Dr Liz Fradgley

Dr Liz Fradgley

CINSW Early Career Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Fradgley has made significant contributions to understanding and promoting the delivery of patient-centred care with recent publications exploring how patients can be involved in redesigning health services and how to support busy health professionals to adapt evidence-based models of care. 

Liz has an outstanding record relative to opportunity including a rapidly increasing publication trajectory with 28 peer-reviewed papers and 8 currently under review. She is cited over 150 times, including by the World Health Organization. She also recently completed an international Fellowship visit to the University of Calgary's Tom Baker Cancer Centre, a world-leading institution in provision of evidence-based supportive care led by Prof Barry Bultz. 

Liz has attracted over $1.5 mil in competitive research funding including an NHMRC partnership grant, CINSW Early Career Fellowship and 2 commissioned studies


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours), University of Calgary - Canada

Keywords

  • Health behaviour
  • Health services research
  • Implementation science
  • Multidisciplinary care
  • Patient-centred care
  • Psycho-oncology
  • Supportive care

Languages

  • French (Fluent)
  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111708 Health and Community Services 45
170110 Psychological Methodology, Design and Analysis 20
111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified 35

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
CINSW Early Career Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
15/02/2016 -  Postdoctoral Research Associate

Dr Fradgley is a postdoctoral researcher within the University of Newcastle's Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour. She is currently responsible for the daily management of a national randomised controlled trial, and is leading a national audit of distress management practices in Australian cancer services. 

The University of Newcastle, Australia
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
27/02/2012 - 15/02/2016 Research Assistant The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

Highlighted Publications

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Fradgley EA, Byrnes E, McCarter K, Rankin N, Britton B, Clover K, et al., 'A cross-sectional audit of current practices and areas for improvement of distress screening and management in Australian cancer services: is there a will and a way to improve?', Support Care Cancer, (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-019-04801-5
Co-authors Chris Paul, Benjamin Britton, Gregory Carter, Kristen Mccarter
2019 Fradgley EA, Karnon J, Roach D, Harding K, Wilkinson-Meyers L, Chojenta C, et al., 'Taking the pulse of the health services research community: a cross-sectional survey of research impact, barriers and support.', Aust Health Rev, (2019)
DOI 10.1071/AH18213
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Chris Paul, Catherine Chojenta

Journal article (23 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Fradgley EA, Boltong A, O'Brien L, Boyes AW, Lane K, Beattie A, et al., 'Implementing Systematic Screening and Structured Care for Distressed Callers Using Cancer Council's Telephone Services: Protocol for a Randomized Stepped-Wedge Trial', JMIR RESEARCH PROTOCOLS, 8 93-103 (2019)
DOI 10.2196/12473
Co-authors Chris Paul, Allison Boyes, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Daniel Barker
2019 Fradgley EA, Byrnes E, McCarter K, Rankin N, Britton B, Clover K, et al., 'A cross-sectional audit of current practices and areas for improvement of distress screening and management in Australian cancer services: is there a will and a way to improve?', Support Care Cancer, (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-019-04801-5
Co-authors Chris Paul, Benjamin Britton, Gregory Carter, Kristen Mccarter
2019 Fradgley EA, Chong SE, Cox ME, Gedye C, Paul CL, 'Patients' experiences and preferences for opt-in models and health professional involvement in biobanking consent: A cross-sectional survey of Australian cancer outpatients', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 15 31-37 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/ajco.12866
Co-authors Chris Paul, Craig Gedye
2019 Fradgley EA, Karnon J, Roach D, Harding K, Wilkinson-Meyers L, Chojenta C, et al., 'Taking the pulse of the health services research community: a cross-sectional survey of research impact, barriers and support.', Aust Health Rev, (2019)
DOI 10.1071/AH18213
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Chris Paul, Catherine Chojenta
2018 Hall AE, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher RW, Fradgley EA, Proietto AM, Roos I, 'Consumer input into health care: Time for a new active and comprehensive model of consumer involvement', Health Expectations, 21 707-713 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: To ensure the provision of patient-centred health care, it is essential that consumers ... [more]

© 2018 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: To ensure the provision of patient-centred health care, it is essential that consumers are actively involved in the process of determining and implementing health-care quality improvements. However, common strategies used to involve consumers in quality improvements, such as consumer membership on committees and collection of patient feedback via surveys, are ineffective and have a number of limitations, including: limited representativeness; tokenism; a lack of reliable and valid patient feedback data; infrequent assessment of patient feedback; delays in acquiring feedback; and how collected feedback is used to drive health-care improvements. Objectives: We propose a new active model of consumer engagement that aims to overcome these limitations. This model involves the following: (i) the development of a new measure of consumer perceptions; (ii) low cost and frequent electronic data collection of patient views of quality improvements; (iii) efficient feedback to the health-care decision makers; and (iv) active involvement of consumers that fosters power to influence health system changes.

