Professor Joanna Bourke

Global Innovation Chair

Office PVC - Education and Arts

Introducing Professor Joanna Bourke

Global Innovation Chair in the Centre for the History of Violence.

Professor Joanna Bourke is a world renowned historian who has shaped profoundly our understanding of subjects—violence, the body, the emotions—central to human experience. She has published prolifically on British, Irish, American and Australian societies from the nineteenth to twenty-first centuries, including histories of rape, fear, face-to-face killing and other vital, and previously taboo, topics. She is the prize-winning author of eleven books, and is a fellow of the British Academy (FBA).

Over the years, her books have ranged from the social and economic history of Ireland in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, to social histories of the British working classes between 1860 and 1960s, to cultural histories of military conflict between the Anglo-Boer war and the present. She has worked on the history of the emotions, particularly fear and hatred, and the history of sexual violence.  In the past few years, her research has focussed on questions of humanity, militarisation, and pain. She wrote a book entitled What It Means to Be Human. In 2014, she published two books: Wounding the World. How Military Violence and War Games Invade Our World and The Story of Pain: From Prayer to Painkillers.

Joanna was born in the town of Blenheim, in the Malborough province of New Zealand. As a young child, she lived in Zambia and Solomon Island, before her parents and four siblings moved to Haiti. Although she returned to New Zealand regularly, much of her education was conducted via correspondence school. She went to Auckland University (New Zealand) to do her BA and MA and, from there, to the Australian National University in Canberra to complete a doctorate on women in nineteenth-century Ireland. After brief posts in the 1980s and early 1990s at the Australian National University and Emmanuel College, Cambridge, she was appointed to Birkbeck College in 1992 where she is Professor of History in the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck College.

Her first book was From Husbandry to Housewifery, a history of female labour in rural Ireland in the nineteenth century. After writing a book on the British working classes in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (Working-Class Cultures in Britain 1860-1960), her interests turned to the experiences of men and women in wartime. After a number of books on the cultural history of modern warfare (including Dismembering the Male and An Intimate History of Killing), she turned to the history of the emotions (especially fear: a book entitled Fear: A Cultural History) and to the history of rape (Rape: A History from the 1860s to the Present).

More recently, she has published What It Means To Be Human. IN 2014, she published The Story of Pain: From Prayer to Painkillers and Wounding the World. How Military Violence and War Games Invade Our Lives.

In her role as Global Innovation Chair in the Centre for the History of Violence, Joanna will be based in the School of Humanities and Social Science and will play a significant role in developing and maintaining UON's research leadership in the area of Violence Studies by facilitating greater engagement with international partners, driving stronger models of collaboration (through centres, hubs and clusters) and maximising the translation and societal impact of our research. She is especially keen to facilitate the research careers of Early Career Researchers and HDR students, and also to build links between the School and external partners in other disciplines including Health and Medicine.

“I have long been a fan of the University of Newcastle: in terms of intellectual attainment, devotion to quality of teaching, and engagement with the community, UON is a leader in the field.” Joanna states.

“I am particularly excited about becoming part of The Centre for the History of Violence, the first in the world to explore this complex topic in an interdisciplinary and historically-complex way. It is rare to be so closely involved in an institution dedicated to addressing the "big question" currently facing us.”

Recent significant publications

Books

Wounding the World: How the Military and War-Play Invade our Lives (London: Virago, 2014)

The Story of Pain: From Prayer to Painkillers (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014)

What It Means To Be Human, Reflections from 1791 to the Present (London: Virago, 2011)

Rape: A History from 1860s to the Present (Berkeley: Counterpoint, 2007)

Fear: A Cultural History (Berkeley: Counterpoint, 2005)

An Intimate History of Killing: Face-to-Face Killing in Twentieth Century Warfare (1999)

Articles

"Police Surgeons and Victims of Rape: Cultures of Harm and Care," Social History of Medicine (forthcoming 2018)

"Psychiatry, Hate Training and the Second World War," Journal of Social History, 52.1 (2017)

