Professor Elizabeth Sullivan

Professor Elizabeth Sullivan

Deputy Head of Faculty

Office of the PVC Health and Medicine

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Elizabeth Sullivan is Deputy Head of the Faculty of Health and Medicine at the University of Newcastle, research lead of Custodial Health within the NSW Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network and Fellow of the Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine. She is a highly experienced university executive leader, public health physician and researcher who is internationally respected for her important contributions to maternal and reproductive health, and to criminal justice health.

Prof. Sullivan is a passionate research leader who is committed to improving health equity for vulnerable women of reproductive age, particularly those who have severe and rare conditions in pregnancy or who are in the criminal justice system. She has an impressive research track record that includes over 200 internationally peer-reviewed publications including Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) and World Health Organisation (WHO) reports, and over $20 million in research and contract funding as a chief investigator. Prof. Sullivan has served extensively by invitation on national and international government committees related to research and is a former member of the NHMRC Council (2015-2018) and has a track record of highly successful national and international collaborations. In 2018, she led UTS’s successful Athena SWAN pilot that received a Bronze Award.

Prof. Sullivan began her medical career in New South Wales before moving to the United States to complete public health training on the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) program followed by preventive medicine residency at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta and New York City respectively. She has contributed to building public health capability at UTS and at UNSW in her roles as founding director of the Australian Centre for Public and Population Health Research and Director AIHW National Perinatal Statistics and Epidemiology Unit, respectively. Furthermore, she lead development of the pan university Health strategy at UTS in her role as Assistant Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research.

Prof. Sullivan is a current NHMRC grant holder who has successfully supervised and mentored higher degree research students and early- and mid-career researchers onto careers in industry, government and senior academia including for external programs such as the Franklin Women Mentoring Program. She is committed to gender equity in research and the development of the next generation of nationally competitive public health researchers.

Prof. Sullivan is a Fellow of Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine (FAFPHM), and holds Membership with the following Professional Organisations;

  • National Health and Medical Research Council (2015-2018)
  • European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology
  • Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand
  • Public Health Association of Australia
  • Council of Academic Public Health Institutions Australia (CAPHIA)
  • Society of Obstetric Medicine of Australia and New Zealand (SOMANZ)
  • Fertility Society of Australia (2005-2015)

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Medicine, University of New South Wales
  • Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, University of Sydney
  • Master of Public Health, University of Sydney
  • Master of Medicine (Sexual Health), University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Aboriginal health
  • assisted reproductive technology
  • family planning
  • justice health
  • maternal health
  • maternal morbidity
  • maternal mortality
  • neonatal
  • perinatal epidemiology
  • pregnancy
  • reproductive health
  • return to custody
  • social determinants
  • surveillance systems

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111706 Epidemiology 30
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 40
111402 Obstetrics and Gynaecology 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Deputy Head of Faculty University of Newcastle
Office of the PVC Health and Medicine
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/08/2018 -  Research Lead, Custodial Health NSW Health
Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network
Australia
1/01/2017 -  Distinguished Professor of Public Health University of Technology Sydney
Faculty of Health
Australia
1/01/2017 - 1/01/2019 Director, Australian Centre for Public and Population Health Research University of Technology Sydney
Faculty of Health
Australia
2/11/2015 - 1/01/2019 Assistant Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research and Academic Lead Athena SWAN University of Technology Sydney
Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research
Australia
31/05/2014 - 1/11/2015 Professor of Public Health, Associate Dean Research University of Technology Sydney
Faculty of Health
Australia
31/05/2012 - 30/06/2014 Head, Research Family Planning NSW
Research
4/03/2002 - 5/05/2014 Director, AIHW National Perinatal Epidemiology and Statistics Unit and Professor, Perinatal and Reproductive Health University of New South Wales
Faculty of Medicine

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
2/01/2012 - 31/12/2014 Director and Professor Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Sullivan EA, Wang YA, 'How to report IVF success rates', How to Improve your ART Success Rates: An Evidence-Based Review of Adjuncts to IVF 235-240 (2011)

© Cambridge University Press 2011. Introduction In the most recent world report on monitoring ART/IVF was available in 54 countries worldwide [1]. There was wide variation in ART ... [more]

© Cambridge University Press 2011. Introduction In the most recent world report on monitoring ART/IVF was available in 54 countries worldwide [1]. There was wide variation in ART practice by country and region and in the measures used to quantify ART treatment success. There was no data on what an individual woman, couple, community, or country would define as successful ART treatment [1]. There is no single measure or universal, standard definition of success for ART. This is evident from the differences in practice guidelines, regulatory processes, and government and private sector policies on access and funding/reimbursement of patient costs of fertility treatment between countries and professional organizations. This chapter defines success from a medical and population paradigm and does not take into account cultural or ethnic specific measures of success.

DOI 10.1017/CBO9780511894756.046
Co-authors E Sullivan

Journal article (195 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Gerstl B, Sullivan E, Vallejo M, Koch J, Johnson M, Wand H, et al., 'Reproductive outcomes following treatment for a gynecological cancer diagnosis: a systematic review', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 13 269-281 (2019)

© 2019, Crown. Purpose: Fertility treatments are available for women diagnosed with a gynecological malignancy, which is important for women who desire a biological family subsequ... [more]

© 2019, Crown. Purpose: Fertility treatments are available for women diagnosed with a gynecological malignancy, which is important for women who desire a biological family subsequent to treatment. The objective of this study was to report reproductive outcomes following fertility-sparing treatment for a gynaecological cancer. Methods: Electronic databases were searched to identify studies that reported on reproductive outcomes after treatment for a gynecological malignancy. Results: In total, 77 studies were included which reported on reproductive outcomes after treatment for cervical cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational trophoblastic disease, and ovarian cancer. The main treatments included vaginal or abdominal radical trachelectomy, progestin therapy, salpingo-oophorectomy, and chemotherapy. The mean age at diagnosis for the study population and at birth were 30.5¿years and 30.3¿years, respectively. There were 4749 pregnancies (42%) reported for the included studies, with a miscarriage rate of 15% and a medical termination rate of 5%. The live birth rate was 74% with a 10% preterm rate. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Patients should be offered timely discussions, information, and counseling regarding the impact of gynecological cancer treatment on a patient¿s fertility. Furthermore, fertility-sparing strategies and fertility preservation should be discussed prior to starting treatment.

DOI 10.1007/s11764-019-00749-x
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Javid N, Hyett JA, Walker SP, Sullivan EA, Homer CSE, 'A survey of opinion and practice regarding prenatal diagnosis of vasa previa among obstetricians from Australia and New Zealand', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS, 144 252-259 (2019)
DOI 10.1002/ijgo.12747
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Zeki R, Li Z, Wang AY, Homer CSE, Oats JJN, Marshall D, Sullivan EA, 'Obstetric anal sphincter injuries among women with gestational diabetes and women without gestational diabetes: A NSW population-based cohort study', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, (2019)

© 2019 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Background: Obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIs) are associated with maternal morbidit... [more]

© 2019 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Background: Obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIs) are associated with maternal morbidity; however, it is uncertain whether gestational diabetes (GDM) is an independent risk factor when considering birthweight mode of birth and episiotomy. Aims: To compare rates of OASIs between women with GDM and women without GDM by mode of birth and birthweight. To investigate the association between episiotomy, mode of birth and the risk of OASIs. Methods: A population-based cohort study of women who gave birth vaginally in NSW, from 2007 to 2013. Rates of OASIs were compared between women with and without GDM, stratified by mode of birth, birthweight and a multi-categorical variable of mode of birth and episiotomy. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by multivariable logistic regression. Results: The rate of OASIs was 3.6% (95% CI: 2.6¿2.7) vs 2.6% (95% CI: 3.4¿2.8; P¿<¿0.001) among women with and without GDM, respectively. Women with GDM and a macrosomic baby (birthweight¿=¿4000¿g) had a higher risk of OASIs with forceps (aOR 1.76, 95% CI: 1.08¿2.86, P¿=¿0.02) or vacuum (aOR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.17¿3.04, P¿=¿0.01), compared with those without GDM. For primiparous women with GDM and all women without GDM, an episiotomy with forceps was associated with lower odds of OASIs than forceps only (primiparous GDM, forceps-episiotomy aOR 2.49, 95% CI: 2.00¿3.11, forceps aOR 5.30, 95% CI: 3.72¿7.54), (primiparous without GDM, forceps-episiotomy aOR 2.71, 95% CI: 2.55¿2.89, forceps aOR 5.95, 95% CI: 5.41¿6.55) and (multiparous without GDM, forceps-episiotomy aOR 3.75, 95% CI: 3.12¿4.50, forceps aOR 6.20, 95% CI: 4.96¿7.74). Conclusion: Women with GDM and a macrosomic baby should be counselled about the increased risk of OASIs with both vacuum and forceps. With forceps birth, this risk can be partially mitigated by performing a concomitant episiotomy.

DOI 10.1111/ajo.12950
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Sullivan EA, Kendall S, Chang S, Baldry E, Zeki R, Gilles M, et al., 'Aboriginal mothers in prison in Australia: a study of social, emotional and physical wellbeing', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 43 241-247 (2019)

© 2019 The Authors Objective: To describe the social, emotional and physical wellbeing of Aboriginal mothers in prison. Methods: Cross-sectional survey, including a Short Form Hea... [more]

© 2019 The Authors Objective: To describe the social, emotional and physical wellbeing of Aboriginal mothers in prison. Methods: Cross-sectional survey, including a Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) and Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (5-item version) administered to Aboriginal women who self-identified as mothers. Results: Seventy-seven Aboriginal mothers in New South Wales (NSW) and 84 in Western Australia (WA) participated in the study. Eighty-three per cent (n=59) of mothers in NSW were in prison for drug-related offences, 64.8% (n=46) of mothers in WA were in prison for offences committed under the influence of alcohol. Sixty-eight per cent (n=52) of mothers in NSW and 35% (n=28) of mothers in WA reported mental health problems. Physical (PCS) and Mental (MCS) component scores of SF-12 varied for mothers in NSW and WA. Mothers in NSW experienced poorer health and functioning than mothers in WA (NSW: PCS 49.5, MCS 40.6; WA: PCS 54.4, MCS 48.3) and high levels of psychological distress (NSW: 13.1; WA 10.1). Conclusions: Aboriginal mothers in prison have significant health needs associated with physical and mental health, and psychological distress. Implications for public health: Adoption of social and emotional wellbeing as an explanatory framework for culturally secure healthcare in prison is essential to improving health outcomes of Aboriginal mothers in prison in Australia.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12892
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Schaap T, Bloemenkamp K, Deneux-Tharaux C, Knight M, Langhoff-Roos J, Sullivan E, et al., 'Defining definitions: a Delphi study to develop a core outcome set for conditions of severe maternal morbidity', BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, 126 394-401 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.14833
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 McCall SJ, Li Z, Kurinczuk JJ, Sullivan E, Knight M, 'Maternal and perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with BMI >50: An international collaborative study', PLoS ONE, 14 (2019)

© 2019 McCall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and repr... [more]

© 2019 McCall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Objective: To examine the association between maternal BMI>50kg/m 2 during pregnancy and maternal and perinatal outcomes. Materials and methods: An international cohort study was conducted using data from separate national studies in the UK and Australia. Outcomes of pregnant women with BMI>50 were compared to those of pregnant women with BMI<50. Multivariable logistic regression estimated the association between BMI>50 and perinatal and maternal outcomes. Results: 932 pregnant women with BMI>50 were compared with 1232 pregnant women with BMI<50. Pregnant women with BMI>50 were slightly older, more likely to be multiparous, and have pre-existing comorbidities. There were no maternal deaths, however, extremely obese women had a nine-fold increase in the odds of thrombotic events compared to those with a BMI<50 (uOR: 9.39 (95%CI:1.15-76.43)). After adjustment, a BMI>50 during pregnancy had significantly raised odds of preeclampsia/eclampsia (aOR:4.88(95%CI: 3.11-7.65)), caesarean delivery (aOR: 2.77 (95%CI: 2.31-3.32)), induction of labour (aOR: 2.45 (95% CI:2.00-2.99)) post caesarean wound infection (aOR:7.25(95%CI: 3.28-16.07)), macrosomia (aOR: 8.05(95%CI: 4.70-13.78)) compared a BMI<50. Twelve of the infants born to women in the extremely obese cohort died in the early neonatal period or were stillborn. Conclusions: Pregnant women with BMI>50 have a high risk of inferior maternal and perinatal outcomes.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0211278
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Donnolley NR, Chambers GM, Butler-Henderson KA, Chapman MG, Sullivan E, 'A validation study of the Australian Maternity Care Classification System', Women and Birth, 32 204-212 (2019)

© 2018 Australian College of Midwives Background: The Maternity Care Classification System is a novel system developed in Australia to classify models of maternity care based on t... [more]

© 2018 Australian College of Midwives Background: The Maternity Care Classification System is a novel system developed in Australia to classify models of maternity care based on their characteristics. It will enable large-scale evaluations of maternal and perinatal outcomes under different models of care independently of the model's name. Aim: To assess the accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility of the Maternity Care Classification System. Method: All 70 public maternity services in New South Wales, Australia, were invited to classify three randomly allocated model case-studies using a web-based survey tool and repeat their classifications 4¿6 weeks later. Accuracy of classifications was assessed against the correct values for the case-studies; repeatability (intra-rater reliability) was analysed by percent agreement and McNemar's test between the same participants in both surveys; and reproducibility (inter-rater reliability) was assessed by percent agreement amongst raters of the same case-study combined with Krippendorff's alpha coefficient for a subset of characteristics. Results: The accuracy of the Maternity Care Classification System was high with 90.8% of responses correctly classified; was repeatable, with no statistically significant change in the responses between the two survey instances (mean agreement 91.5%, p > 0.05 for all but one variable); and was reproducible with a mean percent agreement across 9 characteristics of 83.6% and moderate to substantial agreement as assessed by a Krippendorff's alpha coefficient of 0.4¿0.8. Conclusion: The results indicate the Maternity Care Classification System is a valid system for classifying models of care in Australia, and will enable the legitimate evaluation of outcomes by different models of care.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2018.08.161
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Lee W-S, Mihalopoulos C, Chatterton ML, Chambers GM, Highet N, Morgan VA, et al., 'Policy Impacts of the Australian National Perinatal Depression Initiative: Psychiatric Admission in the First Postnatal Year.', Administration and policy in mental health, 46 277-287 (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s10488-018-0911-9
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Vaughan G, Dawson A, Peek MJ, Carapetis JR, Sullivan EA, 'Standardizing clinical care measures of rheumatic heart disease in pregnancy: A qualitative synthesis.', Birth, (2019)
DOI 10.1111/birt.12435
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Anazodo A, Laws P, Logan S, Saunders C, Travaglia J, Gerstl B, et al., 'How can we improve oncofertility care for patients? A systematic scoping review of current international practice and models of care.', Hum Reprod Update, 25 159-179 (2019)
DOI 10.1093/humupd/dmy038
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Wang Y, Logan S, Stern K, Wakefield CE, Cohn RJ, Agresta F, et al., 'Supportive oncofertility care, psychological health and reproductive concerns: a qualitative study', Supportive Care in Cancer, (2019)

© 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Purpose: Impaired fertility in cancer patients and survivors of reproductive age (15¿45¿years) may lead to psycholog... [more]

© 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Purpose: Impaired fertility in cancer patients and survivors of reproductive age (15¿45¿years) may lead to psychological distress and poor mental health outcomes, and may negatively impact quality of life. Limited research has focused on the fertility experiences of those who have had access to supportive oncofertility care. This study aims to explore the fertility-care experiences and reproductive concerns of reproductive age cancer patients at the time of their cancer diagnosis who have had access to oncofertility care. Methods: The qualitative data from a larger mixed method study is presented, comprising 30 semi-structured telephone interviews with newly diagnosed cancer patients across Australia and New Zealand, undertaken between April 2016 and April 2018. Results: Interviews were undertaken with 9 male patients and 21 female patients aged between 15 and 44¿years. All patients recalled a discussion about fertility and majority underwent some form of fertility preservation. Thematic analysis identified five main themes: (i) satisfaction with oncofertility care, (ii) a need for individualised treatment and support, (iii) desire for parenthood, (iv) fertility treatment can be challenging, and (v) fertility preservation provides a safety net for the future. Conclusions: Participants who access supportive oncofertility care report low emotional impact of threatened future infertility at the time of cancer diagnosis. These results suggest that such services may assist in lowering the emotional burden of potential infertility in survivors. Long-term research is needed to assess the longitudinal benefits for different models of care.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-019-04883-1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Kendall S, Lighton S, Sherwood J, Baldry E, Sullivan E, 'Holistic Conceptualizations of Health by Incarcerated Aboriginal Women in New South Wales, Australia', Qualitative Health Research, (2019)

© The Author(s) 2019. While there has been extensive research on the health and social and emotional well-being (SEWB) of Aboriginal women in prison, there are few qualitative stu... [more]

© The Author(s) 2019. While there has been extensive research on the health and social and emotional well-being (SEWB) of Aboriginal women in prison, there are few qualitative studies where incarcerated Aboriginal women have been directly asked about their health, SEWB, and health care experiences. Using an Indigenous research methodology and SEWB framework, this article presents the findings of 43 interviews with incarcerated Aboriginal women in New South Wales, Australia. Drawing on the interviews, we found that Aboriginal women have holistic conceptualizations of their health and SEWB that intersect with the SEWB of family and community. Women experience clusters of health problems that intersect with intergenerational trauma, perpetuated and compounded by ongoing colonial trauma including removal of children. Women are pro-active about their health but encounter numerous challenges in accessing appropriate health care. These rarely explored perspectives can inform a reframing of health and social support needs of incarcerated Aboriginal women establishing pathways for healing.

DOI 10.1177/1049732319846162
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Cullen P, Vaughan G, Li Z, Price J, Yu D, Sullivan E, 'Counting Dead Women in Australia: An In-Depth Case Review of Femicide', JOURNAL OF FAMILY VIOLENCE, 34 1-8 (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s10896-018-9963-6
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Li Z, Wang AY, Bowman M, Hammarberg K, Farquhar C, Johnson L, et al., 'Cumulative live birth rates following a 'freeze-all' strategy: a population-based study.', Human reproduction open, 2019 hoz004 (2019)
DOI 10.1093/hropen/hoz004
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Anazodo A, Laws P, Logan S, Saunders C, Travaglia J, Gerstl B, et al., 'The Development of an International Oncofertility Competency Framework: A Model to Increase Oncofertility Implementation', Oncologist, (2019)

© AlphaMed Press 2019 Background: Despite international evidence about fertility preservation (FP), several barriers still prevent the implementation of equitable FP practice. Cur... [more]

© AlphaMed Press 2019 Background: Despite international evidence about fertility preservation (FP), several barriers still prevent the implementation of equitable FP practice. Currently, oncofertility competencies do not exist. The aim of this study was to develop an oncofertility competency framework that defines the key components of oncofertility care, develops a model for prioritizing service development, and defines the roles that health care professionals (HCPs) play. Materials and Method: A quantitative modified Delphi methodology was used to conduct two rounds of an electronic survey, querying and synthesizing opinions about statements regarding oncofertility care with HCPs and patient and family advocacy groups (PFAs) from 16 countries (12 high and 4 middle income). Statements included the roles of HCPs and priorities for service development care across ten domains (communication, oncofertility decision aids, age-appropriate care, referral pathways, documentation, oncofertility training, reproductive survivorship care and fertility-related psychosocial support, supportive care, and ethical frameworks) that represent 33 different elements of care. Results: The first questionnaire was completed by 457 participants (332 HCPs and 125 PFAs). One hundred and thirty-eight participants completed the second questionnaire (122 HCPs and 16 PFAs). Consensus was agreed on 108 oncofertility competencies and the roles HCPs should play in oncofertility care. A three-tier service development model is proposed, with gradual implementation of different components of care. A total of 92.8% of the 108 agreed competencies also had agreement between high and middle income participants. Conclusion: FP guidelines establish best practice but do not consider the skills and requirements to implement these guidelines. The competency framework gives HCPs and services a structure for the training of HCPs and implementation of care, as well as defining a model for prioritizing oncofertility service development. Implications for Practice: Despite international evidence about fertility preservation (FP), several barriers still prevent the implementation of equitable FP practice. The competency framework gives 108 competencies that will allow health care professionals (HCPs) and services a structure for the development of oncofertility care, as well as define the role HCPs play to provide care and support. The framework also proposes a three-tier oncofertility service development model which prioritizes the development of components of oncofertility care into essential, enhanced, and expert services, giving clear recommendations for service development. The competency framework will enhance the implementation of FP guidelines, improving the equitable access to medical and psychological oncofertility care.

DOI 10.1634/theoncologist.2019-0043
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Wang AY, Sullivan EA, Li Z, Farquhar C, 'Day 5 versus day 3 embryo biopsy for preimplantation genetic testing for monogenic/single gene defects', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2018 (2018)

© 2018 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the... [more]

© 2018 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the benefits and harms of day 5 embryo biopsy, in comparison to day 3 biopsy, in preimplantation genetic testing for monogenic/single gene defects (PGT-M).

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD013233
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Kendall S, Redshaw S, Ward S, Wayland S, Sullivan E, 'Systematic review of qualitative evaluations of reentry programs addressing problematic drug use and mental health disorders amongst people transitioning from prison to communities', Health and Justice, 6 (2018)

© 2018, The Author(s). Background: The paper presents a systematic review and metasynthesis of findings from qualitative evaluations of community reentry programs. The programs so... [more]

© 2018, The Author(s). Background: The paper presents a systematic review and metasynthesis of findings from qualitative evaluations of community reentry programs. The programs sought to engage recently released adult prison inmates with either problematic drug use or a mental health disorder. Methods: Seven biomedical and social science databases, Cinahl, Pubmed, Scopus, Proquest, Medline, Sociological abstracts and Web of Science and publisher database Taylor and Francis were searched in 2016 resulting in 2373 potential papers. Abstract reviews left 140 papers of which 8 were included after detailed review. Major themes and subthemes were identified through grounded theory inductive analysis of results from the eight papers. Of the final eight papers the majority (6) were from the United States. In total, the papers covered 405 interviews and included 121 (30%) females and 284 (70%) males. Results: Findings suggest that the interpersonal skills of case workers; access to social support and housing; and continuity of case worker relationships throughout the pre-release and post-release period are key social and structural factors in program success. Conclusion: Evaluation of community reentry programs requires qualitative data to contextualize statistical findings and identify social and structural factors that impact on reducing incarceration and improving participant health. These aspects of program efficacy have implications for reentry program development and staff training and broader social and health policy and services.

