MD, 'Marine Stock Enhancement, Restocking, and Sea Ranching in Australia: Future Directions and a Synthesis of Two Decades of Research and Development', Reviews in Fisheries Science, 21 222-236 (2013)

This article synthesizes information on marine and estuarine release programs in Australia and evaluates potential opportunities for stock enhancement. In Australia, the scale of ... [more]

This article synthesizes information on marine and estuarine release programs in Australia and evaluates potential opportunities for stock enhancement. In Australia, the scale of restocking and stock enhancement programs in marine environments has been low compared with other countries, particularly Japan, China, and the United States. However, since the early 1990s, a number of government and industry organizations have made significant investments in research and development for the release of a variety of species to evaluate the potential of releases to increase the productivity of fisheries. The scale of these research programs has varied from releases of tens of thousands of individuals (abalone Haliotis laevigata, barramundi Lates calcarifer, and mulloway Argyrosomos japonicus), hundreds of thousands (tiger prawns Penaeus esculentus and black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri), and millions (eastern king prawn Penaeus plebejus). These programs, which have shown a strong commitment to the responsible approach to enhancement sensu (Blankenship and Leber, 1995; Lorenzen et al., 2010), have resulted in increased knowledge on the population dynamics and ecology of released species and the development of bio-economic and energetic models to better plan and evaluate releases. Currently, research is continuing in New South Wales (A. japonicus, P. plebejus), Queensland (L. calcarifer), and Western Australia (A. butcheri, H. laevigata). Furthermore, Victoria is developing a plan for releasing juveniles to enhance fisheries in estuarine and marine environments, and South Australia has developed a policy for marine and estuarine stock enhancement. Policies on stock enhancement are being considered for development in New South Wales and Western Australia. These developments in policy and the introduction of fishing license fees in some states have generated renewed interest in initiating release programs in Australia that follow the responsible approach to enhancement. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/10641262.2013.796810
Citations Scopus - 17
2013 Taylor MD, Brennan NP, Lorenzen K, Leber KM, 'Generalized Predatory Impact Model: A Numerical Approach for Assessing Trophic Limits to Hatchery Releases and Controlling Related Ecological Risks', Reviews in Fisheries Science, 21 341-353 (2013)

Rigorous assessment of species and ecosystem biology underpins responsible marine stock enhancement. Estimation of limits to stocking density, based on ecosystem productivity and ... [more]

Rigorous assessment of species and ecosystem biology underpins responsible marine stock enhancement. Estimation of limits to stocking density, based on ecosystem productivity and energetic requirements of stocked species, can be used to gauge the appropriate magnitude of release densities, minimizing waste of resources, and the possibility for adverse stocking effects. A generalized mass-balance model (generalized predatory impact model) for stocking density estimation has been developed. The approach is based around the principles of ECOPATH and accounts for dynamic estimation of stocking-related ecosystem relationships at fine temporal (days) and spatial scales. The main parameter inputs include probability distributions for key biological and life-history traits of stocked species and estimates of primary productivity for the target ecosystem. The energetic requirements of stocked fish are evaluated in terms of growth and mortality as well as ontogenetic transitions in diet, habitat use, morphology, and migration. The theoretical carrying capacity for a stocked species within a given arena is assessed from primary productivity, levels of predation by stocked fish on different trophic groups, and a specified level of acceptable trophic impact. A Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainty is used to provide a probability distribution of stocking densities for a given trophic impact. The model is applied for stocking juveniles of snook (Centropomus undecimalis) in Sarasota, FL, USA, and mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus) in Georges River, NSW, Australia. The model is useful for estimating an appropriate stocking density when planning pilot-scale fish releases. Such releases should be carefully monitored to validate model assumptions and determine density-dependent and other environmental effects. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/10641262.2013.796815
Citations Scopus - 10
2013 Chan JT, Appleyard SA, Sherwin WB, Taylor MD, 'Novel polymorphic microsatellite loci for the eastern king prawn, Penaeus (Melicertus) plebejus', Conservation Genetics Resources, 5 1125-1128 (2013)

Eastern king prawn, Penaeus (Melicertus) plebejus, is an endemic Australian species which is heavily exploited both commercially and recreationally in estuaries and in offshore tr... [more]

Eastern king prawn, Penaeus (Melicertus) plebejus, is an endemic Australian species which is heavily exploited both commercially and recreationally in estuaries and in offshore trawl fisheries across several jurisdictions. P. plebejus shows extensive movement throughout the known distribution range during various life history stages (Montgomery et al. in Fish Res 80:80-87, 2007). It is currently unknown whether there is a full migration throughout the species range, or step-wise migration, and identifying the origins of important spawning populations remains as a challenge. We report 20 high resolution microsatellite markers, to address such questions and assist conservation planning for long-term sustainability. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

DOI 10.1007/s12686-013-9972-y
2013 Smith JA, Mazumder D, Suthers IM, Taylor MD, 'To fit or not to fit: Evaluating stable isotope mixing models using simulated mixing polygons', Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 4 612-618 (2013)

Stable isotope analysis is often used to identify the relative contributions of various food resources to a consumer&apos;s diet. Some Bayesian isotopic mixing models now incorpor... [more]

Stable isotope analysis is often used to identify the relative contributions of various food resources to a consumer's diet. Some Bayesian isotopic mixing models now incorporate uncertainty in the isotopic signatures of consumers, sources and trophic enrichment factors (e.g. SIAR, MixSIR). This had made model outputs more comprehensive, but at the expense of simple model evaluation, and there is no quantitative method for determining whether a proposed mixing model is likely to explain the isotopic signatures of all consumers, before the model is run. Earlier linear mixing models (e.g. IsoSource) are easier to evaluate, such that if a consumer's isotopic signature is outside the mixing polygon bounding the proposed dietary sources, then mass balance cannot be established and there is no logical solution. This can be used to identify consumers for exclusion or to reject a model outright. This point-in-polygon assumption is not inherent in the Bayesian mixing models, because the source data are distributions not average values, and these models will quantify source contributions even when the solution is very unlikely. We use a Monte Carlo simulation of mixing polygons to apply the point-in-polygon assumption to these models. Convex hulls ('mixing polygons') are iterated using the distributions of the proposed dietary sources and trophic enrichment factors, and the proportion of polygons that have a solution (i.e. that satisfy point-in-polygon) is calculated. This proportion can be interpreted as the frequentist probability that the proposed mixing model can calculate source contributions to explain a consumer's isotopic signature. The mixing polygon simulation is visualised with a mixing region, which is calculated by testing a grid of values for point-in-polygon. The simulation method enables users to quantitatively explore assumptions of stable isotope analysis in mixing models incorporating uncertainty, for both two- and three-isotope systems. It provides a quantitative basis for model rejection, for consumer exclusion (those outside the 95% mixing region) and for the correction of trophic enrichment factors. The simulation is demonstrated using a two-isotope study (15N, 13C) of an Australian freshwater food web. © 2013 British Ecological Society.