“Pugnacity, Pain, and Professionalism. British Combat Memoirs from Afghanistan, 2007-14, in Philip Dwyer (ed.), War Stories: The War Memoir in History and Literature (New York: Berghahn, 2016)

"Love and Limblesssness: Male Heterosexuality, Disability and the Great War", Journal of War and Culture Studies (March 2016)

"Hazing: Bullying in the Military", Psychology and Education. An Interdisciplinary Journal (2016)

Recent awards

2014: Fellow of the British Academy (FBA)

2011: Treaty of Utrecht Chair

2011-13: Wellcome Trust Pilot Project: The Birkbeck Pain Project (Rhetorics of Pain)

2006: Final shortlist for the Mind Book of the Year for Fear: A Cultural History

2005: Gold for the Most Original Audio for all 10 volumes of "Eyewitness: a History of Twentieth Century Britain"

Joanna Bourke

Introducing Professor Joanna Bourke

Introducing Professor Joanna Burke, Global Innovation Chair in the Centre for the History of Violence

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Joanna Bourke is Professor of History at Birkbeck College, University of London, and Fellow of the British Academy. She is Chair of Modern History at the British Academy. She is the prize-winning author of twelve books, including histories on modern warfare, military medicine, psychology and psychiatry, the emotions, and rape, as well as over 86 articles in academic journals. Among others, she is the author of Dismembering the Male: Men’s Bodies, Britain, and the Great War (1996), An Intimate History of Killing (1999), Fear: A Cultural History (2005) and Rape: A History from the 1860s to the Present (2007). Her book, What it Means to be Human: Reflections from 1791 to the Present was published by Virago in 2011. In 2014, she was the author of The Story of Pain: From Prayer to Painkillers (OUP) and Wounding the World: How Military Violence and War-Play are Invading our Lives (Virago). Her books have been translated into Chinese, Russian, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Turkish, and Greek. An Intimate History of Killing won the Wolfson Prize and the Fraenkel Prize. Her 40-CD audio history of Britain, entitled “Eyewitness” won the Gold for the Best Audio Production for Volume 1910-1919, Gold for the Best Audio Production for Volume 1940-1949, and the Gold for the Most Original Audio for all 10 volumes. She is a frequent contributor to TV and radio shows, and a regular correspondent for newspapers.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Australian National University
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Auckland - NZ
  • Master of Arts, University of Auckland - NZ

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Global Innovation Chair University of Newcastle
Office PVC - Education and Arts
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/1999 -  Professor Birkbeck College
United Kingdom
1/01/1992 - 31/12/1998 Lecturer, Senior Lecturer and Reader Birkbeck College, University of London
United Kingdom
1/01/1990 - 31/12/1992 Research Fellow Emmanuel College, Cambridge
United Kingdom
1/01/1989 - 31/12/1989 Junior Lecturer Australian National University
Australia
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Bourke J, The story of pain: from prayer to painkillers, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 396 (2014) [A1]
2014 Bourke J, Wounding the world: how military violence and war-play invade our lives, Virago, London, 312 (2014) [A1]
2011 Bourke J, What it means to be human: reflections from 1791 to the present, Virago, London, 469 (2011) [A1]
2007 Bourke J, Rape: a history from 1860 to the present day, Virago, London (2007)
2007 Bourke J, Foreword (2007)
DOI 10.4324/9780203962343
2005 Bourke J, Fear: a cultural history, Virago Press, London (2005)
2001 Bourke J, The Second World War: a people's history, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK (2001)
2001 The Penguin atlas of British and Irish history: from earliest times to the present day, Penguin, Harmondsworth, UK (2001)
1999 Bourke J, An intimate history of killing: face-to-face killing in Twentieth Century warfare, Granta Books, London (1999)
1999 Casey E, The misfit soldier : Edward Casey's war story, 1914-1932, Cork University Press, Cork, UK (1999)
1996 Bourke J, Dismembering the male: men's bodies, Britain and the Great War, Reaktion Books, London (1996)
1994 Bourke J, Working-class cultures in Britain, 1890-1960: gender, class and ethnicity, Routledge, London; New York (1994)
1993 Bourke J, Husbandry to housewifery: Women, economic change and housework in Ireland, 1890-1914, Clarendon Press, Oxford, UK (1993)
Show 10 more books