DOI 10.1186/s40352-018-0063-8
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Zeki R, Wang AY, Lui K, Li Z, Oats JJN, Homer CSE, Sullivan EA, 'Neonatal outcomes of live-born term singletons in vertex presentation born to mothers with diabetes during pregnancy by mode of birth: a New South Wales population-based retrospective cohort study.', BMJ paediatrics open, 2 e000224 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjpo-2017-000224
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Belton S, Kruske S, Pulver LJ, Sherwood J, Tune K, Carapetis J, et al., 'Rheumatic heart disease in pregnancy: How can health services adapt to the needs of Indigenous women? A qualitative study', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 58 425-431 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/ajo.12744
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Say L, Chou D, 'Maternal morbidity: Time for reflection, recognition, and action', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS, 141 1-3 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/ijgo.12499
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Filippi V, Chou D, Barreix M, Say L, 'A new conceptual framework for maternal morbidity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS, 141 4-9 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/ijgo.12463
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Barreix M, Barbour K, McCaw-Binns A, Chou D, Petzold M, Gichuhi GN, et al., 'Standardizing the measurement of maternal morbidity: Pilot study results', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS, 141 10-19 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/ijgo.12464
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Silveira C, Souza RT, Costa ML, Parpinelli MA, Pacagnella RC, Ferreira EC, et al., 'Validation of the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS 2.0) 12-item tool against the 36-item version for measuring functioning and disability associated with pregnancy and history of severe maternal morbidity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS, 141 39-47 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/ijgo.12465
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Mayrink J, Souza RT, Silveira C, Guida JP, Costa ML, Parpinelli MA, et al., 'Reference ranges of the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS 2.0) score and diagnostic validity of its 12-item version in identifying altered functioning in healthy postpartum women', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS, 141 48-54 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/ijgo.12466
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Guida JP, Costa ML, Parpinelli MA, Pacagnella RC, Ferreira EC, Mayrink J, et al., 'The impact of hypertension, hemorrhage, and other maternal morbidities on functioning in the postpartum period as assessed by the WHODAS 2.0 36-item tool', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS, 141 55-60 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/ijgo.12467
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Firoz T, McCaw-Binns A, Filippi V, Magee LA, Costa ML, Cecatti JG, et al., 'A framework for healthcare interventions to address maternal morbidity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS, 141 61-68 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/ijgo.12469
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Chambers GM, Randall S, Mihalopoulos C, Reilly N, Sullivan EA, Highet N, et al., 'Mental health consultations in the perinatal period: a cost-analysis of Medicare services provided to women during a period of intense mental health reform in Australia', AUSTRALIAN HEALTH REVIEW, 42 514-521 (2018)
DOI 10.1071/AH17118
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan, Nicole Reilly
2018 Chughtai AA, Wang AY, Hilder L, Li Z, Lui K, Farquhar C, Sullivan EA, 'Gestational age-specific perinatal mortality rates for assisted reproductive technology (ART) and other births', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 33 320-327 (2018)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/dex340
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Li Z, Wang AY, Bowman M, Hammarberg K, Farquhar C, Johnson L, et al., 'ICSI does not increase the cumulative live birth rate in non-male factor infertility', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 33 1322-1330 (2018)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/dey118
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Hammarberg K, Sullivan E, Javid N, Duncombe G, Halliday L, Boyle F, et al., 'Health care experiences among women diagnosed with gestational breast cancer', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER CARE, 27 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12682
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Zeki R, Oats JJN, Wang AY, Li Z, Homer CSE, Sullivan EA, 'Cesarean section and diabetes during pregnancy: An NSW population study using the Robson classification', JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY RESEARCH, 44 890-898 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/jog.13605
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Wang AY, Safi N, Ali F, Lu K, Li Z, Umstad MP, Sullivan EA, 'Neonatal outcomes among twins following assisted reproductive technology: an Australian population-based retrospective cohort study', BMC PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH, 18 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s12884-018-1949-0
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Xu F, Roberts L, Binns C, Sullivan E, Homer CSE, 'Anaemia and depression before and after birth: a cohort study based on linked population data', BMC PSYCHIATRY, 18 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s12888-018-1796-6
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Coombes J, Hunter K, Mackean T, Holland AJA, Sullivan E, Ivers R, 'Factors that impact access to ongoing health care for First Nation children with a chronic condition', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 18 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3263-y
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Gerstl B, Sullivan E, Ives A, Saunders C, Wand H, Anazodo A, 'Pregnancy Outcomes After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis', CLINICAL BREAST CANCER, 18 E79-E88 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.clbc.2017.06.016
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Jones J, Wilson M, Sullivan E, Atkinson L, Gilles M, Simpson PL, et al., 'Australian Aboriginal women prisoners' experiences of being a mother: a review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PRISONER HEALTH, 14 221-231 (2018)
DOI 10.1108/IJPH-12-2017-0059
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Vaughan G, Tune K, Peek MJ, Pulver LJ, Remenyi B, Belton S, Sullivan EA, 'Rheumatic heart disease in pregnancy: strategies and lessons learnt implementing a population-based study in Australia', INTERNATIONAL HEALTH, 10 480-489 (2018)
DOI 10.1093/inthealth/ihy048
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 McCall SJ, Li Z, Kurinczuk JJ, Sullivan E, Knight M, 'Binational cohort study comparing the management and outcomes of pregnant women with a BMI \ 50-59.9 kg/m(2) and those with a BMI \= 60 kg/m(2)', BMJ OPEN, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-021055
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Dawson AJ, Krastev Y, Parsonage WA, Peek M, Lust K, Sullivan EA, 'Experiences of women with cardiac disease in pregnancy: a systematic review and metasynthesis', BMJ OPEN, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022755
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Gerstl B, Sullivan E, Chong S, Chia D, Wand H, Anazodo A, 'Reproductive Outcomes After a Childhood and Adolescent Young Adult Cancer Diagnosis in Female Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis', JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT ONCOLOGY, 7 627-642 (2018)
DOI 10.1089/jayao.2018.0036
Co-authors E Sullivan
2017 Donnolley NR, Chambers GM, Butler-Henderson KA, Chapman MG, Sullivan EA, 'More than a name: Heterogeneity in characteristics of models of maternity care reported from the Australian Maternity Care Classification System validation study', Women and Birth, 30 332-341 (2017)

© 2017 Australian College of Midwives Background Without a standard terminology to classify models of maternity care, it is problematic to compare and evaluate clinical outcomes a... [more]

© 2017 Australian College of Midwives Background Without a standard terminology to classify models of maternity care, it is problematic to compare and evaluate clinical outcomes across different models. The Maternity Care Classification System is a novel system developed in Australia to classify models of maternity care based on their characteristics and an overarching broad model descriptor (Major Model Category). Aim This study aimed to assess the extent of variability in the defining characteristics of models of care grouped to the same Major Model Category, using the Maternity Care Classification System. Method All public hospital maternity services in New South Wales, Australia, were invited to complete a web-based survey classifying two local models of care using the Maternity Care Classification System. A descriptive analysis of the variation in 15 attributes of models of care was conducted to evaluate the level of heterogeneity within and across Major Model Categories. Results Sixty-nine out of seventy hospitals responded, classifying 129 models of care. There was wide variation in a number of important attributes of models classified to the same Major Model Category. The category of ¿Public hospital maternity care¿ contained the most variation across all characteristics. Conclusion This study demonstrated that although models of care can be grouped into a distinct set of Major Model Categories, there are significant variations in models of the same type. This could result in seemingly ¿like¿ models of care being incorrectly compared if grouped only by the Major Model Category.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2017.01.005
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2017 Wang AY, Chughtai AA, Lui K, Sullivan EA, 'Morbidity and mortality among very preterm singletons following fertility treatment in Australia and New Zealand, a population cohort study', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 17 (2017)

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Due to high rates of multiple birth and preterm birth following fertility treatment, the rates of mortality and morbidity among births following ... [more]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Due to high rates of multiple birth and preterm birth following fertility treatment, the rates of mortality and morbidity among births following fertility treatment were higher than those conceived spontaneously. However, it is unclear whether the rates of adverse neonatal outcomes remain higher for very preterm (<32 weeks gestational age) singletons born after fertility treatment. This study aims to compare adverse neonatal outcomes among very preterm singletons born after fertility treatment including assisted reproductive technology (ART) hyper-ovulution (HO) and artificial insemination (AI) to those following spontaneous conception. Methods: The population cohort study included 24069 liveborn very preterm singletons who were admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Australia and New Zealand from 2000 to 2010. The in-hospital neonatal mortality and morbidity among 21753 liveborn very preterm singletons were compared by maternal mode of conceptions: spontaneous conception, HO, ART and AI. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between mode of conception and various outcome factors. Odds ratio (OR) and adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Results: The rate of small for gestational age was significantly higher in HO group (AOR 1.52, 95% CI 1.02-2.67) and AI group (AOR 2.98, 95% CI 1.53-5.81) than spontaneous group. The rate of birth defect was significantly higher in ART group (AOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.36-2.16) and AI group (AOR 3.01, 95% CI 1.47-6.19) compared to spontaneous group. Singletons following ART had 43% increased odds of necrotizing enterocolitis (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 1.04-1.97) and 71% increased odds of major surgery (AOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.37-2.13) compared to singletons conceived spontaneously. Other birth and NICU outcomes were not different among the comparison groups. Conclusions: Compared to the spontaneous conception group, risk of congenital abnormality significantly increases after ART and AI; the risk of morbidities increases after ART, HO and AI. Preconception planning should include comprehensive information about the benefits and risks of fertility treatment on the neonatal outcomes.

DOI 10.1186/s12884-017-1235-6
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors E Sullivan
2017 VanderKruik R, Barreix M, Chou D, Allen T, Say L, Cohen LS, et al., 'The global prevalence of postpartum psychosis: A systematic review', BMC Psychiatry, 17 (2017)

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Mental health is a significant contributor to global burden of disease and the consequences of perinatal psychiatric morbidity can be substantial... [more]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Mental health is a significant contributor to global burden of disease and the consequences of perinatal psychiatric morbidity can be substantial. We aimed to obtain global estimates of puerperal psychosis prevalence based on population-based samples and to understand how postpartum psychosis is assessed and captured among included studies. Methods: In June 2014, we searched PubMed, CiNAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Sociological Collections, and Global Index Medicus for publications since the year 1990. Criteria for inclusion in the systematic review were: use of primary data relevant to pre-defined mental health conditions, specified dates of data collection, limited to data from 1990 onwards, sample size >200 and a clear description of methodology. Data were extracted from published peer reviewed articles. Results: The search yielded 24,273 publications, of which six studies met the criteria. Five studies reported incidence of puerperal psychosis (ranging from 0.89 to 2.6 in 1000 women) and one reported prevalence of psychosis (5 in 1000). Due to the heterogeneity of methodologies used across studies in definitions and assessments used to identify cases, data was not pooled to calculate a global estimate of risk. Conclusions: This review confirms the relatively low rate of puerperal psychosis; yet given the potential for serious consequences, this morbidity is significant from a global public health perspective. Further attention to consistent detection of puerperal psychosis can help provide appropriate treatment to prevent harmful consequences for both mother and baby.

DOI 10.1186/s12888-017-1427-7
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors E Sullivan
2017 Xu F, Sullivan EA, Forero R, Homer CSE, 'The association of Emergency Department presentations in pregnancy with hospital admissions for postnatal depression (PND): a cohort study based on linked population data', BMC emergency medicine, 17 12 (2017)

BACKGROUND: To investigate the impact of presenting to an Emergency Department (ED) during pregnancy on postnatal depression (PND) in women in New South Wales (NSW), Australia.MET... [more]

BACKGROUND: To investigate the impact of presenting to an Emergency Department (ED) during pregnancy on postnatal depression (PND) in women in New South Wales (NSW), Australia.METHOD: An epidemiological population-based study using linked data from the NSW Emergency Department Data Collection (EDDC), the NSW Perinatal Data Collection (PDC) and the NSW Admitted Patients Data Collection (APDC) was conducted. Women who gave birth to their first child in NSW between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2010 were followed up from pregnancy to the end of the first year after birth.RESULTS: The study population includes 154,328 women who gave birth to their first child in NSW between 2006 and 2010. Of these, 31,764 women (20.58%) presented to ED during pregnancy (95%CI¿=¿20.38-20.78). Women who presented to ED during pregnancy were more likely to be admitted to hospital for the diagnosis of unipolar depression (the adjusted relative risk (RR) =1.86, 95%CI¿=¿1.49-2.31) and the diagnosis of mild mental and behavioural disorders associated with the puerperium (the adjusted RR¿=¿1.55, 95%CI¿=¿1.29-1.87) than those without ED presentation.CONCLUSION: Women's hospital admissions for postnatal depression were associated with frequent ED presentations during pregnancy.

DOI 10.1186/s12873-017-0123-8
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2017 Farquhar CM, Li Z, Lensen S, McLintock C, Pollock W, Peek MJ, et al., 'Incidence, risk factors and perinatal outcomes for placenta accreta in Australia and New Zealand: A case-control study', BMJ Open, 7 (2017)

© Article author(s) 2017. Objective Estimate the incidence of placenta accreta and describe risk factors, clinical practice and perinatal outcomes. Design Case-control study. Sett... [more]

© Article author(s) 2017. Objective Estimate the incidence of placenta accreta and describe risk factors, clinical practice and perinatal outcomes. Design Case-control study. Setting Sites in Australia and New Zealand with at least 50 births per year. Participants Cases were women giving birth (=20 weeks or fetus =400 g) who were diagnosed with placenta accreta by antenatal imaging, at operation or by pathology specimens between 2010 and 2012. Controls were two births immediately prior to a case. A total of 295 cases were included and 570 controls. Methods Data were collected using the Australasian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System. Primary and secondary outcome measures Incidence, risk factors (eg, prior caesarean section (CS), maternal age) and clinical outcomes of placenta accreta (eg CS, hysterectomy and death). Results The incidence of placenta accreta was 44.2/100 000 women giving birth (95% CI 39.4 to 49.5); however, this may overestimated due to the case definition used. In primiparous women, an increased odds of placenta accreta was observed in older women (adjusted OR (AOR) women=40 vs <30: 19.1, 95% CI 4.6 to 80.3) and current multiple birth (AOR: 6.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 34.1). In multiparous women, independent risk factors were prior CS (AOR =2 prior sections vs 0: 13.8, 95% CI 7.4 to 26.1) and current placenta praevia (AOR: 36.3, 95% CI 14.0 to 93.7). There were two maternal deaths (case fatality rate 0.7%). Women with placenta accreta were more likely to have a caesarean section (AOR: 4.6, 95% CI 2.7 to 7.6) to be admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU)/high dependency unit (AOR: 46.1, 95% CI 22.3 to 95.4) and to have a hysterectomy (AOR: 209.0, 95% CI 19.9 to 875.0). Babies born to women with placenta accreta were more likely to be preterm, be admitted to neonatal ICU and require resuscitation.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017713
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors E Sullivan
2017 Dawson AJ, Nicolls R, Bateson D, Doab A, Estoesta J, Brassil A, Sullivan EA, 'Medical termination of pregnancy in general practice in Australia: A descriptive-interpretive qualitative study', Reproductive Health, 14 (2017)

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Australian Government approval in 2012 for the use of mifepristone and misoprostol for medical termination of pregnancy (MTOP) allows general pra... [more]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Australian Government approval in 2012 for the use of mifepristone and misoprostol for medical termination of pregnancy (MTOP) allows general practitioners (GPs) to provide early gestation abortion in primary care settings. However, uptake of the MTOP provision by GPs appears to be low and the reasons for this have been unclear. This study investigated the provision of and referral for MTOP by GPs. Methods: We undertook descriptive-interpretive qualitative research and selected participants for diversity using a matrix. Twenty-eight semi-structured interviews and one focus group (N = 4), were conducted with 32 GPs (8 MTOP providers, 24 non MTOP providers) in New South Wales, Australia. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. A framework to examine access to abortion services was used to develop the interview questions and emergent themes identified thematically. Results: Three main themes emerged: scope of practice; MTOP demand, care and referral; and workforce needs. Many GPs saw abortion as beyond the scope of their practice (i.e. a service others provide in specialist private clinics). Some GPs had religious or moral objections; others regarded MTOP provision as complicated and difficult. While some GPs expressed interest in MTOP provision they were concerned about stigma and the impact it may have on perceptions of their practice and the views of colleagues. Despite a reported variance in demand most MTOP providers were busy but felt isolated. Difficulties in referral to a local public hospital in the case of complications or the provision of surgical abortion were noted. Conclusions: Exploring the factors which affect access to MTOP in general practice settings provides insights to assist the future planning and delivery of reproductive health services. This research identifies the need for support to increase the number of MTOP GP providers and for GPs who are currently providing MTOP. Alongside these actions provision in the public sector is required. In addition, formalised referral pathways to the public sector are required to ensure timely care in the case of complications or the provision of surgical options. Leadership and coordination across the health sector is needed to facilitate integrated abortion care particularly for rural and low income women.

DOI 10.1186/s12978-017-0303-8
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors E Sullivan
2017 Wilson M, Jones J, Butler T, Simpson P, Gilles M, Baldry E, et al., 'Violence in the lives of incarcerated aboriginal mothers in Western Australia', SAGE Open, 7 (2017)

© The Author(s) 2017. Drawing on in-depth interviews with incarcerated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers in Western Australia, we report on the women¿s use of violence... [more]

© The Author(s) 2017. Drawing on in-depth interviews with incarcerated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers in Western Australia, we report on the women¿s use of violence in their relationships with others. Results reinforce that Aboriginal women are overwhelmingly victims of violence; however, many women report also using violence, primarily as a strategy to deal with their own high levels of victimization. The ¿normalization¿ of violence in their lives and communities places them at high risk of arrest and incarceration. This is compounded by a widespread distrust of the criminal justice system and associated agencies, and a lack of options for community support.

DOI 10.1177/2158244016686814
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors E Sullivan
2017 Sullivan EA, Javid N, Duncombe G, Li Z, Safi N, Cincotta R, et al., 'Vasa Previa Diagnosis, Clinical Practice, and Outcomes in Australia', Obstetrics and Gynecology, 130 591-598 (2017)

Copyright © by The American College of Obstetricians. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence of women with vasa previa in Australia and to describe risk factors, timing of diagnosis... [more]

Copyright © by The American College of Obstetricians. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence of women with vasa previa in Australia and to describe risk factors, timing of diagnosis, clinical practice, and perinatal outcomes. METHODS: A prospective population-based cohort study was undertaken using the Australasian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System between May 1, 2013, and April 30, 2014, in hospitals in Australia with greater than 50 births per year. Women were included if they were diagnosed with vasa previa during pregnancy or childbirth, confirmed by clinical examination or placental pathology. The main outcome measures included stillbirth, neonatal death, cesarean delivery, and preterm birth. RESULTS: Sixty-three women had a confirmed diagnosis of vasa previa. The estimated incidence was 2.1 per 10,000 women giving birth (95% CI 1.7-2.7). Fifty-eight women were diagnosed prenatally and all had a cesarean delivery. Fifty-five (95%) of the 58 women had at least one risk factor for vasa previa with velamentous cord insertion (62%) and low-lying placenta (60%) the most prevalent. There were no perinatal deaths in women diagnosed prenatally. For the five women with vasa previa not diagnosed prenatally, there were two perinatal deaths with a case fatality rate of 40%. One woman had an antepartum stillbirth and delivered vaginally and the other four women had cesarean deliveries categorized as urgent threat to the life of a fetus with one neonatal death. The overall perinatal case fatality rate was 3.1% (95% CI 0.8-10.5). Two thirds (68%) of the 65 neonates were preterm and 29% were low birth weight. CONCLUSION: The outcomes for neonates in which vasa previa was not diagnosed prenatally were inferior with higher rates of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Our study shows a high rate of prenatal diagnosis of vasa previa in Australia and associated good outcomes.

DOI 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002198
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Wardle J, Frawley J, Steel A, Sullivan E, 'Complementary medicine and childhood immunisation: A critical review', Vaccine, 34 4484-4500 (2016)

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Background Vaccination is one of the most significant and successful public health measures of recent times. Whilst the use of complementary medicine (CM) cont... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Background Vaccination is one of the most significant and successful public health measures of recent times. Whilst the use of complementary medicine (CM) continues to grow, it has been suggested that CM practitioners hold anti-vaccination views. The objective of this critical review is to examine the evidence base in relation to CM practitioner attitudes to childhood vaccination alongside attitudes to vaccination among parents who visit CM practitioners and/or use CM products. Methods A database search was conducted in MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE and AMED for research articles published between January 2000 and September 2015 that evaluated either CM practitioner or CM user attitudes and intention towards childhood vaccination. Results A total of 23 articles were found that detailed the attitudes of CM practitioners to vaccination. A further 16 papers examined the association between the use of CM products and visits to CM practitioners, and immunisation. The interface between CM and vaccination is complex, multi-factorial and often highly individualised. The articles suggest that there is no default position on immunisation by CM practitioners or parents who use CM themselves, or for their children. Although CM use does seem positively associated with lower vaccination uptake, this may be confounded by other factors associated with CM use (such as higher income, higher education or distrust of the medical system), and may not necessarily indicate independent or predictive relationships. Conclusions Although anti-vaccination sentiment is significant amongst some CM practitioners, this review uncovers a more nuanced picture, and one that may be more agreeable to public health values than formerly assumed.

DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.07.026
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Wang AY, Dill SK, Bowman M, Sullivan EA, 'Gestational surrogacy in Australia 2004-2011: Treatment, pregnancy and birth outcomes', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 56 255-259 (2016)

© 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Background Information on gestational surrogacy arrangement and outcomes is limited in Aus... [more]

© 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Background Information on gestational surrogacy arrangement and outcomes is limited in Australia. Aims This national population study investigates the epidemiology of gestational surrogacy arrangement in Australia: treatment procedures, pregnancy and birth outcomes. Materials and methods A retrospective study was conducted of 169 intended parents cycles and 388 gestational carrier cycles in Australia in 2004-2011. Demographics were compared between intended parents and gestational carrier cycles. Pregnancy and birth outcomes were compared by number of embryos transferred. Results Over half (54%) intended parents cycles were in women aged <35 years compared to 38% of gestational carrier cycles. About 77% of intended parents cycles were of nulliparous women compared to 29% of gestational carrier cycles. Of the 360 embryo transfer cycles, 91% had cryopreserved embryos transferred and 69% were single-embryo transfer (SET) cycles. The rates of clinical pregnancy and live delivery were 26% and 19%, respectively. There were no differences in rates of clinical pregnancy and live delivery between SET cycles (27% and 19%) and double-embryo transfer (DET) cycles (25% and 19%). Five of 22 deliveries following DET were twin deliveries compared to none of 48 deliveries following SET. There were 73 liveborn babies following gestational surrogacy treatment, including 9 liveborn twins. Of these, 22% (16) were preterm and 14% (10) were low birthweight. Preterm birth was 13% for liveborn babies following SET, lower than the 31% or liveborn babies following DET. Conclusions To avoid adverse outcomes for both carriers and babies, SET should be advocated in all gestational surrogacy arrangements.