DOI 10.1111/2041-210X.12048
Citations Scopus - 55
2013 Ferguson AM, Harvey ES, Taylor MD, Knott NA, 'A Herbivore Knows Its Patch: Luderick, Girella tricuspidata, Exhibit Strong Site Fidelity on Shallow Subtidal Reefs in a Temperate Marine Park', PLoS ONE, 8 (2013)

Understanding movement patterns, habitat use and behaviour of fish is critical to determining how targeted species may respond to protection provided by &quot;no-take&quot; sanctu... [more]

Understanding movement patterns, habitat use and behaviour of fish is critical to determining how targeted species may respond to protection provided by "no-take" sanctuary zones within marine parks. We assessed the fine and broad scale movement patterns of an exploited herbivore, luderick (Girella tricuspidata), using acoustic telemetry to evaluate how this species may respond to protection within Jervis Bay (New South Wales, Australia). We surgically implanted fourteen fish with acoustic transmitters and actively and passively tracked individuals to determine fine and broad scale movement patterns respectively. Eight fish were actively tracked for 24 h d-1 for 6 d (May 2011), and then intermittently over the following 30 d. Six fish were passively tracked from December 2011 to March 2012, using a fixed array of receivers deployed across rocky reefs around the perimeter of the bay. Luderick exhibited strong site fidelity on shallow subtidal reefs, tending to remain on or return consistently to the reef where they were caught and released. All eight fish actively tracked used core areas solely on their release reef, with the exception of one fish that used multiple core areas, and four of the six fish passively tracked spent between 75 to 96% of days on release reefs over the entire tracking period. Luderick did move frequently to adjacent reefs, and occasionally to more distant reefs, however consistently returned to their release reef. Luderick also exhibited predictable patterns in movement between spatially distinct daytime and night-time core use areas. Night-time core use areas were generally located in sheltered areas behind the edge of reefs. Overall, our data indicate luderick exhibit strong site fidelity on shallow subtidal reefs in Jervis Bay and suggests that this important herbivore may be likely to show a positive response to protection within the marine park. © 2013 Ferguson et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0065838
Citations Scopus - 14
2013 Taylor MD, McPhan L, Van Der Meulen DE, Gray CA, Payne NL, 'Interactive drivers of activity in a free-ranging estuarine predator', PLoS ONE, 8 (2013)

Animal activity patterns evolve as an optimal balance between energy use, energy acquisition, and predation risk, so understanding how animals partition activity relative to extri... [more]

Animal activity patterns evolve as an optimal balance between energy use, energy acquisition, and predation risk, so understanding how animals partition activity relative to extrinsic environmental fluctuations is central to understanding their ecology, biology and physiology. Here we use accelerometry to examine the degree to which activity patterns of an estuarine teleost predator are driven by a series of rhythmic and arrhythmic environmental fluctuations. We implanted free-ranging bream Acanthopagrus australis with acoustic transmitters that measured bi-axial acceleration and pressure (depth), and simultaneously monitored a series of environmental variables (photosynthetically active radiation, tidal height, temperature, turbidity, and lunar phase) for a period of approximately four months. Linear modeling showed an interaction between fish activity, light level and tidal height; with activity rates also negatively correlated with fish depth. These patterns highlight the relatively-complex trade-offs that are required to persist in highly variable environments. This study demonstrates how novel acoustic sensor tags can reveal interactive links between environmental cycles and animal behavior. © 2013 Taylor et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0080962
Citations Scopus - 13
2012 Smith JA, Baumgartner LJ, Suthers IM, Ives MC, Taylor MD, 'Estimating the stocking potential of fish in impoundments by modelling supply and steady-state demand', Freshwater Biology, 57 1482-1499 (2012)

Fish stocking is an increasingly common management tool for freshwater and marine environments and is often used to create and maintain fisheries in closed waters. The densities a... [more]

Fish stocking is an increasingly common management tool for freshwater and marine environments and is often used to create and maintain fisheries in closed waters. The densities at which fish are stocked can have a large impact on a stocking programme's success and sustainability. Stocking densities in impoundment sport-fisheries, for example, are often based on social or practical factors, and ecologically based stocking models are needed to assist the selection of stocking densities that are appropriate for the environment. In this study, stocking density is calculated with a numerical model that balances the supply of prey production with the energetic demand of stocked fish. The model aims to deliver outcomes over a range of potential management objectives, by providing specific consumption scenarios that represent the trade-off between population abundance and individual body size in stocked fisheries. The model uses a steady-state population approach to calculate stocking density, which optimises population consumption by maintaining a consistent biomass distribution and encourages sustainable stocking by considering the energetic needs of all cohorts. Carrying capacity is represented by the steady-state stocking density under a minimum consumption scenario (when fish meet only their minimum energetic needs). The comparison between a desired consumption rate and the existing level of production is used to assess the status or 'health' of the existing population and is used to determine whether stocking can occur and whether stocking densities can be sustainably increased. The probability of incorrectly assuming populations are achieving a given consumption level is also estimated, which is an ideal approach for interpreting multiple probability distributions. A Monte-Carlo analysis of uncertainty was used to provide a probability distribution of stocking density of Australian bass (Macquaria novemaculeata) in three Australian impoundments under various seasonal and consumption scenarios. The likely consumption rates of the existing populations were determined using historical stocking densities, which showed that the three populations were of reasonable health, although one impoundment may be overstocked. The steady-state stocking densities depended on the desired consumption rate, and there was an eightfold difference in the stocking density aimed at providing large 'trophy' fish and the density required to reach carrying capacity. Model outputs of existing abundance and biomass density agreed with empirical estimates of abundance and relative density in these impoundments, which provides support to the model's accuracy. This supply-demand approach to estimating the range of appropriate stocking densities shows promise as a decision-support tool for stocked impoundments and other closed fisheries. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2427.2012.02801.x
Citations Scopus - 16
2012 McKinley AC, Taylor MD, Johnston EL, 'Relationships between body burdens of trace metals (As, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Se, and Zn) and the relative body size of small tooth flounder (Pseudorhombus jenynsii)', Science of the Total Environment, 423 84-94 (2012)

Several studies have described strong relationships between body size and the accumulation of trace metals in animal tissues. However, few of these studies have utilized aging tec... [more]

