Professor Lucy Johnston

Professor Lucy Johnston

Dean of Graduate Research

Graduate Research

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Johnston is currently the Dean of Graduate Research at the University of Newcastle. As part of this position, Professor Johnston plays a key leadership role in driving growth and improvements in research training across the University of Newcastle. 

Professor Johnston joined the University of Newcastle from the University of Canterbury, where she was Dean of Postgraduate Research and Professor of Psychology. She is a recognised experimental social psychologist, whose research is concerned with understanding, predicting and modifying the behaviour of individuals in social interactions, with two distinct foci of social perception and social information processing.

Professor Johnston completed her BA (Hons) in Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford, UK and PhD in Social Psychology at the University Bristol, UK and has more recently completed a MSc Sport and Exercise Psychology at the University of Staffordshire, UK. She lectured at the University of Cardiff before joining the University of Canterbury in 1994. Professor Johnston was a member of the inaugural management team of the New Zealand Institute of Language, Brain and Behaviour, leading the Language and Social Cognition theme and following the Christchurch earthquake in 2011, was appointed to the Psychosocial Recovery Advisory Group for the Joint Centre for Disaster Research. In 2004, she was a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Connecticut, US and has published extensively in the fields of social psychology, and learning and teaching.

Recognised for her engagement with postgraduate research, Professor Johnston was the Chair of the New Zealand Deans and Directors of Graduate Studies (NZ DDOGS) between 2012 and 2016 and was actively involved in the development of the Australian Best Practice Guidelines for Higher Degree Research. She was Convenor of the Universities New Zealand Scholarship Committee from 2011 to 2016 term and has been an invited participant to a number of Council of Graduate Schools Global Summits.

Lucy was awarded Oxford Blues and full colours at the University of Bristol for basketball and played for the British Universities. She rowed for her Oxford College and City of Bristol and played soccer for the University of Bristol. She recently retired from 10 seasons completing in road cycling and triathlons.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Social Psychology), University of Bristol
  • Bachelor of Arts (Hons) (Experimental Psychology), University of Oxford - UK
  • Master of Arts, University of Oxford - UK
  • Master of Science (Sport and Exercise Psychology), Staffordshire University, UK

Keywords

  • Adaptive person construal
  • Behavioural mimicry and interpersonal synchrony
  • Facial expressions of emotion
  • Nonverbal behaviour
  • Postgraduate thesis supervision
  • Social perception
  • Social psychology
  • Sport psychology
  • Stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
130303 Education Assessment and Evaluation 30
170113 Social and Community Psychology 35
170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance 35

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Dean of Graduate Research University of Newcastle
Graduate Research
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/2010 - 24/01/2016 Dean of Postgraduate Research University of Canterbury
Vice Chancellor's Office
New Zealand
6/01/1994 - 22/01/2016 Lecturer to Professor of Psychology University of Canterbury
New Zealand
1/01/1992 - 31/12/1993 Lecturer University of Wales, Cardiff
School of Psychology
United Kingdom
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Beaven S, Wilson T, Johnston LC, Johnston D, Smith R, 'Learning from Earthquake Disasters', Encyclopaedia of Earthquake Engineering, Springer, Berlin Heidelberg (2015)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-36197-5_353-1
2013 Johnston L, 'It's the Way You Walk: Kinematic Specification of Vulnerability to Attack', People Watching: Social, Perceptual, and Neurophysiological Studies of Body Perception (2013)

© Oxford University Press 2013. All rights reserved. This chapter considers whether human gait conveys information to observers about one's vulnerability to attack. Specifica... [more]

© Oxford University Press 2013. All rights reserved. This chapter considers whether human gait conveys information to observers about one's vulnerability to attack. Specifically, it describes a program of research in which the "kinematic fingerprint" of physical vulnerability is assessed. Observers of point-lightdefined body motions form impressions of physical vulnerability that achieve a high level of consensus. Additionally, the authors examine factors that contribute to these perceptions (e.g., manner of dress) and that can mitigate these perceptions (e.g., changing gait).

DOI 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195393705.003.0013
Citations Scopus - 2
2010 Johnston L, Miles L, Macrae CN, 'Male or female? An investigation of factors that modulate the visual perception of another's sex', Social Psychology of Visual Perception 103-122 (2010)
DOI 10.4324/9780203848043
Citations Scopus - 3
2007 Zakharov K, Mitrovic A, Johnston LC, 'Pedagogic agents trying on a Caring Mentor Role', Artificial Intelligence in Education Building Technology Rich Learning Contexts that Work, IOS Press, Amsterdam 59-68 (2007)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2006 Miles L, Johnston LC, 'Not all smiles are created equal: An investigation of the implicit impact of posed and genuine smiles on the social perceiver', Cognition and Language Perspectives from New Zealand, Australian Academic Press, Samford Valley, Queensland 51-64 (2006)
2003 Johnston L, Miles L, 'Responding to the social world: Attributions and stereotype-based judgments', Social Judgements: Implicit and Explicit Processes, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 364-386 (2003)
1990 Johnston L, Hewstone M, 'Intergroup contact: Social identity and social cognition', Social Identity Theory Constructive and Critical Advances, Harvester Wheatsheaf, Hemel Hempstead, United Kingdom 185-210 (1990)
Show 4 more chapters