DOI 10.1111/ajo.12451
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Wang YA, Chughtai AA, Farquhar CM, Pollock W, Lui K, Sullivan EA, 'Increased incidence of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia after assisted reproductive technology treatment', Fertility and Sterility, 105 920-926.e2 (2016)

© 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Objective To determine the association between assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and the rate of combined gestati... [more]

© 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Objective To determine the association between assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and the rate of combined gestational hypertension (GH), preeclampsia (PE). Design Retrospective population study. Setting Not applicable. Patient(s) A total of 596,520 mothers (3.6% ART mothers) who gave birth between 2007 and 2011. Intervention(s) Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) Comparison of the rate of GH/PE for ART and non-ART mothers, with odds ratio (OR), adjusted odds ratio (AOR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) used to assess the association between ART and GH/PE. Result(s) The overall rate of GH/PE was 4.3%, with 6.4% for ART mothers and 4.3% for non-ART mothers. The rate of GH/PE was higher for mothers of twins than singletons (12.4% vs. 5.7% for ART mothers; 8.6% vs. 4.2% for non-ART mothers). The ART mothers had a 17% increased odds of GH/PE compared with the non-ART mothers (AOR 1.17; 95% CI, 1.10-1.24). After stratification by plurality, the difference in GH/PE rates between ART and non-ART mothers was not statistically significant, with AOR 1.05 (95% CI, 0.98-1.12) for mothers of singletons and AOR 1.10 (95% CI, 0.94-1.30) for mothers of twins. Conclusion(s) The changes in AOR after stratification indicated that multiple pregnancies after ART are the single most likely explanation for the increased rate of GH/PE among ART mothers. The lower rate of GH/PE among mothers of singletons compared with mothers of twins suggests that a policy to minimize multiple pregnancies after ART may reduce the excess risk of GH/PE due to ART treatment.

DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2015.12.024
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 20
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Reid S, Bajuk B, Lui K, Sullivan EA, 'Comparing CRIB-II and SNAPPE-II as mortality predictors for very preterm infants', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 51 524-528 (2016)

© 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians). Aims This article compares the severity of illness scoring systems clinical risk index for... [more]

© 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians). Aims This article compares the severity of illness scoring systems clinical risk index for babies (CRIB)-II and score for neonatal acute physiology with perinatal extension (SNAPPE)-II for discriminatory ability and goodness of fit in the same cohort of babies of less than 32 weeks gestation and aims to provide validation in the Australian population. Methods CRIB-II and SNAPPE-II scores were collected on the same cohort of preterm infants born within a 2-year period, 2003 and 2004. The discriminatory ability of each score was assessed by the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, and goodness of fit was assessed by the Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) test. The outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. A multivariate logistic regression model was tested for perinatal variables that might add to the risk of in-hospital mortality. Results Data for both scores were available for 1607 infants. Both scores had good discriminatory ability (CRIB-II area under the curve 0.913, standard error (SE) 0.014; SNAPPE-II area under the curve 0.907, SE 0.012) and adequate goodness of fit (HL ¿2 = 11.384, 8 degrees of freedom, P = 0.183 for CRIB-II; HL ¿2 = 4.319, 7 degrees of freedom, P = 0.742 for SNAPPE-II). The multivariate model did not reveal other significant variables. Conclusions Both severity of illness scores are ascertained during the first 12 h of life and perform similarly. Both can facilitate risk-adjusted comparisons of mortality and quality of care after the first post-natal 12 h. CRIB-II scores have the advantage of being simpler to collect and calculate.

DOI 10.1111/jpc.12742
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Souza JP, Betran AP, Dumont A, De Mucio B, Gibbs Pickens CM, Deneux-Tharaux C, et al., 'A global reference for caesarean section rates (C-Model): A multicountry cross-sectional study', BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 123 427-436 (2016)

© 2015 World Health Organization; licensed by John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Objective To generate a global reference ... [more]

© 2015 World Health Organization; licensed by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Objective To generate a global reference for caesarean section (CS) rates at health facilities. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Health facilities from 43 countries. Population/Sample Thirty eight thousand three hundred and twenty-four women giving birth from 22 countries for model building and 10 045 875 women giving birth from 43 countries for model testing. Methods We hypothesised that mathematical models could determine the relationship between clinical-obstetric characteristics and CS. These models generated probabilities of CS that could be compared with the observed CS rates. We devised a three-step approach to generate the global benchmark of CS rates at health facilities: creation of a multi-country reference population, building mathematical models, and testing these models. Main outcome measures Area under the ROC curves, diagnostic odds ratio, expected CS rate, observed CS rate. Results According to the different versions of the model, areas under the ROC curves suggested a good discriminatory capacity of C-Model, with summary estimates ranging from 0.832 to 0.844. The C-Model was able to generate expected CS rates adjusted for the case-mix of the obstetric population. We have also prepared an e-calculator to facilitate use of C-Model (www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/maternal-perinatal-health/c-model/en/). Conclusions This article describes the development of a global reference for CS rates. Based on maternal characteristics, this tool was able to generate an individualised expected CS rate for health facilities or groups of health facilities. With C-Model, obstetric teams, health system managers, health facilities, health insurance companies, and governments can produce a customised reference CS rate for assessing use (and overuse) of CS. Tweetable abstract The C-Model provides a customized benchmark for caesarean section rates in health facilities and systems.

DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.13509
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 19
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Donnolley N, Butler-Henderson K, Chapman M, Sullivan E, 'The development of a classification system for maternity models of care', Health Information Management Journal, 45 64-70 (2016)

© The Author(s) 2016. Background: A lack of standard terminology or means to identify and define models of maternity care in Australia has prevented accurate evaluations of outcom... [more]

© The Author(s) 2016. Background: A lack of standard terminology or means to identify and define models of maternity care in Australia has prevented accurate evaluations of outcomes for mothers and babies in different models of maternity care. Objective: As part of the Commonwealth-funded National Maternity Data Development Project, a classification system was developed utilising a data set specification that defines characteristics of models of maternity care. Method: The Maternity Care Classification System or MaCCS was developed using a participatory action research design that built upon the published and grey literature. Results: The study identified the characteristics that differentiate models of care and classifies models into eleven different Major Model Categories. Conclusion: The MaCCS will enable individual health services, local health districts (networks), jurisdictional and national health authorities to make better informed decisions for planning, policy development and delivery of maternity services in Australia.

DOI 10.1177/1833358316639454
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Xu F, Sullivan E, Binns C, Homer CSE, 'Mental disorders in new parents before and after birth: a population-based cohort study.', BJPsych Open, 2 233-243 (2016)
DOI 10.1192/bjpo.bp.116.002790
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Betran AP, Torloni MR, Zhang JJ, Gülmezoglu AM, WHO Working Group on Caesarean Section, 'WHO Statement on Caesarean Section Rates.', BJOG, 123 667-670 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.13526
Citations Web of Science - 117
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Anazodo AC, Stern CJ, Mclachlan RI, Gerstl B, Agresta F, Cohn RJ, et al., 'A study protocol for the australasian oncofertility registry: Monitoring referral patterns and the uptake, quality, and complications of fertility preservation strategies in Australia and New Zealand', Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology, 5 215-225 (2016)

© 2016, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment in patients of a reproductive age have led to significant improvements in survival rates; however, a ... [more]

© 2016, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment in patients of a reproductive age have led to significant improvements in survival rates; however, a patient's fertility can be affected by both cancer and its treatment. As survival rates improve, there is an expectation by clinicians and patients that patient's reproductive potential should be considered and protected as much as possible. However, there is a lack of data about current fertility preservation (FP) uptake as well as accurate data on the acute or permanent reproductive risks of cancer treatment, complications of FP in cancer patients, and the use and success of assisted reproductive technology by cancer survivors. FP remains a major gap in acute cancer management with lifelong implications for cancer survivors. The FUTuRE Fertility research team has established the first binational multisite Australasian Oncofertility Registry, which is collecting a complete oncofertility data set from cancer and fertility centers in Australia and New Zealand. Outcomes from the research study will monitor referral, uptake, and complications of FP, document patient's reproductive potential after treatment, and collect data on the use of assisted reproductive technology following cancer treatment. The data will be linked to other routine health and administrative data sets to allow for other research projects to be carried out. The changes in oncofertility care will be benchmarked against the Australasian Oncofertility Charter. The data will be used to develop evidence-based guidelines and resources, including development of accurate risk projections for patients' risk of infertility, allowing clinicians to make recommendations for FP or assisted reproductive technology.

DOI 10.1089/jayao.2015.0062
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Anazodo AC, Gerstl B, Stern CJ, Mclachlan RI, Agresta F, Jayasinghe Y, et al., 'Utilizing the experience of consumers in consultation to develop the australasian oncofertility consortium charter', Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology, 5 232-239 (2016)

© 2016, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Purpose: In Australia and New Zealand, there has not been a national systematic development of oncofertility services for cancer patients of reprodu... [more]

© 2016, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Purpose: In Australia and New Zealand, there has not been a national systematic development of oncofertility services for cancer patients of reproductive age although many cancer and fertility centers have independently developed services. A number of barriers exist to the development of these services, including a lack of clear referral pathways, a lack of communication between clinicians and patients about fertility preservation, differences in the knowledge base of clinicians about the risk of cancer treatment causing infertility and fertility preservation options, a lack of national health insurance funding covering all aspects of fertility preservation, and storage costs and cultural, religious, and ethical barriers. The development of strategies to overcome these barriers is a high priority for oncofertility care to ensure that equitable access to the best standard of care is available for all patients. Method: The FUTuRE Fertility Research Group led a collaborative consultation process with the Australasian Oncofertility Consumer group and oncofertility specialists to explore consumers' experiences of oncofertility care. Consumers participated in qualitative focus group meetings to define and develop a model of consumer driven or informed "gold standard oncofertility care" with the aim of putting together a Charter that specifically described this. Conclusions: The finalized Australasian Oncofertility Consortium Charter documents eight key elements of gold standard oncofertility care that will be used to monitor the implementation of oncofertility services nationally, to ensure that these key elements are incorporated into standard practice over time.

DOI 10.1089/jayao.2015.0056
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Chambers GM, Randall S, Hoang VP, Sullivan EA, Highet N, Croft M, et al., 'The National Perinatal Depression Initiative: An evaluation of access to general practitioners, psychologists and psychiatrists through the Medicare Benefits Schedule', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 50 264-274 (2016)

© 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Objective: To evaluate the impact of the National Perinatal Depression Initiative on access to Medicare servi... [more]

© 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Objective: To evaluate the impact of the National Perinatal Depression Initiative on access to Medicare services for women at risk of perinatal mental illness. Method: Retrospective cohort study using difference-in-difference analytical methods to quantify the impact of the National Perinatal Depression Initiative policies on Medicare Benefits Schedule mental health usage by Australian women giving birth between 2006 and 2010. A random sample of women of reproductive age enrolled in Medicare who had not given birth where used as controls. The main outcome measures were the proportions of women giving birth each month who accessed a Medicare Benefits Schedule mental health items during the perinatal period (pregnancy through to the end of the first postnatal year) before and after the introduction of the National Perinatal Depression Initiative. Results: The proportion of women giving birth who accessed at least one mental health item during the perinatal period increased from 88 to 141 per 1000 between 2007 and 2010. The difference-in-difference analysis showed that while there was an overall increase in Medicare Benefits Schedule mental health item access as a result of the National Perinatal Depression Initiative, this did not reach statistical significance. However, the National Perinatal Depression Initiative was found to significantly increase access in subpopulations of women, particularly those aged under 25 and over 34 years living in major cities. Conclusion: In the 2 years following its introduction, the National Perinatal Depression Initiative was found to have increased access to Medicare funded mental health services in particular groups of women. However, an overall increase across all groups did not reach statistical significance. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of the National Perinatal Depression Initiative on women during childbearing years, including access to tertiary care, the cost-effectiveness of the initiative, and mental health outcomes. It is recommended that new mental health policy initiatives incorporate a planned strategic approach to evaluation, which includes sufficient follow-up to assess the impact of public health strategies.

DOI 10.1177/0004867415580154
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors E Sullivan, Nicole Reilly
2016 Dawson A, Bateson D, Estoesta J, Sullivan E, 'Towards comprehensive early abortion service delivery in high income countries: Insights for improving universal access to abortion in Australia', BMC Health Services Research, 16 (2016)

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Improving access to safe abortion is an essential strategy in the provision of universal access to reproductive health care. Australians are larg... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Improving access to safe abortion is an essential strategy in the provision of universal access to reproductive health care. Australians are largely supportive of the provision of abortion and its decriminalization. However, the lack of data and the complex legal and service delivery situation impacts upon access for women seeking an early termination of pregnancy. There are no systematic reviews from a health services perspective to help direct health planners and policy makers to improve access comprehensive medical and early surgical abortion in high income countries. This review therefore aims to identify quality studies of abortion services to provide insight into how access to services can be improved in Australia. Methods: We undertook a structured search of six bibliographic databases and hand-searching to ascertain peer reviewed primary research in English between 2005 and 2015. Qualitative and quantitative study designs were deemed suitable for inclusion. A deductive content analysis methodology was employed to analyse selected manuscripts based upon a framework we developed to examine access to early abortion services. Results: This review identified the dimensions of access to surgical and medical abortion at clinic or hospital-outpatient based abortion services, as well as new service delivery approaches utilising a remote telemedicine approach. A range of factors, mostly from studies in the United Kingdom and United States of America were found to facilitate improved access to abortion, in particular, flexible service delivery approaches that provide women with cost effective options and technology based services. Standards, recommendations and targets were also identified that provided services and providers with guidance regarding the quality of abortion care. Conclusions: Key insights for service delivery in Australia include the: establishment of standards, provision of choice of procedure, improved provider education and training and the expansion of telemedicine for medical abortion. However, to implement such directives leadership is required from Australian medical, nursing, midwifery and pharmacy practitioners, academic faculties and their associated professional associations. In addition, political will is needed to nationally decriminalise abortion and ensure dedicated public provision that is based on comprehensive models tailored for all populations.

DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1846-z
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Hilder L, Walker JR, Levy MH, Sullivan EA, 'Preparing linked population data for research: Cohort study of prisoner perinatal health outcomes', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 16 (2016)

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: A study of pregnancy outcomes related to pregnancy in prison in New South Wales, Australia, designed a two stage linkage to add maternal history ... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: A study of pregnancy outcomes related to pregnancy in prison in New South Wales, Australia, designed a two stage linkage to add maternal history of incarceration and serious mental health morbidity, neonatal hospital admission and infant congenital anomaly diagnosis to birth data. Linkage was performed by a dedicated state-wide data linkage authority. This paper describes use of the linked data to determine pregnancy prison exposure pregnancy for a representative population of mothers. Methods: Researchers assessed the quality of linked records; resolved multiple-matched identities; transformed event-based incarceration records into person-based prisoner records and birth records into maternity records. Inconsistent or incomplete records were censored. Interrogation of the temporal relationships of all incarceration periods from the prisoner record with pregnancies from birth records identified prisoner maternities. Interrogation of maternities for each mother distinguished prisoner mothers who were incarcerated during pregnancy, from prisoner control mothers with pregnancies wholly in the community and a subset of prisoner mothers with maternities both types of maternity. Standard descriptive statistics are used to provide population prevalence of exposures and compare data quality across study populations stratified by mental health morbidity. Results: Women incarcerated between 1998 and 2006 accounted for less than 1 % of the 404,000 women who gave birth in NSW between 2000 and 2006, while women with serious mental health morbidity accounted for 7 % overall and 68 % of prisoners. Rates of false positive linkage were within the predicted limits set by the linkage authority for non-prisoners, but were tenfold higher among prisoners (RR 9.9; 95%CI 8.2, 11.9) and twice as high for women with serious mental health morbidity (RR 2.2; 95%CI 1.9, 2.6). This case series of 597 maternities for 558 prisoners pregnant while in prison (of whom 128 gave birth in prison); and 2,031 contemporaneous prisoner control mothers is one of the largest available. Conclusions: Record linkage, properly applied, offers the opportunity to extend knowledge about vulnerable populations not amenable to standard ascertainment. Dedicated linkage authorities now provide linked data for research. The data are not research ready. Perinatal exposures are time-critical and require expert processing to prepare the data for research.

DOI 10.1186/s12874-016-0174-7
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2016 Mu Y, McDonnell N, Li Z, Liang J, Wang Y, Zhu J, Sullivan E, 'Amniotic fluid embolism as a cause of maternal mortality in China between 1996 and 2013: A population-based retrospective study', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 16 (2016)

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: To analyse the maternal mortality ratio, demographic and pregnancy related details in women who suffered a fatal amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) in... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: To analyse the maternal mortality ratio, demographic and pregnancy related details in women who suffered a fatal amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) in China. Methods: A retrospective population based study using data collected as part of the National Maternal Mortality Surveillance System between 1996 and 2013. Data were collected onto a standardised form from women whose cause of death was listed as being secondary to AFE. Results: Records were available for 640 deaths. Over the 17 year period the maternal mortality ratio for AFE decreased from 4.4 per 100,000 births (95 % confidence interval (CI):2.72-6.12) to 1.9 per 100,000 births (95 % CI:1.35-2.54). Over the same period the proportion of maternal deaths secondary to AFE increased from 6.8 to 12.5 %. The mean age of women who died was 30.1 years and the onset of the AFE occurred prior to delivery in 39 %. The most prominent presenting features included premonitory symptoms (29 %), acute fetal compromise (28 %), maternal haemorrhage (16 %) and shortness of breath (15 %). Conclusions: Maternal mortality secondary to AFE has decreased in China, however at a slower rate than mortality secondary to other conditions. Active surveillance is recommended to assess case fatality rates, risk factors and other lessons specific to this population.

DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1106-6
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2015 Ishihara O, Adamson GD, Dyer S, De Mouzon J, Nygren KG, Sullivan EA, et al., 'International committee for monitoring assisted reproductive technologies: World report on assisted reproductive technologies, 2007', Fertility and Sterility, 103 402-413.e11 (2015)

© 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Objective To analyze information on assisted reproductive technology (ART) performed worldwide, and trends in outcomes over succ... [more]

© 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Objective To analyze information on assisted reproductive technology (ART) performed worldwide, and trends in outcomes over successive years. Design Cross-sectional survey on access, efficiency, and safety of ART procedures performed in 55 countries during 2007. Setting Not applicable. Patient(s) Infertile women and men undergoing ART globally. Intervention(s) Collection and analysis of international ART data. Main Outcome Measure(s) Number of cycles performed, by country and region, including pregnancies, single and multiple birth rates, and perinatal mortality. Result(s) Overall, >1,251,881 procedures with ART were reported, and resulted in 229,442 reported babies born. The availability of ART varied by country, from 12 to 4,140 treatments per million population. Of all aspiration cycles, 65.2% (400,617 of 614,540) were intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The overall delivery rate per fresh aspiration was 20.3%, and for frozen-embryo transfer (FET), 18.4%, with a cumulative delivery rate of 25.8%. With wide regional variations, single-embryo transfer represented 23.4% of fresh transfers, and the proportion of deliveries with twins and triplets from fresh transfers was 22.3% and 1.2%, respectively. The perinatal mortality rate was 19.9 per 1,000 births for fresh in vitro fertilization using intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and 9.6 per 1,000 for FET. The proportion of women aged =40 years increased to 19.8% from 15.5% in 2006. Conclusion(s) The international trend toward <3 transferred embryos continued, as did the wider uptake of FET. This was achieved without compromising delivery rates. The application of ART for women aged >40 years was a major component of ART services in some regions and countries.

DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.11.004
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 42
Co-authors E Sullivan
2015 Li Z, Sullivan EA, Chapman M, Farquhar C, Wang YA, 'Risk of ectopic pregnancy lowest with transfer of single frozen blastocyst', Human Reproduction, 30 2048-2054 (2015)

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. STUDY QUESTION What type of transferred embryo is a... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. STUDY QUESTION What type of transferred embryo is associated with a lower rate of ectopic pregnancy? SUMMARY ANSWER The lowest risk of ectopic pregnancy was associated with the transfer of blastocyst, frozen and single embryo compared with cleavage stage, fresh and multiple embryos. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Ectopic pregnancy is a recognized complication following assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. It has been estimated that the rate of ectopic pregnancy is doubled in pregnancies following ART treatment compared with spontaneous pregnancies. However, it was not clear whether the excess rate of ectopic pregnancy following ART treatment is related to the underlying demographic factors of women undergoing ART treatment, the number of embryos transferred or the developmental stage of the embryo. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A population-based cohort study of pregnancies following autologous treatment cycles between January 2009 and December 2011 were obtained from the Australian and New Zealand Assisted Reproduction Technology Database (ANZARD). The ANZARD collects ART treatment information and clinical outcomes annually from all fertility centres in Australia and New Zealand. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Between 2009 and 2011, a total of 44 102 pregnancies were included in the analysis. The rate of ectopic pregnancy was compared by demographic and ART treatment factors. Generalized linear regression of Poisson distribution was used to estimate the likelihood of ectopic pregnancy. Odds ratios, adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The overall rate of ectopic pregnancy was 1.4% for women following ART treatment in Australia and New Zealand. Pregnancies following single embryo transfers had 1.2% ectopic pregnancies, significantly lower than double embryo transfers (1.8%) (P < 0.01). The highest ectopic pregnancy rate was 1.9% for pregnancies from transfers of fresh cleavage embryo, followed by transfers of frozen cleavage embryo (1.7%), transfers of fresh blastocyst (1.3%), and transfers of frozen blastocyst (0.8%). Compared with fresh blastocyst transfer, the likelihood of ectopic pregnancy was 30% higher for fresh cleavage stage embryo transfers (AOR 1.30, 95% CI 1.07-1.59) and was consistent across subfertility groups. Transfer of frozen blastocyst was associated with a significantly decreased risk of ectopic pregnancy (AOR 0.70, 95% CI 0.54-0.91) compared with transfer of fresh blastocyst. LIMITATIONS, REASON FOR CAUTION A limitation of this population-based study is the lack of information available on clinical- specific protocols and processes for embryo transfer (i.e. embryo quality, cryopreservation protocol, transfer techniques, etc.) and the potential impact on outcomes. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS The lowest risk of ectopic pregnancy was associated with the transfer of a single frozen blastocyst. This finding adds to the increasing evidence of better perinatal outcomes following frozen embryo transfers. The approach of freezing all embryos in the initiated fresh cycle and transfer of a single frozen blastocyst in the subsequent thaw cycle may improve the overall pregnancy and birth outcomes following ART treatment, in part by reducing the ectopic pregnancy rate.