Chapter (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Bourke J, 'Afterword: War on the senses', 375-378 (2017)
DOI 10.4324/9781315682228
2017 Bourke J, 'Pugnacity, pain and professionalism: British combat memoirs from Afghanistan, 2007-2014', War Stories: The War Memoir in History and Literature, Berghahn Books, New York 277-301 (2017)
2016 Bourke J, 'Why history hurts', Traumatic Memories of the Second World War and After 269-289 (2016) [B1]

© The Editor(s) and The Author(s) 2016. When invited to write an epilogue to this volume of essays, my thoughts went immediately to a poem written by R.L. Barth, former US Marine... [more]

© The Editor(s) and The Author(s) 2016. When invited to write an epilogue to this volume of essays, my thoughts went immediately to a poem written by R.L. Barth, former US Marine. Entitled ¿Epilogue¿, Barth reflected on his war service, observing that.

DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-33470-7_12
2016 Bourke J, 'Why history hurts', Traumatic Memories of the Second World War and After 269-289 (2016)

© The Editor(s) and The Author(s) 2016. When invited to write an epilogue to this volume of essays, my thoughts went immediately to a poem written by R.L. Barth, former US Marine... [more]

© The Editor(s) and The Author(s) 2016. When invited to write an epilogue to this volume of essays, my thoughts went immediately to a poem written by R.L. Barth, former US Marine. Entitled ¿Epilogue¿, Barth reflected on his war service, observing that.

DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-33470-7_12
2014 Bourke J, 'Phantom suffering: amputees, stump pain and phantom sensations in Modern Britain', Pain and Emotion in Modern History, Palgrave Macmillian, Basingstoke, UK 66-89 (2014) [B1]
DOI 10.1057/9781137372437
2014 Bourke J, 'Killing in a posthuman world: the philosophy and practice of critical military history', The Subject of Rosi Braidotti: Politics and Concepts, Bloomsbury, London (2014) [B1]
2013 Bourke J, 'Wartime rape: the politics of making visible', Liberal democracies at War: Conflict and Representation, Bloomsbury Academic, London 135-156 (2013) [B1]
2011 Bourke J, 'Gender roles in killing zones', The Cambridge History of the First World War: Volume III Civil Society 153-178 (2011) [B1]

© Cambridge University Press 2014. Die Waffen Hoch! Das Schwert ist Mannes eigen. Wo Männer fechten Hat das weib zu schweigen. (Hold your weapons high! The sword belongs to the ... [more]

© Cambridge University Press 2014. Die Waffen Hoch! Das Schwert ist Mannes eigen. Wo Männer fechten Hat das weib zu schweigen. (Hold your weapons high! The sword belongs to the man. Where men are duelling Women have to keep silent.) Marching songs possess a rhythm that is both mesmerising and deeply unsettling. They claim to convey knowledge not only about underlying values, but also about the bodily comportment required of men preparing to kill. They lay claim to military conflict as fundamental to what it means to be a man. The lyrics conflate war and combat. Misleadingly, the donning of a military uniform is assumed to initiate men into a gnostic society, from which women and children are resolutely excised, and confers upon these chosen ones the greatest power of all: that is, power over life and death. Except that is not what happens. Living and dying are more random; the performance of gender roles in war is confused and confusing. Men are disarmed; women, indispensable. In wartime, commonplace assumptions about the dichotomous concepts of masculinity and femininity are conspicuously fractured, inciting desperate attempts to reaffirm their salience in the face of palpable discord.