Several studies have described strong relationships between body size and the accumulation of trace metals in animal tissues. However, few of these studies have utilized aging techniques to control for age related effects. We utilized relative body size (gy-1) of a model flounder species, Pseudorhombus jenynsii, in order to control for age related effects on growth and size measurements. We investigated links between relative body size, concentrations of trace metals in flounder muscle tissue, physico-chemical variables (temperature, salinity, pH, and turbidity), and levels of trace metals in the sediment. Flounder were sampled using an otter trawl net in the inner areas of eight estuaries that were either heavily modified or relatively unmodified by urbanization and industrial activity. Our results indicate that this commonly eaten fish is accumulating significant levels of some trace metals in their muscle tissue, both in relatively unmodified and heavily modified estuaries. Concentrations of Cu, Zn and Fe in muscle tissue, as well as temperature, showed a negative relationship to the relative body size of flounder. In contrast, Se and Hg in muscle showed a positive relationship to relative body size. Observed growth patterns indicate that these effects are not driven by age related differences in metabolic activity. Instead, our results suggest that differences in food supply or toxicological effects may be responsible for the observed relationships between relative body size and concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Se in muscle tissues. The use of otolith aging and growth measurement techniques represents a novel method for assessing the relationships between trace metal accumulation and the relative body size of fish in a field environment. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.02.007
Citations Scopus - 14
2012 Ochwada-Doyle F, Gray CA, Loneragan NR, Suthers IM, Taylor MD, 'Competition between wild and captive-bred Penaeus plebejus and implications for stock enhancement', Marine Ecology Progress Series, 450 115-129 (2012)

The mechanisms that drive density dependence are rarely studied in the applied context of population management. We examined the potential for competition for food and shelter and... [more]

The mechanisms that drive density dependence are rarely studied in the applied context of population management. We examined the potential for competition for food and shelter and the resulting demographic density dependence to influence how well populations of the eastern king prawn Penaeus plebejus Hess can recover following marine stock enhancement programmes in which captive-bred juveniles are released into the wild. Specifically, manipulative laboratory experiments were used to quantify the differential effects of competition for food and competition for shelter on survival of wild and captive-bred P. plebejus as densities were increased and as each category of P. plebejus (wild or captive-bred) was supplemented with the alternate category. Increasing population densities when food and shelter were limited lowered survival for both categories. When food was limited, survival of both categories was unaffected by addition of the alternative category. Adding wild P. plebejus to their captive-bred counterparts when shelter was limited under laboratory conditions resulted in significantly higher mortality in captive-bred individuals. In contrast, adding captive-bred P. plebejus to wild individuals under these conditions did not affect wild P. plebejus. We conclude that if the current results can be extended to wild conditions, competition for shelter may lead to the loss of captive-bred P. plebejus, thereby reducing the intended outcomes of stock enhancement. This highlights the importance of investigating interactions between wild and captive-bred animals prior to stock enhancement to predict long-term outcomes and identify situations where stock enhancement could be an effective response to the loss of populations or recruitment limitation. © Inter-Research 2012.

DOI 10.3354/meps09600
Citations Scopus - 13
2011 Smith JA, Baumgartner LJ, Suthers IM, Taylor MD, 'Generalist niche, specialist strategy: The diet of an Australian percichthyid', Journal of Fish Biology, 78 1183-1199 (2011)

Dietary analysis revealed that an impoundment population of Australian bass Macquaria novemaculeata holds a generalist niche, but one arising from persistent individual specializa... [more]

Dietary analysis revealed that an impoundment population of Australian bass Macquaria novemaculeata holds a generalist niche, but one arising from persistent individual specialization and interindividual variation. This 'individual specialist' strategy appeared adaptive, but the strength of individual specialization was largely independent of variation in diet composition, except during blooms of Daphnia sp. Diet composition and dietary overlap showed only moderate ontogenetic variation, and niche breadth showed no relationship with ontogeny. Macquaria novemaculeata showed an asymmetric predator and prey size distribution, consistent with many aquatic predators, with positive relationships between fish size and average, maximum and minimum prey size. There was no asymmetry in the relative size-based niche breadths of individuals, however, which indicates that the niche is a fixed 'window' of relative prey sizes. The difference in the dietary niche and prey-size relationships of M. novemaculeata at the population and individual levels highlights the necessity of assessing the niche at both these levels. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2011 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

DOI 10.1111/j.1095-8649.2011.02926.x
Citations Scopus - 20
2011 Taylor MD, Ko A, 'Monitoring acoustically tagged king prawns Penaeus (Melicertus) plebejus in an estuarine lagoon', Marine Biology, 158 835-844 (2011)

Fine-scale movement patterns in penaeid prawns are rarely observed in situ, but are essential in understanding habitat use, foraging, and anti-predator behaviour. Acoustic telemet... [more]

Fine-scale movement patterns in penaeid prawns are rarely observed in situ, but are essential in understanding habitat use, foraging, and anti-predator behaviour. Acoustic telemetry was applied to examine the activity, space utilization, and habitat use of the eastern king prawn Penaeus (Melicertus) plebejus, at small temporal and spatial scales. Tracking of sub-adult P. plebejus (n = 9) in Wallagoot Lake (36.789°S, 149.959°E; 23 April-12 May 2009) and calculation of a minimum activity index (MAI) revealed high variation in activity rates across diel periods and in different habitats. Elevated activity rates and movement indicated foraging in unvegetated habitats during the night. Areas within the 95 and 50% space utilization contours averaged 2,654.1 ± 502.0 and 379.9 ± 103.9 m2, respectively, and there was a significant negative relationship between these areas and prawn activity rates in unvegetated habitats. This study provides the first estimates of prawn activity rates and space utilization in the field. Application of acoustic telemetry can increase knowledge of prawn movements and their interactions with other marine species in different habitats. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/s00227-010-1610-6
Citations Scopus - 26
2011 Henschke N, Everett JD, Baird ME, Taylor MD, Suthers IM, 'Distribution of life-history stages of the salp Thalia democratica in shelf waters during a spring bloom', Marine Ecology Progress Series, 430 49-62 (2011)

Swarms of the salp Thalia democratica periodically occur off southeast Australia following the austral spring bloom of phytoplankton. The present study aimed to determine the abun... [more]

Swarms of the salp Thalia democratica periodically occur off southeast Australia following the austral spring bloom of phytoplankton. The present study aimed to determine the abundance and size/stage distribution of T. democratica and their relationship with copepods in 3 water types of the western Tasman Sea. Samples were taken from vertical net hauls along 4 cross-shelf transects spaced along 200 km of the New South Wales coast, from the East Australian Current (EAC) sepa - ration zone, around 32.5° S, to off Sydney (34° S). Temperature-salinity signatures grouped stations into 3 distinct water types: inner shelf water, EAC and upwelled water. Although common across all stations, T. democratica was significantly more abundant in inner shelf waters compared to both EAC and upwelled water. Analysis of population structure (aggregate buds, aggregate females, aggregate males, immature solitaries and mature solitaries) also identified higher proportions of reproductive aggregates and their offspring in inner shelf water. This salp population structure was significantly different in the EAC regions, characterised by a paucity of the solitary stages, higher temperatures and lower chlorophyll a concentrations. A weak negative correlation was identified between T. democratica and copepod abundance. In the present study, the maximum abundance of T. democratica was twice the highest globally recorded abundance and 10-fold greater than maximum abundances sampled from the continental shelf and slope waters off southeast Australia during the period from 1938 to 1942. © Inter-Research 2011.