DOI 10.1093/humrep/dev168
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 19
Co-authors E Sullivan
2015 Lindquist A, Noor N, Sullivan E, Knight M, 'The impact of socioeconomic position on severe maternal morbidity outcomes among women in Australia: A national case-control study', BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 122 1601-1609 (2015)

© 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Objective Studies in other developed countries have suggested that socioeconomic position may be a risk factor for poorer... [more]

© 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Objective Studies in other developed countries have suggested that socioeconomic position may be a risk factor for poorer pregnancy outcomes. This analysis aimed to explore the independent impact of socioeconomic position on selected severe maternal morbidities among women in Australia. Design A case-control study using data on severe maternal morbidities associated with direct maternal death collected through the Australasian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System. Setting Australia. Population 623 cases, 820 controls. Methods Logistic regression analysis to investigate differences in outcomes among different socioeconomic groups, classified by Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA) quintile. Main outcome measures Severe maternal morbidity (amniotic fluid embolism, placenta accreta, peripartum hysterectomy, eclampsia or pulmonary embolism). Results SEIFA quintile was statistically significantly associated with maternal morbidity, with cases being twice as likely as controls to reside in the most disadvantaged areas (adjusted OR 2.00, 95%CI 1.29-3.10). Maternal age [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.20 for women aged 35 or over compared with women aged 25-29, 95%CI 1.64-3.15] and previous pregnancy complications (aOR 1.30, 95%CI 1.21-1.87) were significantly associated with morbidity. A parity of 1 or 2 was protective (aOR 0.58, 95%CI 0.43-0.79), whereas previous caesarean delivery was associated with maternal morbidity (aOR 2.20 for women with one caesarean delivery, 95%CI 1.44-2.85, compared with women with no caesareans). Conclusion The risk of severe maternal morbidity among women in Australia is significantly increased by social disadvantage. This study suggests that future efforts in improving maternity care provision and maternal outcomes in Australia should include socioeconomic position as an independent risk factor for adverse outcome.

DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.13058
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 14
Co-authors E Sullivan
2015 Dawson AJ, Turkmani S, Varol N, Nanayakkara S, Sullivan E, Homer CSE, 'Midwives' experiences of caring for women with female genital mutilation: Insights and ways forward for practice in Australia', Women and Birth, 28 207-214 (2015)

© 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Background: Female genital mutilation (FGM) has serious health consequences, including adverse obstetric outcomes and significant physical, ... [more]

© 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Background: Female genital mutilation (FGM) has serious health consequences, including adverse obstetric outcomes and significant physical, sexual and psychosocial complications for girls and women. Migration to Australia of women with FGM from high-prevalence countries requires relevant expertise to provide women and girls with FGM with specialised health care. Midwives, as the primary providers of women during pregnancy and childbirth, are critical to the provision of this high quality care. Aim: To provide insight into midwives' views of, and experiences working with, women affected by FGM. Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was undertaken using focus group discussions with midwives from four purposively selected antenatal clinics and birthing units in three hospitals in urban New South Wales. The transcripts were analysed thematically. Findings: Midwives demonstrated knowledge and recalled skills in caring for women with FGM. However, many lacked confidence in these areas. Participants expressed fear and a lack of experience caring for women with FGM. Midwives described practice issues, including the development of rapport with women, working with interpreters, misunderstandings about the culture of women, inexperience with associated clinical procedures and a lack of knowledge about FGM types and data collection. Conclusion: Midwives require education, training and supportive supervision to improve their skills and confidence when caring for women with FGM. Community outreach through improved antenatal and postnatal home visitation can improve the continuity of care provided to women with FGM.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2015.01.007
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors E Sullivan
2015 Li Z, Umstad MP, Hilder L, Xu F, Sullivan EA, 'Australian national birthweight percentiles by sex and gestational age for twins, 2001-2010', BMC Pediatrics, 15 (2015)

© 2015 Li et al. Background: Birthweight remains one of the strongest predictors of perinatal mortality and disability. Birthweight percentiles form a reference that allows the de... [more]

© 2015 Li et al. Background: Birthweight remains one of the strongest predictors of perinatal mortality and disability. Birthweight percentiles form a reference that allows the detection of neonates at higher risk of neonatal and postneonatal morbidity. The aim of the study is to present updated national birthweight percentiles by gestational age for male and female twins born in Australia. Methods: Population data were extracted from the Australian National Perinatal Data Collection for twins born in Australia between 2001 and 2010. A total of 43,833 women gave birth to 87,666 twins in Australia which were included in the study analysis. Implausible birthweights were excluded using Tukey's methodology based on the interquartile range. Univariate analysis was used to examine the birthweight percentiles for liveborn twins born between 20 and 42 weeks gestation. Results: Birthweight percentiles by gestational age were calculated for 85,925 live births (43,153 males and 42,706 females). Of these infants, 53.6 % were born preterm (birth before 37 completed weeks of gestation) while 50.2 % were low birthweight (<2500 g) and 8.7 % were very low birthweight (<1500 g). The mean birthweight decreased from 2462 g in 2001 to 2440 g in 2010 for male twins, compared with 2485 g in 1991-94. For female twins, the mean birthweight decreased from 2375 g in 2001 to 2338 g in 2010, compared with 2382 g in 1991-94. Conclusions: The birthweight percentiles provide clinicians and researchers with up-to-date population norms of birthweight percentiles for twins in Australia.

DOI 10.1186/s12887-015-0464-y
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors E Sullivan
2015 Andreucci CB, Bussadori JC, Pacagnella RC, Chou D, Filippi V, Say L, et al., 'Sexual life and dysfunction after maternal morbidity: A systematic review', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 15 (2015)

© 2015 Andreucci et al. Background: Because there is a lack of knowledge on the long-term consequences of maternal morbidity/near miss episodes on women&apos;s sexual life and fun... [more]

© 2015 Andreucci et al. Background: Because there is a lack of knowledge on the long-term consequences of maternal morbidity/near miss episodes on women's sexual life and function we conducted a systematic review with the purpose of identifying the available evidence on any sexual impairment associated with complications from pregnancy and childbirth. Methods: Systematic review on aspects of women sexual life after any maternal morbidity and/or maternal near miss, during different time periods after delivery. The search was carried out until May 22nd, 2015 including studies published from 1995 to 2015. No language or study design restrictions were applied. Maternal morbidity as exposure was split into general or severe/near miss. Female sexual outcomes evaluated were dyspareunia, Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) scores and time to resume sexual activity after childbirth. Qualitative syntheses for outcomes were provided whenever possible. Results: A total of 2,573 studies were initially identified, and 14 were included for analysis after standard selection procedures for systematic review. General morbidity was mainly related to major perineal injury (3rd or 4th degree laceration, 12 studies). A clear pattern for severity evaluation of maternal morbidity could not be distinguished, unless when a maternal near miss concept was used. Women experiencing maternal morbidity had more frequently dyspareunia and resumed sexual activity later, when compared to women without morbidity. There were no differences in FSFI scores between groups. Meta-analysis could not be performed, since included studies were too heterogeneous regarding study design, evaluation of exposure and/or outcome and time span. Conclusion: Investigation of long-term repercussions on women's sexual life aspects after maternal morbidity has been scarcely performed, however indicating worse outcomes for those experiencing morbidity. Further standardized evaluation of these conditions among maternal morbidity survivors may provide relevant information for clinical follow-up and reproductive planning for women.

DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0742-6
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors E Sullivan
2015 Sullivan EA, Dickinson JE, Vaughan GA, Peek MJ, Ellwood D, Homer CSE, et al., 'Maternal super-obesity and perinatal outcomes in Australia: A national population-based cohort study', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 15 (2015)

© 2015 Sullivan et al. Background: Super-obesity is associated with significantly elevated rates of obstetric complications, adverse perinatal outcomes and interventions. The purp... [more]

© 2015 Sullivan et al. Background: Super-obesity is associated with significantly elevated rates of obstetric complications, adverse perinatal outcomes and interventions. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, risk factors, management and perinatal outcomes of super-obese women giving birth in Australia. Methods: A national population-based cohort study. Super-obese pregnant women (body mass index (BMI) >50 kg/m2 or weight >140 kg) who gave birth between January 1 and October 31, 2010 and a comparison cohort were identified using the Australasian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System (AMOSS). Outcomes included maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Prevalence estimates calculated with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. Results: 370 super-obese women with a median BMI of 52.8 kg/m2 (range 40.9-79.9 kg/m2) and prevalence of 2.1 per 1 000 women giving birth (95 % CI: 1.96-2.40). Super-obese women were significantly more likely to be public patients (96.2 %), smoke (23.8 %) and be socio-economically disadvantaged (36.2 %). Compared with other women, super-obese women had a significantly higher risk for obstetric (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.42, 95 % CI: 1.77-3.29) and medical (AOR: 2.89, 95 % CI: 2.64-4.11) complications during pregnancy, birth by caesarean section (51.6 %) and admission to special care (HDU/ICU) (6.2 %). The 372 babies born to 365 super-obese women with outcomes known had significantly higher rates of birthweight =4500 g (AOR 19.94, 95 % CI: 6.81-58.36), hospital transfer (AOR 3.81, 95 % CI: 1.93-7.55) and admission to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) (AOR 1.83, 95 % CI: 1.27-2.65) compared to babies of the comparison group, but not prematurity (10.5 % versus 9.2 %) or perinatal mortality (11.0 (95 % CI: 4.3-28.0) versus 6.6 (95 % CI: 2.6- 16.8) per 1 000 singleton births). Conclusions: Super-obesity in pregnancy in Australia is associated with increased rates of pregnancy and birth complications, and with social disadvantage. There is an urgent need to further address risk factors leading to super-obesity among pregnant women and for maternity services to better address pre-pregnancy and pregnancy care to reduce associated inequalities in perinatal outcomes.

DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0693-y
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors E Sullivan
2015 McDonnell N, Knight M, Peek MJ, Ellwood D, Homer CSE, McLintock C, et al., 'Amniotic fluid embolism: An Australian-New Zealand population-based study', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 15 (2015)

© 2015 McDonnell et al. Background: Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a major cause of direct maternal mortality in Australia and New Zealand. There has been no national population... [more]

© 2015 McDonnell et al. Background: Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a major cause of direct maternal mortality in Australia and New Zealand. There has been no national population study of AFE in either country. The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of amniotic fluid embolism in Australia and New Zealand and to describe risk factors, management, and perinatal outcomes. Methods: A population-based descriptive study using the Australasian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System (AMOSS) carried out in 263 eligible sites (>50 births per year) covering an estimated 96% of women giving birth in Australia and all 24 New Zealand maternity units (100% of women giving birth in hospitals) between January 1 2010-December 31 2011. A case of AFE was defined either as a clinical diagnosis (acute hypotension or cardiac arrest, acute hypoxia and coagulopathy in the absence of any other potential explanation for the symptoms and signs observed) or as a post mortem diagnosis (presence of fetal squames/debris in the pulmonary circulation). Results: Thirty-three cases of AFE were reported from an estimated cohort of 613,731women giving birth, with an estimated incidence of 5.4 cases per 100 000 women giving birth (95% CI 3.5 to 7.2 per 100 000). Two (6%) events occurred at home whilst 46% (n = 15) occurred in the birth suite and 46% (n = 15) in the operating theatre (location not reported in one case). Fourteen women (42%) underwent either an induction or augmentation of labour and 22 (67%) underwent a caesarean section. Eight women (24%) conceived using assisted reproduction technology. Thirteen (42%) women required cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 18% (n = 6) had a hysterectomy and 85% (n = 28) received a transfusion of blood or blood products. Twenty (61%) were admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), eight (24%) were admitted to a High Dependency Unit (HDU) and seven (21%) were transferred to another hospital for further management. Five woman died (case fatality rate 15%) giving an estimated maternal mortality rate due to AFE of 0.8 per 100 000 women giving birth (95% CI 0.1% to 1.5%). There were two deaths among 36 infants. Conclusions: A coordinated emergency response requiring resource intense multi-disciplinary input is required in the management of women with AFE. Although the case fatality rate is lower than in previously published studies, high rates of hysterectomy, resuscitation, and admission to higher care settings reflect the significant morbidity associated with AFE. Active, ongoing surveillance to document the risk factors and short and long-term outcomes of women and their babies following AFE may be helpful to guide best practice, management, counselling and service planning. A potential link between AFE and assisted reproductive technology warrants further investigation.

DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0792-9
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 11
Co-authors E Sullivan
2015 Yeo KT, Lee QY, Quek WS, Wang YA, Bolisetty S, Lui K, Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network, 'Trends in Morbidity and Mortality of Extremely Preterm Multiple Gestation Newborns.', Pediatrics, 136 263-271 (2015)
DOI 10.1542/peds.2014-4075
Citations Web of Science - 9
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Chambers GM, Hoang VP, Sullivan EA, Chapman MG, Ishihara O, Zegers-Hochschild F, et al., 'The impact of consumer affordability on access to assisted reproductive technologies and embryo transfer practices: An international analysis', Fertility and Sterility, 101 (2014)

Objective To systematically quantify the impact of consumer cost on assisted reproduction technology (ART) utilization and numbers of embryos transferred. Design Ordinary least sq... [more]

Objective To systematically quantify the impact of consumer cost on assisted reproduction technology (ART) utilization and numbers of embryos transferred. Design Ordinary least squared (OLS) regression models were constructed to measure the independent impact of ART affordability - measured as consumer cost relative to average disposable income - on ART utilization and embryo transfer practices. Setting Not applicable. Patient(s) Women undergoing ART treatment. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) OLS regression coefficient for ART affordability, which estimates the independent effect of consumer cost relative to income on utilization and number of embryos transferred. Result(s) ART affordability was independently and positively associated with ART utilization with a mean OLS coefficient of 0.032. This indicates that, on average, a decrease in the cost of a cycle of 1 percentage point of disposable income predicts a 3.2% increase in utilization. ART affordability was independently and negatively associated with the number of embryos transferred, indicating that a decrease in the cost of a cycle of 10 percentage points of disposable income predicts a 5.1% increase in single-embryo transfer cycles. Conclusion(s) The relative cost that consumers pay for ART treatment predicts the level of access and number of embryos transferred. Policies that affect ART funding should be informed by these findings to ensure equitable access to treatment and clinically responsible embryo transfer practices. © 2014 by American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.09.005
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 48
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Zegers-Hochschild F, Mansour R, Ishihara O, Adamson GD, De Mouzon J, Nygren KG, Sullivan EA, 'International committee for monitoring assisted reproductive technology: World report on assisted reproductive technology, 2005', Fertility and Sterility, 101 (2014)

Objective To analyze information on assisted reproductive technology (ART) performed worldwide and trends in outcomes over successive years. Design Cross-sectional survey on acces... [more]

Objective To analyze information on assisted reproductive technology (ART) performed worldwide and trends in outcomes over successive years. Design Cross-sectional survey on access, effectiveness, and safety of ART procedures performed in 53 countries during 2005. Setting A total of 2,973 clinics from national and regional ART registries. Patient(s) Infertile women and men undergoing ART globally. Intervention(s) Collection and analysis of international ART data. Main Outcome Measure(s) Number of cycles performed by country and region, including pregnancies, single and multiple birth rates, and perinatal mortality. Result(s) Overall, 1,052,363 ART procedures resulted in an estimated 237,315 babies born. The availability of ART varied by country from 15 to 3,982 cycles per million of population. Of all initiated fresh cycles, 62.9% were intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The overall delivery rate per fresh aspiration was 19.6% and for frozen embryo transfer 17.4%, with a cumulative delivery rate of 23.9%. With wide regional variations, single embryo transfer represented 17.5% of cycles, and the proportion of deliveries with twins and triplets from fresh transfers was 23.6% and 1.5%, respectively. Conclusion(s) Systematic collection and dissemination of international ART data allows patients, health professionals, and policy makers to examine and compare the impact of reproductive strategies or lack of them as markers of reproductive health. © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Published by Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.10.005
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 22
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Ory SJ, Devroey P, Banker M, Brinsden P, Buster J, Fiadjoe M, et al., 'International Federation of Fertility Societies Surveillance 2013: Preface and conclusions', Fertility and Sterility, 101 1582-1583 (2014)

Surveillance is a triennial worldwide compendium of national rules and regulations for assisted reproductive technology. It was last published in 2010. Copyright © 2014 American S... [more]

Surveillance is a triennial worldwide compendium of national rules and regulations for assisted reproductive technology. It was last published in 2010. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Published by Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.03.045
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 7
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Chambers GM, Lee E, Hoang VP, Hansen M, Bower C, Sullivan EA, 'Hospital utilization, costs and mortality rates during the first 5 years of life: A population study of ART and non-ART singletons', Human Reproduction, 29 601-610 (2014)

STUDY QUESTIONDo singletons conceived following assisted reproduction technologies (ARTs) have significantly different hospital utilization, and therefore costs, compared with non... [more]

STUDY QUESTIONDo singletons conceived following assisted reproduction technologies (ARTs) have significantly different hospital utilization, and therefore costs, compared with non-ART children during the first 5 years of life?SUMMARY ANSWERART singletons have longer hospital birth-admissions and a small increased risk of re-admission during the first 5 years of life resulting in higher costs of hospital care.WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADYART singletons are at greater risk of adverse perinatal outcomes compared with non-ART singletons. Long-term physical and mental health outcomes of ART singletons are generally reassuring. There is a scarcity of information on health service utilization and the health economic impact of ART conceived children.STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATIONA population cohort study using linked birth, hospital and death records. Perinatal outcomes, hospital utilization and costs, and mortality rates were compared for non-ART and ART singletons to 5 years. Adjustments were made for maternal age, parity, sex, birth year, socioeconomic status and funding source. Australian Diagnosis Related Groups cost-weights were used to derive costs. All costs are reported in 2009/2010 Australian dollars.PARTICIPANTS/ MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODSAll babies born in Western Australia between 1994 and 2003 were included; 224 425 non-ART singletons and 2199 ART conceived singletons. Hospital admission and death records in Western Australia linked to 2008 were used.MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCEOverall, ART singletons had a significantly longer length of stay during the birth-admission (mean difference 1.8 days, P < 0.001) and a 20% increased risk of being admitted during the first 5 years of life. The average adjusted difference in hospital admission costs up to 5 years of age was $2490, with most of the additional cost occurring during the birth-admission ($1473). The independent residual cost associated with ART conception was $342 during the birth-admission and an additional $548 up to 5 years of age, indicating that being conceived as an ART child predicts not only higher birth-admission costs but excess costs to at least 5 years of age.LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTIONThis study could not investigate the impact of different ART practices and techniques on perinatal outcomes or hospital utilization, nor could it adjust for parental characteristics such as cause of infertility and treatment-seeking behaviour. This study related to ART treatment undertaken before 2003.WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGSClinicians and patients should be aware of the risk of poorer perinatal outcomes and increased hospitalization of ART singletons compared with non-ART singletons. These differences are significant enough to affect health-care resource consumption, but are substantially and significantly less than those associated with ART multiple birth infants. Understanding the short-and long-term health services and economic impact of ART is important for setting the research agenda in ART, for informing economic evaluations of infertility and treatment strategies, and for providing an important input to clinical and administrative decision making. © 2013 The Author.

DOI 10.1093/humrep/det397
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Mansour R, Ishihara O, Adamson GD, Dyer S, De Mouzon J, Nygren KG, et al., 'International committee for monitoring assisted reproductive technologies world report: Assisted reproductive technology 2006', Human Reproduction, 29 1536-1551 (2014)

STUDY QUESTION What are the access, effectiveness and safety of assisted reproductive technology (ART) worldwide in 2006? SUMMARY ANSWER ART access, effectiveness and safety vary ... [more]

STUDY QUESTION What are the access, effectiveness and safety of assisted reproductive technology (ART) worldwide in 2006? SUMMARY ANSWER ART access, effectiveness and safety vary markedly among countries. Overall, there was an increase in the use of ICSI, single embryo transfer (SET) and frozen embryo transfer (FET). There was a decline in the multiple delivery rate (DR) and preterm birth rate. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY ART is widely practiced worldwide and there is a need for its continuous monitoring to improve the comprehensiveness and quality of ART data and services. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This is a retrospective, cross-sectional survey of ART cycles undertaken worldwide in 2006. PARTICIPANTS, SETTING, METHODS A total of 2352 clinics in 56 countries provided data. Data were analyzed at a country and regional level. The forms for data collection were developed by the International Committee Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ICMART) and sent to each country or regional ART register. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE A total of >1 050 300 initiated cycles resulted in an estimated >256 668 babies. The overall pregnancy rates (PRs) and DRs per aspiration for IVF were 30.7 and 22.8%, respectively, and for ICSI 29.7 and 20.0%, respectively. The PRs and DRs for FETs were 26.4 and 17.8%, respectively. Multiple DR per PR were 22.2% for twins and 1.5% for triplets following fresh IVF/ICSI and 16.4% for twins and 0.8% for triplets for FETs. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome complicated >4585 cycles (0.6%). Access to ART varied from 11 to 3988 cycles per million population. ICSI comprised 66.0% of all initiated cycles, FET 27.4% and SET 20.7%. Perinatal mortality rate was 25.2 per 1000 births for fresh IVF/ICSI and 17.5 per 1000 for FETs. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION 44.6% of the countries provided incomplete data. Quality of data varies among individual countries and is dependant on the policy of the local regulatory authority for monitoring ART clinics. Continuous efforts are needed to improve comprehensiveness and quality of data collected. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS Adopting the policy of SET, FET and the cessation of transferring more than two embryos should be widely applied. ICMART will continue helping countries and regions to establish their own ART registries. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) ICMART receives financial support from medical societies: European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE), American Society for Reproduction Medicine (ASRM), Fertility Society of Australia (FSA), Japan Society for Reproductive Medicine (JSRM), Latin American Network for Reproductive Medicine (REDLARA) and Middle East Fertility Society (MEFS) and Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART). All authors have no conflict of interest in relation to this work. We declare no support or financial relationship with any organizations or any activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work. © 2014 The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1093/humrep/deu084
Citations Scopus - 81Web of Science - 64
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Li Z, Wang YA, Ledger W, Sullivan EA, 'Birthweight percentiles by gestational age for births following assisted reproductive technology in Australia and New Zealand, 2002-2010', Human Reproduction, 29 1787-1800 (2014)

study question: What is the standard of birthweight for gestational age for babies following assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment? summaryanswer: Birthweight for gesta... [more]

study question: What is the standard of birthweight for gestational age for babies following assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment? summaryanswer: Birthweight for gestational age percentile charts were developed for singleton births following ART treatment using population-based data. what is known already: Small for gestational age (SGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) births are at increased risks of perinatal morbidity and mortality.Abirthweight percentile chart allowsthe detection of neonates at high risk, and can help inform the need for special care if required. study design, size, duration: Thispopulationstudy useddata fromtheAustralianandNewZealandAssistedReproductionDatabase (ANZARD) for 72 694 live born singletons following ART treatment between January 2002 and December 2010 in Australia and New Zealand. participants/materials, setting, methods: A total of 69 315 births (35 580 males and 33 735 females) following ART treatment were analysed for the birthweight percentile. Exact percentiles of birthweight in grams were calculated for each gestational week betweenWeek 25 and 42 for fresh and thaw cycles by infant sex. Univariate analysis was used to determine the exact birthweight percentile values. Student t-test was used to examine the mean birthweight difference between male and female infants, between single embryo transfer (SET) and double embryo transfer (DET) and between fresh and thaw cycles. main results and the role of chance: Preterm births (birth before 37 completed weeks of gestation) and low birthweight (<2500 g) were reported for 9.7 and 7.0% of live born singletons following ART treatment. The mean birthweight was 3280 g for live born singletons following fresh cycles (3338 g for male infants and 3217 for female infants) and 3413 g for live born singletons following thaw cycles (3475 g for male infants and 3349 for female infants). The proportion of SGA for male ART births following thaw cycles at 35-41 weeks gestation was significantly lower than for the Australian general population, ranging from 3.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3%, 6.2%) at 35 weeks gestation to 7.9% (95% CI: 6.3%, 9.5%) at 41 weeks gestation. The proportion ofLGAfor maleARTbirths following thaw cycles was significantly higher than for the Australian general population between 33 weeks (17.1%, 95% CI: 8.9%, 25.2%) and 41 weeks (14.4%, 95% CI: 12.3%, 16.5%). A similar trend was shown for female infants following thaw cycles. The live born singletons following SET were, on average, 45 g heavier than live born singletons following DET (P < 0.001). Overall, SGA was reported for 8.9% (95% CI: 8.6%, 9.1%) of live born singletons following SET and for 9.9% (95% CI: 9.5%, 10.3%) of live born singletons following DET. limitations, reasons for caution: Birthweight percentile charts do not represent fetal growth standards but only theweight of live born infants at birth. wider implications of the findings: The comparison of birthweight percentile charts for ART births and general population births provide evidence that the proportion of SGA births following ART treatment was comparable to the general population for SET fresh cycles and significantly lower for thaw cycles. Both fresh and thaw cycles showed better outcomes for singleton births following SET compared with DET. Policies to promote single embryo transfer should be considered in order to minimize the adverse perinatal outcomes associated with ART treatment. © The Author 2014.