DOI 10.1017/CHO9780511675683.010
2010 Bourke J, '¿Going home¿: The personal adjustment of British and American servicemen after the war', Life After Death: Approaches to a Cultural and Social History of Europe During The 1940s and 1950s 149-160 (2010)

© The German Historical Institute 2003 and Cambridge University Press, 2007. War requires some men to commit acts of exceptional violence. They are sent to the front lines not pr... [more]

© The German Historical Institute 2003 and Cambridge University Press, 2007. War requires some men to commit acts of exceptional violence. They are sent to the front lines not primarily to die for their country, but to kill for it. They are executioners as well as victims, and, as such, inspire fear. For all men - whether they belong to the minority who are required to engage in front-line combat or whether they are the majority working behind the scenes in ¿support roles¿ - war disrupts lives in unprecedented ways. Without a doubt, the experience of combat during World War II had a permanent effect on its British and American participants. But what was the nature of this ¿impact¿ on combatants? Although historians have analyzed the political and social impact of the war, the psychological impact has been explored less frequently. Despite the difficulties involved in analyzing the copious number of accounts about the war of 1939-45 and its aftermath, it is crucial that an attempt be made to examine the ways in which servicemen themselves attempted to create and recreate themselves upon returning home. Indisputably, combat experiences were powerful ones - and not wholly negative. Most combatants were able to find positive sides to their war. They frequently describe deep friendships and the excitement of travel. There was virile beauty in much of the technology of war. Even the act of fighting was often said to be thrilling, even sexually so. The removal of souvenirs from the bodies of their victims was indulged in as a way of prolonging the memories of the joys of combat long after the conflict had ended.

DOI 10.1017/CBO9781139052344.007
Citations Scopus - 5
2004 Bourke J, 'The body in modern warfare: Myth and meaning, 1914-1945', What History Tells: George L. Mosse and the Culture of Modern Europe 202-219 (2004)
Citations Scopus - 2
Show 7 more chapters

