Dr Kannan Krishnan

Dr Kannan Krishnan

Research Fellow

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
During my employment as Scientist in the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India (1997 to 2006), my research primarily focused on protein structure and function using Tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence and Circular Dichroism, and at the folding-unfolding dynamics of Neuronal calcium sensor-1. I have identified the presence of novel crystalline molecules in frog and crocodile cornea. I moved to the University of New England, Armidale to complete my PhD with Dr Pierre Moens and Professor Ken Watson. My PhD focused on the dynamics of lipid-protein interaction using the Giant Unilamellar Vesicle (GUV) model. The phosphatidylinositol (4, 5) bisphosphate lipid molecules were introduced into GUVs made of POPC lipids and human Profilin-1 interaction was analysed using laser scanning confocal microscopy based Number and Brightness (N&B) and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS) analysis. I have researched protein structure and function studies where I compared human profiling-1 and profiling-2 by comparing the stability and interaction with P-L-P and phosphatidylinositol (4, 5) bisphosphate. I joined Prof. Megharaj Mallavarapu and Prof. Ravi Naidu’s group in CERAR at the University of South Australia in 2009 as Molecular Microbiologist and worked on the CRC CARE project in developing a general biosensor for detecting environmental contaminants. I developed a whole cell biosensor to detect copper in soil and I am currently working on developing a whole cell biosensor to detect the presence of benzene in contaminated groundwater. I have co-supervised PhD students studying PFOS-induced (perfluorooctanesulfonate an environmental contaminant) differential gene expression in Eisenis fetida by next generation mRNA sequencing and transcriptome assembly. We have looked at benzo (a) pyrene (BaP) interaction with algae using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) and N&B analysis using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope. We have characterized genes from soil bacterial isolates that are involved in degrading environmental pollutants.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of New England
  • Bachelor of Science, Madurai Kamaraj University - India
  • Master of Science, Madurai Kamaraj University - India
  • Master of Technology, Anna University - Madras

Keywords

  • Biosensors and biomarkers
  • Differential gene expression
  • Environmental science
  • Molecular microbiology
  • Optical Microscopy
  • Raster image correlation spectroscopy

Languages

  • Tamil (Mother)
  • Telugu (Fluent)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050206 Environmental Monitoring 35
059999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified 30
050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified 35

