Dr Hannah Brown

Dr Hannah Brown

Casual Academic

School of Health Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Hannah May Brown is a post-doctoral researcher from the University of Newcastle and an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD). Hannah graduated with First Class Honours in Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics in 2015 and was awarded her PhD in 2019. Hannah’s PhD was focused on improving the dietary knowledge and skills of pregnant women, with a focus on carbohydrate portion and serving sizes, to improve diet quality and health outcomes of both mother and child. Hannah's PhD also involved the assessment of portion size tools, including food labels and augmented reality, on improving knowledge and portion size selection. Hannah is now working as a post-doctoral researcher at Hunter New England Population Health.


                               

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Nutrition
  • Public health

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
NUDI3310 Public Health Nutrition
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Tutor 31/01/2019 - 31/07/2019
NUDI3310 Public Health Nutrition
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Tutor 7/03/2018 - 31/12/2018
NUDI2210 Community Nutrition Practice
Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Lecturer and Tutor 31/05/2019 - 31/12/2019
NUDI2210 Community Nutrition Practice
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Tutor 30/06/2018 - 31/12/2018
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Brown HM, Bucher T, Collins CE, Rollo ME, 'A review of pregnancy apps freely available in the Google Play Store.', Health Promot J Austr, (2019)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.270
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Tamara Bucher
2019 Brown HM, Collins CE, Bucher T, Rollo ME, 'Evaluation of the effectiveness and usability of an educational portion size tool, ServARpreg, for pregnant women.', J Hum Nutr Diet, (2019)
DOI 10.1111/jhn.12660
Co-authors Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Tamara Bucher
2018 Brown H, Collins C, Rollo M, Bucher T, 'A review of pregnancy smartphone apps assessing their quality, inclusion of behaviour change techniques and nutrition guidelines', A review of pregnancy smartphone apps assessing their quality, inclusion of behaviour change techniques and nutrition guidelines, (2018)
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Tamara Bucher, Clare Collins
2018 Brown HM, Rollo ME, de Vlieger NM, Collins CE, Bucher T, 'Influence of the nutrition and health information presented on food labels on portion size consumed: a systematic review.', Nutrition reviews, 76 655-677 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/nutrit/nuy019
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Nienke Devlieger Uon, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Tamara Bucher
2017 Brown HM, De Vlieger N, Collins C, Bucher T, 'The influence of front-of-pack nutrition information on consumers' portion size perceptions', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 28 144-147 (2017) [C1]

Issue addressed Portion size guidance strategies have been suggested as an important component of weight management; therefore, the Health Star Rating (HSR) front-of-pack labels c... [more]

Issue addressed Portion size guidance strategies have been suggested as an important component of weight management; therefore, the Health Star Rating (HSR) front-of-pack labels could influence consumers' portion-size decisions. However, this has not been investigated to date. This study aims to evaluate whether presenting energy content information and HSRs influences portion size self-selection of specific foods and meals. Methods Adults were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups in this randomised controlled experiment. Each participant was given either a kJ/100g food label or a HSR label, or was given no information on nutrient composition. They were then asked to serve themselves an adequate portion of breakfast cereal (Kellogg's Nutri-Grain), fruit salad and chocolate, plus a three-component meal (chicken, fries and mixed vegetables). Portion serves and meal weights were compared between each experimental group using ANOVA and the discretionary foods were also compared with the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE). Results Neither the kilojoule nor HSR information influenced the self-served portion size of foods or meal components. Mean self-served portion size of the discretionary foods were significantly greater than the standard serving sizes as specified in the AGHE. Conclusion Although food labels have the potential to assist consumers in making product choices, this study indicates that presenting nutrition information does not affect portion size decisions in young adults. So what? Strategies that assist consumers to choose appropriate portion sizes should be developed as a weight management tool.

DOI 10.1071/HE16011
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Nienke Devlieger Uon, Tamara Bucher, Clare Collins
2017 Bucher T, Rollo ME, Smith SP, Dean M, Brown H, Sun M, Collins C, 'Position paper on the need for portion-size education and a standardised unit of measurement', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 28 260-263 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/he15137
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tamara Bucher, Shamus Smith, Megan Rollo
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Conference (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Brown H, Collins C, Rollo M, Bucher T, Brown H, 'Pregnant women s knowledge of carbohydrate content and standard serving sizes of common foods', Pregnant women s knowledge of carbohydrate content and standard serving sizes of common foods, Hong Kong (2018)
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Tamara Bucher, Clare Collins
2018 Brown H, Collins C, Rollo M, Bucher T, Brown H, 'The effectiveness of an augmented reality mobile application, ServAR, on improving the portion size awareness of pregnant women', The effectiveness of an augmented reality mobile application, ServAR, on improving the portion size awareness of pregnant women, Sydney (2018)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tamara Bucher, Megan Rollo
2015 Bucher T, Brown H, de Vlieger N, Collins C, 'Do Front Of Pack Labels Influence Portion Size Decisions?', Berlin, Germany (2015)
Co-authors Tamara Bucher, Clare Collins, Nienke Devlieger Uon
2015 Bucher T, Brown H, de Vlieger N, Collins C, 'Do Front Of Pack Labels Influence Portion Size Decisions?', Brisbane, Australia (2015)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Nienke Devlieger Uon, Tamara Bucher
Show 1 more conference
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Dr Hannah Brown

Positions

Casual Academic
Nicole Nathan's team
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Academic
Nicole Nathan's team
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Research Assistant
Nicole Nathan's team
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email hannah.brown@newcastle.edu.au
Phone NA
Mobile 0420423005
Fax NA
Link Twitter

Office

Room Wallsend hospital- Pod 6
Building Wallsend Hospital
Location Wallsend Hospital, Longworth Avenue

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