Journal article (59 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Bourke J, 'The art of medicine The headache in history and culture', LANCET, 389 1509-1510 (2017)
2017 Bourke J, 'The art of medicine Police surgeons and sexual violence: a history', LANCET, 390 548-549 (2017)
2016 Bourke J, 'War's carnage: wounds and weapons', LANCET, 387 1610-1611 (2016)
2016 Bourke J, 'Cytomegalovirus: A Hospitalization Diary', BIOGRAPHY-AN INTERDISCIPLINARY QUARTERLY, 39 231-233 (2016)
DOI 10.1353/bio.2016.0031
2016 Bourke J, 'Phantom suffering?', PSYCHOLOGIST, 29 730-731 (2016)
2016 Bourke J, 'Love and limblessness: male heterosexuality, disability and the Great War', Journal of War and Culture Studies, 9 3-19 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17526272.2015.1106756
2016 Bourke J, 'Hazing: bullying in the military', Psychology and Education, 53 (2016)
2015 Bourke J, 'Juvenile Nation: Youth, Emotions and the Making of the Modern British Citizen, 1880-1914', AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW, 120 717-718 (2015)
2015 Bourke J, 'Science and Emotions after 1945: A Transatlantic Perspective.', BRITISH JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE, 48 708-709 (2015)
DOI 10.1017/S0007087415000849
2015 Bourke J, 'War, Art, and Surgery. The Work of Henry Tonks and Julia Midgley', MEDICAL HISTORY, 59 501-502 (2015)
DOI 10.1017/mdh.2015.39
2015 Bourke J, 'The History of Emotions: An Introduction', SOCIAL HISTORY, 40 557-558 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/03071022.2015.1080022
2015 Bourke J, 'DRESSED FOR WAR Uniform, civilian clothing and trappings, 1914 to 1918', TLS-THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT, 21-21 (2015)
2015 Bourke J, 'Pain: A Political History', ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 31 91-92 (2015)
2015 Bourke J, 'Emotional Lexicons. Continuity and Change in the Vocabulary of Feeling 1700-2000', MODERN & CONTEMPORARY FRANCE, 23 116-117 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/09639489.2014.940865
2014 Bourke J, 'King, Anthony The Combat Soldier. Infantry Tactics and Cohesion in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, 65 194-195 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/1468-4446.12060
2014 Bourke J, 'The Martial Imagination: Cultural Aspects of American Warfare', JOURNAL OF AMERICAN STUDIES, 48 893-894 (2014)
DOI 10.1017/S0021875814001133
2014 Bourke J, 'Childbirth in the UK: suffering and citizenship before the 1950s', LANCET, 383 1288-1289 (2014)
Citations Web of Science - 3
2014 Bourke J, 'Pain: metaphor, body, and culture in Anglo-American societies between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries', RETHINKING HISTORY, 18 475-498 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13642529.2014.893660
2014 Bourke J, 'The Bioethics of Pain Management: Beyond Opioids', MEDICAL HUMANITIES, 40 145-+ (2014)
DOI 10.1136/medhum-2014-010625
2014 Bourke J, 'Pain sensitivity: an unnatural history from 1800 to 1965.', J Med Humanit, 35 301-319 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s10912-014-9283-7
2013 Bourke J, 'What is pain? A history: the Prothero Lecture', Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 23 155-173 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S0080440113000078
2013 Bourke J, 'Knowledge and Pain', BULLETIN OF THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE, 87 685-686 (2013)
2013 Bourke J, 'Bodily Pain, Combat, and the Politics of Memoirs: Between the American Civil War and the War in Vietnam', HISTOIRE SOCIALE-SOCIAL HISTORY, 46 43-61 (2013) [C1]
2013 Bourke J, 'Grassroots Memorials. The Politics of Memorializing Traumatic Death', JOURNAL OF SOCIAL HISTORY, 47 222-223 (2013)
DOI 10.1093/jsh/sht002
2012 Hide L, Bourke J, Mangion C, 'Perspectives on pain: introduction', 19 : Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century, 15 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.16995/ntn.663
2012 Bourke J, 'The sensible and insensible body: a visual essay', 19 : Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century, 15 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.16995/ntn.647
2012 Bourke J, 'Enduring Battle: American Soldiers in Three Wars, 1776-1945.', AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW, 117 512-512 (2012)
2012 Bourke J, 'Death in War and Peace: Loss and Grief in England, 1914-1970', JOURNAL OF SOCIAL HISTORY, 45 872-873 (2012)
DOI 10.1093/ish/shr133
2012 Bourke J, 'The art of medicine Languages of pain', LANCET, 379 2420-2421 (2012)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2012 Bourke J, 'Sexual Violence, Bodily Pain, and Trauma: A History', THEORY CULTURE & SOCIETY, 29 25-51 (2012)
DOI 10.1177/0263276412439406
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2012 Bourke J, 'Pain, sympathy and the medical encounter between the mid eighteenth and the mid twentieth centuries', HISTORICAL RESEARCH, 85 430-452 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1468-2281.2011.00593.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2012 Bourke J, 'War, Disability and Rehabilitation in Britain: 'Soul of a Nation'', SOCIAL HISTORY OF MEDICINE, 25 565-566 (2012)
DOI 10.1093/shm/hks004
2012 Bourke J, 'Languages of pain.', Lancet, 379 2420-2421 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 2
2011 Bourke J, 'Peter Whitehead and Niki de Saint Phalle's 'Daddy' (1973)', Framework: the journal of cinema and media, 52 622-637 (2011)
2011 Bourke J, 'The history of medicine as the history of pain', History Today, 61 (2011)
2011 Bourke J, 'Bachelors and Bunnies: The Sexual Politics of Playboy', JOURNAL OF AMERICAN STUDIES, 45 (2011)
DOI 10.1017/S0021875811001010
2011 Bourke J, 'Managing the Body: Beauty, Health, and Fitness in Britain, 1880-1939', MEDICAL HISTORY, 55 567-568 (2011)
2011 Bourke J, 'Horrorism: naming contemporary violence', ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING D-SOCIETY & SPACE, 29 187-188 (2011)
2011 Bourke J, 'Queen Victoria's Stalker. The Strange Story of the Boy Jones', LONDON JOURNAL, 36 192-193 (2011)
2011 Bourke J, 'THE BEAUTY AND THE SORROW An intimate history of the First World War', TLS-THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT, 3-4 (2011)
2011 Bourke J, 'ALL HELL LET LOOSE The world at war 1939-45', TLS-THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT, 3-4 (2011)
2010 Bourke J, 'Enjoying the high life - Drugs in history and culture', The Lancet, 376 1817 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(10)62153-8
2010 Bourke J, 'Masculinity in the modern west: gender, civilization and the body', MEDICAL HISTORY, 54 417-418 (2010)
2010 Bourke J, 'SEXUAL VIOLATION AND TRAUMA IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE', ARBOR-CIENCIA PENSAMIENTO Y CULTURA, 186 407-416 (2010)
DOI 10.3989/arbor.2010.743n1205
Citations Scopus - 1
2009 Bourke J, 'DIVINE MADNESS: THE DILEMMA OF RELIGIOUS SCRUPLES IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICA AND BRITAIN', JOURNAL OF SOCIAL HISTORY, 42 581-+ (2009)
2009 Bourke J, 'Silas Weir Mitchell's The Case of George Dedlow.', Lancet, 373 1332-1333 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 4
2008 Bourke J, 'Sexual violence, marital guidance, and Victorian bodies: An aesthesiology', VICTORIAN STUDIES, 50 419-436 (2008)
DOI 10.2979/VIC.2008.50.3.419
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2006 Bourke J, 'War and Violence', Thesis Eleven, 86 23-38 (2006)