Journal article (93 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Groves SJ, Pitcher TL, Melzer TR, Jordan J, Carter JD, Malhi GS, et al., 'Brain activation during processing of genuine facial emotion in depression: Preliminary findings', Journal of Affective Disorders, 225 91-96 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2017.07.049
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2017 Beaven S, Wilson T, Johnston L, Johnston D, Smith R, 'Role of Boundary Organization after a Disaster: New Zealand's Natural Hazards Research Platform and the 2010-2011 Canterbury Earthquake Sequence', Natural Hazards Review, 18 (2017)

© 2016 American Society of Civil Engineers. The boundary organization concept has been used to establish that collaborative arrangements and outputs across science and policy doma... [more]

© 2016 American Society of Civil Engineers. The boundary organization concept has been used to establish that collaborative arrangements and outputs across science and policy domain boundaries need to be credible, relevant, and legitimate in order to be to be effective. Although widely accepted in other issue-driven fields, this concept does not have equivalent currency in the natural hazard and disaster risk reduction context. This paper uses the development of the New Zealand Natural Hazards Research Platform during a recent earthquake disaster to assess the utility of the concept in this topic area. Lessons are also identified concerning the use of larger consortium organizations to increase policy and other end-user involvement in the management and coordination of research funding, and the impact of a major disaster on this research-funding initiative. Mapping the Platform's collaborative arrangements in relation to boundary tensions over time makes it possible to distinguish disaster effects from preexisting and ongoing structural effects and incentive regimes. Largely based in the research domain, this organization was well placed to resist the negative pressure of postdisaster time compression on research quality. The lack of balancing policy input at all levels made it difficult to resist the effect of this pressure on the networking required to integrate disciplinary, organizational, and higher-level science/policy domains, and thus build the legitimacy of the larger collaboration. The utility of the boundary organization concept stemmed from the emphasis on balance across domains and scales. The focus on effects, trends, and patterns serves as a counterweight to the blame attribution common after high-profile disasters.

DOI 10.1061/(ASCE)NH.1527-6996.0000202
Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Collings D, Garrill A, Johnston L, 'Student application for special consideration for examination performance following a natural disaster', Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 43 260-271 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02602938.2017.1332755
Co-authors David Collings
2017 Schluter PJ, Johnston L, 'In the spirit of William Georgetti: scrutiny of a prestigious national scholarship selection process', ASSESSMENT & EVALUATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION, 42 316-328 (2017)
DOI 10.1080/02602938.2015.1108387
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2017 Johnston L, Schluter PJ, 'And the winner is ¿ : inter-rater reliability among scholarship assessors', Studies in Higher Education, 42 1736-1749 (2017)

© 2015 Society for Research into Higher Education. With increasing competition for postgraduate research scholarships, awarding processes demand attention and scrutiny. We examine... [more]

© 2015 Society for Research into Higher Education. With increasing competition for postgraduate research scholarships, awarding processes demand attention and scrutiny. We examine inter-rater reliability for two prestigious New Zealand scholarships, the Shirtcliffe Fellowship and the Gordon Watson Scholarship. For each scholarship, five assessors (three academic; two non-academic) independently evaluate all applicants over three domains: Academic Merit, Quality of Study Plans and Character/Leadership. Data from years 2009 to 2014 were extracted, comprising 12 separate assessment rounds. Good to excellent agreement was observed for each scholarship in each year. Agreement was significantly higher for the Academic Merit domain compared to the other domains. Moreover, agreement among academics was higher and less variable than non-academics for this Academic Merit domain. No such differences were noted in the other domains. While resource efficiencies could be made, reductions in committee size resulted in poorer applicant selection performance. Applicants and donors alike can be confident that the awardee for these scholarships is a top applicant.

DOI 10.1080/03075079.2015.1124849
2016 Johnston L, Wilson T, MacKenzie A, 'Assisting Ph.D. completion following a natural disaster', International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 11 367-382 (2016)

© 2016 Informing Science Institute. All Rights Reserved. This article describes the experiences and outcomes for 761 doctoral students enrolled at the Uni-versity of Canterbury wh... [more]

© 2016 Informing Science Institute. All Rights Reserved. This article describes the experiences and outcomes for 761 doctoral students enrolled at the Uni-versity of Canterbury who had their research disrupted by a magnitude 6.2 earthquake on 22nd February 2011. We describe the measures that were put in place to assist the students to continue their studies through continued disruption from aftershocks, dislocation, building demolition and remediation, equipment failure, and limited access to resources. We used data from a number of University databases and student surveys to assess the impact of the disruption on student out-comes, considering measures such as completion rates and times, attrition rates, and student satis-faction. Overall the findings showed little impact of the disruption on completion rates or student satisfaction and only a slight increase in completion times. We consider the impact of additional factors, such as temporary relocation, and draw attention to key lessons learned that may assist those confronted with similar situations in the future.