DOI 10.1111/hex.12665
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, Zucca A, Oldmeadow C, 'System-wide and group-specific health service improvements: Cross-sectional survey of outpatient improvement preferences and associations with demographic characteristics', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15020179
Co-authors Chris Paul, Alison Zucca, Jamie Bryant, Christopher Oldmeadow
2018 Fradgley EA, Chong SE, Cox ME, Paul CL, Gedye C, 'Enlisting the willing: A study of healthcare professional initiated and opt-in biobanking consent reveals improvement opportunities throughout the registration process', European Journal of Cancer, 89 36-41 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 The Authors Biobanking consent processes should accord with patients' preferences and be offered in a consistent and systematic manner. However, these aims can be diff... [more]

© 2017 The Authors Biobanking consent processes should accord with patients' preferences and be offered in a consistent and systematic manner. However, these aims can be difficult to achieve under healthcare professionals' (HCPs) time-constrained workflows, resulting in low participation rates. This current perspective provides a brief overview of HCP involvement in consent and reports new data on participant attrition at each step of the biobanking consent process as experienced by 113 patients at an Australian tertiary cancer centre. To determine attrition in this HCP-driven consent process, we reviewed medical records for the following events: inclusion of biobanking consent forms; visible patient and HCP signatures; consent status selected (decline or accept) and specimen registration with local biobank. Accessible medical records revealed the following data: 75 of 85 records included viewable forms; 22 of 85 records included patient and 19 of 85 included HCP signatures; 15 of 85 records included signed and completed forms and 3 of 85 had samples banked with annotated clinical data. We compared these data with self-reported experiences of being approached to participate by HCPs. Of the 15 participants (17.6%) who successfully completed consent, only five could recall being asked and providing consent. The low enrolment rate is a considerable lost opportunity because most patients (59%) who were not asked to participate indicated they would have consented if asked. Furthermore, in comparing self-reported experiences with medical records, we believe cancer patients' preferences for participation are mismatched with actual biobanking enrolment, which has considerable attrition at each step in the consent process.

DOI 10.1016/j.ejca.2017.10.025
Co-authors Craig Gedye, Chris Paul
2017 Paul CL, Fradgley EA, Roach D, Baird H, 'Impact of financial costs of cancer on patients - the Australian experience', CANCER FORUM, 41 4-9 (2017) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Chris Paul
2016 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Hobden B, Zucca A, Henskens F, et al., 'A consumer register: an acceptable and cost-effective alternative for accessing patient populations', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 16 1-10 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however, they have several limitations including low c... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however, they have several limitations including low consent and participation rates, and potential selection bias. To improve access to samples for research, the utility of a new model of recruitment termed the 'Consumer Register', that allows for direct patient recruitment from hospitals, was examined. This paper reports: (i) consent rates onto the register; (ii) preferred methods and frequency of contact; and (iii) the feasibility of establishing the register, including: (a) cost per person recruited to the register; (b) the differential cost and consent rates of volunteer versus paid data collectors; and (c) participant completion rates. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five outpatient clinics in Australia. Patients were approached by volunteers or paid data collectors and asked to complete a touch-screen electronic survey. Consenting individuals were asked to indicate their willingness and preferences for enrolment onto a research register. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patient preferences and linear regression used to model the success of volunteer versus paid data collectors. The opportunity and financial costs of establishing the register were calculated. Results: A total of 1947 patients (80.6 %) consented to complete the survey, of which, 1486 (76.3 %) completed the questionnaire. Of the completers, the majority (69.4 %, or 1032 participants) were willing to be listed on the register and preferred to be contacted by email (50.3 %). Almost 39 % of completers were willing to be contacted three or more times in a 12 month period. The annual opportunity cost of resources consumed by the register was valued at $37,187, giving an opportunity cost per person recruited to the register of $36. After amortising fixed costs, the annual financial outlay was $23,004 or $22 per person recruited to the register. Use of volunteer data collectors contributed to an annual saving of $14,183, however paid data collectors achieved significantly higher consent rates. Successful enrolment onto the register was completed for 42 % of the sample. Conclusions: A Consumer Register is a promising and feasible alternative to population-based registries, with the majority of participants willing to be contacted multiple times via low-resource methods such as email. There is an effectiveness/cost trade off in the use of paid versus volunteer data collectors.