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (24 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Mayilswami S, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Transcriptome analysis of Eisenia fetida chronically exposed to benzo(a)pyrene', Environmental Technology & Innovation, 7 54-62 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.12.002
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2017 Venugopal E, Ramadoss G, Krishnan K, Eranezhath SS, Bhattacharyya A, Rajendran S, 'Stimulation of human osteoblast cells (MG63) proliferation using decanoic acid and isopropyl amine fractions of Wattakaka volubilis leaves', JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACOLOGY, 69 1578-1591 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jphp.12801
2017 Mahbub KR, Krishnan K, Andrews S, Venter H, Naidu R, Mallavarapu M, 'Bio-augmentation and nutrient amendment decrease concentration of mercury in contaminated soil', Science of the Total Environment, 576 303-309 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.10.083
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2017 Mahbub KR, Bahar MM, Labbate M, Krishnan K, Andrews S, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Bioremediation of mercury: not properly exploited in contaminated soils!', APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 101 963-976 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00253-016-8079-2
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu, Mezbaul Bahar
2017 Nookongbut P, Kantachote D, Krishnan K, Mallavarapu M, 'Arsenic resistance genes of As-resistant purple nonsulfur bacteria isolated from As-contaminated sites for bioremediation application', JOURNAL OF BASIC MICROBIOLOGY, 57 316-324 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jobm.201600584
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Mahbub K, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Development of a whole cell biosensor for the detection of inorganic mercury', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 8 64-70 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.04.003
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2017 Khandaker Rayhan Mahbub, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Mallavarapu M, 'Mercury remediation potential of a mercury resistant strain Sphingopyxis sp. SE2 isolated from contaminated soil', Journal of Environmental Sciences, 51 128-137 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jes.2016.06.032
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Khandaker Rayhan Mahbub, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Mercury toxicity to Eisenia fetida in three different soils', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 24 1261-1269 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-7869-5
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2017 Mahbub KR, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Andrews S, Megharaj M, 'Mercury toxicity to terrestrial biota', ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS, 74 451-462 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecolind.2016.12.004
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2017 Mahbub KR, Subashchandrabose SR, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Mercury alters the bacterial community structure and diversity in soil even at concentrations lower than the guideline values', APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 101 2163-2175 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00253-016-7965-y
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2017 Mahbub KR, Kader M, Krishnan K, Labbate M, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Toxicity of Inorganic Mercury to Native Australian Grass Grown in Three Different Soils', BULLETIN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 98 850-855 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00128-017-2096-4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Mahbub K, Krishnan, Mallavarapu, Naidu, 'Mercury Inhibits Soil Enzyme Activity in a Lower Concentration than the Guideline Value', Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 96 76-82 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00128-015-1664-8
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Mahbub KR, Krishnan K, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation potential of a highly mercury resistant bacterial strain Sphingobium SA2 isolated from contaminated soil', Chemosphere, 144 330-337 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. A mercury resistant bacterial strain, SA2, was isolated from soil contaminated with mercury. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of this isolate showed 99% sequence s... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. A mercury resistant bacterial strain, SA2, was isolated from soil contaminated with mercury. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of this isolate showed 99% sequence similarity to the genera Sphingobium and Sphingomonas of a-proteobacteria group. However, the isolate formed a distinct phyletic line with the genus Sphingobium suggesting the strain belongs to Sphingobium sp. Toxicity studies indicated resistance to high levels of mercury with estimated EC 50 values 4.5 mg L -1 and 44.15 mg L -1 and MIC values 5.1 mg L -1 and 48.48 mg L -1 in minimal and rich media, respectively. The strain SA2 was able to volatilize mercury by producing mercuric reductase enzyme which makes it potential candidate for remediating mercury. ICP-QQQ-MS analysis of Hg supplemented culture solutions confirmed that almost 79% mercury in the culture suspension was volatilized in 6 h. A very small amount of mercury was observed to accumulate in cell pellets which was also evident according to ESEM-EDX analysis. The mercuric reductase gene merA was amplified and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence demonstrated sequence homology with a-proteobacteria and Ascomycota group.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.08.061
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Mayilswami S, Krishnan K, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Gene expression profile changes in Eisenia fetida chronically exposed to PFOA', Ecotoxicology, 25 759-769 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Eisenia fetida is a terrestrial organism, which can be used to diagnose sub-lethal concentrations of PFOA by using molecular bio... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Eisenia fetida is a terrestrial organism, which can be used to diagnose sub-lethal concentrations of PFOA by using molecular biomarkers. In order to identify potential molecular biomarkers, we have exposed E.¿fetida to 10¿mg/kg of PFOA in soil for 8¿months. The mRNA isolation, sequencing, transcriptome assembly followed by differential gene expression studies have revealed that genes that are involved in apoptotic process, reproduction, calcium signalling, neuronal development and lipid metabolism are predominantly affected. Highly specific genes that are altered by PFOA can be further validated and used as biomarker to detect sub-lethal concentrations of PFOA in the soil.