DOI 10.28945/3590
2016 Beaven S, Wilson T, Johnston L, Johnston D, Smith R, 'Research engagement after disasters: Research coordination before, during, and after the 2011-2012 canterbury Earthquake Sequence, New Zealand', Earthquake Spectra, 32 713-735 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1193/082714EQS134M
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
2016 Sampson KA, Johnston L, Comer K, Brogt E, 'Using doctoral experience survey data to support developments in postgraduate supervision and support', International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 11 185-203 (2016)

© 2016 American Institute of Mathematical Sciences. All rights reserved. Provision of both high standards of thesis supervision and high quality research environments are required... [more]

© 2016 American Institute of Mathematical Sciences. All rights reserved. Provision of both high standards of thesis supervision and high quality research environments are required for doctoral candidates to flourish. An important component of ensuring quality provision of research resources is the soliciting of feedback from research students and the provision from research supervisors and institutions of timely and constructive responses to such feedback. In this manuscript we describe the use of locally developed survey instruments to elicit student feedback. We then demonstrate how actions taken in response to this student feedback can help establish a virtuous circle that enhances doctoral students' research experiences. We provide examples of changes to supervisory practice and resource allocation based on feedback and show the positive impact on subsequent student evaluations. While the examples included here are local, the issues considered and the methods and interventions developed are applicable to all institutions offering research degrees.

DOI 10.28945/3505
Citations Scopus - 3
2016 Sampson KA, Johnston L, Comer K, Brogt E, 'Developing evidence for action on the postgraduate experience: an effective local instrument to move beyond benchmarking', Higher Education Research and Development, 35 337-351 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07294360.2015.1087469
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
2016 Gruber J, King J, Hay J, Johnston L, 'The hands, head, and brow A sociolinguistic study of Maori gesture', GESTURE, 15 1-36 (2016)
DOI 10.1075/gest.15.1.01gru
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Beaven S, Johnston LC, Wilson T, Brogt E, Blythe J, Reugg C, et al., 'Risk and resilience factors reported by a New Zealand tertiary student population after the 4th September 2010 Darfield Earthquake', International journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, 32 375-404 (2014)
2014 Malinen S, Willis GM, Johnston L, 'Might informative media reporting of sexual offending influence community members' attitudes towards sex offenders?', PSYCHOLOGY CRIME & LAW, 20 535-552 (2014)
DOI 10.1080/1068316X.2013.793770
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
2014 Johnston L, McLellan T, McKinlay A, '(Perceived) Size Really Does Matter: Male Dissatisfaction With Penis Size', PSYCHOLOGY OF MEN & MASCULINITY, 15 225-228 (2014)
DOI 10.1037/a0033264
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2013 Malinen S, Johnston L, 'Workplace Ageism: Discovering Hidden Bias', EXPERIMENTAL AGING RESEARCH, 39 445-465 (2013)
DOI 10.1080/0361073X.2013.808111
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 15
2013 Latner JD, McLeod G, O'Brien KS, Johnston L, 'The role of self-efficacy, coping, and lapses in weight maintenance', EATING AND WEIGHT DISORDERS-STUDIES ON ANOREXIA BULIMIA AND OBESITY, 18 359-366 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s40519-013-0068-1
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 10
2013 Willis GM, Malinen S, Johnston L, 'Demographic Differences in Public Attitudes Towards Sex Offenders', PSYCHIATRY PSYCHOLOGY AND LAW, 20 230-247 (2013)
DOI 10.1080/13218719.2012.658206
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
2012 Douglas KM, Porter RJ, Johnston L, 'Sensitivity to posed and genuine facial expressions of emotion in severe depression', PSYCHIATRY RESEARCH, 196 72-78 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.psychres.2011.10.019
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
2012 McLellan TL, Wilcke JC, Johnston L, Watts R, Miles LK, 'Sensitivity to posed and genuine displays of happiness and sadness: A fMRI study', NEUROSCIENCE LETTERS, 531 149-154 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.neulet.2012.10.039
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
2012 Willis GM, Johnston L, 'Planning helps: The impact of release planning on subsequent re-entry experiences of child sex offenders', JOURNAL OF SEXUAL AGGRESSION, 18 194-208 (2012)
DOI 10.1080/13552600.2010.506576
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2011 Mooney MF, Paton D, de Terte I, Johal S, Karanci AN, Gardner D, et al., 'Psychosocial recovery from disasters: A framework informed by evidence', New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 40 26-39 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 20
2011 Malinen S, Johnston L, 'Seeking a Better Work-life Balance: Expectations and Perceptions of Work-related Practices and Attitudes of Recent Immigrants to New Zealand', ASIAN AND PACIFIC MIGRATION JOURNAL, 20 233-252 (2011)
DOI 10.1177/011719681102000206
Citations Web of Science - 2
2011 Johnston L, Carter J, McLellan T, 'DON'T DWELL ON IT: THE IMPACT OF RUMINATION ON EMOTIONAL SENSITIVITY', JOURNAL OF SOCIAL AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, 30 506-530 (2011)
DOI 10.1521/jscp.2011.30.5.506
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2011 Johal S, Chambers R, Collins S, de Terte I, Gardner D, Glavovic B, et al., 'Potential social and psychological consequences of the Rena incident: Lessons from an international perspective', New Zealand Medical Journal, 124 86-89 (2011)
2010 Johnston L, Miles L, Macrae CN, 'Why are you smiling at me? Social functions of enjoyment and non-enjoyment smiles', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 49 107-127 (2010)
DOI 10.1348/014466609X412476
Citations Scopus - 69Web of Science - 60
2010 Blampied M, Johnston L, Miles L, Liberty K, 'Sensitivity to differences between enjoyment and non-enjoyment smiles in children with autism spectrum disorder', BRITISH JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, 28 483-489 (2010)
DOI 10.1348/026151009X467621
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2010 McLellan T, Johnston L, Dalrymple-Alford J, Porter R, 'Sensitivity to genuine versus posed emotion specified in facial displays', COGNITION & EMOTION, 24 1277-1292 (2010)
DOI 10.1080/02699930903306181
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 39
2010 Lopresti-Goodman S, Kallen RW, Richardson MJ, Marsh KL, Johnston L, 'The Influence of Heightened Body-awareness on Walking Through Apertures', APPLIED COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, 24 557-570 (2010)
DOI 10.1002/acp.1568
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
2010 Johnston L, Porter R, Mackenzie A, Miles B, 'Fluctuations in Testosterone Levels and Person Construal in Male Perceivers', Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research, 15 187-195 (2010)