DOI 10.3354/meps09090
Citations Scopus - 12
2011 McKinley AC, Miskiewicz A, Taylor MD, Johnston EL, 'Strong links between metal contamination, habitat modification and estuarine larval fish distributions', Environmental Pollution, 159 1499-1509 (2011)

Changes to larval fish assemblages may have far reaching ecological impacts. Correlations between habitat modification, contamination and marine larval fish communities have rarel... [more]

Changes to larval fish assemblages may have far reaching ecological impacts. Correlations between habitat modification, contamination and marine larval fish communities have rarely been assessed in situ. We investigated links between the large-scale distribution of stressors and larval fish assemblages in estuarine environments. Larval fish communities were sampled using a benthic sled within the inner and outer zones of three heavily modified and three relatively unmodified estuaries. Larval abundances were significantly greater in modified estuaries, and there were trends towards greater diversity in these systems. Differences in larval community composition were strongly related to sediment metal levels and reduced seagrass cover. The differences observed were driven by two abundant species, Paedogobius kimurai and Ambassis jacksoniensis, which occurred in large numbers almost exclusively in highly contaminated and pristine locations respectively. These findings suggest that contamination and habitat alteration manifest in substantial differences in the composition of estuarine larval fish assemblages. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2011.03.008
Citations Scopus - 27
2011 Syahailatua A, Taylor MD, Suthers IM, 'Growth variability and stable isotope composition of two larval carangid fishes in the East Australian Current: The role of upwelling in the separation zone', Deep-Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography, 58 691-698 (2011)

The larvae of two carangid fishes, silver trevally (Pseudocaranx dentex) and yellowtail scad (Trachurus novaezelandiae), were compared among coastal water masses and the East Aust... [more]

The larvae of two carangid fishes, silver trevally (Pseudocaranx dentex) and yellowtail scad (Trachurus novaezelandiae), were compared among coastal water masses and the East Australian Current (EAC). Samples followed a north to south gradient including a southern region of upwelling, generated as the EAC separated from the coast. Mean larval carangid densities were greater in the mixed layer (10-30m) than the surface, but there was no difference between inshore and offshore stations or along latitudinal gradients. Overall, P. dentex recent larval growth over two days pre-capture was faster than T. novaezelandiae, and faster at inshore, coastal stations than in the EAC. Integrated larval growth rate (mmd-1) was usually faster at inshore stations for both species. T. novaezelandiae were enriched in both nitrogen (d15N) and carbon (d13C) stable isotopes relative to P. dentex. Larvae of both species captured within the upwelling region were enriched in d15N and depleted in d13C relative to other sites. Recent larval growth had a significant positive relationship with fluorescence (as a proxy of chlorophyll a biomass), and integrated larval growth rate had a significant positive relationship with fluorescence and larval isotope (d15N) composition. Recent and integrated growth of larval T. novaezelandiae and P. dentex was enhanced by EAC separation and upwelling, and also in coastal water; stimulated by food availability, and potentially through exploitation of a different trophic niche. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.dsr2.2010.06.009
Citations Scopus - 9
2011 McKinley AC, Ryan L, Coleman MA, Knott NA, Clark G, Taylor MD, Johnston EL, 'Putting marine sanctuaries into context: A comparison of estuary fish assemblages over multiple levels of protection and modification', Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 21 636-648 (2011)

In recent decades there has been a significant effort to establish marine sanctuaries for the purpose of protecting marine biodiversity and ecological processes. While many studie... [more]

In recent decades there has been a significant effort to establish marine sanctuaries for the purpose of protecting marine biodiversity and ecological processes. While many studies have demonstrated that marine sanctuaries increase the abundance, diversity, and trophic level of marine fish communities, few have compared these parameters across multiple levels of protection and human modification. This study utilized baited remote underwater video to compare fish assemblages between marine parks, between different levels of protection within parks (sanctuary and habitat protection zones), and between parks and highly modified systems with similar ecological communities. It was demonstrated that sanctuary zones have higher abundance of targeted fish species compared with other areas within some marine parks. The total abundance of targeted species and abundances of some key fisheries species (e.g. pink snapper) were found to be higher in sanctuary zones. This suggests that increased protection may be effective at improving these aspects of the fish assemblage. However, when marine parks were compared with highly modified environments it was found that targeted species were much more abundant in the highly modified systems. Community composition of entire fish assemblages also differed between these levels of modification and economically important fisheries species contributed most to this difference. These findings suggest that while highly protected sanctuary zones may increase the abundance of targeted fish compared with less protected areas within the same estuary, highly industrialized or urbanized systems, not typically chosen as marine parks, may actually support more targeted species of fish. It was demonstrated that forms of modification in addition to fishing pressure are having large effects on fish assemblages and productivity. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/aqc.1223
Citations Scopus - 13
2011 Smith JA, Baumgartner LJ, Suthers IM, Taylor MD, 'Distribution and movement of a stocked freshwater fish: Implications of a variable habitat volume for stocking programs', Marine and Freshwater Research, 62 1342-1353 (2011)

Fish are commonly stocked into impoundments globally, yet their patterns of habitat use in this variable environment are rarely incorporated into the management of stocking densit... [more]

Fish are commonly stocked into impoundments globally, yet their patterns of habitat use in this variable environment are rarely incorporated into the management of stocking density. The movement and distribution of Australian bass Macquaria novemaculata (Perchichthyidae) were monitored in two impoundments to assess whether: (1) impoundment populations exhibit behaviour typical of wild or riverine percichthyids; (2) changing gradients of temperature and dissolved oxygen influenced distribution; and (3) the volume of available habitat should be incorporated into the management of these fisheries. Habitat use was determined with a combination of gill netting and ultrasonic telemetry using depth-coded tags. Tagged fish displayed both crepuscular and migratory behaviour typical of the Percichthyidae, but also showed a previously unobserved division between littoral and pelagic foraging strategies. Australian bass showed no obvious thermal preferences, but avoided areas with dissolved oxygen 4mgL-1. In one impoundment, a combination of hypoxia and water extraction reduced the volume of available habitat to 15% of maximum in March 2009, which coincided with increased catch per unit effort (CPUE) and decreased fish condition. The adaptive behaviour of Australian bass makes them well suited to the variability of impoundments, but annual and stochastic events of habitat reduction should be considered when planning stocking regimes for these fisheries. © CSIRO 2011.