DOI 10.1093/humrep/deu120
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Li Z, Wang YA, Ledger W, Edgar DH, Sullivan EA, 'Clinical outcomes following cryopreservation of blastocysts by vitrification or slow freezing: A population-based cohort study', Human Reproduction, 29 2794-2801 (2014)

© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. STUDY QUESTION What are the clinical efficacy and p... [more]

© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. STUDY QUESTION What are the clinical efficacy and perinatal outcomes following transfer of vitrified blastocysts compared with transfer of fresh or of slow frozen blastocysts? SUMMARY ANSWER Compared with slow frozen blastocysts, vitrified blastocysts resulted in significantly higher clinical pregnancy and live delivery rates with similar perinatal outcomes at population level. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Although vitrification has been reported to be associated with significantly increased post-thaw survival rates compared with slow freezing, there has been a lack of general consensus over which method of cryopreservation (vitrification versus slow freezing) is most appropriate for blastocysts. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A population-based cohort of autologous fresh and initiated thaw cycles (a cycle where embryos were thawed with intention to transfer) performed between January 2009 and December 2011 in Australia and New Zealand was evaluated retrospectively. A total of 46 890 fresh blastocyst transfer cycles, 12 852 initiated slow frozen blastocyst thaw cycles and 20 887 initiated vitrified blastocyst warming cycles were included in the data analysis. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Pairwise comparisons were made between the vitrified blastocyst group and slow frozen or fresh blastocyst group. A Chi-square test was used for categorical variables and t-test was used for continuous variables. Cox regression was used to examine the pregnancy outcomes (clinical pregnancy rate, miscarriage rate and live delivery rate) and perinatal outcomes (preterm delivery, low birthweight births, small for gestational age (SGA) births, large for gestational age (LGA) births and perinatal mortality) following transfer of fresh, slow frozen and vitrified blastocysts. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The 46 890 fresh blastocyst transfers, 11 644 slow frozen blastocyst transfers and 19 978 vitrified blastocyst transfers resulted in 16 845, 2766 and 6537 clinical pregnancies, which led to 13 049, 2065 and 4955 live deliveries, respectively. Compared with slow frozen blastocyst transfer cycles, vitrified blastocyst transfer cycles resulted in a significantly higher clinical pregnancy rate (adjusted relative risk (ARR): 1.47, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.39-1.55) and live delivery rate (ARR: 1.41, 95% CI: 1.34-1.49). Compared with singletons born after transfer of fresh blastocysts, singletons born after transfer of vitrified blastocysts were at 14% less risk of being born preterm (ARR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.77-0.96), 33% less risk of being low birthweight (ARR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.58-0.78) and 40% less risk of being SGA (ARR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.53-0.68). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION A limitation of this population-based study is the lack of information available on clinic-specific cryopreservation protocols and processes for slow freezing-thaw and vitrification-warm of blastocysts and the potential impact on outcomes. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS This study presents population-based evidence on clinical efficacy and perinatal outcomes associated with transfer of fresh, slow frozen and vitrified blastocysts. Vitrified blastocyst transfer resulted in significantly higher clinical pregnancy and live delivery rates with similar perinatal outcomes compared with slow frozen blastocyst transfer. Comparably better perinatal outcomes were reported for singletons born after transfer of vitrified blastocysts than singletons born after transfer of fresh blastocysts. Elective vitrification could be considered as an alternative embryo transfer strategy to achieve better perinatal outcomes following Assisted Reproduction Technology (ART) treatment.

DOI 10.1093/humrep/deu246
Citations Scopus - 71Web of Science - 72
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Xu F, Li Z, Binns C, Bonello M, Austin MP, Sullivan E, 'Does infant feeding method impact on maternal mental health?', Breastfeeding Medicine, 9 215-221 (2014)

Background: Breastfeeding has been reported to reduce the risk of postpartum anxiety and depression. However, little is known of the effects of breastfeeding on hospital admission... [more]

Background: Breastfeeding has been reported to reduce the risk of postpartum anxiety and depression. However, little is known of the effects of breastfeeding on hospital admissions for postpartum mental disorders. Materials and Methods: This is a population-based longitudinal cohort study using linked data. All mothers who gave birth to a live infant between 2007 and 2008 in New South Wales, Australia were followed up for 1 year for hospital admissions with diagnoses of psychiatric and/or substance use disorders. Results: There were 186,452 women who were reported as giving birth in New South Wales between 2007 and 2008. The "any breastfeeding" rate at the time of discharge was 87.1%. In total, 2,940 mothers were admitted to the hospital with psychiatric diagnoses within 12 months of birth. The first hospital admission for the diagnoses of overall mental illness was 32 days earlier for non-breastfeeding mothers compared with those with full breastfeeding. Mothers who did not breastfeed were more likely to be admitted to the hospital in the first year postpartum for schizophrenia (adjusted relative risk [ARR]=2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3, 3.1), bipolar affective disorders (ARR=1.9; 95% CI 1.1, 3.5), and mental illness due to substance use (ARR=1.8; 95% CI 1.3, 2.5) compared with full breastfeeding mothers. Conclusions: Breastfeeding is associated with a decrease in the risk of subsequent maternal hospital admissions for schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorders, and mental illness due to substance use, in the first postpartum year. © Copyright 2014, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2014.

DOI 10.1089/bfm.2013.0142
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Bonello MR, Xu F, Li Z, Burns L, Austin MP, Sullivan EA, 'Mental and behavioral disorders due to substance abuse and perinatal outcomes: A study based on linked population data in New South Wales, Australia', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 11 4991-5005 (2014)

Background: The effects of mental and behavioral disorders (MBD) due to substance use during peri-conception and pregnancy on perinatal outcomes are unclear. The adverse perinatal... [more]

Background: The effects of mental and behavioral disorders (MBD) due to substance use during peri-conception and pregnancy on perinatal outcomes are unclear. The adverse perinatal outcomes of primiparous mothers admitted to hospital with MBD due to substance use before and/or during pregnancy were investigated. Method: This study linked birth and hospital records in NSW, Australia. Subjects included primiparous mothers admitted to hospital for MBD due to use of alcohol, opioids or cannabinoids during peri-conception and pregnancy. Results: There were 304 primiparous mothers admitted to hospital for MBD due to alcohol use (MBDA), 306 for MBD due to opioids use (MBDO) and 497 for MBD due to cannabinoids (MBDC) between the 12 months peri-conception and the end of pregnancy. Primiparous mothers admitted to hospital for MBDA during pregnancy or during both peri-conception and pregnancy were significantly more likely to give birth to a baby of low birthweight (AOR = 4.03, 95%CI: 1.97-8.24 for pregnancy; AOR = 9.21, 95%CI: 3.76-22.57 both periods); preterm birth (AOR = 3.26, 95% CI: 1.52-6.97 for pregnancy; AOR = 4.06, 95%CI: 1.50-11.01 both periods) and admission to SCN or NICU (AOR = 2.42, 95%CI: 1.31-4.49 for pregnancy; AOR = 4.03, 95%CI: 1.72-9.44 both periods). Primiparous mothers admitted to hospital for MBDO, MBDC or a combined diagnosis were almost three times as likely to give birth to preterm babies compared to mothers without hospital admissions for psychiatric or substance use disorders. Babies whose mothers were admitted to hospital with MBDO before and/or during pregnancy were six times more likely to be admitted to SCN or NICU (AOR = 6.29, 95%CI: 4.62-8.57). Conclusion: Consumption of alcohol, opioids or cannabinoids during peri-conception or pregnancy significantly increased the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph110504991
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Chambers GM, Van Hoang P, Lee E, Hansen M, Sullivan EA, Bower C, Chapman M, 'Hospital costs of multiple-birth and singleton-birth children during the first 5 years of life and the role of assisted reproductive technology', JAMA Pediatrics, 168 1045-1053 (2014)

Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE: The unprecedented increase in multiple births during the past 3 decades is a major public health conc... [more]

Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE: The unprecedented increase in multiple births during the past 3 decades is a major public health concern and parallels the uptake of medically assisted conception. The economic implications of such births are not well understood. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a comprehensive economic and health services assessment of the frequency, duration, and cost of hospital admissions during the first 5 years of life for singleton, twin, and higher-order multiple (HOM) children and to examine the contribution of assisted reproductive technology (ART) to the incidence and cost of multiple births. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A retrospective population cohort study using individually linked birth, hospital, and death records among 233 850 infants born in Western Australia between October 1993 and September 2003, and followed up to September 2008. EXPOSURES: Multiple-gestation delivery and ART conception. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Odds of stillbirth, prematurity and low birth weight, frequency and length of hospital admissions, the mean costs by plurality, and the independent effect of prematurity on childhood costs. RESULTS: Of 226 624 singleton, 6941 twin, and 285 HOM infants, 1.0% of singletons, 15.4%of twins, and 34.7%of HOM children were conceived following ART. Compared with singletons, twins and HOMs were 3.4 and 9.6 times, respectively, more likely to be stillborn and were 6.4 and 36.7 times, respectively, more likely to die during the neonatal period. Twins and HOMs were 18.7 and 525.1 times, respectively, more likely to be preterm, and 3.6 and 2.8 times, respectively, more likely to be small for gestational age. The mean hospital costs of a singleton, twin, and HOM child to age 5 years were $2730, $8993, and $24 411 (in 2009-2010 US dollars), respectively, with cost differences concentrated in the neonatal period and during the first year of life. Almost 15%of inpatient costs for multiple births could have been avoided if ART twins and HOMs had been born as singletons. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Compared with singletons, multiple-birth infants consume significantly more hospital resources, particularly during the neonatal period and first year of life. A significant proportion of the clinical and economic burden associated with multiple births can be prevented through single-embryo transfer. Increasing ART use worldwide and persistently high ART multiple-birth rates in several countries highlight the need for strategies that encourage single-embryo transfer. The costs from this study can be generalized to other settings.

DOI 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.1357
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 21
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Walker JR, Hilder L, Levy MH, Sullivan EA, 'Pregnancy, prison and perinatal outcomes in New South Wales, Australia: A retrospective cohort study using linked health data', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 14 (2014)

Background: Studies from the United States and the United Kingdom have found that imprisoned women are less likely to experience poorer maternal and perinatal outcomes than other ... [more]

Background: Studies from the United States and the United Kingdom have found that imprisoned women are less likely to experience poorer maternal and perinatal outcomes than other disadvantaged women. This population-based study used both community controls and women with a history of incarceration as a control group, to investigate whether imprisoned pregnant women in New South Wales, Australia, have improved maternal and perinatal outcomes.Methods: Retrospective cohort study using probabilistic record linkage of routinely collected data from health and corrective services in New South Wales, Australia. Comparison of the maternal and perinatal outcomes of imprisoned pregnant women aged 18-44 years who gave birth between 2000-2006 with women who were (i) imprisoned at a time other than pregnancy, and (ii) community controls. Outcomes of interest: onset of labour, method of birth, pre-term birth, low birthweight, Apgar score, resuscitation, neonatal hospital admission, perinatal death.Results: Babies born to women who were imprisoned during pregnancy were significantly more likely to be born pre-term, have low birthweight, and be admitted to hospital, compared with community controls. Pregnant prisoners did not have significantly better outcomes than other similarly disadvantaged women (those with a history of imprisonment who were not imprisoned during pregnancy).Conclusions: In contrast to the published literature, we found no evidence that contact with prison health services during pregnancy was a " therapunitive" intervention. We found no association between imprisonment during pregnancy and improved perinatal outcomes for imprisoned women or their neonates. A history of imprisonment remained the strongest predictor of poor perinatal outcomes, reflecting the relative health disadvantage experienced by this population of women. © 2014 Walker et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-14-214
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Javid N, Sullivan EA, Halliday LE, Duncombe G, Homer CSE, '¿Wrapping myself in cotton wool¿: Australian women's experience of being diagnosed with vasa praevia', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 14 1-11 (2014)

© 2014 Javid et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Background: Vasa praevia (VP) is an obstetric condition that is associated with significant perinatal mortality and morbidity. Al... [more]

© 2014 Javid et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Background: Vasa praevia (VP) is an obstetric condition that is associated with significant perinatal mortality and morbidity. Although the incidence of VP is low, it is one of the few causes of perinatal death that can be potentially prevented through detection and appropriate care. The experience of women diagnosed with or suspected to have VP is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and impact that a diagnosis or suspected diagnosis of VP had on a group of Australian women.Method: A qualitative study using a descriptive exploratory design was conducted and Australian women diagnosed with VP were recruited via online methods in 2012. An inductive approach was undertaken and interviews were analysed using the stages of thematic analysis. Results: Of the 14 women interviewed, 11 were diagnosed with VP during pregnancy with 5 subsequently found not to have VP (non-confirmed diagnosis). Three women were diagnosed during childbirth with one neonatal death. Five major themes were identified: feeling like a ticking time bomb; getting diagnosis right; being taken seriously; coping with inconsistent information; and, just a massive relief when it was all over.Conclusions: This is the first study to describe women's experience of being diagnosed with or suspected to have VP. The findings from this research reveal the dilemmas these women face even if their baby is ultimately born healthy. Their need for clear and consistent information, sensitive care, support and continuity is evident. Clinicians can use these findings in developing information, counselling and models of care for these women.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-14-318
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Xu XK, Wang YA, Li Z, Lui K, Sullivan EA, 'Risk factors associated with preterm birth among singletons following assisted reproductive technology in Australia 2007-2009-a population-based retrospective study', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 14 (2014)

© Xu et al. Background: Preterm birth, a leading cause of neonatal death, is more common in multiple births and thus there has being an increasing call for reducing multiple birth... [more]

© Xu et al. Background: Preterm birth, a leading cause of neonatal death, is more common in multiple births and thus there has being an increasing call for reducing multiple births in ART. However, few studies have compared risk factors for preterm births amongst ART and non-ART singleton birth mothers. Methods: A population-based study of 393,450 mothers, including 12,105 (3.1%) ART mothers, with singleton gestations born between 2007 and 2009 in 5 of the 8 jurisdictions in Australia. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were conducted to evaluate socio-demographic, medical and pregnancy factors associated with preterm births in contrasting ART and non-ART mothers. Results: Ten percent of singleton births to ART mothers were preterm compared to 6.8% for non-ART mothers (P < 0.01). Compared with non-ART mothers, ART mothers were older (mean 34.0 vs 29.7 yr respectively), less socio-economically disadvantaged (12.4% in the lowest quintile vs 20.7%), less likely to be smokers (3.8% vs 19.4%), more likely to be first time mothers (primiparous 62.4% vs 40.5%), had more preexisting hypertension and complications during pregnancy. Irrespective of the mode of conception, preexisting medical and pregnancy complications of hypertension, diabetes and antepartum hemorrhages were consistently associated with preterm birth. In contrast, socio-demographic variables, namely young and old maternal age (<25 and >34), socioeconomic disadvantage (most disadvantaged quintile Odds Ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.77-1.17), smoking (OR 1.12, 95%CI: 0.79-1.61) and priminarity (OR 1.19, 95% CI: 1.05-1.35, AOR not significant) shown to be associated with elevated risk of preterm birth for non-ART mothers were not demonstrated for ART mothers, even after adjusting for potential confounders. Nonetheless, in multivariable analysis, the association between ART and the elevated risk for singleton preterm birth persisted after controlling for all included confounding medical, pregnancy and socio-economic factors (AOR 1.51, 95% CI: 1.42-1.61). Conclusions: Preterm birth rate is approximately one-and-a-half-fold higher in ART mothers than non-ART mothers albeit for singleton births after controlling for confounding factors. However, ART mothers were less subject to the adverse influence from socio-demographic factors than non-ART mothers. This has implications for counselling prospective parents.

DOI 10.1186/s12884-014-0406-y
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Xu F, Sullivan EA, Li Z, Burns L, Austin MP, Slade T, 'The increased trend in mothers' hospital admissions for psychiatric disorders in the first year after birth between 2001 and 2010 in New South Wales, Australia', BMC Women's Health, 14 (2014)

© 2014 Xu et al. Background: The burden of mental and behavioural disorders in Australia has increased significantly over the last decade. The aim of the current study is to descr... [more]

© 2014 Xu et al. Background: The burden of mental and behavioural disorders in Australia has increased significantly over the last decade. The aim of the current study is to describe the hospital admission rates for mental illness over a 10-year period for primiparous mothers in the first year after birth. Methods: This is an Australian population-based descriptive study with linked data from the New South Wales Midwives Data Collection and Admitted Patients Data Collection. The study population included primiparous mothers who gave birth between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010. All hospital admissions with a mental health diagnosis in the first year after birth were recorded. Results: There were 6,140 mothers (1.67%) admitted to hospital with a principal diagnosis of mental health in the first year after birth between 2001 and 2010 in New South Wales (7,884 admissions, 2.15%). The hospital admission rates increased significantly over time, particularly from 2005. The increase in hospital admissions was mainly attributed to the diagnoses of unipolar depression, adjustment disorders and anxiety disorders. Conclusions: This study shows that hospital admissions for mothers with a mental health diagnosis after birth in New South Wales has significantly increased in the last decade. Possible reasons for this change need to be studied further.

DOI 10.1186/1472-6874-14-119
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Laws PJ, Xu F, Welsh A, Tracy SK, Sullivan EA, 'Maternal morbidity of women receiving birth center care in New South Wales: a matched-pair analysis using linked health data', Birth (Berkeley, Calif.), 41 268-275 (2014)

© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. BACKGROUND: Around 2 percent of women who give birth in Australia each year do so in a birth center. New South Wales, Australia&apos;s largest state... [more]

© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. BACKGROUND: Around 2 percent of women who give birth in Australia each year do so in a birth center. New South Wales, Australia's largest state, accounts for almost half of these births. Previous studies have highlighted the need for better quality data on maternal morbidity and mortality, to fully evaluate the safety of birth center care.AIMS: This study aimed to examine maternal morbidity related to birth center care for women in New South Wales.METHODS: A retrospective cohort study with matched-pairs was conducted using linked health data for New South Wales. Maternal outcomes were compared for women who intended to give birth in a birth center, matched with women who intended to give birth in the co-located hospital labor ward.RESULTS: Rates of maternal outcomes, including postpartum hemorrhage, retained placenta, and postpartum infection, were significantly lower in the birth center group, after controlling for demographic and institutional factors. Interventions such as cesarean section and episiotomy were also significantly lower in these women, and the rate of breastfeeding at discharge was higher. There existed no difference in length of stay, admission to ICU, or maternal mortality.CONCLUSIONS: Birth centers are a safe option for low-risk women; however, further research is required for some rare maternal outcomes.