Male perceivers completed two testing sessions 1 week apart. In each of two testing sessions held a week apart, male perceivers provided a saliva sample that was analyzed for test... [more]

Male perceivers completed two testing sessions 1 week apart. In each of two testing sessions held a week apart, male perceivers provided a saliva sample that was analyzed for testosterone level and completed a sex categorization task. Within-subjects analyses showed relative testosterone levels to influence response time to female but not to male targets. Males were significantly slower to identify females when their testosterone levels were relatively high. These findings are considered in terms of adaptive person construal. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI 10.1111/j.1751-9861.2011.00061.x
2010 Wallace B, Johnston L, Trenberth L, 'Bullying the Boss: The Prevalence of Upward Bullying Behaviours', The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Organisational Psychology, 3 66-71 (2010)
DOI 10.1375/ajop.3.1.66
2009 Marsh KL, Johnston L, Richardson MJ, Schmidt RC, 'Toward a radically embodied, embedded social psychology', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 39 1217-1225 (2009)
DOI 10.1002/ejsp.666
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 43
2009 Marsh KL, Johnston L, Richardson MJ, Schmidt RC, 'Hop off the mirror neuron bandwagon and join ours, it's less crowded! Reply', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 39 1234-1235 (2009)
DOI 10.1002/ejsp.689
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2008 Johnston L, Miles L, McKinlay A, 'A critical review of the Eyes Test as a measure of social-cognitive impairment', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 60 135-141 (2008)
DOI 10.1080/00049530701449521
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 24
2008 Brinsinead-Stockham K, Johnston L, Miles L, Macrae CN, 'Female sexual orientation and menstrual influences on person perception', JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 44 729-734 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.jesp.2007.05.003
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
2008 Zhang B, Johnston L, Kilic GB, 'Assessing the reliability of self- and peer rating in student group work', ASSESSMENT & EVALUATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION, 33 329-340 (2008)
DOI 10.1080/02602930701293181
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 19
2008 Johnston L, Miles L, Macrae CN, 'Was that a Man? Sex Identification as a Function of Menstrual Cycle and Masculinity', APPLIED COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, 22 1185-1194 (2008)
DOI 10.1002/acp.1436
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2008 McLellan T, Johnston L, Dalrymple-Alford J, Porter R, 'The recognition of facial expressions of emotion in Alzheimer's disease: a review of findings', ACTA NEUROPSYCHIATRICA, 20 236-250 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1601-5215.2008.00315.x
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24
2007 Johnston L, Peace V, 'Where did that car come from?: Crossing the road when the traffic comes from an unfamiliar direction', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 39 886-893 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2006.12.010
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2007 Johnston L, Miles L, 'Attributions and stereotype moderation', NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 36 13-17 (2007)
2007 Malinen S, Johnston L, 'The influence of an equity statement on perceivers' implicit and explicit associations between males and science', NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 36 18-24 (2007)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2007 Miles L, Johnston L, 'Detecting happiness: Perceiver sensitivity to enjoyment and non-enjoyment smiles', JOURNAL OF NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR, 31 259-275 (2007)
DOI 10.1007/s10919-007-0036-4
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 51
2006 Yabar Y, Johnston LC, Miles L, Peace V, 'Implicit Behavioural Mimicry of an In-group and an Out-group Member', JOURNAL OF NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR, 30 97-113 (2006)
2006 Holloway R, Johnston L, 'Evaluating the evaluators: Perceptions of interviewers by rejected job applicants as a function of interviewer and applicant sex', JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 36 2635-2648 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.0021-9029.2006.00120.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2006 Aavik T, Abu-Hilal M, Ahmad FZ, Ahmed RA, Alarco B, Amponsah B, et al., 'A world of lies', JOURNAL OF CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY, 37 60-74 (2006)
DOI 10.1177/0022022105282295
Citations Scopus - 178Web of Science - 117
2006 Johnston L, 'Reducing stereotype-based judgments: The impact of habitual stereotype use', NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 35 14-20 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2006 Yabar Y, Johnston L, Miles L, Peace V, 'Implicit behavioral mimicry: Investigating the impact of group membership', JOURNAL OF NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR, 30 97-113 (2006)
DOI 10.1007/s10919-006-0010-6
Citations Scopus - 96Web of Science - 94
2006 Peace V, Miles L, Johnston L, 'It doesn't matter what you wear: The impact of posed and genuine expressions of happiness on product evaluation', SOCIAL COGNITION, 24 137-168 (2006)
DOI 10.1521/soco.2006.24.2.137
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 20
2006 Blackburn S, Johnston L, Blampied N, Popp D, Kallen R, 'An application of escape theory to binge eating', EUROPEAN EATING DISORDERS REVIEW, 14 23-31 (2006)
DOI 10.1002/erv.675
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 21
2005 Rudge AD, Chase JG, Shaw GM, Lee D, Wake GC, Hudson IL, Johnston L, 'Impact of control on agitation-sedation dynamics', CONTROL ENGINEERING PRACTICE, 13 1139-1149 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.conengprac.2004.10.010
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2005 Johnstone A, Johnston L, 'The relationship between organizational climate, occupational type and workaholism', NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 34 181-188 (2005)
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 46
2005 Richardson MJ, Johnston L, 'Person recognition from dynamic events: The kinematic specification of individual identity in walking style', JOURNAL OF NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR, 29 25-44 (2005)
DOI 10.1007/s10919-004-0888-9
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 21
2005 Johnston L, Miles L, Carter C, Macrae CN, 'Menstrual influences on person perception: Male sensitivity to fluctuating female fertility', SOCIAL COGNITION, 23 279-290 (2005)
DOI 10.1521/soco.2005.23.3.279
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
2004 Johnston L, Miles L, 'Assessing contributions to group assignments', Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 29 751-768 (2004)