The brutalities of the past century have taken place in the milieu of Enlightenment values. At present, even the ideals of human rights have been used to (at the very least) toler... [more]

The brutalities of the past century have taken place in the milieu of Enlightenment values. At present, even the ideals of human rights have been used to (at the very least) tolerate and (and at its worst) justify barbaric acts, such as torture. This article interrogates the diverse ways British, American, and Australian individuals engaged in extremes of violence during three major conflicts of the 20th century. Like servicemen and servicewomen today, these combatants struggled to find a language capable of making sense of their violent deeds. Constraining their excesses of violence proved a formidable task. In particular, I examine the ways in which sexual violence was normalized. Finally, on returning home after the war, these individuals and civilian society more broadly struggled with the problem of ¿remembering¿ wartime violence in the post-war world. The act of ¿framing¿ extremes of violence was integral to the process of enabling perpetrators of violence to assimilate his or her acts into a peacetime self. © 2006, Sage Publications. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1177/0725513606066238
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
2005 Bourke J, 'SEXY SNAPS', INDEX ON CENSORSHIP, 34 39-45 (2005)
DOI 10.1080/03064220512331339454
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2004 Bourke J, 'Introduction 'remembering' war', Journal of Contemporary History, 39 473-485 (2004)
DOI 10.1177/0022009404046750
Citations Scopus - 35
2003 Bourke J, 'Fear and anxiety: Writing about emotion in modern history', History Workshop Journal, 55 111-133 (2003)
DOI 10.1093/hwj/55.1.111
Citations Scopus - 106
2001 Bourke J, 'The emotions in war: Fear and the British and American military, 1914-45', Historical Research, 74 314-330 (2001)

In modern warfare, technological innovations are applied to terrifying effect. On the machine-dominated battlefields of the twentieth century, the ability of individuals to master... [more]

In modern warfare, technological innovations are applied to terrifying effect. On the machine-dominated battlefields of the twentieth century, the ability of individuals to master their emotions is crucial to the whole martial enterprise. Fear has widely been recognized as the most fraught of all emotions: it may stimulate combatants to fight and it may cause them to flee. This article examines the proliferation of theories about the nature of this emotion within the British and American forces during the First and Second World Wars. The military recognized the impact of new technologies upon human physiology and psychology, elaborated ways of interpreting the particular threat posed by 'fear' in modern conflicts, and prescribed ways of disciplining the emotional lives of combatants. © Institute of Historical Research 2001.