DOI 10.1007/s10646-016-1634-x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Mahbub KR, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Mercury resistance and volatilization by Pseudoxanthomonas sp. SE1 isolated from soil', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 6 94-104 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. A mercury resistant bacterial strain SE1 isolated from contaminated soil was identified as Pseudoxanthomonas based on 16s rRNA sequencing. The Hg resistance ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. A mercury resistant bacterial strain SE1 isolated from contaminated soil was identified as Pseudoxanthomonas based on 16s rRNA sequencing. The Hg resistance was examined in both nutrient-rich media as well as low nutrient media and expressed as EC 50 and MIC values. Estimated EC 50 and MIC values in nutrient-rich media and low nutrient media had the following respective recordings ¿ 22.6 mg L -1 ; 23.1 mg L -1 and 1.4 mg L -1 and 1.7 mg L -1 . The isolate was able to volatilize inorganic mercury demonstrated by a modified photographic film experiment and subsequently revealed its ability to remove mercury from the solution. The ICP-QQQ-MS analysis of SE1 inoculated solution showed almost 60% of 1.5 mg L -1 mercury was volatilized in 6 h and almost 40% were accumulated in cell pellets. The mercuric reductase gene merA was identified in the genome of isolate SE1 and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of merA gene indicated a sequence homology with different organisms from the alpha proteobacteria group and eukaryotic fungi. merA encoded enzyme mercuric reductase activity was evident in the crude protein of the isolate. The isolate's ability to resist Hg, it's Hg volatilization potential and the presence of merA gene and mercuric reductase enzyme demonstrates the potential application of this strain in mercury bioremediation.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.08.001
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Mayilswami S, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Transcriptome analysis of Eisenia fetida chronically exposed to benzo(a)pyrene', Environmental Technology & Innovation, (2016)
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Perumal V, Krishnan K, Gratton E, Dharmarajan AM, Fox SA, 'Number and brightness analysis of sFRP4 domains in live cells demonstrates vesicle association signal of the NLD domain and dynamic intracellular responses to Wnt3a', International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, 64 91-96 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.biocel.2015.03.010
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Subashchandrabose SR, Krishnan K, Gratton E, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Potential of fluorescence imaging techniques to monitor mutagenic PAH uptake by microalga', Environmental Science and Technology, 48 9152-9160 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es500387v
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu, Suresh Subashchandrabose
2014 Mayilswami S, Krishnan K, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Chronic PFOS exposure alters the expression of neuronal development-related human homologues in Eisenia fetida', Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 110 288-297 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2014.09.017
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2009 Krishnan K, Holub O, Gratton E, Clayton AHA, Cody S, Moens PDJ, 'Profilin interaction with phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate destabilizes the membrane of giant unilamellar vesicles', Biophysical Journal, 96 5112-5121 (2009)

Profilin, a small cytoskeletal protein, and phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P 2 ] have been implicated in cellular events that alter the cell morphology, such as e... [more]

Profilin, a small cytoskeletal protein, and phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P 2 ] have been implicated in cellular events that alter the cell morphology, such as endocytosis, cell motility, and formation of the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. Profilin has been shown to interact with PI(4,5)P 2 , but the role of this interaction is still poorly understood. Using giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) as a simple model of the cell membrane, we investigated the interaction between profilin and PI(4,5)P 2 . A number and brightness analysis demonstrated that in the absence of profilin, molar ratios of PI(4,5)P 2 above 4% result in lipid demixing and cluster formations. Furthermore, adding profilin to GUVs made with 1% PI(4,5)P 2 leads to the formation of clusters of both profilin and PI(4,5)P 2 . However, due to the self-quenching of the dipyrrometheneboron difluoride-labeled PI(4,5)P 2 , we were unable to determine the size of these clusters. Finally, we show that the formation of these clusters results in the destabilization and deformation of the GUV membrane. © 2009 by the Biophysical Society.

DOI 10.1016/j.bpj.2009.03.034
Citations Scopus - 13
2009 Krishnan K, Moens PDJ, 'Structure and functions of profilins', Biophysical Reviews, 1 71-81 (2009)

Profilins are small actin-binding proteins found in eukaryotes and certain viruses that are involved in cell development, cytokinesis, membrane trafficking, and cell motility. Ori... [more]

