Dr Hannah Brown

Dr Hannah Brown

Project Manager

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Hannah Brown is an early career researcher and is employed as a Project Manager for Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, at the University of Newcastle’s Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research. Hannah completed her PhD in Nutrition and Dietetics in 2019 and has since worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher in the university setting, health service and in industry. Hannah has experience in the design, implementation and evaluation of social and public health translational initiatives across nutrition, physical activity and mental health research. Hannah is also a qualified Dietitian.

Hannah is passionate about empowering those in the community to improve their mental and physical health, in order to prevent chronic diseases. As Project Manager, Hannah will work across a range of health-promoting projects, including Health4Life, which aims to improve the health of young people by addressing risk factors that contribute to disease, as well as the ihelp project, which focuses on the promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviours.


                               

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Nutrition
  • Public health
  • allied health
  • mental health
  • research
  • suicide prevention

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Project Manager University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
NUDI3310 Public Health Nutrition
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Tutor 31/1/2019 - 31/7/2019
NUDI3310 Public Health Nutrition
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Tutor 7/3/2018 - 31/12/2018
NUDI2210 Community Nutrition Practice
Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Lecturer and Tutor 31/5/2019 - 31/12/2019
NUDI2210 Community Nutrition Practice
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Tutor 30/6/2018 - 31/12/2018
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Wolfenden L, Barnes C, Lane C, McCrabb S, Brown HM, Gerritsen S, et al., 'Consolidating evidence on the effectiveness of interventions promoting fruit and vegetable consumption: an umbrella review', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 18 (2021) [C1]

Background: The overarching objective was to examine the effectiveness of intervention strategies to promote fruit and vegetable consumption. To do this, systematic review evidenc... [more]

Background: The overarching objective was to examine the effectiveness of intervention strategies to promote fruit and vegetable consumption. To do this, systematic review evidence regarding the effects of intervention strategies was synthesized; organized, where appropriate, by the setting in which the strategies were implemented. Additionally, we sought to describe gaps in the review of evidence; that is, where evidence regarding the effectiveness of recommended policy actions had not been systematically synthesised. Methods: We undertook a systematic search of electronic databases and the grey literature to identify systematic reviews describing the effects of any intervention strategy targeting fruit and/or vegetable intake in children or adults of any age. Results: The effects of 32 intervention strategies were synthesised from the 19 included reviews. The strategies were mapped across all three broad domains of the NOURISHING framework (i.e. food environment, food system and behaviour change communication), but covered just 14 of the framework¿s 65 sub-policy areas. There was evidence supporting the effectiveness of 19 of the 32 intervention strategies. The findings of the umbrella review suggest that intervention strategies implemented within schools, childcare services, homes, workplaces and primary care can be effective, as can eHealth strategies, mass media campaigns, household food production strategies and fiscal interventions. Conclusions: A range of effective strategy options are available for policy makers and practitioners interested in improving fruit and/or vegetable intake. However, the effects of many strategies ¿ particularly those targeting agricultural production practices, the supply chain and the broader food system ¿ have not been reported in systematic reviews. Primary studies assessing the effects of these strategies, and the inclusion of such studies in systematic reviews, are needed to better inform national and international efforts to improve public health nutrition. Trial registration: The review protocol was deposited in a publicly available Open Science framework prior to execution of the search strategy. https://osf.io/unj7x/.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-01046-y
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Sam Mccrabb, Serene Yoong, Courtney Barnes, Luke Wolfenden
2021 Brown HM, Bucher T, Rollo ME, Collins CE, 'Pregnant Women Have Poor Carbohydrate Knowledge and Do Not Receive Adequate Nutrition Education', Maternal and Child Health Journal, 25 909-918 (2021) [C1]

Objectives: In order to manage blood glucose levels in pregnancy, women need to know what and how much to eat, particularly for foods containing carbohydrate. The aim was to asses... [more]

Objectives: In order to manage blood glucose levels in pregnancy, women need to know what and how much to eat, particularly for foods containing carbohydrate. The aim was to assess pregnant women¿s carbohydrate and standard serve size knowledge and examine whether health professionals provided nutrition education. Methods: Between July 2017 and April 2018 Australian pregnant women were recruited to complete an online survey, including a modified PedCarbQuiz carbohydrate knowledge questionnaire and an online buffet, where they selected images equivalent to one Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) standard serve size. Results: 186 pregnant women (mean age 30.9¿years, SD = 4.7¿years) 12¿22¿weeks gestation completed the survey. Participants achieved a median score of 27/36 for identification of carbohydrate-containing foods and a median score of 1/12 (range 0¿11) for identification of grams of carbohydrate in specific portions. Participants achieved a median score of 14/22 (range 4¿19) for identification of one AGHE standard serve of 11 carbohydrate-containing foods. Less than half (n = 92, 49.5%) received nutrition education from health professionals. Conclusions for Practice: Pregnant women had sub-optimal carbohydrate knowledge. This could contribute to impaired blood glucose concentrations and risk of adverse health outcomes in pregnancy. Opportunities for pregnant women to access nutrition advice from health professionals should be explored.

