Mrs Ishanka Madhurangani Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage

Mrs Ishanka Madhurangani Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

Ishanka Weerasekara is a PhD candidate in Physiotherapy, and a part time research assistant at the University of Newcastle and she worked there as a casual academic and also as a casual research assistant. She is affiliated with the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences of University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka as a Lecturer and obtained her Bachelor’s degree in Physiotherapy from the same faculty. Further, she obtained her degree in M.Phil. from Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya. She also possesses a Diploma in Sport and Exercise Sciences and a Post Graduate Diploma in Applied Statistics, received from University of Peradeniya. 


Keywords

  • Ankle disabilities and rehabilitation
  • Ankle mobilisation
  • Exercises

Languages

  • Sinhalese (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/1/2017 - 31/12/2017 Sessional Academic Staff Member (Casual) The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
11/9/2019 - 3/4/2020 Research Assitant Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Australia
15/2/2018 - 3/12/2018 Research Assistant (Part time) NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY
Australia
1/8/2016 - 31/12/2016 Casual Research Assistant The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences
Australia
12/12/2012 -  Lecturer University of Peradeniya
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences
Sri Lanka

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/6/2016 - 30/9/2016 Casual Academic (PBL) The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Australia
1/4/2016 - 31/12/2016 Casual Academic (Marker) The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences
Australia
1/2/2016 - 30/4/2016 Casual Lecturer in Musculoskeletal Anatomy The University of Newcastle- School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
1/9/2011 - 12/12/2012 Temporary Lecturer University of Peradeniya
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences
Sri Lanka
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, Home Exercise Guide for Ankle Sprain, LAP Lambert Academic Publishing, Germany (2015)

Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Pillay M, Weerasekara I, Ranawalage UCR, Boateng EB, 'Investigating the Measurement of Resilience Engineering for Improving Organisational Safety', Human Systems Engineering and Design III, Springer, Cham, Switzerland 253-257 (2021) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-030-58282-1_40
Co-authors Manikam Pillay

Journal article (25 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 English C, Weerasekara I, Carlos A, Chastin S, Crowfoot G, Fitzsimons C, et al., 'Investigating the rigour of research findings in experimental studies assessing the effects of breaking up prolonged sitting extended scoping review', Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 25 4-16 (2021) [C1]

Objectives: Sedentary behaviour research is a relatively new field, much of which has emerged since the widespread acceptance of clinical trial registration. The aim of this study... [more]

Objectives: Sedentary behaviour research is a relatively new field, much of which has emerged since the widespread acceptance of clinical trial registration. The aim of this study was to investigate the trial registration and related issues in studies investigating the effect of frequent activity interruptions to prolonged sitting-time. Methods: Secondary analysis of a scoping review including systematic searches of databases and trial registries. We included experimental studies investigating the effects of frequent activity interruptions to prolonged sitting-time. Results: We identified 32 trials published in 45 papers. Only 16 (50%) trials were registered, with all 16 trials being completed and published. Of the unregistered trials, we identified three (19%) for which similarities in the sample size and participant demographics across papers was suggestive of duplicate publication. Identification of potential duplicate publications was difficult for the remaining 13 (81%). Results from 53 (76%) of the 70 registered outcomes were published, but 11 (69%) registered trials reported results from additional outcomes not prospectively registered. A total of 46 different outcomes (out of 53 reported outcome measures, similar measures were collated) were reported across all trials, 31 (67%) of which were collected in =2 trials. Conclusions: We found direct evidence of trial registration issues in experimental trials of breaking up sitting-time. The lack of prospective registration of all trials, and the large number of outcomes measured per trial are key considerations for future research in this field. These issues are unlikely to be confined to the field of sedentary behaviour research.