DOI 10.1186/s12874-016-0238-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Bree Hobden, Frans Henskens, Andrew Searles, Alison Zucca, Christopher Oldmeadow, Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Paul CL, Boyes AW, O'Brien L, Baker AL, Henskens FA, Roos I, et al., 'Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial of Proactive Web-Based Versus Telephone-Based Information and Support: Can Electronic Platforms Deliver Effective Care for Lung Cancer Patients?', JMIR RESEARCH PROTOCOLS, 5 (2016)
DOI 10.2196/resprot.6248
Citations Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Frans Henskens, Amanda Baker, Chris Paul, Daniel Barker, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2016 Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, Oldmeadow C, 'Getting right to the point: Identifying Australian outpatients' priorities and preferences for patient-centred quality improvement in chronic disease care', International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 28 470-477 (2016) [C1]

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. Objectives: To identify spec... [more]

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. Objectives: To identify specific actions for patient-centred quality improvement in chronic disease outpatient settings, this study identified patients' general and specific preferences among a comprehensive suite of initiatives for change.Design and setting: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in three hospital-based clinics specializing in oncology, neurology and cardiology care located in New South Wales, Australia.Participants and measures: Adult English-speaking outpatients completed the touch-screen Consumer Preferences Survey in waiting rooms or treatment areas. Participants selected up to 23 general initiatives that would improve their experience. Using adaptive branching, participants could select an additional 110 detailed initiatives and complete a relative prioritization exercise.Results: A total of 541 individuals completed the survey (71.1% consent, 73.1% completion). Commonly selected general initiatives, presented in order of decreasing priority (along with sample proportion), included: improved parking (60.3%), up-to-date information provision (15.0%), ease of clinic contact (12.9%), access to information at home (12.8%), convenient appointment scheduling (14.2%), reduced wait-times (19.8%) and information on medical emergencies (11.1%). To address these general initiatives, 40 detailed initiatives were selected by respondents.Conclusions: Initiatives targeting service accessibility and information provision, such as parking and up-to-date information on patient prognoses and progress, were commonly selected and perceived to be of relatively greater priority. Specific preferences included the need for clinics to provide patient-designated parking in close proximity to the clinic, information on treatment progress and test results (potentially in the form of designated brief appointments or via telehealth) and comprehensive and trustworthy lists of information sources to access at home.

DOI 10.1093/intqhc/mzw049
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Jamie Bryant, Chris Paul
2016 Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, Collins N, Ackland SP, Bellamy D, Levi CR, 'Collaborative Patient-Centered Quality Improvement: A Cross-Sectional Survey Comparing the Types and Numbers of Quality Initiatives Selected by Patients and Health Professionals.', Eval Health Prof, 39 475-495 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0163278716659524
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Stephen Ackland, Chris Paul, Jamie Bryant, Christopher Levi
2016 Fradgley EA, Bryant J, Paul CL, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Oldmeadow C, 'Cross-sectional data that explore the relationship between outpatients' quality of life and preferences for quality improvement in oncology settings', Journal of Oncology Practice, 12 e746-e754 (2016) [C1]

Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Purpose This cross-sectional study assessed the association between oncology outpatients' quality improvement prefe... [more]

Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Purpose This cross-sectional study assessed the association between oncology outpatients' quality improvement preferences and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Implementation of specific initiatives preferred by patients with lower HRQoL may be a strategic approach to enhancing care for potentially vulnerable patients. Methods English-speaking adults were recruited from five outpatient chemotherapy clinics located in New South Wales, Australia. Using touch screen devices, participants selected up to 25 initiatives that would improve their experiences and completed the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) survey. The logistic odds of selecting an initiative according to FACT-G scores were calculated to determine whether preferences were associated with HRQoL after controlling for potential confounders. Results Of the 411 eligible outpatients approached to participate, 263 (64%) completed surveys. Commonly selected initiatives were up-to-date information on treatment and condition progress (19.8%), access to or information on financial assistance (18.3%), and reduced clinic wait times (17.5%). For those with relatively lower FACT-G scores, the adjusted odds of selecting five initiatives illustrated an increasing trend: convenient appointment scheduling systems (+23% [P =.002]), reduced wait times (+15% [P =.01]), information on medical emergencies (+14% [P =.04]), access to or information on financial assistance (+15% [P =.009]), help to maintain daily living activities (+18% [P =.007]). Conclusion Two areas of improvement were commonly selected: easily accessible health services and information and support for self-management. Although the results suggest an association between a few quality improvement preferences and HRQoL, a wider spectrum of patient characteristics must be considered when targeting quality improvement to patient subgroups.