DOI 10.1111/birt.12114
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors E Sullivan
2014 Xu F, Austin MP, Reilly N, Hilder L, Sullivan EA, 'Length of stay for mental and behavioural disorders postpartum in primiparous mothers: A cohort study', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 11 3540-3552 (2014)

Background: Previous research showed that there was a significant increase in psychiatric hospital admission of postpartum mothers. The aim of the current study is to describe the... [more]

Background: Previous research showed that there was a significant increase in psychiatric hospital admission of postpartum mothers. The aim of the current study is to describe the length of hospital stays and patient days for mental and behavioural disorders (MBD) of new mothers in the first year after birth. Method: This was a cohort study based on linked population data between the New South Wales (NSW) Midwives Data Collection (MDC) and the NSW Admitted Patients Data Collection (APDC). The study population included primiparous mothers aged from 18 to 44 who gave birth between 1 July 2000 and 31 December 2005. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to describe the length of hospital stay for MBD. Results: For principal diagnoses of MBD, the entire length of hospital stay in the first year postpartum was 11.38 days (95% CI: 10.70-12.06) for mean and 6 days (95% CI: 5.87-6.13) for median. The length of hospital stay per admission was 8.47 days (95% CI: 8.03-8.90) for mean and 5 days (95% CI: 4.90-5.10) for median. There were 5,129 patient days of hospital stay per year for principal diagnoses of postpartum MBD in new mothers between 1 July 2000 and 31 December 2005 in NSW, Australia. Conclusions: MBD, especially unipolar depressions, adjustment disorders, acute psychotic episodes, and schizophrenia, or schizophrenia-like disorders during the first year after birth, placed a significant burden on hospital services due to long hospital stays and large number of admissions. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph110403540
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nicole Reilly, E Sullivan
2013 Halliday LE, Peek MJ, Ellwood DA, Homer C, Knight M, McLintock C, et al., 'The Australasian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System: An evaluation of stakeholder engagement, usefulness, simplicity, acceptability, data quality and stability', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 53 152-157 (2013)

Background The Australasian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System (AMOSS) conducts active, prospective surveillance of severe maternal conditions in Australia and New Zealand (AN... [more]

Background The Australasian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System (AMOSS) conducts active, prospective surveillance of severe maternal conditions in Australia and New Zealand (ANZ). AMOSS captures greater than 96% of all births, and utilises an online, active case-based negative reporting system. Aim To evaluate AMOSS using the United States Centres for Disease Control (MMWR 2001; 50 (RR13): 1-35.) surveillance system evaluation framework. Methods Data were gathered using multiple methods, including an anonymous online survey administered to 353 AMOSS data collectors, in addition to review of case data received during 2009-2011, documented records of project board and advisory group meeting minutes, publications, annual reports and the AMOSS database. Results AMOSS is a research system characterised by its simplicity and efficiency. The socio-demographic, risk factor and severe morbidity clinical data collected on rare conditions are not duplicated in other routine data systems. AMOSS is functioning well and has sustained buy-in from clinicians, stakeholders and consumers and a high level of acceptability to data collectors in ANZ maternity units. Conclusions AMOSS is the only existing national system of surveillance for rare and severe maternal conditions in ANZ and therefore serves an important function, utilising data collected from reliable sources, in an effective, efficient and timely way. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

DOI 10.1111/ajo.12020
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors E Sullivan
2013 Umstad MP, Hale L, Wang YA, Sullivan EA, 'Multiple deliveries: The reduced impact of in vitro fertilisation in Australia', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 53 158-164 (2013)

Background The number of twins born in Australia steadily increased from 2420 sets in 1983 to 4458 sets in 2010. At one stage, almost 25% of all twin deliveries in Australia were ... [more]

Background The number of twins born in Australia steadily increased from 2420 sets in 1983 to 4458 sets in 2010. At one stage, almost 25% of all twin deliveries in Australia were a consequence of assisted reproductive technologies. Aims To determine the influence of a policy of single embryo transfer (SET) on the rate of multiple deliveries in Australia. Methods We used population data to compare the prevalence of twin and higher order multiple births in women giving birth in Australia before and after the implementation of the RTAC COP 2001 and 2005 revisions for ART units. Results There was a steady fall in the twin delivery rate for assisted reproductive technologies from 210.4 per 1000 deliveries in 2001 to 84.3 per 1000 deliveries in 2009. In 2009, assisted reproductive technologies accounted for approximately 16% of all twin births from 3% of all conceptions, substantially less than the 24.5% in 2002. Conclusions The decline in multiple births is multifactorial. However, the fall in the proportion of ART multiple births has paralleled adoption of a voluntary policy of SET within a setting of largely public funding of ART. © 2013 The Authors ANZJOG © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

DOI 10.1111/ajo.12048
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors E Sullivan
2013 Li Z, Chen M, Guy R, Wand H, Oats J, Sullivan EA, 'Chlamydia screening in pregnancy in Australia: Integration of national guidelines into clinical practice and policy', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 53 338-346 (2013)

Background Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common reportable infection in Australia. Since 2006, the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists... [more]

Background Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common reportable infection in Australia. Since 2006, the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG) have recommended chlamydia screening in pregnant women aged <25 years. Aims To assess clinical uptake and policy integration of the 2006 RANZCOG recommendation on chlamydia testing in pregnant women aged <25 years. Methods A mixed method approach was used involving a literature review, a survey of obstetricians and gynaecologists, and survey of hospital managers from April 2010 to May 2010. Results Of the 1644 participating RANZCOG Fellows, Trainees, and Diplomates, 21.2% reported universal screening for pregnant women <25 years (25% of primary care clinicians, 23% of those working in the public hospital sector, 16% of those working in both public and private hospitals, and 13% of those in private hospitals or private practice). There was a strong association between members who agreed with the guideline and offering universal screening to pregnant women aged <25 years (adjusted odds ratio = 17.1, 95% CI: 6.0-49.2, P < 0.01). Of the 143 participating hospital managers who completed the hospital policy questionnaire; 20% reported that their hospital had a formal screening guideline. There were two national and four state/local policy documents recommending chlamydia screening in pregnancy. Conclusions This study shows low uptake of chlamydia screening of young pregnant women by RANZCOG Fellows, Trainees, and Diplomates involved in antenatal care and highlights the need for national clinical leadership regarding screening for chlamydia among pregnant women aged <25 years. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

DOI 10.1111/ajo.12099
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors E Sullivan
2013 Xu F, Bonello M, Burns L, Austin MP, Li Z, Sullivan E, 'Hospital admissions for alcohol use disorders before, during, and after pregnancy: A study based on linked population data in New South Wales, Australia', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 37 1706-1712 (2013)

Background: Alcohol use disorders (AUD) during pregnancy can have profound lifelong effects on the baby, including fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Hospital admission for ... [more]

Background: Alcohol use disorders (AUD) during pregnancy can have profound lifelong effects on the baby, including fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Hospital admission for AUD during pregnancy provides an opportunity for intervention. Characterization of women along the AUD spectrum during pregnancy aids the development of prevention strategies, policy, and clinical management guidelines aimed at this population. This study describes the hospital admission levels for AUD between the sixth month before pregnancy and the first year after birth and explores risk factors associated with the hospital admissions. Methods: This study was based on linked population data between 2002 and 2005 using the New South Wales (NSW) Midwives Data Collection (MDC) and the NSW Admitted Patients Data Collection (APDC), Australia. The study subjects included primiparous mothers who were admitted to hospital in the period from the sixth month before pregnancy to 1 year after birth with at least 1 of the following diagnoses (ICD-10-AM): mental and behavioral disorders due to the use of alcohol (MBDA) (F10.0-10.9); toxic effects of alcohol (T51.0-51.9); maternal care for suspected damage to fetus from alcohol (O35.4); or alcohol rehabilitation (Z50.2). Results: A total of 175 new mothers had 287 hospital admissions with the principal or stay AUD diagnoses during the study period in NSW. Of the 287 admissions, 181 admissions (63.07%) were reported for an alcohol-related disorder as the principal diagnosis. The hospital admission rate for AUD was 1.76/1,000 person-years (PY) (95% CI: 1.45 to 2.07) during the 6 months prepregnancy. The rate decreased to 0.49/1,000 PY (95% CI: 0.36 to 0.63) during pregnancy and to 0.82/1,000 PY (95% CI: 0.67 to 0.97) in the first year after birth. Women who smoked during pregnancy, lived in a remote area and were younger than 25 years, were more likely to be admitted to hospital with AUD diagnoses. Women in the middle disadvantaged quintile and born in other countries were less likely to be admitted to hospital with AUD diagnoses. Conclusions: Hospital admission for AUD decreased significantly in pregnancy and the first year postpartum compared to the prepregnancy period. © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

DOI 10.1111/acer.12138
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2013 Sullivan EA, Zegers-Hochschild F, Mansour R, Ishihara O, De Mouzon J, Nygren KG, Adamson GD, 'International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ICMART) world report: Assisted reproductive technology 2004', Human Reproduction, 28 1375-1390 (2013)

Study Questio: NHave changes in assisted reproductive technology (ART) practice and outcomes occurred globally between 2003 and 2004? Summary Answer: Globally, ART practice has ch... [more]

Study Questio: NHave changes in assisted reproductive technology (ART) practice and outcomes occurred globally between 2003 and 2004? Summary Answer: Globally, ART practice has changed with an increasing prevalence of the use of ICSI rather than conventional IVF. In 2004, a small but increasing number of countries are incorporating single embryo transfer. There remain unacceptably high rates of three or more embryo transfers in select countries resulting in multiple births and adverse perinatal outcomes. What Is Known Already: World data on the availability, effectiveness and safety of ART have been published since 1989. The number of embryos transferred is a major determinant of the iatrogenic increase in multiple pregnancies and is highly correlated with the likelihood of multiple birth and excess perinatal morbidity and mortality.STUDY Design: , SIZE, DURATIONCross-sectional survey of countries and regions undertaking surveillance of ART procedures started in 2004 and their corresponding outcomes. Participants/Materials, Setting, Methods: Of total, 2184 clinics from 52 reporting countries and regions. Number of ART clinics, types of cycles and procedures, pregnancy, delivery and multiple birth rates and perinatal outcomes. Main Results and the Role of Chance: A total of 954 743 initiated cycles resulted in an estimated 237 809 babies born. This was a 2.3% increase in the number of reported cycles from 2003. The availability of ART varied by country and ranged from 14 to 3844 treatment cycles per million population. Over one-third (37.2%) of ART clinics performed <100 cycles per year with only 19.9% performing =500 cycles per year. Of all cycles, 60.6% were ICSI. Frozen embryo transfers (FETs) represented 31% of the initiated cycles. The overall delivery rate per fresh aspiration for IVF and ICSI was 20.2% compared with 16.6% per FET. The average number of embryos transferred was 2.35. Single (16.3%) and double embryo transfers accounted for 73.2% of cycles. The overall proportion of deliveries with twins and triplets from IVF and ICSI was 25.1 and 1.8%, respectively, but varied widely by country and region. The proportion of premature deliveries per fresh aspiration for IVF and ICSI was 33.7% compared with 26.3% per FET. The perinatal death rate was 25.8 per 1000 births for fresh aspiration for IVF and ICSI compared with 14.2 per 1000 births per FET.LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTIONData are incomplete with seven countries not providing data to the International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ICMART) in 2004 that had in 2003. The validity of data reflects current data collection practice. In 2004, 79.3% of the clinics in participating countries reported to their national or regional registries and to ICMART. In addition, the number of ART cycles per million population is a measure which is affected by a country's government policy, regulation, funding and the number of service providers. Wider Implications of the Findings: ART practice, effectiveness and outcomes vary markedly internationally. Notably, the increasing proportion of cycles that are FET, the change in practice to single embryo transfer and the cessation of the transfer of three or more embryos in some countries has resulted in improved perinatal outcomes with minimal impact on pregnancy rates. Study Funding/Competing Interest: (S)ICMART receives financial support from ASRM, ESHRE, FSA, Japan Society for Reproductive Medicine, REDLARA, MEFS and SART. © 2013 The Author.

DOI 10.1093/humrep/det036
Citations Scopus - 109Web of Science - 86
Co-authors E Sullivan
2013 Chambers GM, Wang YA, Chapman MG, Hoang VP, Sullivan EA, Abdalla HI, Ledger W, 'What can we learn from a decade of promoting safe embryo transfer practices? A comparative analysis of policies and outcomes in the UK and Australia, 2001-2010', Human Reproduction, 28 1679-1686 (2013)

STUDY QUESTION Given similar socio-demographic profiles and costs of healthcare, why has Australia been significantly more successful than the UK in reducing the assisted reproduc... [more]

STUDY QUESTION Given similar socio-demographic profiles and costs of healthcare, why has Australia been significantly more successful than the UK in reducing the assisted reproductive technology (ART) multiple birth rate? SUMMARY ANSWER The Australian model of supportive public ART funding, permissive clinical guidelines and an absence of published clinic league tables has enabled Australian fertility specialists to act collectively to achieve rapid and widespread adoption of single embryo transfer (SET). WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY There are striking differences in ART utilization and clinical practice between Australia and the UK. The ART multiple birth rate in Australia is <8% compared with slightly <20% in the UK. The role played by public funding, clinical guidelines, league tables and educational campaigns deserves further evaluation. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Parallel time-series analysis was performed on ART treatment and outcome data sourced from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) ART Registry and the Australian and New Zealand Assisted Reproduction Database (ANZARD). Funding arrangements, clinical practice guidelines and key professional and public education campaigns were mapped to trends in clinical practice and ART treatment outcomes between 2001 and 2010. PARTICIPANTS/ MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS A total of 425 360 and 422 003 autologous treatment cycles undertaken between 2001 and 2010 in the UK and Australia were analysed. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE From 2001 to 2010, the most striking difference in clinical practice was the increase in SET cycles in Australia from 21 to 70% of cycles, compared with an increase from 8.4 to 31% in the UK. In 2004-2005, both countries introduced clinical guidelines encouraging safe embryo practices, however, Australia has a history of supportive funding for ART, while the National Health Service has a more restrictive and fragmented approach. While clinical guidelines and education campaigns have an important role to play, funding remains a key element in the promotion of SET. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION This is a descriptive population study and therefore quantifying the independent effect of differential levels of public funding was not possible. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS With demand for ART continuing to increase worldwide, it is imperative that we remove barriers that impede safe embryo transfer practices. This analysis highlights the importance of supportive public funding in achieving this goal. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) No specific funding was received to undertake this study. G.M.C. reports receiving grant support to her institution from the Australian Government, Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Grant No LP1002165; ARC Linkage Grant Partner Organisations are IVFAustralia, Melbourne IVF and Queensland Fertility Group. The Fertility Society of Australia (FSA) paid her for 1 week of consultancy work in 2009. Y.A.W. does not report any conflict of interest. M.G.C. reports being a shareholder of IVFAustralia. V.P.H. reports being employed by a grant to his institution from the ARC, Linkage Grant No LP1002165; ARC Linkage Grant Partner Organisations are IVFAustralia, Melbourne IVF and Queensland Fertility Group. E.A.S. reports receiving grant support to her institution from the Australian Government, National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), ARC, National Breast Cancer Foundation, International Vasa Praevia Foundation, the FSA and Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. She is Head of Research, Family Planning NSW. H.I.A. reports being Director of Lister Fertility Clinic, the largest private fertility clinic in UK, and is a member of HFEA. W.L. reports receiving grant support to his institution from the NHMRC, research grants from Merck Sharp & Dhome and Swiss Precision Diagnostics. © 2013 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduct...

DOI 10.1093/humrep/det080
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors E Sullivan
2013 Wang YA, Nikravan R, Smith HC, Sullivan EA, 'Higher prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus following assisted reproduction technology treatment', Human Reproduction, 28 2554-2561 (2013)

STUDY QUESTIONDo mothers following assisted reproduction technology (ART) treatment have increased likelihood of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) compared with non-ART mothers ... [more]

STUDY QUESTIONDo mothers following assisted reproduction technology (ART) treatment have increased likelihood of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) compared with non-ART mothers after controlling for maternal factors and plurality?SUMMARY ANSWERART mothers had 28% increased likelihood of GDM compared with non-ART mothers.WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADYAdvanced maternal age and multiple pregnancies are independently associated with increased likelihood of GDM. Given the average age of mothers having ART treatment is higher than non-ART mothers and the higher multiple pregnancy rate following ART treatment, ART treatment might be expected to be associated with increased risk of GDM.STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATIONA population retrospective cohort study of 400 392 mothers who gave birth in Australia between 2007 and 2009, using the Australian National Perinatal Data Collection from five states (Australian Capital Territory, Queensland, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia) where a code for ART treatment is available.PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODSThe study included 13 732 ART mothers and 386 660 non-ART mothers. The prevalence of GDM was compared between ART and non-ART mothers. Logistic regressions were used to assess the association between ART treatment and GDM. Odds ratio (OR), adjusted OR (AOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated.MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCEA larger proportion of ART mothers were aged =40 years compared with non-ART counterpart (11.7 versus 3.4%, P < 0.01). The prevalence of GDM was 7.6% for ART mothers and 5.0% for non-ART mothers (P < 0.01). Mothers who had twins had higher prevalence of GDM than those who gave births to singletons (8.8 versus 7.5%, P = 0.06 for ART mothers; and 7.3 versus 5.0%, P < 0.01 for non-ART mothers). Overall, ART mothers had a 28% increased likelihood of GDM compared with non-ART mothers (AOR 1.28, 95% CI 1.20-1.37). Of mothers who had singletons, ART mothers had higher odds of GDM than non-ART mothers (AOR 1.26, 95% CI 1.18-1.36). There was no significant difference in the likelihood of GDM among mothers who had twins between ART and non-ART (AOR 1.18, 95% CI 0.94-1.48). For mothers aged <40 years, the younger the maternal age, the higher the odds of GDM for ART singleton mothers compared with non-ART singleton mothers.LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTIONIt was not possible to investigate which ART procedure is associated with increased risk of GDM and how the risk could have been minimized. The information on BMI and smoking during pregnancy was not stated for a large proportion of mothers. These limitations may have reduced the validity of the study.WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGSIn agreement with other studies, our data suggest that the underlying cause of subfertility and some particular ART procedures might have played an important role in the increased likelihood of GDM. Together with the public education on not delaying motherhood, minimizing multiple pregnancies by applying single embryo transfer may diminish the excess risk of GDM related to ART treatment. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1093/humrep/det270
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors E Sullivan
2013 Sullivan EA, Wang YA, Norman RJ, Chambers GM, Chughtai AA, Farquhar CM, 'Perinatal mortality following assisted reproductive technology treatment in Australia and New Zealand, a public health approach for international reporting of perinatal mortality', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 13 (2013)

Background: There is a need to have uniformed reporting of perinatal mortality for births following assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment to enable international compar... [more]