Profilins are small actin-binding proteins found in eukaryotes and certain viruses that are involved in cell development, cytokinesis, membrane trafficking, and cell motility. Originally identified as an actin sequestering/binding protein, profilin has been involved in actin polymerization dynamics. It catalyzes the exchange of ADP/ATP in actin and increases the rate of polymerization. Profilins also interact with polyphosphoinositides (PPI) and proline-rich domains containing proteins. Through its interaction with PPIs, profilin has been linked to signaling pathways between the cell membrane and the cytoskeleton, while its role in membrane trafficking has been associated with its interaction with proline-rich domain-containing proteins. Depending on the organism, profilin is present in a various number of isoforms. Four isoforms of profilin have been reported in higher organisms, while only one or two isoforms are expressed in single-cell organisms. The affinity of these isoforms for their ligands varies between isoforms and should therefore modulate their functions. However, the significance and the functions of the different isoforms are not yet fully understood. The structures of many profilin isoforms have been solved both in the presence and the absence of actin and poly-L-proline. These structural studies will greatly improve our understanding of the differences and similarities between the different profilins. Structural stability studies of different profilins are also shedding some light on our understanding of the profilin/ligand interactions. Profilin is a multifaceted protein for which a dramatic increase in potential functions has been found in recent years; as such, it has been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. © 2009 International Union for Pure and Applied Biophysics (IUPAB) and Springer.

DOI 10.1007/s12551-009-0010-y
Citations Scopus - 11
2007 Krishnan K, Kathiresan T, Raman R, Rajini B, Dhople VM, Aggrawal RK, Sharma Y, 'Ubiquitous lens alpha-, beta-, and gamma-crystallins accumulate in anuran cornea as corneal crystallins', JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 282 18953-18959 (2007)
DOI 10.1074/jbc.M609275200
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2006 Kathiresan T, Krishnan K, Krishnakumar V, Agrawal R, Anand A, Muralidhar D, et al., 'Triose phosphate isomerase, a novel enzyme-crystallin, and tau-crystallin in crocodile cornea - High accumulation of both proteins during late embryonic development', FEBS JOURNAL, 273 3370-3380 (2006)
DOI 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2006.05344.x
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
2005 Muralidhar D, Jobby MK, Krishnan K, Annapurna V, Chary KVR, Jeromin A, Sharma Y, 'Equilibrium unfolding of neuronal calcium sensor-1 - N-terminal myristoylation influences unfolding and reduces protein stiffening in the presence of calcium', JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 280 15569-15578 (2005)
DOI 10.1074/jbc.M414243200
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
Show 21 more journal articles

Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Krishnan K, Megharaj M, Mayilswami S, Sivaram AK, Panneerselvan L, Naidu R, 'Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) And Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA): Ecotoxicity And Environmental Concerns.', Melbourne (2015)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Logeshwaran Panneerselvan
2015 Krishnan K, Mayilswami S, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Differential Gene Expression Analysis in Eisenia fetida chronically exposed To Benzo (A) Pyrene', Melbourne (2015)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2010 Subashchandrabose SR, Krishnan K, Gratton E, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Potential of fluorescence imaging techniques to monitor mutagenic PAH uptake by microalga', Adelaide (2010)
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Ravi Naidu
2008 Krishnan K, Moens P, 'The Interaction between Human Profilin-I and Phosphatidylinositol-4, 5 Bisphosphate Destabilizes the Membrane of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles', Canberra (2008)
2008 Krishnan K, Moens P, 'Stabilization of Profilin I and II by Poly-L-Proline', Canberra (2008)
2007 Krishnan K, Moens P, 'Interactions of Human profilin-1 and Phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate in Giant Unilamellar Vesicles', Newcastle (2007)
2006 Krishnan K, Bagatolli L, Clayton AH, Moens P, 'Andrew Clayton and Pierre Moens: New insight on the interaction between phosphatidylinositol (4, 5) bisphosphate and profilin: a study in giant unilamellar vesicles', Sydney (2006)
2006 Krishnan K, Bagattolli L, Clayton AH, Moens P, 'Properties of profilin binding to sub-micellar concentration of phosphatidyl inositol bisphosphate', Sydney (2006)
Show 5 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 8
Total funding $1,272,498

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20162 grants / $12,500

Functional Dynamics of Ligand Induced Transcription Factor, ARNT$7,500

This project focuses on understanding the role of Ligand (pollutants) Induced Transcription Factor ARNT1 and ARNT2 in human diseases. It is essential to study the ligand receptor interaction and functional signalling of these transcription factors in the presence of various environmental pollutants in order to understand the mechanism of pollution induced diseases.