We report the use of a combination of self- and peer-assessment in an undergraduate social psychology laboratory course. Students worked in small groups on a self-directed empiric... [more]

We report the use of a combination of self- and peer-assessment in an undergraduate social psychology laboratory course. Students worked in small groups on a self-directed empirical project that they each wrote up independently as a laboratory report. Marks for the written assignment were moderated by a contribution index measure based on the self- and peer-assessment measures. Our analyses indicated that: (i) students took the peer-assessment process seriously, clearly differentiating between group members on the contributions questionnaires; (ii) students show a self-bias, rating their own contribution to the group task higher than that of other group members; (iii) for a large majority of students the contribution index resulted in very little moderation of the final assignment marks; (iv) there was a strong correlation between the contribution index and the overall assignment score. Implications for the assessment of group work are considered. © 2004 Taylor & Francis Ltd.

DOI 10.1080/0260293042000227272
Citations Scopus - 75
2004 Dzendrowskyj P, Shaw G, Johnston L, 'Effects of nursing industrial action on relatives of Intensive Care Unit patients: A 16-month follow-up', New Zealand Medical Journal, 117 (2004)

Aims: In December 2001, nursing industrial action occurred at Christchurch Hospital. This study assesses the effect industrial action had on relatives of those Intensive Care Unit... [more]

Aims: In December 2001, nursing industrial action occurred at Christchurch Hospital. This study assesses the effect industrial action had on relatives of those Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients involved. Method: A written questionnaire was sent to the relatives of the 17 patients on Intensive Care around the time of the strike; 11 of these patients had needed to be transferred to out of region hospitals for continuing care, whilst the others remained in the intensive care unit. Comparisons were made with a control group of 26 next-of-kin. Results: Compared with relatives of patients not involved in the strike, relatives involved during the strike were significantly more angry (p<0.007) and less trusting that the patients had received the best possible care (p<0.05). Compared to the control group, they were also more negative in their continuing view of the healthcare system (p<0.05). Those relatives involved in air transfers were more distressed (p<0.05), angry (p<0.001), and less trusting than those not involved in a transfer (p<0.005). Conclusion: The study shows that industrial action caused measurable distress and anxiety to the relatives involved some 16 months after the strike, especially in patients who were transferred. A persistent negative perception of the healthcare system in New Zealand could be demonstrated in this group. © NZMA.