DOI 10.1071/MF11120
Citations Scopus - 8
2011 Ochwada-Doyle F, Gray CA, Loneragan NR, Taylor MD, Suthers IM, 'Spatial and temporal variability in the condition of postlarval and juvenile Penaeus plebejus sampled from a population subjected to pilot releases', Aquaculture Environment Interactions, 2 15-25 (2011)

The potential for hatchery-release programs to augment the harvest rates of fisheries can be limited by environmental factors associated with survival, growth and body condition a... [more]

The potential for hatchery-release programs to augment the harvest rates of fisheries can be limited by environmental factors associated with survival, growth and body condition among released individuals. We assessed spatial and temporal variability in the condition of postlarval and small juvenile (1-10 mm carapace length) eastern king prawns Penaeus plebejus Hess sampled from an estuarine population subjected to pilot releases of 3 million postlarvae per year in southeastern Australia. Variability in the length-weight relationship was used as a measure of condition and compared between (1) autumn/winter and spring/summer periods and (2) bare and macrophytic habitats for P. plebejus sampled from a population in a closed estuarine system. At a reference carapace length of 3.97 mm, condition was ~14% higher for individuals sampled from bare habitat and ~16% higher for those sampled during autumn/winter compared, respectively, with individuals sampled within macrophytic habitat and during spring/summer. Further experimental work on the factors investigated here is encouraged to increase our understanding of the environmental characteristics and mechanisms that lead to improved condition and thus persistence of stocked populations of P. plebejus. © Inter-Research 2011.

DOI 10.3354/aei00026
Citations Scopus - 8
2011 McKinley AC, Dafforn KA, Taylor MD, Johnston EL, 'High levels of sediment contamination have little influence on estuarine beach fish communities', PLoS ONE, 6 (2011)

While contaminants are predicted to have measurable impacts on fish assemblages, studies have rarely assessed this potential in the context of natural variability in physico-chemi... [more]

While contaminants are predicted to have measurable impacts on fish assemblages, studies have rarely assessed this potential in the context of natural variability in physico-chemical conditions within and between estuaries. We investigated links between the distribution of sediment contamination (metals and PAHs), physico-chemical variables (pH, salinity, temperature, turbidity) and beach fish assemblages in estuarine environments. Fish communities were sampled using a beach seine within the inner and outer zones of six estuaries that were either heavily modified or relatively unmodified by urbanization and industrial activity. All sampling was replicated over two years with two periods sampled each year. Shannon diversity, biomass and abundance were all significantly higher in the inner zone of estuaries while fish were larger on average in the outer zone. Strong differences in community composition were also detected between the inner and outer zones. Few differences were detected between fish assemblages in heavily modified versus relatively unmodified estuaries despite high concentrations of sediment contaminants in the inner zones of modified estuaries that exceeded recognized sediment quality guidelines. Trends in species distributions, community composition, abundance, Shannon diversity, and average fish weight were strongly correlated to physico-chemical variables and showed a weaker relationship to sediment metal contamination. Sediment PAH concentrations were not significantly related to the fish assemblage. These findings suggest that variation in some physico-chemical factors (salinity, temperature, pH) or variables that co-vary with these factors (e.g., wave activity or grain size) have a much greater influence on this fish assemblage than anthropogenic stressors such as contamination. © 2011 McKinley et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0026353
Citations Scopus - 13
2010 Ochwada-Doyle F, Gray CA, Loneragan NR, Taylor MD, 'Using experimental ecology to understand stock enhancement: Comparisons of habitat-related predation on wild and hatchery-reared Penaeus plebejus Hess', Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 390 65-71 (2010)

Marine stock enhancement is often characterized by poor survival of hatchery-reared individuals due to deficiencies in their fitness, such as a diminished capacity to avoid predat... [more]

Marine stock enhancement is often characterized by poor survival of hatchery-reared individuals due to deficiencies in their fitness, such as a diminished capacity to avoid predators. Field experiments were used to examine predation on Penaeus plebejus, a current candidate for stock enhancement in Australia. We compared overall survival of, and rates of predation on, wild P. plebejus juveniles, naïve hatchery-reared juveniles (which represented the state of individuals intended for stock enhancement) and experienced hatchery-reared juveniles (which had been exposed to natural predatory stimuli). Predation was examined in the presence of an ambush predator (Centropogon australis White, 1790) and an active-pursuit predator (Metapenaeus macleayi Haswell) within both complex (artificial macrophyte) and simple (bare sand and mud) habitats. Overall survival was lower and rates of predation were higher in simple habitats compared to complex habitats in the presence of C. australis. However, the three categories of juveniles survived at similar proportions and suffered similar rates of predation within each individual habitat. No differences in survival and rates of predation were detected among habitats or the categories of juveniles when M. macleayi was used as a predator. These results indicate that wild and hatchery-reared P. plebejus juveniles are equally capable of avoiding predators. Furthermore, exposure of hatchery-reared juveniles to wild conditions does not increase their ability to avoid predators, suggesting an innate rather than learned anti-predator response. The lower predation by C. australis in complex habitats was attributed to a reduction in this ambush predator's foraging efficiency due to the presence of structure. Ecological experiments comparing wild and hatchery-reared individuals should precede all stock enhancement programs because they may identify deficits in hatchery-reared animals that could be mitigated to optimize survival. Such studies can also identify weaknesses in wild animals, relative to hatchery-reared individuals, that may lead to the loss of resident populations. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.jembe.2010.04.003
Citations Scopus - 20
2010 Taylor MD, Mullaney TJ, Suthers IM, 'Mesoscale distribution of larval Euphausia similis in various water masses of the East Australian Current', Deep-Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, 57 1295-1303 (2010)

Larval Euphausia similis were collected off temperate eastern Australia in spring 2004 and 2006 to evaluate the relationships between larval populations, mesoscale oceanographic v... [more]

Larval Euphausia similis were collected off temperate eastern Australia in spring 2004 and 2006 to evaluate the relationships between larval populations, mesoscale oceanographic variability, and the wider planktonic community. Larval E. similis were present in greater numbers in the East Australian Current (EAC) relative to productive coastal waters. Larval E. similis density was homogenous across the EAC-Tasman Sea frontal region, but larvae were smaller in the Tasman Sea. Larval E. similis density was not enhanced within a cold core eddy relative to the surrounding EAC. We observed a negative correlation between larval E. similis density and larval fish density, and a weak positive correlation with fluorescence. Evaluation of a significant fish density×fluorescence interaction term showed that the effect of fish density was reduced at high fluorescence values. Analysis of normalized biomass size spectrum (NBSS) provided evidence for potential competitive exclusion of copepods by krill. Data presented in this study suggest a predatory influence on surface E. similis populations by mesopelagic larval fish. The degree of predation appears to be dependent on food availability, potentially mediated by changes in the physiological condition of krill. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.dsr.2010.06.010
Citations Scopus - 1
2010 Evans MR, Taylor M, Kuehny J, 'Physical properties of biocontainers for greenhouse crops production', HortTechnology, 20 549-555 (2010)