Citations Scopus - 4
1998 Bourke J, 'The battle of the limbs: Amputation, artificial limbs and the great war in Australia', Australian Historical Studies, 29 49-67 (1998)

The expectation or experience of physical suffering was shared by 330,000 Australian men who saw active service during the first world war. Of these men, one in five was killed an... [more]

The expectation or experience of physical suffering was shared by 330,000 Australian men who saw active service during the first world war. Of these men, one in five was killed and tens of thousands returned to Australia ill or wounded. Genital mutilation, facial disfigurement and limblessness were the three fates most feared by soldiers. This article focuses on Australian servicemen in the last category: men whose limbs had been amputated as a result of war service. It examines the surgical and medical services offered to these soldiers and the ways in which they strove to adapt to their injuries. The war radically changed their lives, yet, despite wartime promises, politicians and the larger community rapidly forgot the 'sacrifice' so many had made of their arms and legs.

DOI 10.1080/10314619808596060
Citations Scopus - 5
1996 Bourke J, 'The great male renunciation: Men's dress reform in inter-war Britain', Journal of Design History, 9 23-33 (1996)
Citations Scopus - 7
1995 Bourke J, 'Heroes and Hoaxes: The unknown warrior, kitchener and ¿Missing Men¿ in the 1920s', War and Society, 13 41-63 (1995)

The most terrible words in all writing used to be ¿There they crucified Him¿, but there is a sadder sentence now¿¿I know not where they have laid Him¿¿Surely ¿missing¿ is ... [more]

The most terrible words in all writing used to be ¿There they crucified Him¿, but there is a sadder sentence now¿¿I know not where they have laid Him¿¿Surely ¿missing¿ is the cruelest word in the language. (Anonymous, To My Unknown Warrior, 1920.). © The University of New South Wales 1995.

DOI 10.1179/072924795791200934
Citations Scopus - 6
1994 Bourke J, 'Housewifery in working-class England 1860-1914', Past and Present, 143 167-197 (1994)
DOI 10.1093/past/143.1.167
Citations Scopus - 39
1994 Bourke J, '¿I was always fond of my pillow¿: The handmade lace industry in the united kingdom, 1870-1914', Rural History, 5 155-169 (1994)
DOI 10.1017/S0956793300000650
Citations Scopus - 6
1990 Bourke J, 'Dairywomen and affectionate wives: women in the Irish dairy industry, 1890-1914', Agricultural History Review, 38 149-164 (1990)

Milking and butter-making were important to the rural Irish economy. In the 19th century, dairy work was dominated by women. By World War One, it was dominated by men. The establi... [more]

Milking and butter-making were important to the rural Irish economy. In the 19th century, dairy work was dominated by women. By World War One, it was dominated by men. The establishment of creameries and male-only agricultural colleges, in addition to legislation limiting female hours of employment, encouraged the substitution of male labour for female labour. Schemes to educate rural women in the new dairying technologies had minimal effect. Although the value of dairy production in Ireland increased, female status in the industry declined as managerial control came to be vested in men. The removal of women from the dairy was justified by reference to the need of increasing female investment of time in housework. -Author

Citations Scopus - 9
1986 Bourke J, 'Piety or poverty: Catholic fertility in Australia and New Zealand: 1911, 1926, 1936.', New Zealand Population Review, 12 18-31 (1986)

In demography, the larger average size of Catholic families has become a truism in the study of fertility differentials. Unlike the sociologist or demographer working with a large... [more]

In demography, the larger average size of Catholic families has become a truism in the study of fertility differentials. Unlike the sociologist or demographer working with a large amount of recently collected data, the historian or historical demographer is usually faced with a very small amount of statistical data in an attempt to answer a very basic question: was high Catholic fertility a result of the obedience of the laity to the strong stance of their Church against artifical birth control or did it result from variation in the social and economic composition of the Catholic population and the effect these characteristics have on fertility levels? Data from the Australian census of 1911, and the New Zealand censuses of 1926 and 1936, show that higher Catholic fertility can be explained by reference to the occupational structure and high rural residence of the Catholic population. Catholicity per se has an extremely small effect. -from Author

Show 56 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2000 Bourke J, 'Effeminacy, ethnicity and the end of trauma: The sufferings of 'shell-shocked' men in Great Britain and Ireland, 1914-39', Journal of Contemporary History (2000)