2004 Johnston L, Hudson SM, Richardson MJ, Gunns RE, Garner M, 'Changing kinematics as a means of reducing vulnerability to physical attack', JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 34 514-537 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1559-1816.2004.tb02559.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 17
2004 Chase JG, Rudge AD, Shaw GM, Wake GC, Lee D, Hudson IL, Johnston L, 'Modeling and control of the agitation-sedation cycle for critical care patients', MEDICAL ENGINEERING & PHYSICS, 26 459-471 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.medengphy.2004.02.001
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2004 Miles L, Johnston LC, Owen DH, 'Knowing whom to trust: Evidence for a mediating role of posed and genuine smiles', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, (2004)
2004 Johnston LC, Miles L, Macrae CN, Carter C, Arden K, Grace RC, 'Identifying a potential reproductive partner', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, (2004)
2004 Miles L, Johnston LC, Owen DH, 'Not all smiles are created equal: An investigation of the implicit impact of genuine and posed smiles on the social perceiver', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, (2004)
2004 Peace V, Yabar Y, Johnston LC, Miles L, 'Mimicking others: Is implicit behavioural mimicry moderated by stigmatization', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, (2004)
2004 Yabar Y, Johnston LC, Miles L, Peace V, 'Friends or foes: Mimicry and stigmatization', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, (2004)
2003 Simpson G, Johnston L, Richardson M, 'An investigation of road crossing in a virtual environment', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 35 787-796 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S0001-4575(02)00081-7
Citations Scopus - 78Web of Science - 65
2003 Johnston L, Arden K, Macrae CN, Grace RC, 'The need for speed: The menstrual cycle and person construal', SOCIAL COGNITION, 21 89-100 (2003)
DOI 10.1521/soco.21.2.89.21319
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
2002 McNab SM, Johnston L, 'The impact of equal employment opportunity statements in job advertisements on applicants' perceptions of organisations', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 54 105-109 (2002)
DOI 10.1080/00049530210001706573
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
2002 Gunns RE, Johnston L, Hudson SM, 'Victim selection and kinematics: A point-light investigation of vulnerability to attack', JOURNAL OF NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR, 26 129-158 (2002)
DOI 10.1023/A:1020744915533
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 47
2002 Johnston L, 'Behavioral mimicry and stigmatization', SOCIAL COGNITION, 20 18-35 (2002)
DOI 10.1521/soco.20.1.18.20944
Citations Scopus - 79Web of Science - 80
2000 Johnston L, Bristow M, Love N, 'An investigation of the link between attributional judgments and stereotype-based judgments', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 30 551-568 (2000)
DOI 10.1002/1099-0992(200007/08)30:4&lt;551::AID-EJSP7&gt;3.0.CO;2-8
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
2000 Watkins LM, Johnston L, 'Screening job applicants: The impact of physical attractiveness and application quality', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SELECTION AND ASSESSMENT, 8 76-84 (2000)
DOI 10.1111/1468-2389.00135
Citations Scopus - 71Web of Science - 54
1999 Johnston L, Bulik CM, Anstiss V, 'Suppressing thoughts about chocolate', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EATING DISORDERS, 26 21-27 (1999)
DOI 10.1002/(SICI)1098-108X(199907)26:1&lt;21::AID-EAT3&gt;3.0.CO;2-7
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 41
1999 Johnston LC, 'Behavioral mimicry: It depends on who is being mimicked', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, (1999)
1998 Harvie K, Marshall-McCaskey J, Johnston L, 'Gender-based biases in occupational hiring decisions', JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 28 1698-1711 (1998)
DOI 10.1111/j.1559-1816.1998.tb01341.x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
1998 Bruce J, Curtis H, Johnston L, 'Social identity in young New Zealand children', NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 27 21-27 (1998)
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
1998 Macrae CN, Johnston L, 'Help, I need somebody: Automatic action and inaction', SOCIAL COGNITION, 16 400-417 (1998)
DOI 10.1521/soco.1998.16.4.400
Citations Scopus - 175Web of Science - 153
1998 Johnston LC, 'Individual differences and stereotype change', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, (1998)
1997 Johnston L, Hudson SM, Ward T, 'The suppression of sexual thoughts by child molesters: A preliminary investigation', Sexual Abuse: Journal of Research and Treatment, 9 303-319 (1997)

The cognitive and emotional demands of modern life mean that it has become increasingly important to learn how to manage effectively our mental processes and behavior. Central to ... [more]

The cognitive and emotional demands of modern life mean that it has become increasingly important to learn how to manage effectively our mental processes and behavior. Central to the achievement of mental control is the suppression, or inhibition, of unwanted or inappropriate thoughts or behaviors. Our recent work has considered the potential utility of instructing individuals to suppress sexually deviant thoughts as a therapy technique for sexual offenders. Of special concern was the subsequent hyperaccessibility, or "rebound," of the very thoughts which were previously suppressed. The present study is a preliminary experimental investigation of the ability of incarcerated child molesters to suppress unwanted sexual thoughts and the subsequent impact of this suppression on the accessibility of the suppressed thoughts. Participants completed an articulated thoughts task under instructions to suppress sex-related thoughts or under no specific instructions. Suppression instructions reduced the incidence of sex-related thoughts. In a subsequent color naming task (Stroop Task), the accessibility of the previously suppressed thoughts was tested. Both sex-related and child-related words were more accessible after prior suppression instructions for preferential child molesters than for either situational child molesters or nonsexual offenders. Implications for treatment of sexual offenders and for offender typology are discussed. © 1997 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