DOI 10.1007/s10995-021-03123-5
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Tamara Bucher, Clare Collins
2020 Brown HM, Bucher T, Collins CE, Rollo ME, 'A review of pregnancy apps freely available in the Google Play Store', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 31 340-342 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/hpja.270
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Tamara Bucher
2020 Lavelle F, Bucher T, Dean M, Brown HM, Rollo ME, Collins CE, 'Diet quality is more strongly related to food skills rather than cooking skills confidence: Results from a national cross-sectional survey', Nutrition and Dietetics, 77 112-120 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12583
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tamara Bucher, Megan Rollo
2020 Hutchesson MJ, De Jonge Mulock Houwer M, Brown HM, Lim S, Moran LJ, Vincze L, et al., 'Supporting women of childbearing age in the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity: a scoping review of randomized control trials of behavioral interventions', BMC WOMENS HEALTH, 20 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12905-020-0882-3
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Jenna Hollis, Megan Rollo
2019 Brown HM, Bucher T, Collins CE, Rollo ME, 'A review of pregnancy smartphone apps assessing their quality, inclusion of behaviour change techniques and nutrition guidelines', Maternal and Child Nutrition, 15 (2019) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Tamara Bucher, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins
2019 Brown HM, Collins CE, Bucher T, Rollo ME, 'Evaluation of the effectiveness and usability of an educational portion size tool, ServARpreg, for pregnant women', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 32 719-727 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jhn.12660
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Tamara Bucher, Clare Collins
2018 Brown HM, Rollo ME, de Vlieger NM, Collins CE, Bucher T, 'Influence of the nutrition and health information presented on food labels on portion size consumed: a systematic review.', Nutrition reviews, 76 655-677 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/nutrit/nuy019
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Tamara Bucher, Nienke Devlieger
2017 Brown HM, De Vlieger N, Collins C, Bucher T, 'The influence of front-of-pack nutrition information on consumers' portion size perceptions', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 28 144-147 (2017) [C1]

Issue addressed Portion size guidance strategies have been suggested as an important component of weight management; therefore, the Health Star Rating (HSR) front-of-pack labels c... [more]

Issue addressed Portion size guidance strategies have been suggested as an important component of weight management; therefore, the Health Star Rating (HSR) front-of-pack labels could influence consumers' portion-size decisions. However, this has not been investigated to date. This study aims to evaluate whether presenting energy content information and HSRs influences portion size self-selection of specific foods and meals. Methods Adults were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups in this randomised controlled experiment. Each participant was given either a kJ/100g food label or a HSR label, or was given no information on nutrient composition. They were then asked to serve themselves an adequate portion of breakfast cereal (Kellogg's Nutri-Grain), fruit salad and chocolate, plus a three-component meal (chicken, fries and mixed vegetables). Portion serves and meal weights were compared between each experimental group using ANOVA and the discretionary foods were also compared with the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE). Results Neither the kilojoule nor HSR information influenced the self-served portion size of foods or meal components. Mean self-served portion size of the discretionary foods were significantly greater than the standard serving sizes as specified in the AGHE. Conclusion Although food labels have the potential to assist consumers in making product choices, this study indicates that presenting nutrition information does not affect portion size decisions in young adults. So what? Strategies that assist consumers to choose appropriate portion sizes should be developed as a weight management tool.

DOI 10.1071/HE16011
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tamara Bucher, Nienke Devlieger
2017 Bucher T, Rollo ME, Smith SP, Dean M, Brown H, Sun M, Collins C, 'Position paper on the need for portion-size education and a standardised unit of measurement', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 28 260-263 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/he15137
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Tamara Bucher, Shamus Smith, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins
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Conference (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Brown H, Collins C, Rollo M, Bucher T, Brown H, 'Pregnant women s knowledge of carbohydrate content and standard serving sizes of common foods', Pregnant women s knowledge of carbohydrate content and standard serving sizes of common foods, Hong Kong (2018)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Tamara Bucher
2018 Brown H, Collins C, Rollo M, Bucher T, Brown H, 'The effectiveness of an augmented reality mobile application, ServAR, on improving the portion size awareness of pregnant women', The effectiveness of an augmented reality mobile application, ServAR, on improving the portion size awareness of pregnant women, Sydney (2018)
Co-authors Tamara Bucher, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo
2015 Bucher T, Brown H, de Vlieger N, Collins C, 'Do Front Of Pack Labels Influence Portion Size Decisions?', Berlin, Germany (2015)
Co-authors Nienke Devlieger, Tamara Bucher, Clare Collins
2015 Bucher T, Brown H, de Vlieger N, Collins C, 'Do Front Of Pack Labels Influence Portion Size Decisions?', Brisbane, Australia (2015)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Nienke Devlieger, Tamara Bucher
Show 1 more conference
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Dr Hannah Brown

Position

Project Manager
The Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email hannah.brown@newcastle.edu.au
Phone NA
Fax NA
Link Twitter

Office

Room Calvary Mater Hospital, Macauley Centre
Building Calvary Mater Hospital, Macauley Centre
Location Calvary Mater Hospital, Macauley Centre

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