We will generate recombinant ARNT1-CFP and ARNT2-YFP fusion proteins and study the molecular dynamics in the presence of pollutants such as benzo(a)pyrene using confocal microscopy based techniques such as N&B and FLIM.   

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Project Team

Kannan Krishnan

Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Research pre-feasibility study on the sensor technology for monitoring air pollutants and wastewater$5,000

Funding body: Infratech Industries Pty Ltd

Funding body Infratech Industries Pty Ltd
Project Team

Dr. Kannan Krishnan and Prof. Megh Mallavarapu

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20153 grants / $361,229

Biosensor for Monitoring Natural Attenuation of Benzene in Groundwater$346,722

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Kannan Krishnan, Professor Megh Mallavarapu, Professor Ravi Naidu
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1501242
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS in WATER, SEDIMENT and BIOTA$8,000

Funding body: Lake Macquarie City Council

Funding body Lake Macquarie City Council
Project Team Doctor Kannan Krishnan, Doctor Logeshwaran Panneerselvan, Doctor Suresh Subashchandrabose, Doctor Thava Palanisami, Professor Megh Mallavarapu
Scheme Lake Macquarie Environmental Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1600058
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

Microplastics in Lake Macquarie: Distribution, Characteristics $6,507

Funding body: Lake Macquarie City Council

Funding body Lake Macquarie City Council
Project Team Doctor Thava Palanisami, Doctor Suresh Subashchandrabose, Doctor Logeshwaran Panneerselvan, Doctor Kannan Krishnan, Professor Megh Mallavarapu
Scheme Lake Macquarie Environmental Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1600173
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

20141 grants / $292,004

Biosensor for Monitoring Natural Attenuation of Benzene in Groundwater$292,004

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team

Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu

Scheme CRC
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N

20131 grants / $203,680

Biosensor for Monitoring Natural Attenuation of Benzene in Groundwater$203,680

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team

Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu

Scheme CRC
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N

20121 grants / $403,085

Biosensor for Monitoring Natural Attenuation of Benzene in Groundwater$403,085

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team

Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu

Scheme CRC
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current8

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD3.6

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Microplastics as a Vector for Contaminant Transport in Fresh Water Ecosystem: An Ecotoxicological and Molecular Assessment PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Effect of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons on Gut Microflora Dynamics in Mouse PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Study of Anaerobic Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Contaminated Coastal Marine Sediments by Improved Enrichment Culture and Combined Genomic-Proteomic Approaches PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Degradation of Lignocellulose Waste by Using Bacterial Cellulases PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD PFOS Interaction with Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase Could Cause Alzheimer's Disease PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD The Polymer Types of the Nanoplastics Particles in Wastewater, Sludge and Soil PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Understanding the Mechanism of Alzheimer's Disease by PFOS Induced Transcriptome Changes in Eisenia Fetida PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Toxicity and Impact of Nanoparticles Released to the Environment by Cosmetics, Pharmaceuticals, Agricultural and Related Products PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Eco-toxicity and Bioremediation of Mercury in Terrestrial Environments PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Earthworm biomarkers for monitoring persistent organic pollutants Environmental Studies, The University of South Australia Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Enzymatic detoxification of organophosphorus pesticides, fenamiphos and malathion by Microbacterium sp. MM1 Microbiology, University of South Australia Co-Supervisor
Edit

Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 20
India 4
United States 4
Bangladesh 2
United Kingdom 1
More...
Edit

Dr Kannan Krishnan

Position

Research Fellow
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email kannan.krishnan@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49138732
Links Google+
Research Networks
Facebook
Research Networks

Office

Room ATC
Building Advanced Technology Center.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
Edit