DOI 10.1016/j.bjpt.2020.04.007
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Heidi Janssen, Gary Crowfoot, Coralie English
2021 Do Nascimento IJB, Marcolino MS, Abdulazeem HM, Weerasekara I, Azzopardi-Muscat N, Goncalves MA, Novillo-Ortiz D, 'Impact of big data analytics on people's health: Overview of systematic reviews and recommendations for future studies', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 23 (2021) [C1]

Background: Although the potential of big data analytics for health care is well recognized, evidence is lacking on its effects on public health. Objective: The aim of this study ... [more]

Background: Although the potential of big data analytics for health care is well recognized, evidence is lacking on its effects on public health. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the use of big data analytics on people's health based on the health indicators and core priorities in the World Health Organization (WHO) General Programme of Work 2019/2023 and the European Programme of Work (EPW), approved and adopted by its Member States, in addition to SARS-CoV-2-related studies. Furthermore, we sought to identify the most relevant challenges and opportunities of these tools with respect to people's health. Methods: Six databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews via Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Scopus, and Epistemonikos) were searched from the inception date to September 21, 2020. Systematic reviews assessing the effects of big data analytics on health indicators were included. Two authors independently performed screening, selection, data extraction, and quality assessment using the AMSTAR-2 (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews 2) checklist. Results: The literature search initially yielded 185 records, 35 of which met the inclusion criteria, involving more than 5,000,000 patients. Most of the included studies used patient data collected from electronic health records, hospital information systems, private patient databases, and imaging datasets, and involved the use of big data analytics for noncommunicable diseases. "Probability of dying from any of cardiovascular, cancer, diabetes or chronic renal disease" and "suicide mortality rate" were the most commonly assessed health indicators and core priorities within the WHO General Programme of Work 2019/2023 and the EPW 2020/2025. Big data analytics have shown moderate to high accuracy for the diagnosis and prediction of complications of diabetes mellitus as well as for the diagnosis and classification of mental disorders; prediction of suicide attempts and behaviors; and the diagnosis, treatment, and prediction of important clinical outcomes of several chronic diseases. Confidence in the results was rated as "critically low" for 25 reviews, as "low" for 7 reviews, and as "moderate" for 3 reviews. The most frequently identified challenges were establishment of a well-designed and structured data source, and a secure, transparent, and standardized database for patient data. Conclusions: Although the overall quality of included studies was limited, big data analytics has shown moderate to high accuracy for the diagnosis of certain diseases, improvement in managing chronic diseases, and support for prompt and real-time analyses of large sets of varied input data to diagnose and predict disease outcomes.

DOI 10.2196/27275
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2021 Downs C, Snodgrass SJ, Weerasekara I, Valkenborghs SR, Callister R, 'Injuries in Netball-A Systematic Review', SPORTS MEDICINE-OPEN, 7 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40798-020-00290-7
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass, Robin Callister, Sarah Valkenborghs
2021 Borges do Nascimento IJ, O Mathúna DP, von Groote TC, Abdulazeem HM, Weerasekara I, Marusic A, et al., 'Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic: an overview of systematic reviews', BMC Infectious Diseases, 21 (2021) [C1]

Background: Navigating the rapidly growing body of scientific literature on the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is challenging, and ongoing critical appraisal of this output is essential. We ... [more]

Background: Navigating the rapidly growing body of scientific literature on the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is challenging, and ongoing critical appraisal of this output is essential. We aimed to summarize and critically appraise systematic reviews of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in humans that were available at the beginning of the pandemic. Methods: Nine databases (Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Sciences, PDQ-Evidence, WHO¿s Global Research, LILACS, and Epistemonikos) were searched from December 1, 2019, to March 24, 2020. Systematic reviews analyzing primary studies of COVID-19 were included. Two authors independently undertook screening, selection, extraction (data on clinical symptoms, prevalence, pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, diagnostic test assessment, laboratory, and radiological findings), and quality assessment (AMSTAR 2). A meta-analysis was performed of the prevalence of clinical outcomes. Results: Eighteen systematic reviews were included; one was empty (did not identify any relevant study). Using AMSTAR 2, confidence in the results of all 18 reviews was rated as ¿critically low¿. Identified symptoms of COVID-19 were (range values of point estimates): fever (82¿95%), cough with or without sputum (58¿72%), dyspnea (26¿59%), myalgia or muscle fatigue (29¿51%), sore throat (10¿13%), headache (8¿12%) and gastrointestinal complaints (5¿9%). Severe symptoms were more common in men. Elevated C-reactive protein and lactate dehydrogenase, and slightly elevated aspartate and alanine aminotransferase, were commonly described. Thrombocytopenia and elevated levels of procalcitonin and cardiac troponin I were associated with severe disease. A frequent finding on chest imaging was uni- or bilateral multilobar ground-glass opacity. A single review investigated the impact of medication (chloroquine) but found no verifiable clinical data. All-cause mortality ranged from 0.3 to 13.9%. Conclusions: In this overview of systematic reviews, we analyzed evidence from the first 18 systematic reviews that were published after the emergence of COVID-19. However, confidence in the results of all reviews was ¿critically low¿. Thus, systematic reviews that were published early on in the pandemic were of questionable usefulness. Even during public health emergencies, studies and systematic reviews should adhere to established methodological standards.