Citations Scopus - 14
1997 Johnston L, Locke V, Giles L, Rattray K, 'The good, the bad, and the ugly', JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 27 725-741 (1997)
DOI 10.1111/j.1559-1816.1997.tb00656.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
1997 Johnston L, Ward T, Hudson SM, 'Deviant sexual thoughts: Mental control and the treatment of sexual offenders', JOURNAL OF SEX RESEARCH, 34 121-130 (1997)
DOI 10.1080/00224499709551876
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 20
1997 Ward T, Hudson SM, Johnston L, Marshall WL, 'Cognitive distortions in sex offenders: An integrative review', CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW, 17 479-507 (1997)
DOI 10.1016/S0272-7358(97)81034-3
Citations Scopus - 228Web of Science - 158
1996 Johnston L, 'Resisting change: Information-seeking and stereotype change', European Journal of Social Psychology, 26 799-825 (1996)

Despite recent laboratory successes in demonstrating stereotype change in response to disconfirming information, stereotypes remain resistant to change or modification. The report... [more]

Despite recent laboratory successes in demonstrating stereotype change in response to disconfirming information, stereotypes remain resistant to change or modification. The reported research employed an information gathering methodology in which perceivers could control the amount and nature of the information they received about members of a stereotyped group prior to evaluating the group on a number of stereotype-relevant characteristics. Perceivers showed a stereotype-preservation bias in their information gathering (Experiments 1 and 2) and, consequently, showed no modification of existing stereotypic beliefs. Experiment 3 manipulated the salient processing goals under which perceivers gathered information and found that, under certain conditions, the stereotype preservation bias could be overcome and stereotypes moderated.

DOI 10.1002/(SICI)1099-0992(199609)26:5&lt;799::AID-EJSP796&gt;3.0.CO;2-O
Citations Scopus - 82
1996 Johnston L, Ward T, 'Social cognition and sexual offending: A theoretical framework', Sexual Abuse: Journal of Research and Treatment, 8 55-80 (1996)

Clinicians and researchers have noted the important rote of maladaptive beliefs and distorted thinking in facilitating or justifying sexual offenses. There have been a number of a... [more]

Clinicians and researchers have noted the important rote of maladaptive beliefs and distorted thinking in facilitating or justifying sexual offenses. There have been a number of attempts to describe the nature of these beliefs and to develop ways of measuring them but in the absence of any integrating theory. It is our belief that an understanding of the cognitive processes underlying the initiation, maintenance, and justification of sexual offending is a vital prerequisite to the development of successful treatment programs. The present paper proposes the use of a social cognition framework in considering cognitive processes that may be important contributing factors in the propensity of some men to commit sexual offenses. Pertinent research in the social cognition domain, covering information processing, mental control, and the impact of affective and motivational factors on cognitive processes, is described and related to the sexual offending literature. Implications for clinical practice and suggestions for future research are highlighted. © 1996 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

Citations Scopus - 39
1996 Ward T, Bulik CM, Johnston L, 'Return of the suppressed: Mental control and bulimia nervosa', BEHAVIOUR CHANGE, 13 79-90 (1996)
DOI 10.1017/S0813483900003788
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
1996 Johnston LC, 'Resisting change: Information seeking and stereotype change', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, (1996)
Citations Web of Science - 76
1995 JOHNSTON L, COOLEN P, 'A DUAL PROCESSING APPROACH TO STEREOTYPE CHANGE', PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY BULLETIN, 21 660-673 (1995)
DOI 10.1177/0146167295217001
Citations Web of Science - 18
1995 Johnston LC, Ward T, Hudson SM, 'Suppressing sex: Mental control and the treatment of sexual offenders', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, (1995)
1994 JOHNSTON L, HEWSTONE M, PENDRY L, FRANKISH C, 'COGNITIVE MODELS OF STEREOTYPE CHANGE .4. MOTIVATIONAL AND COGNITIVE INFLUENCES', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 24 237-265 (1994)
DOI 10.1002/ejsp.2420240203
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Miles Hewstone
1994 JOHNSTON LC, MACRAE CN, 'CHANGING SOCIAL STEREOTYPES - THE CASE OF THE INFORMATION SEEKER', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 24 581-592 (1994)
DOI 10.1002/ejsp.2420240505
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 40
1992 JOHNSTON L, HEWSTONE M, 'COGNITIVE MODELS OF STEREOTYPE CHANGE .3. SUBTYPING AND THE PERCEIVED TYPICALITY OF DISCONFIRMING GROUP MEMBERS', JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 28 360-386 (1992)
DOI 10.1016/0022-1031(92)90051-K
Citations Scopus - 166Web of Science - 130
Co-authors Miles Hewstone
1992 HEWSTONE M, JOHNSTON L, AIRD P, 'COGNITIVE MODELS OF STEREOTYPE CHANGE .2. PERCEPTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND HETEROGENEOUS GROUPS', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 22 235-249 (1992)
DOI 10.1002/ejsp.2420220304
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Miles Hewstone
1991 HEWSTONE M, HANTZI A, JOHNSTON L, 'SOCIAL CATEGORIZATION AND PERSON MEMORY - THE PERVASIVENESS OF RACE AS AN ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 21 517-528 (1991)
DOI 10.1002/ejsp.2420210606
Citations Scopus - 97Web of Science - 95
Co-authors Miles Hewstone
1990 JOHNSTON RJ, PATTIE CJ, JOHNSTON LC, 'GREAT-BRITAIN CHANGING ELECTORAL GEOGRAPHY - THE FLOW-OF-THE-VOTE AND SPATIAL POLARIZATION', TIJDSCHRIFT VOOR ECONOMISCHE EN SOCIALE GEOGRAFIE, 81 189-206 (1990)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-9663.1990.tb00770.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
1990 SIMON B, MLICKI P, JOHNSTON L, CAETANO A, WAROWICKI M, VANKNIPPENBERG AD, DERIDDER R, 'THE EFFECTS OF INGROUP AND OUTGROUP HOMOGENEITY ON INGROUP FAVOURITISM, STEREOTYPING AND OVERESTIMATION OF RELATIVE INGROUP SIZE', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 20 519-523 (1990)
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
1989 Johnston RJ, Pattie CJ, Johnston LC, 'The impact of constituency spending on the result of the 1987 British general election', Electoral Studies, 8 143-155 (1989)