The vertical dry strength of rice hull containers was the highest of all containers tested. Plastic containers and paper containers had similar vertical dry strengths. Containers ... [more]

The vertical dry strength of rice hull containers was the highest of all containers tested. Plastic containers and paper containers had similar vertical dry strengths. Containers composed of 80% cedar fiber and 20% peat (Fertil), composted dairy manure (Cowpot), and peat had lower dry vertical dry strengths than the aforementioned containers but had higher vertical dry strengths than those composed of bioplastic (OP47), coconut fiber, and rice straw. Rice hull containers and paper containers had the highest lateral dry strengths. Rice straw, Cowpot, and plastic containers had similar dry lateral strengths, which were significantly higher than those of OP47, Fertil, coconut fiber, and peat containers. Highest dry punch strengths occurred with traditional plastic and Cowpot containers, while the lowest dry punch strengths occurred with OP47, Fertil, coconut fiber, peat, and rice straw containers. Plastic, rice hull, and paper containers had the highest wet vertical and lateral strengths. Plastic containers had the highest wet punch strength, while Fertil, Cowpot, and peat containers had the lowest wet punch strengths. When saturated substrate was placed into containers and the substrate surface and drainage holes were sealed with wax, plastic, OP47, and rice hull containers had the lowest rates of water loss per unit of container surface area, while peat, Fertil, and rice straw containers had the highest rates of water loss per unit of container surface area. The amounts of water required to produce a geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum) crop were significantly higher and the average irrigation intervals were shorter for peat, Fertil, coconut fiber, Cowpot, and rice straw containers than for traditional plastic containers. The amounts of water required to produce a geranium crop and the average irrigation intervals were similar among plastic, rice hull, and OP47 containers. Algal and fungal coverage on the outside container walls averaged 47% and 26% for peat and Fertil containers, respectively, and was higher than for all other containers tested, which had 4% or less algal and fungal coverage. After 8 weeks in the field, Cowpot containers had decomposed 62% and 48% in the Pennsylvania and Louisiana locations, respectively. Peat, rice straw, and Fertil containers decomposed 32%, 28%, and 24%, respectively, in Pennsylvania, and 10%, 9%, and 2%, respectively, in Louisiana. Coconut fiber containers had the lowest level of decomposition at 4% and 1.5% in Pennsylvania and Louisiana, respectively.

Citations Scopus - 26
2010 Taylor MD, Mazumder D, 'Stable isotopes reveal post-release trophodynamic and ontogenetic changes in a released finfish, mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus)', Marine and Freshwater Research, 61 302-308 (2010)

Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were analysed for hatchery-reared, recaptured and wild mulloway, Argyrosomus japonicus, to investigate temporal and growth-related change... [more]

Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were analysed for hatchery-reared, recaptured and wild mulloway, Argyrosomus japonicus, to investigate temporal and growth-related changes in isotopic composition for stocked fish after release, and to evaluate changes in isotopic composition in terms of ontogenetic dietary switches. d13C and d15N values decreased and increased, respectively, after release. The isotope composition of released fish was distinct from wild fish until 200 days after release, but after 200 days post-release fish did not differ significantly from wild fish of similar or greater sizes. Abrupt dietary transitions from crustaceans to teleost fish (>50 cm total length (TL)) were evident in a rapid d13C and d15N change in wild mulloway, and d15N was significantly greater in wild fish >65 cm TL compared with wild fish <50 cm TL. Multivariate carbon and nitrogen isotopic data were suitable for separating stocked and wild fish for up to 200 days after release, but did not separate wild fish grouped according to dietary composition. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition closely reflected dietary transitions and rapid adaptation by stocked mulloway to wild diets, which was evident in a high tissue turnover rate of up to 0.017 day -1. Stable isotopes are a useful tool for examining the integration of released fish into stocked ecosystems and can be used to describe convergence in the diets of wild and released fish. © 2010 CSIRO.

DOI 10.1071/MF09014
Citations Scopus - 10
2009 Pursche AR, Suthers IM, Taylor MD, 'Tethering induces increased stress artifacts in social fish species', Journal of Fish Biology, 74 1525-1531 (2009)

Behaviour of juvenile mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus were investigated under laboratory conditions to determine the efficacy of estimating predation mortality using tethering. The... [more]

Behaviour of juvenile mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus were investigated under laboratory conditions to determine the efficacy of estimating predation mortality using tethering. The occurrence and duration of stressed behaviour was evaluated for individual A. japonicus that were hooked but untethered, hooked and tethered and unhooked and untethered (free swimming), both in schools and in isolation. Tethered and hooked treatments showed a significantly higher incidence and duration of stressed behaviour over controls, but stressed behaviour was lower for hooked but untethered fish in the presence of a school. Artifacts associated with elevated stress may reduce the reliability of estimates of relative predation derived from tethering data for schooling fishes.

DOI 10.1111/j.1095-8649.2009.02218.x
Citations Scopus - 4
2009 Ochwada F, Loneragan NR, Gray CA, Suthers IM, Taylor MD, 'Complexity affects habitat preference and Predation mortality in postlarval Penaeus plebejus: Implications for stock enhancement', Marine Ecology Progress Series, 380 161-171 (2009)

Global attempts to offset declines in fishery populations through stock enhancement have had varied levels of success due to the absence of preliminary studies to determine which ... [more]

Global attempts to offset declines in fishery populations through stock enhancement have had varied levels of success due to the absence of preliminary studies to determine which habitats best support release species and the mechanisms controlling their distribution. Habitat preference was examined as a possible mechanism driving distribution of postlarval Penaeus plebejus, a current candidate prawn for stock enhancement in Australia. Occupancy of complex (artificial macrophyte) and simple (bare sand and mud) habitats by postlarvae was compared in the presence and absence of a choice between the habitats. Predation mortality was also compared amongst these habitats. P. plebejus settled into the different habitats randomly during the night, but actively selected macrophyte over the simple habitats during the day. Mortality caused by the predatory fishes Centropogan australis and Acanthopagrus australis was higher in simple habitats than in complex habitats, but was similar across habitats when large penaeid prawns, Metapenaeus macleayi (which are tactile rather than visual feeders), were used as predators. Postlarvae may select macrophyte habitats during the day to lower predation risk, but because nighttime foraging efficiency is reduced in their predators, which are primarily visual hunters, this may preclude the need of postlarvae to obtain shelter in macrophyte habitats at night. Predation mortality of stocked P. plebejus may be minimized by releasing postlarvae directly into macrophyte habitats. Studies such as these must precede all stock enhancement attempts because they identify optimal release strategies and allow ecological and financial costs of enhancement to be weighed against projected benefits, and thereby assess the practicality of enhancement as a management option. © Inter-Research 2009.