DOI 10.1186/s12879-021-06214-4
Citations Scopus - 1
2021 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly PG, Snodgrass S, Tessier J, Rivett DA, 'Is the fibula positioned anteriorly in weight-bearing in individuals with chronic ankle instability? A case control study', Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy, 29 168-175 (2021)

Background: Clinically, a discrepancy of fibular position in relation to the tibia has been proposed as a factor in the persistence of chronic ankle instability (CAI). Previous st... [more]

Background: Clinically, a discrepancy of fibular position in relation to the tibia has been proposed as a factor in the persistence of chronic ankle instability (CAI). Previous studies have produced conflicting findings, perhaps due to varying radiological methods and measurement of participants in non-weight-bearing positions. Objectives: To compare normalized-fibular position in weight-bearing in individuals with CAI with healthy controls. Design: A weight-bearing lateral X-ray was taken of the affected ankle of 33 adults with CAI and 33 matched controls. The distance between the anterior edges of the distal fibula and tibia was recorded, and then normalized as a proportion of maximal tibial width. Normalized-fibular position was compared between groups using independent t-tests. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) were calculated to determine reliability of measurements. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine sensitivity, specificity, and a cutoff score to differentiate individuals with CAI from controls using normalized-fibular position. Results: Normalized fibular position was significantly different (CAI, 29.7 (6.6)%; healthy, 26.7 (4.8)%) between the groups. Measurement of intra-rater (0.99, 95%CI¿=¿0.98 to 1.00) and inter-rater (0.98, 95%CI¿=¿0.96 to 0.99) reliability were both excellent. The threshold normalized-fibular position was 27%, with a score more than 27% indicating a greater chance of being in the CAI group. Sensitivity was 69.7% and specificity was 54.5% for this threshold. Conclusion: A slightly anteriorly positioned fibula in relation to the tibia was observed in people with CAI. Specificity/sensitivity scores for normalized-fibular position indicate that it has little ability to predict CAI alone.

DOI 10.1080/10669817.2020.1844852
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Tessier, Suzanne Snodgrass, Peter Osmotherly, Darren Rivett
2020 Borges do Nascimento IJ, Cacic N, Abdulazeem HM, von Groote TC, Jayarajah U, Weerasekara I, et al., 'Novel Coronavirus Infection (COVID-19) in Humans: A Scoping Review and Meta-Analysis', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, 9 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/jcm9040941
Citations Web of Science - 198
2020 do Nascimento IJB, von Groote TC, O'Mathúna DP, Abdulazeem HM, Henderson C, Jayarajah U, et al., 'Clinical, laboratory and radiological characteristics and outcomes of novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection in humans: A systematic review and series of meta-analyses', PLoS ONE, 15 1-35 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0239235
Citations Web of Science - 19
2020 Weerasekara I, Tennakoon SUB, Suraweera HJ, 'Pain Level, Range of Motion, and Foot Volume Do Not Differ in Recurrent and First-Time Ankle Sprains', Foot and Ankle Specialist, 13 116-122 (2020)