Background: There is a need to have uniformed reporting of perinatal mortality for births following assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment to enable international comparison and benchmarking of ART practice.Methods: The Australian and New Zealand Assisted Reproduction Database was used in this study. Births of = 20 weeks gestation and/or = 400 grams of birth weight following embryos transfer cycles in Australia and New Zealand during the period 2004 to 2008 were included. Differences in the mortality rates by different perinatal periods from a gestational age cutoff of = 20, = 22, = 24, or = 28 weeks (wks) to a neonatal period cutoff of either < 7 or < 28 days after birth were assessed. Crude and specific (number of embryos transferred and plurality) rates of perinatal mortality were calculated for selected gestational and neonatal periods.Results: When the perinatal period is defined as = 20 wks gestation to < 28 days after birth, the perinatal mortality rate (PMR) was 16.1 per 1000 births (n = 630). A progressive contraction of the gestational age groups resulted in marked reductions in the PMR for deaths at < 28 days (22 wks 11.0; 24 wks 7.7; 28 wks 5.6); and similarly for deaths at < 7 days (20 wks 15.6, 22 wks 10.5; 24 wks 7.3; 28 wks 5.3). In contrast, a contraction of the perinatal period from < 28 to < 7 days after birth only marginally reduced the PMR from 16.2 to 15.6 per 1000 births which was consistent across all gestational ages.The PMR for single embryo transfer (SET) births (= 20 weeks gestation to < 7 days post-birth) was significantly lower (12.8 per 1000 SET births) compared to double embryo transfer (DET) births (PMR 18.3 per 1000 DET births; p < 0.001, Fisher's Exact Test). Similarly, the PMR for SET births (= 22 weeks gestation to < 7 days post-birth) was significantly lower (8.8 per 1000 SET births, p < 0.001, Fisher's Exact Test) when compared to DET births (12.2 per 1000 DET births). The highest PMR (50.5 per 1000 SET births, 95% CI 36.5-64.5) was for twins following SET births (= 20 weeks gestation to < 7 days post-birth) compared to twins following DET (23.9 per 1000 DET births, 95% CI 20.8-27.1).Conclusion: Reporting of perinatal mortality of ART births is an essential component of quality ART practice. This should include measures that monitor the impact on perinatal mortality of multiple embryo transfer. We recommend that reporting of perinatal deaths following ART treatment, should be stratified for three gestation-specific perinatal periods of = 20, = 22 and = 28 completed weeks to < 7 days post-birth; and include plurality specific rates by SET and DET. This would provide a valuable international evidence-base of PMR for use in evaluating ART policy, practice and new research. © 2013 Sullivan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-13-177
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors E Sullivan
2012 Vaughan G, Pollock W, Peek MJ, Knight M, Ellwood D, Homer CS, et al., 'Ethical issues: The multi-centre low-risk ethics/governance review process and AMOSS', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 52 195-203 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2011.01390.x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors E Sullivan
2012 Dobbins TA, Sullivan EA, Roberts CL, Simpson JM, 'Australian national birthweight percentiles by sex and gestational age, 1998-2007', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 197 291-294 (2012)
DOI 10.5694/mja11.11331
Citations Scopus - 131Web of Science - 115
Co-authors E Sullivan
2012 Liu B, Guthridge S, Li SQ, Markey P, Krause V, McIntyre P, et al., 'The end of the Australia antigen? An ecological study of the impact of universal newborn hepatitis B vaccination two decades on', VACCINE, 30 7309-7314 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.09.033
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 16
Co-authors E Sullivan
2012 Wang YA, Farquhar C, Sullivan EA, 'Donor age is a major determinant of success of oocyte donation/recipient programme', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 27 118-125 (2012)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/der359
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors E Sullivan
2012 Sullivan EA, Wang YA, Hayward I, Chambers GM, Illingworth P, McBain J, Norman RJ, 'Single embryo transfer reduces the risk of perinatal mortality, a population study', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 27 3609-3615 (2012)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/des315
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 36
Co-authors E Sullivan
2012 Austin M-P, Reilly N, Sullivan E, 'The need to evaluate public health reforms: Australian perinatal mental health initiatives', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 36 208-211 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2012.00851.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Nicole Reilly, E Sullivan
2012 Xu F, Austin M-P, Reilly N, Hilder L, Sullivan EA, 'Major depressive disorder in the perinatal period: using data linkage to inform perinatal mental health policy', ARCHIVES OF WOMENS MENTAL HEALTH, 15 333-341 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s00737-012-0289-8
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Nicole Reilly, E Sullivan
2012 Xu F, Sullivan EA, Madden RC, Black D, Pulver LRJ, 'Improvement of maternal Aboriginality in NSW birth data', BMC MEDICAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY, 12 (2012)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-12-8
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors E Sullivan
2012 Xu F, Hilder L, Austin M-P, Sullivan EA, 'Data preparation techniques for a perinatal psychiatric study based on linked data', BMC MEDICAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY, 12 (2012)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-12-71
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors E Sullivan
2012 Knight M, Berg C, Brocklehurst P, Kramer M, Lewis G, Oats J, et al., 'Amniotic fluid embolism incidence, risk factors and outcomes: a review and recommendations', BMC PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH, 12 (2012)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-12-7
Citations Scopus - 70Web of Science - 51
Co-authors E Sullivan
2012 Xu F, Sullivan EA, Black DA, Pulver LRJ, Madden RC, 'Under-reporting of birth registrations in New South Wales, Australia', BMC PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH, 12 (2012)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-12-147
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
Co-authors E Sullivan
2011 Nygren KG, Sullivan E, Zegers-Hochschild F, Mansour R, Ishihara O, Adamson GD, de Mouzon J, 'International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technology (ICMART) world report: assisted reproductive technology 2003', FERTILITY AND STERILITY, 95 2209-U121 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2011.03.058
Citations Scopus - 75Web of Science - 63
Co-authors E Sullivan
2011 Chambers GM, Illingworth PJ, Sullivan EA, 'Assisted reproductive technology: public funding and the voluntary shift to single embryo transfer in Australia', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 195 594-598 (2011)
DOI 10.5694/mja10.11448
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 32
Co-authors E Sullivan
2011 Homer CSE, Biggs J, Vaughan G, Sullivan EA, 'Mapping maternity services in Australia: location, classification and services', AUSTRALIAN HEALTH REVIEW, 35 222-229 (2011)
DOI 10.1071/AH10908
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors E Sullivan
2011 Nair P, Davies AR, Beca J, Bellomo R, Ellwood D, Forrest P, et al., 'Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe ARDS in pregnant and postpartum women during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic', INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, 37 648-654 (2011)
DOI 10.1007/s00134-011-2138-z
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 41
Co-authors E Sullivan
2011 Laws PJ, Lim C, Tracy SK, Dahlen H, Sullivan EA, 'Changes to booking, transfer criteria and procedures in birth centres in Australia from 1997-2007: a national survey', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 20 2812-2821 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03765.x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors E Sullivan
2011 Knight M, Pierce M, Seppelt I, Kurinczuk JJ, Spark P, Brocklehurst P, et al., 'Critical illness with AH1N1v influenza in pregnancy: a comparison of two population-based cohorts', BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, 118 232-239 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2010.02736.x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
Co-authors E Sullivan
2011 Knight M, Pierce M, Seppelt I, Kurinczuk JJ, Spark P, Brocklehurst P, et al., 'Influenza AH1N1v in pregnancy', BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, 118 1140-1141 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2011.02958.x
Co-authors E Sullivan
2011 Wang YA, Costello M, Chapman M, Black D, Sullivan EA, 'Transfers of fresh blastocysts and blastocysts cultured from thawed cleavage embryos are associated with fewer miscarriages', REPRODUCTIVE BIOMEDICINE ONLINE, 23 777-788 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.rbmo.2011.07.023
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors E Sullivan
2010 Chambers GM, Sullivan EA, Shanahan M, Ho MT, Priester K, Chapman MG, 'Is in vitro fertilisation more effective than stimulated intrauterine insemination as a first-line therapy for subfertility? A cohort analysis', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 50 280-288 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2010.01155.x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
Co-authors E Sullivan
2010 de Mouzon J, Lancaster P, Nygren KG, Sullivan E, Zegers-Hochschild F, Mansour R, et al., 'World Collaborative Report on Assisted Reproductive Technology, 2002 (vol 24, pg 2310, 2009)', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 25 1345-1345 (2010)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/dep454
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2010 Wang YA, Chapman M, Costello M, Sullivan EA, 'Better perinatal outcomes following transfer of fresh blastocysts and blastocysts cultured from thawed cleavage embryos: a population-based study', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 25 1536-1542 (2010)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/deq067
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 14
Co-authors E Sullivan
2010 Wang YA, Kovacs G, Sullivan EA, 'Transfer of a selected single blastocyst optimizes the chance of a healthy term baby: a retrospective population based study in Australia 2004-2007', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 25 1996-2005 (2010)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/deq145
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 21
Co-authors E Sullivan
2010 Farquhar CM, Wang YA, Sullivan EA, 'A comparative analysis of assisted reproductive technology cycles in Australia and New Zealand 2004-2007', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 25 2281-2289 (2010)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/deq187
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors E Sullivan
2010 Laws PJ, Tracy SK, Sullivan EA, 'Perinatal Outcomes of Women Intending to Give Birth in Birth Centers in Australia', BIRTH-ISSUES IN PERINATAL CARE, 37 28-36 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1523-536X.2009.00375.x
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 27
Co-authors E Sullivan
2010 Sullivan EA, Chapman MG, Wang YA, Adamson GD, 'Population-Based Study of Cesarean Section After In Vitro Fertilization in Australia', BIRTH-ISSUES IN PERINATAL CARE, 37 184-191 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1523-536X.2010.00405.x
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 18
Co-authors E Sullivan
2010 Abeywardana S, Bower C, Halliday J, Chan A, Sullivan EA, 'Prevalence of neural tube defects in Australia prior to mandatory fortification of bread-making flour with folic acid', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 34 351-355 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00565.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors E Sullivan
2010 Dean JH, Chapman MG, Sullivan EA, 'The effect on human sex ratio at birth by assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures - an assessment of babies born following single embryo transfers, Australia and New Zealand, 2002-2006', BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, 117 1628-1634 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2010.02731.x
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 32
Co-authors E Sullivan
2010 Knight M, Sullivan EA, 'Variation in caesarean delivery rates', BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 341 (2010)
DOI 10.1136/bmj.c5255
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors E Sullivan
2010 Guy RJ, Kong F, Goller J, Franklin N, Bergeri I, Dimech W, et al., 'A new national Chlamydia Sentinel Surveillance System in Australia: evaluation of the first stage of implementation.', Communicable diseases intelligence, 34 319-328 (2010)

The Australian Collaboration for Chlamydia Enhanced Sentinel Surveillance (ACCESS) was established with funding from the Department of Health and Ageing to trial the monitoring of... [more]

The Australian Collaboration for Chlamydia Enhanced Sentinel Surveillance (ACCESS) was established with funding from the Department of Health and Ageing to trial the monitoring of the uptake and outcome of chlamydia testing in Australia. ACCESS involved 6 separate networks; 5 clinical networks involving sexual health services, family planning clinics, general practices, antenatal clinics, Aboriginal community controlled health services, and 1 laboratory network. The program ran from May 2007 to September 2010. An evaluation of ACCESS was undertaken in early 2010, 2 years after the program was funded. At the time of the evaluation, 76 of the 91 participating sites were contributing data. The jurisdictional distribution of the 76 sites generally matched the jurisdictional distribution of the Australian population. In 2008, the chlamydia testing rates in persons aged 16-29 years attending the 26 general practices was 4.2% in males and 7.0% in females. At the 25 sexual health services, the chlamydia testing rates in heterosexuals aged less than 25 years in 2008 was 77% in males and 74% in females. Between 2004 and 2008, the chlamydia positivity rate increased significantly in heterosexual females aged less than 25 years attending the sexual health services, from 11.5% to 14.1% (P < 0.01). Data completeness was above 85% for all core variables except Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status and country of birth, which ranged from 68%-100%, and 74%-100%, respectively, per network. There were delays in establishment of the system due to recruitment of 91 sites, multiple ethics applications and establishment of automated extraction programs in 10 different database systems, to transform clinic records into a common, pre-defined surveillance format. ACCESS has considerable potential as a mechanism toward supporting a better understanding of long-term trends in chlamydia notifications and to support policy and program delivery.

Citations Scopus - 45
Co-authors E Sullivan, Nicole Reilly
2009 Homer C, Clements V, McDonnell N, Peek M, Sullivan E, 'Maternal mortality: What can we learn from stories of postpartum haemorrhage?', Women and Birth, 22 97-104 (2009)

Death from pregnancy is rare in developed countries such as Australia but is still common in third world and developing countries. The investigation of each maternal death yields ... [more]

Death from pregnancy is rare in developed countries such as Australia but is still common in third world and developing countries. The investigation of each maternal death yields valuable information and lessons that all health care providers involved with the care of women can learn from. The aim of these investigations is to prevent future maternal morbidity and mortality. Obstetric haemorrhage remains a leading cause of maternal death internationally. It is the most common cause of death in developing countries. In Australia and the United Kingdom, obstetric haemorrhage is ranked as the 4th and 3rd most common cause of direct maternal death respectively. In a number of cases there are readily identifiable factors associated with the care that the women received that may have contributed to their death. It is from these identifiable factors that both midwives and doctors can learn to help prevent similar episodes from occurring. This article will identify some of the lessons that can be learnt from the recent Australian and UK maternal death reports. This paper presents an overview of the process and systems for the reporting of maternal death in Australia. It will then specifically focus on obstetric haemorrhage, with a focus on postpartum haemorrhage, for the 12-year period, 1994-2005. Vignettes from the maternal mortality reports in Australia and the United Kingdom are used to highlight the important lessons for providers of maternity care. © 2009 Australian College of Midwives.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2009.02.002
Citations Scopus - 16
Co-authors E Sullivan
2009 Lim JM, Sullivan E, Kennedy D, 'MotherSafe: Review of three years of counselling by an Australian teratology Information Service', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 49 168-172 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2009.00976.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
Co-authors E Sullivan
2009 Laws PJ, Lim C, Tracy S, Sullivan EA, 'Characteristics and practices of birth centres in Australia', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 49 290-295 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2009.01002.x
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 24
Co-authors E Sullivan
2009 Sullivan EA, Moran K, Chapman M, 'Term breech singletons and caesarean section: A population study, Australia 1991-2005', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 49 456-460 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2009.01050.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
Co-authors E Sullivan
2009 Chambers GM, Sullivan EA, Ishihara O, Chapman MG, Adamson GD, 'The economic impact of assisted reproductive technology: a review of selected developed countries', FERTILITY AND STERILITY, 91 2281-2294 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2009.04.029
Citations Scopus - 167Web of Science - 149
Co-authors E Sullivan
2009 Zegers-Hochschild F, Adamson GD, de Mouzon J, Ishihara O, Mansour R, Nygren K, et al., 'International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technology (ICMART) and the World Health Organization (WHO) revised glossary of ART terminology, 2009', FERTILITY AND STERILITY, 92 1520-1524 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2009.09.009
Citations Scopus - 506Web of Science - 429
Co-authors E Sullivan
2009 Wang YA, Sullivan EA, Healy DL, Black DA, 'Perinatal outcomes after assisted reproductive technology treatment in Australia and New Zealand: single versus double embryo transfer', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 190 234-237 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 39
Co-authors E Sullivan
2009 Robson SJ, Laws P, Sullivan EA, 'Adverse outcomes of labour in public and private hospitals in Australia: a population-based descriptive study', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 190 474-477 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 36
Co-authors E Sullivan
2009 Robson SJ, Laws P, Sullivan EA, 'Adverse outcomes of labour in public and private hospitals in Australia Reply', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 190 519-519 (2009)
Co-authors E Sullivan
2009 de Mouzon J, Lancaster P, Nygren KG, Sullivan E, Zegers-Hochschild F, Mansour R, et al., 'World Collaborative Report on Assisted Reproductive Technology, 2002', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 24 2310-2320 (2009)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/dep098
Citations Scopus - 115Web of Science - 93
Co-authors E Sullivan
2009 Zegers-Hochschild F, Adamson GD, de Mouzon J, Ishihara O, Mansour R, Nygren K, et al., 'The International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technology (ICMART) and the World Health Organization (WHO) Revised Glossary on ART Terminology, 2009', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 24 2683-2687 (2009)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/dep343
Citations Scopus - 438Web of Science - 365
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Austin M-P, Priest SR, Sullivan EA, 'Antenatal psychosocial assessment for reducing perinatal mental health morbidity', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CD005124 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd005124.pub2
Citations Scopus - 58Web of Science - 37
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Pollock W, Sullivan E, Nelson S, King J, 'Capacity to monitor severe maternal morbidity in Australia', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 48 17-25 (2008)

Maternal mortality has traditionally been the key element in the monitoring of maternal health and adequacy of obstetric services in Australia and around the world. In developed c... [more]

Maternal mortality has traditionally been the key element in the monitoring of maternal health and adequacy of obstetric services in Australia and around the world. In developed countries, the ability of maternal mortality to serve this purpose is reduced because of the rarity of maternal mortality, reflected in very low maternal mortality ratios. Internationally, there has been increasing interest in severe maternal morbidity as an indicator to monitor maternal health and maternity services. The aim of this paper is to critically examine the capacity to measure and monitor maternal morbidity in Australia. There is a paucity of reliable maternal morbidity data in Australia; Australia is lagging behind peer countries that are endeavouring to monitor severe maternal morbidity. Dedicated efforts and adequate resources are needed in order to monitor severe maternal morbidity in Australia. © 2008 The Authors.

DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2007.00810.x
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Tracy SK, Tracy MB, Sullivan E, 'Admission of term infants to neonatal intensive care: A population-based study', Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey, 63 217-218 (2008)
DOI 10.1097/01.ogx.0000308997.34335.cd
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Tracy SK, Dahlen H, Tracy MB, Laws P, Sullivan E, 'Reply', Birth, 35 86 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1523-536X.2007.00219_3.x
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Tracy SK, Sullivan EA, Tracy MB, 'Reply: Admitting term infants to neonatal intensive care units in Australia', Birth, 35 259-260 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1523-536X.2008.00250_4.x
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Pollock W, Sullivan E, Nelson S, King J, 'Capacity to monitor severe maternal morbidity in Australia', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 48 17-25 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-82SX.2007.00810.x
Citations Web of Science - 10
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Cliffe S, Black D, Bryant J, Sullivan E, 'Maternal deaths in New South Wales, Australia: A data linkage project', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 48 255-260 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2008.00878.x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Pollock W, Sullivan E, Nelson S, King J, 'Monitoring severe maternal morbidity in Australia - Authors' reply', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 48 356-357 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2008.00885.x
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Chan DL, Sullivan EA, 'Teenage smoking in pregnancy and birthweight: a population study, 2001-2004', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 188 392-396 (2008)
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 14
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Cliffe SJ, Tabrizi S, Sullivan EA, 'Chlamydia in the pacific region, the silent epidemic', SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, 35 801-806 (2008)
DOI 10.1097/OLQ.0b013e318175d885
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 22
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Wang YA, Healy D, Black D, Sullivan EA, 'Age-specific success rate for women undertaking their first assisted reproduction technology treatment using their own oocytes in Australia, 2002-2005', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 23 1633-1638 (2008)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/den135
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 33
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Sullivan E, Wang Y, Chapman M, Chambers G, 'Success rates and cost of a live birth following fresh assisted reproduction treatment in women aged 45 years and older, Australia 2002-2004', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 23 1639-1643 (2008)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/den102
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors E Sullivan
2008 Tracy SK, Sullivan EA, Tracy MB, '"The baby is breastfeeding'' - Reply', BIRTH-ISSUES IN PERINATAL CARE, 35 259-260 (2008)
Co-authors E Sullivan
2007 Tracy SK, Sullivan E, Wang YA, Black D, Tracy M, 'Birth outcomes associated with interventions in labour amongst low risk women: A population-based study', Women and Birth, 20 41-48 (2007)

Introduction: Despite concern over high rates of operative birth in many countries, particularly amongst low risk healthy women, the obstetric antecedents of operative birth are p... [more]

Introduction: Despite concern over high rates of operative birth in many countries, particularly amongst low risk healthy women, the obstetric antecedents of operative birth are poorly described. We aimed to determine the association between interventions introduced during labour with interventions in the birth process amongst women of low medical risk. Methods: We undertook a population-based descriptive study of all low risk women amongst the 753,895 women who gave birth in Australia during 2000-2002. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were calculated using multinomial logistic regression to describe the association between mode of birth and each of four labour intervention subgroups separately for primiparous and multiparous women. Results: We observed increased rates of operative birth in association with each of the interventions offered during the labour process. For first time mothers the association was particularly strong. Conclusions: This study underlines the need for better clinical evidence of the effects of epidurals and pharmacological agents introduced in labour. At a population level it demonstrates the magnitude of the fall in rates of unassisted vaginal birth in association with a cascade of interventions in labour and interventions at birth particularly amongst women with no identified risk markers and having their first baby. This information may be useful for women wanting to explore other methods of influencing the course of labour and the management of pain in labour, especially in their endeavour to achieve a normal vaginal birth. © 2007.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2007.03.005
Citations Scopus - 53
Co-authors E Sullivan
2007 Austin M-P, Kildea S, Sullivan E, 'Maternal mortality and psychiatric morbidity in the perinatal period: challenges and opportunities for prevention in the Australian setting', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 186 364-367 (2007)
Citations Scopus - 99Web of Science - 82
Co-authors E Sullivan
2007 Graham S, Pulver LRJ, Wang YA, Kelly PM, Laws PJ, Grayson N, Sullivan EA, 'The urban-remote divide for Indigenous perinatal outcomes', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 186 509-512 (2007)
Citations Web of Science - 26
Co-authors E Sullivan
2007 Haddow LJ, Sullivan EA, Taylor J, Abel M, Cunningham AL, Tabrizi S, Mindel A, 'Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection in women attending an antenatal clinic in the South Pacific island nation of Vanuatu', SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, 34 258-261 (2007)
DOI 10.1097/01.olq.0000237774.29010.30
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 11
Co-authors E Sullivan
2007 Hansen M, Sullivan E, Jequier AM, Burton P, Junk S, Yovich J, Bower C, 'Practitioner reporting of birth defects in children born following assisted reproductive technology: Does it still have a role in surveillance of birth defects?', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 22 516-520 (2007)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/del384
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 7
Co-authors E Sullivan
2007 Chambers GM, Chaptnan MG, Grayson N, Shanahan M, Sullivan EA, 'Babies born after ART treatment cost more than non-ART babies: a cost analysis of inpatient birth-admission costs of singleton and multiple gestation pregnancies', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 22 3108-3115 (2007)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/dem311
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 47
Co-authors E Sullivan
2007 Bryant J, Porter M, Tracy SK, Sullivan EA, 'Caesarean birth: Consumption, safety, order, and good mothering', SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE, 65 1192-1201 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.socscimed.2007.05.025
Citations Scopus - 61Web of Science - 51
Co-authors E Sullivan
2007 Tracy SK, Dahlen H, Caplice S, Laws P, Wang YA, Tracy MB, Sullivan E, 'Birth centers in Australia: A national population-based study of perinatal mortality associated with giving birth in a birth center', BIRTH-ISSUES IN PERINATAL CARE, 34 194-201 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1523-536X.2007.00171.x
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 31
Co-authors E Sullivan
2007 Tracy SK, Tracy MB, Sullivan E, 'Admission of term infants to neonatal intensive care: A population-based study', BIRTH-ISSUES IN PERINATAL CARE, 34 301-307 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1523-536X.2007.00188.x
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 29
Co-authors E Sullivan
2007 Tracy SK, Tracy MB, Dean J, Laws P, Sullivan E, 'Spontaneous preterm birth of liveborn infants in women at low risk in Australia over 10 years: a population-based study', BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, 114 731-735 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2007.01323.x
Citations Scopus - 58Web of Science - 58
Co-authors E Sullivan
2006 Sullivan E, 'Prevalence and perinatal outcomes of multiple gestation - Introduction to theme', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 46 S3-S7 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828x.2006.00612_1.x
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2006 Adamson GD, de Mouzon J, Lancaster P, Nygren K-G, Sullivan E, Zegers-Hochschild F, 'World collaborative report on in vitro fertilization, 2000', FERTILITY AND STERILITY, 85 1586-1622 (2006)
DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2006.01.011
Citations Scopus - 128Web of Science - 102
Co-authors E Sullivan
2006 Zegers-Hochschild F, Nygren K-G, Adamson GD, de Mouzon J, Lancaster P, Mansour R, Sullivan E, 'The International Committee Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ICMART) glossary on ART terminology', FERTILITY AND STERILITY, 86 16-19 (2006)
DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2006.04.018
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 46
Co-authors E Sullivan
2006 Chambers GM, Ho MT, Sullivan EA, 'Assisted reproductive technology treatment costs of a live birth: an age-stratified cost-outcome study of treatment in Australia', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 184 155-158 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 36
Co-authors E Sullivan
2006 Zegers-Hochschild F, Nygren K-G, Adamson GD, de Mouzon J, Lancaster P, Mansour R, Sullivan E, 'The ICMART glossary on ART terminology', HUMAN REPRODUCTION, 21 1968-1970 (2006)
DOI 10.1093/humrep/del171
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 63
Co-authors E Sullivan
2006 Tracy SK, Sullivan E, Dahlen H, Black D, Wang YPA, Tracy MB, 'Does size matter? A population-based study of birth in lower volume maternity hospitals for low risk women', BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, 113 86-96 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2005.00794.x
Citations Scopus - 68Web of Science - 68
Co-authors E Sullivan
2006 Tracy SK, Dahlen H, Tracy MB, Sullivan E, 'Does size matter? A population based study of birth in lower volume maternity hospitals for low risk women - Author's reply', BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, 113 617-U16 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2006.00920.x
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2005 Henry A, Birch MR, Sullivan EA, Katz S, Wang YPA, 'Primary postpartum haemorrhage in an Australian tertiary hospital: a case-control study', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 45 233-236 (2005)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2005.00394.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors E Sullivan
2005 Wang YA, Sullivan EA, Black D, Dean J, Bryant J, Chapman M, 'Preterm birth and low birth weight after assisted reproductive technology-related pregnancy in Australia between 1996 and 2000', FERTILITY AND STERILITY, 83 1650-1658 (2005)
DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2004.12.033
Citations Scopus - 145Web of Science - 136
Co-authors E Sullivan
2004 Sullivan EA, Ford JB, Chambers G, Slaytor EK, 'Maternal mortality in Australia, 1973-1996', AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, 44 452-457 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2004.00313.x
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 45
Co-authors E Sullivan
2004 King JF, Slaytor EK, Sullivan EA, 'Maternal deaths in Australia, 1997-1999', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 181 413-414 (2004)
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors E Sullivan
2004 Sullivan EA, Koro S, Tabrizi S, Kaldor J, Poumerol G, Chen S, et al., 'Prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases and human immunodeficiency virus among women attending prenatal services in Apia, Samoa', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STD & AIDS, 15 116-119 (2004)
DOI 10.1258/095646204322764316
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 15
Co-authors E Sullivan
2004 Ford JB, Henry RL, Sullivan EA, 'Comparison of selected reasons for hospitalization of children among children's/tertiary hospitals, Australia, 1996-97 and 1997-98', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 40 374-379 (2004)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2004.00405.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2003 Sullivan EA, Abel M, Tabrizi S, Garland SM, Grice A, Poumerol G, et al., 'Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections among antenatal women in Vanuatu, 1999-2000', SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, 30 362-366 (2003)
DOI 10.1097/00007435-200304000-00017
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 21
Co-authors E Sullivan
2002 Sullivan EA, Willcock S, Ardzejewska K, Slaytor EK, 'A pre-employment programme for overseas-trained doctors entering the Australian workforce, 1997-99', MEDICAL EDUCATION, 36 614-621 (2002)
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2923.2002.01196.x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
Co-authors E Sullivan
2002 Walters WAW, Ford JB, Sullivan EA, King JF, 'Maternal deaths in Australia', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 176 413-414 (2002)
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors E Sullivan
2001 Marks GB, Bai J, Stewart GJ, Simpson SE, Sullivan EA, 'Effectiveness of postmigration screening in controlling tuberculosis among refugees: A historical cohort study, 1984-1998', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 91 1797-1799 (2001)
DOI 10.2105/AJPH.91.11.1797
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
Co-authors E Sullivan
2000 Comino E, Sullivan E, Harris E, Killian D, Jiang CY, 'A community-based health service census: Describing the client base', Australian Journal of Primary Health - Interchange, 6 63-71 (2000)

This paper describes the results of a census of newly registered clients attending community-based health services in a large health region on the south western outskirts of Sydne... [more]

This paper describes the results of a census of newly registered clients attending community-based health services in a large health region on the south western outskirts of Sydney to enumerate the client base of these services and to investigate the reach to population groups. Two questionnaires, one for adults and the other for children were administered to all new clients of community, allied and dental health services. These questionnaires collected enhanced demographic information during a three month period that was compared with the resident population. 10,734 new clients were registered. These included 2,638 adults and 3,047 children who were attending community health services. Older adults were over-represented in the adult client population while adults accompanying children to services were largely aged 20-39 years. The data suggest good reach of services to ethnic minority groups when country of birth was considered (32.3% NESB versus 30.4% in the resident population). When language spoken at home was used those who spoke a language other that English at home were under- represented in these data (31.6%) compared to the resident population (39.7%). Adults attending with a child were more likely to be married and to have stayed at school until at least 17 years. The study was the first attempt in NSW to enumerate the client base of community-based health services and was important in demonstrating to staff the value of adequate systems to monitor the use and reach of services. The data suggest a bias of services to more advantaged groups.

Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2000 Marks GB, Bai U, Simpson SE, Sullivan EA, Stewart GJ, 'Incidence of tuberculosis among a cohort of tuberculin-positive refugees in Australia - Reappraising the estimates of risk', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 162 1851-1854 (2000)
DOI 10.1164/ajrccm.162.5.2004154
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 48
Co-authors E Sullivan
1999 Sullivan EM, Burgess MA, Forrest JM, 'The epidemiology of rubella and congenital rubella in Australia, 1992 to 1997.', Communicable diseases intelligence, 23 209-214 (1999)

Selective rubella vaccination of schoolgirls commenced in 1971 and was followed by a significant reduction in congenital rubella. Infant vaccination with MMR was introduced in 198... [more]

Selective rubella vaccination of schoolgirls commenced in 1971 and was followed by a significant reduction in congenital rubella. Infant vaccination with MMR was introduced in 1989 to interrupt circulation of the virus in young children, and in 1994/95 the adolescent school based rubella vaccination program was changed to MMR for both boys and girls. This report reviews the epidemiology of rubella and congenital rubella between 1992 and 1997 using reports to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) and the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit (APSU). Notification rates for rubella exceeded 20 per 100,000 in 1992, 1993 and 1995 and declined to 7.2 per 100,000 in 1997. Sixty-one per cent of notifications occurred between September and December and 68% occurred in males. The incidence rate in males aged 15-22 years peaked at 152.6 per 100,000 in 1995 reflecting the lack of immunisation in this cohort. From 1993 to 1997, 19 children were reported with congenital rubella syndrome, representing 1 in 67,000 live births. Of these, 17 had multiple defects (4 died) and 2 had deafness only. There were also 5 infants with congenital rubella infection but no defects. Australia's rate of congenital rubella syndrome exceeded that of the United Kingdom and the United States of America but this may be partly attributable to differences in reporting practices. The impact of changing the second dose of MMR vaccine to 4 years of age in 1998 will require careful monitoring.

Citations Scopus - 27
Co-authors E Sullivan
1999 Gosbell IB, Newton PJ, Sullivan EA, 'Survey of blood cultures from five community hospitals in south-western Sydney, Australia, 1993-1994', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, 29 684-692 (1999)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.1999.tb01616.x
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
Co-authors E Sullivan
1999 Gosbell IB, Sullivan EA, Maidment CA, 'An unexpected result in an evaluation of a serological test to detect syphilis', PATHOLOGY, 31 398-402 (1999)
DOI 10.1080/003130299104800
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
1999 Smith B, Sullivan E, Bauman A, Powell-Davies G, Mitchell J, 'Lay beliefs about the preventability of major health conditions', HEALTH EDUCATION RESEARCH, 14 315-325 (1999)
DOI 10.1093/her/14.3.315
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 27
Co-authors E Sullivan
1999 Bai J, Marks GB, Stewart GJ, Simpson SE, Sullivan EA, 'Specificity of notification for tuberculosis among screened refugees in NSW', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 23 410-413 (1999)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.1999.tb01284.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors E Sullivan
1998 Sullivan EA, Geoffroy P, Weisman R, Hoffman R, Frieden TR, 'Isoniazld poisonings in New York City', Journal of Emergency Medicine, 16 57-59 (1998)

We identified 41 New York City residents who had been hospitalized at least overnight between January 1992 and September 1993 because of a toxic isoniazid (INH) exposure. Review o... [more]

We identified 41 New York City residents who had been hospitalized at least overnight between January 1992 and September 1993 because of a toxic isoniazid (INH) exposure. Review of the available medical charts of 33 patients revealed that median age was 19 years, 27 (82%) were females, and 24 (83%) were taking INH chemoprophylaxis for tuberculosis infection. Twenty- two patients had seizures. Twenty-seven (82%) patients had attempted suicide using INH, and another three patients had intentionally misused INH by making up missed doses at one time. All patients survived. Physicians should be aware of the potential for INH toxicity and should assess their patients' current mental and psychosocial status when prescribing it. INH toxicity should be considered when young patients, particularly females, present with unexplained intractable seizures, and treatment with pyridoxine should be given.

DOI 10.1016/S0736-4679(97)00242-4
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors E Sullivan
1998 Sullivan EA, Chey T, Nossar V, 'Erratum: A population-based survey of immunisation coverage in children aged 2 years and younger in New South Wales (Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health (1998) 34 (342-345))', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 34 595 (1998)
Co-authors E Sullivan
1998 Sullivan EA, Chey T, Nossar V, 'A population-based survey of immunisation coverage in children aged 2 years and younger in New South Wales', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 34 342-345 (1998)
DOI 10.1046/j.1440-1754.1998.00235.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors E Sullivan
1998 Sullivan EA, Chey T, Nossar V, 'A population-based survey of immunisation coverage in children aged 2 years and younger in New South Wales. (vol 34, pg 342, 1998)', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 34 595-595 (1998)
Co-authors E Sullivan
1998 Chant KG, Sullivan EA, Burgess MA, Ferson MJ, Forrest JM, Baird LM, et al., 'Varicella-zoster virus infection in Australia', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 22 413-418 (1998)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.1998.tb01405.x
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 44
Co-authors E Sullivan
1997 Mitchell SL, Sullivan EA, Lipsitz LA, 'Exclusion of elderly subjects from clinical trials for Parkinson disease', ARCHIVES OF NEUROLOGY, 54 1393-1398 (1997)
DOI 10.1001/archneur.1997.00550230060018
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 21
Co-authors E Sullivan
1996 Stanford DG, Georgouras KE, Sullivan EA, Greenoak GE, 'Skin phototyping in Asian Australians', Australasian Journal of Dermatology, 37 (1996)

Skin phototype was assessed in 257 Asian Australians by self-reporting questionnaire. Minimal erythema dose, minimal melonogenic dose and minimal immediate pigment darkening dose ... [more]

Skin phototype was assessed in 257 Asian Australians by self-reporting questionnaire. Minimal erythema dose, minimal melonogenic dose and minimal immediate pigment darkening dose were measured in a subgroup of 30 subjects. About 15% of Asian Australians in this study report that they have skin type I or II. Phototesting confirms that there is a UV-sensitive group and a wide spectrum of UV-sensitivity in this population. Whether Fitzpatrick's skin typing system adequately identifies this UV-sensitive group needs assessment by a larger study. The relationship between burning tendency and tanning capacity in Asians may differ from Caucasians.

Citations Scopus - 20
Co-authors E Sullivan
1996 Sullivan EA, Kamb ML, Jones JL, Meyer P, Philen RM, Falk H, Sinks T, 'The natural history of Eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome in a tryptophan-exposed cohort in South Carolina', ARCHIVES OF INTERNAL MEDICINE, 156 973-979 (1996)
DOI 10.1001/archinte.156.9.973
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 11
Co-authors E Sullivan
1996 Sullivan EA, Staehling N, Philen RM, 'Eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome among the non-L-tryptophan users and pre-epidemic cases', JOURNAL OF RHEUMATOLOGY, 23 1784-1787 (1996)
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors E Sullivan
1995 SULLIVAN EA, KREISWIRTH BN, PALUMBO L, KAPUR V, MUSSER JM, EBRAHIMZADEH A, FRIEDEN TR, 'EMERGENCE OF FLUOROQUINOLONE-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS IN NEW-YORK-CITY', LANCET, 345 1148-1150 (1995)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(95)90980-X
Citations Scopus - 108Web of Science - 97
Co-authors E Sullivan
1992 Philen RM, Sullivan E, 'EMS and L-tryptophan', American Family Physician, 46 (1992)
Co-authors E Sullivan
1992 BEK MD, SMITH WT, LEVY MH, SULLIVAN E, RUBIN GL, 'RABIES CASE IN NEW-SOUTH-WALES, 1990 - PUBLIC-HEALTH ASPECTS', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 156 596-& (1992)
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Wayne Smith, E Sullivan
Show 192 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2001 Marks GB, Bai J, Simpson SE, Stewart GJ, Sullivan EA, 'The incidence of tuberculosis in a cohort of South-East Asian refugees arriving in Australia 1984-94', Respirology (2001)

We have used record linkage analysis to describe the incidence of tuberculosis in a cohort of 24 652 predominantly south-east Asian refugees who arrived in Sydney, Australia durin... [more]

We have used record linkage analysis to describe the incidence of tuberculosis in a cohort of 24 652 predominantly south-east Asian refugees who arrived in Sydney, Australia during the period 1984 to 1994. Cases that had been registered with the State Department of Health were confirmed by examination of case records. After an average follow-up interval of 10.3 years there were 189 cases of tuberculosis, equivalent to an average incidence rate of 74.9 cases per 100 000 person-years. The highest incidence rate was in 40-49 year olds and 47% of cases were in women. One hundred and twenty seven cases (67%) were pulmonary and, of these, 64 (50%) were direct smear positive. The incidence of tuberculosis in this cohort is similar to that observed among Vietnamese migrants to Australia and the USA and substantially higher than the incidence among people born in Australia. It is important to maintain awareness of the diagnosis of tuberculosis, especially in countries such as Australia, where the incidence in the general population is low but where there are large populations of migrants and refugees in whom a higher incidence is expected.

DOI 10.1046/j.1440-1843.2001.00300.x
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors E Sullivan
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 38
Total funding $16,494,623

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


Highlighted grants and funding

Bangamalhana: A collaborative throughcare program to support social and emotional wellbeing of young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island females transitioning from prison to community.$955,647

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

A – Sullivan EA, Williams M, Kang M, Sherwood J, Baldry E, Bowman J, Brown J, Chang S, Warner F, Wayland S.

Scheme Targeted Call for Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2023
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

Cancer and Outcomes in Pregnancy - A national evaluation (COPE)$445,385

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team

Sullivan EA, Anazado A, Roder D, Nicholl M, Currow D, Gordon A, Hayen A, Hamad N.

Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C1600 - Aust Competitive - StateTerritory Govt
Category 1600
UON N

Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal women perpetrators of violence: a trial of a prison-based intervention (Beyond Violence)$1,411,825

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

Sullivan E, Butler T, Kubiak S, Wilson M, Barrett E,Jones J, Kariminia A,Dean K

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

Recidivism, health and social functioning following release to the community of NSW prisoners with problematic drug use, an evaluation of the Connections Program$536,966

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

Sullivan EA, Sherwood J, Zador D, Wang YW, Chang S.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

CRE in the evaluation, management and health care needs of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and related health implications$2,489,052

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Teede H,Norman R,Handelsman D,Davies M,Sullivan,McNeil J,Moran L,Rodgers R,J Patton G

Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

Sexual and reproductive health and behaviours of young offenders (14–18 years) in New South Wales and Queensland$869,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Chief Investigator C – Sullivan EA (University of Technology Sydney); CIA Butler A (University of New South Wales), Smith A, Ward J, Donovan B, Amin J, Yap L, Nathan S

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

The Australian perinatal mental health reforms: using population data to evaluate their impact on service utilisation and related cost-effectiveness$1,009,140

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Chief Investigator B – Sullivan EA (University of Technology Sydney); CIA Austin M (University of New South Wales)

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

A national population-based study of rheumatic heart disease in pregnancy$841,035

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

CIA Sullivan EA – (University of Technology Sydney) CIB Jackson Pulver L CIC Carapetis J CID Walsh W CIE Peek M CIF McLintock C CIG Kruske S

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

Social and cultural resilience and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal mothers in prison (SCREAM)$885,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Role Chief Investigator – A (University of Technology Sydney) CIA Sullivan EA (University of Technology Sydney) CIB Sherwood J CIC Jones J CID Baldry E CIE Butler T CIF Gilles M CIG Levy M

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

The Australian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System: Improving safety and quality of maternity care in Australia (AMOSS)$773,500

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Role Chief Investigator – A CIA Sullivan EA (University of New South Wales) CIB Peek M CIC Knight M CID Ellwood D CIE Jackson Pulver L CIF Homer C

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

Investigating the association between incarceration while pregnant and maternal and infant outcomes (MAGIC)$299,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

A feasibility study on redeveloping the ANZARD collection to include data on cryo-preserved embryos and their fate$218,854

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

Sullivan EA

Scheme Program Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

HERON$2,500,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Chief Investigator X – Sullivan EA (Affiliation); CIA BK Armstrong (University of New South Wales

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

20191 grants / $955,647

Bangamalhana: A collaborative throughcare program to support social and emotional wellbeing of young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island females transitioning from prison to community.$955,647

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

A – Sullivan EA, Williams M, Kang M, Sherwood J, Baldry E, Bowman J, Brown J, Chang S, Warner F, Wayland S.

Scheme Targeted Call for Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2023
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

20181 grants / $445,385

Cancer and Outcomes in Pregnancy - A national evaluation (COPE)$445,385

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team

Sullivan EA, Anazado A, Roder D, Nicholl M, Currow D, Gordon A, Hayen A, Hamad N.

Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C1600 - Aust Competitive - StateTerritory Govt
Category 1600
UON N

20173 grants / $220,000

NSW longitudinal population-based study of first-time mothers and cardiac disease and their babies.$150,000

Funding body: The Heart Foundation NSW

Funding body The Heart Foundation NSW
Project Team

Sullivan EA, Cordina R, Simmons L, Lawrence L, Peek M, Clarke M, Celemajer D.

Scheme CVRN Women and Heart Disease Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Systematic review of mental health and induced abortion$40,000

Funding body: Family Planning NSW

Funding body Family Planning NSW
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Kidney disease in pregnancy in Australia and New Zealand: Understanding risks and improving outcomes$30,000

Funding body: Central Adelaide Local Health Network

Funding body Central Adelaide Local Health Network
Project Team

Jesudason S; McDonald S; Sullivan EA

Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20165 grants / $2,100,219

Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal women perpetrators of violence: a trial of a prison-based intervention (Beyond Violence)$1,411,825

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

Sullivan E, Butler T, Kubiak S, Wilson M, Barrett E,Jones J, Kariminia A,Dean K

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

Recidivism, health and social functioning following release to the community of NSW prisoners with problematic drug use, an evaluation of the Connections Program$536,966

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

Sullivan EA, Sherwood J, Zador D, Wang YW, Chang S.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

Kidney disease in pregnancy in Australia and New Zealand: Understanding risks and improving outcomes.$53,128

Funding body: Central Adelaide Local Health Network

Funding body Central Adelaide Local Health Network
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Parenthood in patients receiving dialysis or kidney transplantation: a national study of perinatal risks and outcomes through population record linkage’$50,000

Funding body: Central Adelaide Local Health Network

Funding body Central Adelaide Local Health Network
Project Team

Jesudason S; McDonald S; Sullivan EA

Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Kidney Disease in Pregnancy in Australia and New Zealand: Understanding Risks and Improving Outcomes. $48,300

Funding body: Central Adelaide Local Health Network

Funding body Central Adelaide Local Health Network
Project Team

Jesudason S; McDonald S; Sullivan EA

Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20142 grants / $2,589,052

CRE in the evaluation, management and health care needs of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and related health implications$2,489,052

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Teede H,Norman R,Handelsman D,Davies M,Sullivan,McNeil J,Moran L,Rodgers R,J Patton G

Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

Abortion in New South Wales$100,000

Funding body: Family Planning NSW

Funding body Family Planning NSW
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20133 grants / $966,000

Sexual and reproductive health and behaviours of young offenders (14–18 years) in New South Wales and Queensland$869,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Chief Investigator C – Sullivan EA (University of Technology Sydney); CIA Butler A (University of New South Wales), Smith A, Ward J, Donovan B, Amin J, Yap L, Nathan S

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

Life-threatening massive obstetric haemorrhage requiring rapid, high-volume blood transfusion$57,000

Funding body: Australian Red Cross

Funding body Australian Red Cross
Scheme Research Application
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Life-threatening massive obstetric haemorrhage requiring rapid, high-volume blood transfusion. A collaborative study of Australian and New Zealand Maternity Units$40,000

Funding body: Royal Hospital for Women Foundation

Funding body Royal Hospital for Women Foundation
Scheme Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20125 grants / $2,170,829

The Australian perinatal mental health reforms: using population data to evaluate their impact on service utilisation and related cost-effectiveness$1,009,140

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Chief Investigator B – Sullivan EA (University of Technology Sydney); CIA Austin M (University of New South Wales)

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

A national population-based study of rheumatic heart disease in pregnancy$841,035

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

CIA Sullivan EA – (University of Technology Sydney) CIB Jackson Pulver L CIC Carapetis J CID Walsh W CIE Peek M CIF McLintock C CIG Kruske S

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

Breast cancer in pregnancy: Surveillance, management, outcomes and experiences$200,000

Funding body: National Breast Cancer Foundation

Funding body National Breast Cancer Foundation
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Vasa Praevia in Australia: Surveillance, Management, Outcomes and Experiences$97,654

Funding body: International Vasa Praevia Foundation IVPF

Funding body International Vasa Praevia Foundation IVPF
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Australian and New Zealand Fertility Preservation Registry (ANZFPR). Fertility Society of Australia$23,000

Funding body: Fertility Society of Australia

Funding body Fertility Society of Australia
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20111 grants / $170,000

Australia and New Zealand Neonatal Network (ANZNN) – Data Capture Portal$170,000

Funding body: Australian National Data Service

Funding body Australian National Data Service
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20102 grants / $1,320,000

Social and cultural resilience and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal mothers in prison (SCREAM)$885,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Role Chief Investigator – A (University of Technology Sydney) CIA Sullivan EA (University of Technology Sydney) CIB Sherwood J CIC Jones J CID Baldry E CIE Butler T CIF Gilles M CIG Levy M

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

Economic impact and policy implications of assisted reproductive technologies in Australia$435,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Scheme Large Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON N

20091 grants / $38,359

The Australian Collaboration for Chlamydia Enhanced Sentinel Surveillance (ACCESS)$38,359

Funding body: Antenatal Network. Department of Health & Ageing

Funding body Antenatal Network. Department of Health & Ageing
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20081 grants / $773,500

The Australian Maternity Outcomes Surveillance System: Improving safety and quality of maternity care in Australia (AMOSS)$773,500

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Role Chief Investigator – A CIA Sullivan EA (University of New South Wales) CIB Peek M CIC Knight M CID Ellwood D CIE Jackson Pulver L CIF Homer C

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

20072 grants / $428,132

Investigating the association between incarceration while pregnant and maternal and infant outcomes (MAGIC)$299,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

The Australian Collaboration for Chlamydia Enhanced Sentinel Surveillance (ACCESS) Antenatal Network$129,132

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing
Scheme Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20063 grants / $1,437,708

Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit: A Collaborative network for child health research$1,000,000

Funding body Unknown
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

A feasibility study on redeveloping the ANZARD collection to include data on cryo-preserved embryos and their fate$218,854

Funding body: Australian National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body Australian National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

Sullivan EA

Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

A feasibility study on redeveloping the ANZARD collection to include data on cryo-preserved embryos and their fate$218,854

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

Sullivan EA

Scheme Program Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

20052 grants / $69,500

Implementation of second generation surveillance Pacific Island Countries. Provision of external support to setting up the first round of second generation HIV surveillance (SGS) in seven sentinel sites of Pacific Island Countries$62,000

Funding body: World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre

Funding body World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Process evaluation of implementation of SGS. Provision of external support to setting up the first round of second generation HIV surveillance (SGS) in seven sentinel sites of Pacific Island Countries$7,500

Funding body: World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre

Funding body World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20041 grants / $2,500,000

HERON$2,500,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Chief Investigator X – Sullivan EA (Affiliation); CIA BK Armstrong (University of New South Wales

Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

20031 grants / $58,992

Report on Maternal mortality in Australia, 1997–1999$58,992

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Scheme unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N

20011 grants / $80,300

STI risk behavioural and prevalence survey in fishermen and pregnant women, Kiribati.$80,300

Funding body: World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre

Funding body World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

19993 grants / $171,000

STD prevalence survey in Samoa$83,000

Funding body: World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre

Funding body World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 1999
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

STD prevalence survey in Vanuatu$78,000

Funding body: World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre

Funding body World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre
Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 1999
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Report on Maternal mortality in Australia, 1994–1996$10,000

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Scheme unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 1999
GNo
Type Of Funding C1100 - Aust Competitive - NHMRC
Category 1100
UON N
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News

Aboriginal mothers in prison face poorer health outcomes

April 18, 2019

The health needs of Aboriginal mothers in Australian prisons are not being met, according to a new study released today.

Professor Elizabeth Sullivan

Position

Deputy Head of Faculty
Office of the PVC Health and Medicine
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email liz.sullivan@newcastle.edu.au
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