DOI 10.3354/meps07936
Citations Scopus - 32
2009 Taylor MD, Fielder DS, Suthers IM, 'Growth and viability of hatchery-reared Argyrosomus japonicus released into open and semi-closed systems', Fisheries Management and Ecology, 16 478-483 (2009)

Hatchery-reared Argyrosomus japonicus (Temminck &amp; Schlegel) were released into estuaries of varying habitat between 1996 and 2004, and growth and recruitment to the fishery ev... [more]

Hatchery-reared Argyrosomus japonicus (Temminck & Schlegel) were released into estuaries of varying habitat between 1996 and 2004, and growth and recruitment to the fishery evaluated. Fish stocked earlier in summer had significantly faster growth rates (P < 0.01), and post-stocking mortality ranged from 1.1% to 11.7% within 7 day post-release. Argyrosomus japonicus stocked in the Georges River in 2003 and 2004 yielded fishery independent recapture rates up to 0.2%. For A. japonicus stocked in Smith's Lake in 1997 and 2004, growth rates, timing of recaptures and increases in commercial catches suggested recruitment to the fishery by 18 months. The 1997 stocking led to a 30-fold increase in A. japonicus catch, but stocking was not financially viable, with a cost:benefit ratio of 2.1. Small, shallow coastal lagoons may represent experimental units for refining stocking strategies, but are not optimal for A. japonicus. The potential for density-dependent effects, and complex relationships between growth, habitat and mortality, highlighted the need for a thorough understanding of species - system interactions. Pilot releases can contribute to this understanding, particularly assessment of habitat requirements, and season, site and size-of-release. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2400.2009.00700.x
Citations Scopus - 14
2008 Taylor MD, Piola RF, 'Scale stocking checks to differentiate between hatchery-reared and wild mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus', Fisheries Management and Ecology, 15 211-216 (2008)

Scales from hatchery-reared, stocked and wild mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus (Temminck and Schlegel) captured in the Georges River, and a library of mulloway scales from coastal N... [more]

Scales from hatchery-reared, stocked and wild mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus (Temminck and Schlegel) captured in the Georges River, and a library of mulloway scales from coastal New South Wales, were examined for the presence of scale checks. Checks specific for hatchery-reared fish were present in 100% of recaptured hatchery-reared mulloway; the origin of which was confirmed by the presence of a chemical mark in the otolith or fin spine. Up to 7% of wild mulloway were incorrectly classified as hatchery-reared on the basis of these checks. An abrupt reduction in salinity from 35 to 5 and 6days starvation successfully induced checks in the scales of hatchery-reared mulloway. The marking efficiency for stocking checks was comparable to that obtained using oxytetracycline hydrochloride, and supports the short-term use of scale stocking checks to evaluate mulloway stock enhancement programmes in Australia. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2400.2008.00602.x
Citations Scopus - 12
2008 Taylor MD, Suthers IM, 'A predatory impact model and targeted stock enhancement approach for optimal release of mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus)', Reviews in Fisheries Science, 16 125-134 (2008)

Habitat, diet, and life history information were used to estimate appropriate stocking density and the potential predatory impact of a stocked finfish. Our Predatory Impact Model ... [more]

Habitat, diet, and life history information were used to estimate appropriate stocking density and the potential predatory impact of a stocked finfish. Our Predatory Impact Model uses data from the literature for fish in freshwater or estuarine habitats. Model simulations were run for the Georges River Recreational Fishing Haven (RFH), Sydney, to evaluate appropriate stocking density and associated predatory impact. The estuary contained about 1,760,000 m2 of key nursery habitat for mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus), and 10% of mysid shrimp production within this habitat was assigned to support stocked fish, as mysids represent the immediate forage requirements of stocked mulloway. Given these values, this section of river could support 17,500 stocked mulloway of 8 cm TL. During the first 3.5 years post stocking, when mulloway are predominantly estuarine residents, predatory impact includes 1 t mysid shrimp, 80 t forage fish, 45 t prawns, 3 t miscellaneous invertebrates and 5 t cephalopods. For comparison, this predatory impact represents 107%, 154%, and 24% of the commercial fishery in Botany Bay/Georges River for forage fish, prawns, and cephalopods, respectively, for 3.5 years before the declaration of the RFH. To maximize the benefit of the approach, a targeted approach to stocking should be taken. Stocked fish should be stocked directly into key habitats, as opposed to being released from a few shore-based sites within the estuarine system. Copyright © Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/10641260701727293
Citations Scopus - 18
2008 Taylor MD, 'Spatial and temporal patterns of habitat use by three estuarine species of mysid shrimp', Marine and Freshwater Research, 59 792-798 (2008)

The mysids Rhopalopthalmus egregius, Haplostylus dakini and Doxomysis australiensis are abundant yet unstudied omnivorous crustaceans in Australian estuaries. Habitat use and popu... [more]

The mysids Rhopalopthalmus egregius, Haplostylus dakini and Doxomysis australiensis are abundant yet unstudied omnivorous crustaceans in Australian estuaries. Habitat use and population dynamics were investigated for these species over spring and summer in the Tweed River, Australia, to explore their ecological role in estuarine ecosystems. Overall, mysids were concentrated in shallow unvegetated and deep unvegetated estuarine habitats. H. dakini were most abundant in shallow and deep bare habitats at night, whereas R. egregius were most abundant in deep bare habitats during the night. D. australiensis were present across all habitats in the night, but negligible numbers were present during the day. Significantly greater numbers of R. egregius and D. australiensis were sampled during the new moon, compared with the full moon. Significantly larger R. egregius and D. australiensis individuals were present in benthic habitats at night, indicating possible partitioning of habitat for juvenile and adult subpopulations. Adaptive foraging strategies and habitat use facilitates the coexistence of sympatric mysid species, H. dakini and R. egregius, and within-species habitat partitioning allowed juvenile R. egregius to avoid interaction with adult R. egregius. The observed dynamics minimize inter- and intra-specific predation between mysids, and by other predators, while optimizing access to key trophic resources. © CSIRO 2008.