Most analysts of British general elections believe that the constituency campaigns have very little impact on the outcome. Using campaign expenditure as a surrogate for constituen... [more]

Most analysts of British general elections believe that the constituency campaigns have very little impact on the outcome. Using campaign expenditure as a surrogate for constituency campaign activity, analyses of the 1987 general election indicate that it was significantly related to the outcome. © 1989.

DOI 10.1016/0261-3794(89)90031-0
Citations Scopus - 26
1988 Johnston RJ, Pattie CJ, Johnston LC, 'The role of ecological analysis in electoral geography: The changing pattern of labour voting in Great Britain 1983-1987', Geografiska Annaler: Series B, Human Geography, 70 307-324 (1988)
DOI 10.2307/490333
1986 Touyz SW, Beumont PJV, Johnstone LC, 'Neuropsychological correlates of dieting disorders', International Journal of Eating Disorders, 5 1025-1034 (1986)
DOI 10.1002/1098-108X(198609)5:6&lt;1025::AID-EAT2260050606&gt;3.0.CO;2-T
Show 90 more journal articles

Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Vanman EJ, Horiguchi M, Philipp M, Johnston L, 'WHAT IS THE ROLE OF MIMICRY IN DETECTING POSED AND GENUINE SMILES?', PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, New Orleans, LA (2012)
2008 Zakharov K, Mitrovic A, Johnston L, 'Towards emotionally-intelligent pedagogical agents', INTELLIGENT TUTORING SYSTEM, PROCEEDINGS, Montreal, CANADA (2008)
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 23
2007 Zakharov K, Mitrovic A, Johnston L, 'Intelligent Tutoring Systems respecting human nature', Proceedings of NZCSRSC 2007, the 5th New Zealand Computer Science Research Student Conference (2007)

The current level of development in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) ensures successful cognitive support. However, a number of studies suggest that learning outcomes are signif... [more]

The current level of development in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) ensures successful cognitive support. However, a number of studies suggest that learning outcomes are significantly influenced by a complex interaction between cognitive and affective states of learners. Little research has been done to investigate the effectiveness of learning with the help of affect-aware ITSs. Recently used approaches to affect recognition rely on facial feature tracking and physiological signal processing, but there is no clear winner among them because of the complexity and ambiguity associated with the task and the low-level data interpretation. The goal of our project is to develop a robust way of affect recognition for creating affect-aware pedagogical agents with the view to improve learners' engagement, motivation and learning outcomes.

Citations Scopus - 1
2006 Malinen S, Johnston L, 'The malleability of implicit attitudes towards overweight people', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY (2006)
2006 Blampied NM, Williams F, Johnston L, 'The impact of chronic pain on relationship satisfaction', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY (2006)
2005 Yabar YC, Johnston L, 'Impact of stigmatisation on behavioural mimicry', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY (2005)
2004 Miles L, Johnston L, 'Knowing whom to trust: Evidence for a mediating role of posed and genuine smiles', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY (2004)
2004 Yabar Y, Johnston L, Miles L, Peace V, 'Mimicking others: Is implicit behavioural mimicry moderated by stigmatisation?', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY (2004)
2003 Rudge AD, Chase JG, Shaw GM, Johnston LC, Wake GC, 'Modelling And Control Of The Agitation-Sedation Cycle', Melbourne, Australia (2003)
Show 6 more conferences
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
New Zealand 82
United Kingdom 26
Australia 13
United States 12
Turkey 4
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News

University of Newcastle establishes first Doctoral Training Centre

March 12, 2018

The University of Newcastle has today launched its inaugural Doctoral Training Centre (DTC) focused on supporting the Mining Equipment, Technology and Services (METS) sector.

Professor Lucy Johnston

Position

Dean of Graduate Research
UON Graduate Research
Graduate Research
Research and Innovation Division

Contact Details

Email lucy.johnston@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4985 4975

Office

Room NIERC G34
Building NIER
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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