Objective. This study aims to describe the clinical features in terms of pain perception, ankle range of motion, and foot volume in participants with recurrent ankle sprains compa... [more]

Objective. This study aims to describe the clinical features in terms of pain perception, ankle range of motion, and foot volume in participants with recurrent ankle sprains compared with first-time sprains. Methods. Individuals with grade I and II ankle sprains were referred to physiotherapy care for further rehabilitation by their general practitioner. Primary outcome measures were range of movement, pain, and foot volume. Recurrences were described according to engagement in sport. Results. A total of 115 participants were recruited (age = 22.2 ± 6.9 years; female, 84). Neither pain level (P =.822), nor range of motion (dorsiflexion P =.452; plantar flexion P =.436; inversion P =.383; eversion P =.657), nor foot volume (P =.654) were significantly different between the groups: individuals with first-time sprain or with recurrences. Conclusion. Pain and high existence of other lower-limb injuries were reported disregarding the presence of a recurrence. Clinically, it is difficult to differentiate recurrent sprain from a first-time ankle sprain by means of foot volume, range of movement, or pain intensity.

DOI 10.1177/1938640019843331
Citations Scopus - 1
2020 Weerasekara I, Deam H, Bamborough N, Brown S, Donnelly J, Thorp N, Rivett DA, 'Effect of Mobilisation with Movement (MWM) on clinical outcomes in lateral ankle sprains: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Foot, 43 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.foot.2019.101657
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2020 Marquez J, Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, Chambers L, 'Hippotherapy in adults with acquired brain injury: A systematic review.', Physiotherapy theory and practice, 36 779-790 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09593985.2018.1494233
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jodie Marquez
2019 'Correction: Exorotated radiographic views have additional diagnostic value in detecting an osseous impediment in patients with posterior ankle impingement', Journal of ISAKOS: Joint Disorders & Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, 4 e2-e2 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/jisakos-2019-000272corr1
2019 Mackie P, Weerasekara I, Crowfoot G, Janssen H, Holliday E, Dunstan D, English C, 'What is the effect of interrupting prolonged sitting with frequent bouts of physical activity or standing on first or recurrent stroke risk factors? A scoping review', PLoS ONE, 14 1-24 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0217981
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Heidi Janssen, Gary Crowfoot, Coralie English
2019 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly PG, Snodgrass SJ, Tessier J, Rivett DA, 'Effects of mobilisation with movement (MWM) on anatomical and clinical characteristics of chronic ankle instability: a randomised controlled trial protocol', BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, 20 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12891-019-2447-x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Tessier, Darren Rivett, Peter Osmotherly, Suzanne Snodgrass
2019 Dobbe JGG, Streekstra GJ, Blankevoort L, Wiegerinck JI, Maas M, Zwiers R, et al., 'Exorotated radiographic views have additional diagnostic value in detecting an osseous impediment in patients with posterior ankle impingement', Journal of ISAKOS, 4 181-187 (2019)

Objectives A standard lateral radiograph is the first step in the diagnostic workup in patients with posterior ankle pain. Because of overprojection by other structures at subopti... [more]

Objectives A standard lateral radiograph is the first step in the diagnostic workup in patients with posterior ankle pain. Because of overprojection by other structures at suboptimal radiographic projection angle, often an os trigonum is not discovered or erroneously be mistaken for a hypertrophic posterior talar process. The aim of this study was to identify the projection angles at which a radiograph is optimal for detecting bony impediments in patients suffering from posterior ankle impingement. Methods Using ankle CT scans of patients with posterior ankle impingement, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) simulating 13 different radiographic projection angles were generated. The ankle CT scans served as a reference for the detection of an os trigonum and hypertrophic posterior talar process. Members of the Ankleplatform Study Group were invited to assess the DRRs, for presence or absence of an os trigonum or hypertrophic posterior talar process. Diagnostic accuracy and interobserver reliability were estimated for each projection angle. In addition, the diagnostic accuracy of the standard lateral view in combination with the rotated views was calculated. Results High sensitivity for detecting an os trigonum was found for +15° (90.3%), +20° (81.7%) and +25° (89.7%) degrees of exorotation. Specificity in this range of projection angles was between 89.6% and 97.8%. Regarding the presence of a hypertrophic posterior talar process, increased sensitivity was found for +15° (65.7%), +20° (61.0%), +25° (60.7%), +30° (56.3%) and +35° (54.5%). Specificity ranged from 78.0% to 94.7%. The combination of the standard lateral view in combination with exorotated views showed higher sensitivity. For detecting an os trigonum, a negative predictive value of 94.6% (+15°), 94.1% (+20°) and 96.1% (+25°) was found. Conclusion This study underlines the additional diagnostic value of exorotated views instead of, or in addition to the standard lateral view in detecting an osseous impediment. We recommend to use the 25° exorotated view in combination with the routine standard lateral ankle view in the workup of patients with posterior ankle pain. Level of evidence Level III.