DOI 10.1071/MF07247
Citations Scopus - 16
2006 Taylor MD, Laffan SD, Fielder DS, Suthers IM, 'Key habitat and home range of mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus in a south-east Australian estuary: Finding the estuarine niche to optimise stocking', Marine Ecology Progress Series, 328 237-247 (2006)

The preferred habitats, home range and activity patterns of sub-adult mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus (Sciaenidae) in the Georges River, New South Wales, Australia, were investigat... [more]

The preferred habitats, home range and activity patterns of sub-adult mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus (Sciaenidae) in the Georges River, New South Wales, Australia, were investigated using ultrasonic telemetry. Tags were surgically implanted in 9 hatchery-reared and 12 wild-caught mulloway (330 to 730 mm total length, TL). Fish were tracked for 2 periods of continuous tracking over 72 h in a 15 km section of river, once daily for a 20 d period, and up to 3 times mo-1 for 11 mo. Key habitats were identified as discrete holes or basins up to 20 m deep. Mulloway preferred this deep hole habitat as small fish (hatchery-reared, 300 to 500 mm TL) remained in these deep holes both day and night, while large fish (wild, 500 to 800 mm TL) ventured outside the holes at night. Maximum home range of small and large mulloway was 6000 and 17710 m2, respectively, and home range correlated significantly with length. Small fish moved up to 7 km d-1 while large fish moved up to 16 km d-1. Small fish released in shallow water initially had significantly greater movements than those released directly over deep holes, with movement up to 10 km in 3 d. Activity patterns varied between small and large fish, with significantly larger movements by large fish during the night and early morning than daytime. Five wild-caught mulloway tracked over 11 mo showed strong fidelity to holes within their particular home range. Mulloway should be stocked directly into their deep holes to minimise movements. The use of key habitats by mulloway indicate that their survival will be sensitive to stocking density. Optimal stocking density could be estimated from the area of key habitat in the target estuary. © Inter-Research 2006.

DOI 10.3354/meps328237
Citations Scopus - 57
2006 Taylor MD, Fielder DS, Suthers IM, 'Spatial and ontogenetic variation in the diet of wild and stocked mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus, Sciaenidae) in Australian estuaries', Estuaries and Coasts, 29 785-793 (2006)

Prey importance and ontogenetic transitions in the diet of stocked and wild mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus) were compared between a southeast Australian riverine estuary and a co... [more]

Prey importance and ontogenetic transitions in the diet of stocked and wild mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus) were compared between a southeast Australian riverine estuary and a coastal lagoon. Stomach content analysis of fish captured from these estuaries in 1977-1979, 1997-1998, and 2003-2005 revealed size-specific and estuary-specific diets. Mysid shrimp were most common in diets of fish < 250 mm total length (TL), and prawns were common in diets of fish measuring 301-450 mm. Forage fish were most abundant in diets of mulloway > 500 mm. Index of Relative Importance (IRI) of forage fish increased with TL, while IRI of mysids decreased with TL. Prawn IRI was greatest for fish 150-600 mm TL. Comparisons between benthic resources and dietary composition revealed that Georges River mulloway consumed prey categories in proportions similar to those in their environment. No mysid shrimp were detected in the coastal lagoon or in the diet of mulloway captured there; growth was comparable to the Georges River. Hatchery-reared fish fed < 16 d after stocking, indicating normal behavioural adaptation after release. Dietary information can be used to optimize stocking locations, times, and densities, as well as estimate potential effects of mulloway on potential prey and wild conspecifics. © 2006 Estuarine Research Federation.

DOI 10.1007/BF02786529
Citations Scopus - 34
2005 Taylor MD, Fielder DS, Suthers IM, 'Batch marking of otoliths and fin spines to assess the stock enhancement of Argyrosomus japonicus', Journal of Fish Biology, 66 1149-1162 (2005)

Juvenile mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus (54.6 ± 4.6 mm total length, mean ± S.E.) were immersed in a range of oxytetracycline (OTC) solutions ranging between 0-600 mg l-1 in salin... [more]

Juvenile mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus (54.6 ± 4.6 mm total length, mean ± S.E.) were immersed in a range of oxytetracycline (OTC) solutions ranging between 0-600 mg l-1 in salinities of 5 (diluted sea water) and 35 (undiluted sea water), and alizarin complexone (ALC) solutions ranging between 0-60 mg l-1 in undiluted sea water, for 6, 12 and 24 h. Optimal marking conditions were 600 mg l-1 OTC for 24 h in a salinity of 5, and 30 mg l-1 ALC for 12 h respectively. Mark quality (MQ) was assessed using a score of 0-3 in both otoliths and anal fin spines, with a score >2 found to be acceptable for adequate mark identification. Acceptable marks were not produced using OTC in undiluted sea water. Immersion in OTC or ALC, or reduced salinity had no effect on survival relative to controls. Transverse sections of vertebrae from the ALC and OTC treatments with the highest otolith mark quality showed no discrete marks. Optimal marking techniques were used to produce double marks with a 3 day interval between marking, and marking techniques were applied to 130 000 juvenile mulloway in batch mode with minimal mortality. A numerical model of the chemical behaviour of OTC in sea water describes the decline of available OTC in increasing salinity, so that a species' salinity tolerance and successful marking can be optimized. © 2005 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

DOI 10.1111/j.0022-1112.2005.00678.x
Citations Scopus - 39
2005 Taylor MD, Palmer PJ, Fielder DS, Suthers IM, 'Responsible estuarine finfish stock enhancement: An Australian perspective', Journal of Fish Biology, 67 299-331 (2005)

The responsible approach to marine stock enhancement is a set of principles aimed at maximising the success and benefits of artificially re-stocking depleted fisheries. The benefi... [more]

The responsible approach to marine stock enhancement is a set of principles aimed at maximising the success and benefits of artificially re-stocking depleted fisheries. The benefits of such an approach are evident in the 400% increase in survival of stocked striped mullet in Hawaii through refinement of release techniques, however financially or temporally constrained stocking programs in Australia have not adhered to all principles. A pragmatic approach to address these principles is proposed, using international examples and Australian marine finfish pilot stockings of barramundi, mulloway, sand whiting, dusky flathead and black bream. Biological ranking of candidate species by estuarine residency, a low natural-mortality to growth ratio, a large L 8 and comparison by recreational value and available rearing technologies, show that mulloway, barramundi and sea mullet are ideal species for stocking in Australia. Australian intermittently closed opening landlocked lagoons and recreational fishing havens, especially near cities, provide experimental opportunities to apply this approach and stock suitable species through small-scale pilot experiments. This would allow evaluation of production and carrying capacity, and density dependent processes with respect to optimal stocking strategies unconfounded by emigration and commercial fishing practices. Twenty per cent of Australians fish each year, and harvest approximately 27 000 t of finfish. Stocking recreationally important species in Australia should give a greater financial benefit, which is spread across a larger cross-section of the community, compared to stocking to enhance commercial fisheries. The pragmatic application of the responsible approach, and stocking of fast growing estuarine residents into recreational fishing havens would enhance the benefit from marine stocking. © 2005 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

DOI 10.1111/j.0022-1112.2005.00809.x
Citations Scopus - 50
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2017 PhD The Effects of Catchment-Derived Stressors on Fisheries Productivity PhD (Marine Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Professor Matthew Taylor

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