Enforced passivity in the midst of life-threatening danger caused many men in wartime to suffer psychological collapse. This article examines some aspects of this experience inclu... [more]

Enforced passivity in the midst of life-threatening danger caused many men in wartime to suffer psychological collapse. This article examines some aspects of this experience including the ways in which men who were repelled by combat violence were regarded as 'abnormal' and needed to be 'cured' of this repulsion and made to embrace their aggressive urges. During the first world war, certain types of men were regarded by military and medical personnel as more susceptible to this weakness. One crucial indicator was ethnicity. For instance, despite their reputation for being a 'martial race', Irishmen were said to be pre-disposed to insanity. This article, therefore, examines the ways in which this prejudice developed, and its implications for Irish sufferers of 'shell-shock' during and after the war. © 2000 SAGE Pulications.

DOI 10.1177/002200940003500106
Citations Scopus - 33
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $2,811,070

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $8,600

Cultures of harm in institutions of care$8,600

Funding body: Wellcome Trust

Funding body Wellcome Trust
Scheme Investigator award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20151 grants / $17,140

A global history of art and war$17,140

Funding body: British Academy

Funding body British Academy
Scheme Discovery project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20111 grants / $550,330

A history of pain$550,330

Funding body: Wellcome Trust

Funding body Wellcome Trust
Scheme Investigator award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20081 grants / $2,235,000

Sexual violence, medicine and psychiatry$2,235,000

Medical professionals play central roles in examining, treating, and counselling victims of sexual violence. Their scrutiny of the complainant’s body is decisive in determining whether or not the police take the assault seriously and whether legal proceedings are instigated. Women, men, and children who are sexually abused depend on the medical and psychiatric professionals for physical and emotional care. Physicians play significant roles in determining whether an accused person is subsequently convicted, punished, or treated. This research projects focuses on the UK, US, Australia, and New Zealand between the first decade of the nineteenth century and the present. It sets out to promote human health through providing unprecedented insights into the role of medicine and psychiatry in understanding, interpreting, treating, prosecuting, and preventing sexual violence in the context of four Research Streams: 1) Medicine and Law; 2) GPs, Police Surgeons and Forensic Medical Examiners; 3) From Psychopathia Sexualis to the DSM/ICD; 4) Psychiatric Aftermaths. There will also be a research theme on child sexual abuse, attached to one or more of the Research Streams. The project will be a powerful example of how historical scholarship can inform contemporary crises and debates. 

Funding body: Wellcome Trust

Funding body Wellcome Trust
Scheme Investigator award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed16
Current0

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD The road to Dr Down's idiot asylum: the creation of the idea of intellectual disability History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2016 PhD War neurosis and civilian mental health in Britain during the Second World War History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2015 PhD Curing sexual deviants: doctors and sexual offenders in Britain 1919-1962 History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2013 PhD The other world: religion and the Western Front during the Great War History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2013 PhD The Experience of the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Navy in the Great War History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2013 PhD "A pseudo-soldier's cross": the subjectivities of British POWs held in Germany and Italy during the Second World War History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2012 PhD The renegotiation of America: gender, national identity and the Gulf War History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2011 PhD Inside the asylum: gender and class in English mental hospitals, 1890-1914 History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2010 PhD The frame of exception: US film and TV featuring terrorism 1990-2010 History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2008 PhD Irish Masculinities in Ulster, 1890-1922 History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2005 PhD British Atrocities within the First World War History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2004 PhD Catholic women in Nineteenth Century England and Wales History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2004 PhD Irish Nationalism and the British Labour Party History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2003 PhD Homosexual Identities in Nineteenth Century Britain History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2003 PhD Irish Women and Nationalism, 1890-1922 History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
2000 PhD Social Change and Social Reform in Southwark and Bermonsey History, Birkbeck College, University of London Sole Supervisor
Edit

Professor Joanna Bourke

Position

Global Innovation Chair
Office PVC - Education and Arts
Faculty of Education and Arts

Edit