DOI 10.1136/jisakos-2019-000272
Citations Scopus - 1
2018 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, Marquez J, de Zoete R, Rivett DA, 'Clinical Benefits of Joint Mobilization on Ankle Sprains: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 99 1395-1412.e5 (2018) [C1]

Objective: To assess the clinical benefits of joint mobilization for ankle sprains. Data Sources: MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, Embase, AMED, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PE... [more]

Objective: To assess the clinical benefits of joint mobilization for ankle sprains. Data Sources: MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, Embase, AMED, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PEDro, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and Dissertations and Theses were searched from inception to June 2017. Study Selection: Studies investigating humans with grade I or II lateral or medial sprains of the ankle in any pathologic state from acute to chronic, who had been treated with joint mobilization were considered for inclusion. Any conservative intervention was considered as a comparator. Commonly reported clinical outcomes were considered such as ankle range of movement, pain, and function. After screening of 1530 abstracts, 56 studies were selected for full-text screening, and 23 were eligible for inclusion. Eleven studies on chronic sprains reported sufficient data for meta-analysis. Data Extraction: Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, outcomes, and study design approach. Clinically relevant outcomes (dorsiflexion range, proprioception, balance, function, pain threshold, pain intensity) were assessed at immediate, short-term, and long-term follow-up points. Data Synthesis: Methodological quality was assessed independently by 2 reviewers, and most studies were found to be of moderate quality, with no studies rated as poor. Meta-analysis revealed significant immediate benefits of joint mobilization compared with comparators on improving posteromedial dynamic balance (P=.0004), but not for improving dorsiflexion range (P=.16), static balance (P=.96), or pain intensity (P=.45). Joint mobilization was beneficial in the short-term for improving weight-bearing dorsiflexion range (P=.003) compared with a control. Conclusions: Joint mobilization appears to be beneficial for improving dynamic balance immediately after application, and dorsiflexion range in the short-term. Long-term benefits have not been adequately investigated.

DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.07.019
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Darren Rivett, Suzanne Snodgrass, Jodie Marquez
2018 Hunter D, Rivett D, Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, McKiernan S, Snodgrass S, 'Is the inclinometer a valid measure of thoracic kyphosis? A cross-sectional study', Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 22 310-317 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.02.005
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass, Darren Rivett, Sharmaine Mckiernan
2017 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, de Zoete R, Rivett D, 'Clinical benefits of passive joint mobilisation on ankle sprains', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 20 e49-e49 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.01.133
2017 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, Hiller C, 'Chronic musculoskeletal ankle disorders in Sri Lanka', BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 18 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1580-7
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
2016 RAJAPAKSHA MUDIYANSELAGE I, Tennakoon SUB, Suraweera HJ, 'Contrast Therapy and Heat Therapy in Subacute Stage of Grade I and II Lateral Ankle Sprains', Foot & Ankle Specialist, 9 307-323 (2016)
DOI 10.1177/1938640016640885
2016 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, Banneheka BMHSK, Sivananthawerl T, Fahim ACM, 'Awareness among School Athletes about The Handling and Transferring Techniques of a Suspected Spinal Cord Injured Athlete', International Journal of Neurorehabilitation, 3 (2016)
DOI 10.4172/2376-0281.1000217
2015 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, Tennakoon SUB, Suraweera HJ, 'Effect of a self - managed exercise protocol for subjects with ankle sprain', The Foot and Ankle Online Journal, 8 8-8 (2015)
DOI 10.3827/faoj.2015.0801.0008
2014 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, Wadugodapitiya S, Liyanage E, Dissanayaka D, Liyanage I, Kodikara D, Banneheka S, 'Influence of English on academic performance of physiotherapy students', International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development, 1 169-172 (2014)
2013 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, Banneheka S, 'Awareness about Spinal Cord Injuries among School Athletes of Kandy Educational Zone, Sri Lanka', International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications, 3 (2013)
2013 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, 'The Prevalence of Hamstring Tightness among the Male Athletes of University of Peradeniya in 2010, Sri Lanka', International Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 01 (2013)
DOI 10.4172/2329-9096.1000108
Borges do Nascimento IJ, Marusic A, Cacic N, Mohamed Abdulazeem H, Abdar Esfahani M, Jayarajah U, et al., 'Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Infection in Humans: A Scoping Review and Meta-Analysis', SSRN Electronic Journal,
DOI 10.2139/ssrn.3550028
Show 22 more journal articles

Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Mackie P, Weerasekara I, Crowfoot G, Janssen H, Holliday E, Dunstan D, English C, 'Interrupting prolonged sitting with frequent bouts of physical activity or standing on first or recurrent stroke risk factors: Scoping review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2019)
Co-authors Gary Crowfoot, Heidi Janssen, Coralie English
2019 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, Tessier J, Rivett D, 'Fibular position in chronic ankle instability radiographically measured in weight-bearing', Fibular position in chronic ankle instability radiographically measured in weight-bearing, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2019)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Darren Rivett, Suzanne Snodgrass
2019 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage IM, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, Tessier J, Rivett D, 'Fibular position in chronic ankle instability (CAI) and the reliability of weight bearing radiographic measurements of fibular position.', (ACCEPTED), Geneva, Switzerland (2019)
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass, Darren Rivett, Peter Osmotherly
2018 Hunter D, Snodgrass SNJ, weerasekara I, Rivett DA, McKiernan ST, 'Thoracic Kyphosis: The Modified Cobb Angle and Inclinometer Measurement.', Canberra (2018)
Co-authors Sharmaine Mckiernan, Darren Rivett, Suzanne Snodgrass
2017 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, Marsden D, English C, Kramer S, Callister R, Bernhardt J, et al., 'Building a Compendium of Energy Expenditure Rates during Physical Activities in People After Stroke: Protocol for a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.', International Journal of Stroke 12(3_suppl):51-2, Queenstown, New Zealand (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1747493017720548
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Coralie English, Robin Callister, Paulette Vanvliet
2017 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, Hiller C, 'O3 Chronic musculoskeletal ankle disorders in Sri Lanka', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE 51(Suppl 1) A1-A2, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, US (2017)
2017 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, Osmotherly PG, Snodgrass S, Marquez J, de Zoete R, Rivett DA, 'A systematic review and meta analysis of the clinical benefits of passive joint mobilisation on ankle sprains.', Momentum 2017. Proceedings of Australian Physiotherapy Association Biennial Conference, Sydney (2017)
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass, Darren Rivett, Peter Osmotherly, Jodie Marquez
2016 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, de Zoete R, Rivett D, 'Clinical Benefits of Passive Joint Mobilisation on Ankle Sprains', Melbourne (2016)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Darren Rivett, Suzanne Snodgrass
Show 5 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
Borges do Nascimento IJ, Marcolino MS, Abdulazeem HM, Weerasekara I, Azzopardi-Muscat N, Gonçalves MA, Novillo-Ortiz D, 'Impact of Big Data Analytics on People s Health: Overview of Systematic Reviews and Recommendations for Future Studies (Preprint)', JMIR Publications Inc. [O1]
DOI 10.2196/preprints.27275
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Mrs Ishanka Madhurangani Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage

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