DOI 10.1200/JOP.2016.011023
Co-authors Chris Paul, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant
2016 Paul C, Bonevski B, Twyman L, D'Este C, Siahpush M, Guillaumier A, et al., 'The 'price signal' for health care is loud and clear: A cross-sectional study of self-reported access to health care by disadvantaged Australians', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40 132-137 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia. Objective: To describe self-reported inability to access health care and factors associated with lack of access among a socioeconomi... [more]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia. Objective: To describe self-reported inability to access health care and factors associated with lack of access among a socioeconomically disadvantaged group. Method: A cross-sectional survey with 906 adult clients of a large community welfare agency in New South Wales. Clients attending the service for emergency assistance completed a touchscreen survey. Results: Inability to access health care in the prior year was reported by more than one-third of the sample (38%), compared to the 5% found for the general population. Dentists (47%), specialists (43%) or GPs (29%) were the least accessible types of health care. The main reason for inability to access health care was cost, accounting for 60% of responses. Almost half (47%) the sample reported delayed or non-use of medicines due to cost. Increasing financial stress was associated with increased inability to access GP or specialist care, medicines and imaging. Higher anxiety scores were associated with inability to access health care, and with cost-related inability to access medicines and imaging. Conclusion: For disadvantaged groups, cost-related barriers to accessing care are prominent and are disproportionately high - particularly regarding dentistry, specialist and GP care. Implications: Improvements in health outcomes for disadvantaged groups are likely to require strategies to reduce cost-related barriers to health care.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12405
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Catherine Deste, Jamie Bryant, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Chris Paul
2016 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Hobden B, Zucca A, Henskens F, et al., 'A consumer register: an acceptable and cost-effective alternative for accessing patient populations', BMC medical research methodology, 16 134 (2016)

BACKGROUND: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however,¿they have several limitations including low consent and participati... [more]

BACKGROUND: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however,¿they have several limitations including low consent and participation rates, and potential selection bias. To improve access to samples for research, the utility of a new model of recruitment termed the 'Consumer Register', that allows for direct patient recruitment from hospitals, was examined. This paper reports: (i) consent rates onto the register; (ii) preferred methods and frequency of contact; and (iii) the feasibility of establishing the register, including: (a) cost per person recruited to the register; (b) the differential cost and consent rates of volunteer versus paid data collectors; and (c) participant completion rates. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five outpatient clinics in Australia. Patients were approached by volunteers or paid data collectors and asked to complete a touch-screen electronic survey. Consenting individuals were asked to indicate their willingness and preferences for enrolment onto a research register. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patient preferences and linear regression used to model the success of volunteer versus paid data collectors. The opportunity and financial costs of establishing the register were calculated. RESULTS: A total of 1947 patients (80.6¿%) consented to complete the survey, of which, 1486 (76.3¿%) completed the questionnaire. Of the completers, the majority (69.4¿%, or 1032 participants) were willing to be listed on the register and preferred to be contacted by email (50.3¿%). Almost 39¿% of completers¿were willing to be contacted three or more times in a 12¿month period. The annual opportunity cost of resources consumed by the register was valued at $37,187, giving an opportunity cost per person recruited to the register of $36. After amortising fixed costs, the annual financial outlay was $23,004 or $22 per person recruited to the register. Use of volunteer data collectors contributed to an annual saving of $14,183, however paid data collectors achieved significantly higher consent rates. Successful enrolment onto the register was completed for 42 % of the sample. CONCLUSIONS: A Consumer Register is a promising and feasible alternative to population-based registries, with the majority of participants willing to be contacted multiple times via low-resource methods such as email. There is an effectiveness/cost trade off in the use of paid versus volunteer data collectors.

Co-authors Frans Henskens, Jamie Bryant, Andrew Searles, Bree Hobden, Alison Zucca, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, Fradgley E, Regan T, 'Medical Oncology Patients: Are They Offered Help and Does It Provide Relief?', Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 50 436-444 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Context Identifying modifiable gaps in the symptom management pathway, as perceived by patients, is the first step to r... [more]

© 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Context Identifying modifiable gaps in the symptom management pathway, as perceived by patients, is the first step to relieving patient suffering. Objectives The objective is to describe the proportion of patients experiencing treatable cancer-related symptoms who reported 1) a health care provider at the treatment center offered assistance for their symptom, 2) they accepted the assistance offered, and 3) the assistance relieved suffering. Variation in symptom management among treatment centers also was examined. Methods A survey was done with 528 medical oncology outpatients recruited from six treatment centers. Eight items explored management of prevalent, burdensome, and treatable cancer-related symptoms: pain, fatigue, other physical side effects, and emotional distress. Participants were asked about symptom management provided at the clinic from where they were recruited. Questions referred to the last occasion the patient experienced the symptom. Results Fewer patients were offered help to relieve fatigue (44%) and emotional distress (57%), than pain (90%) and other physical side effects (84%). In most cases, help was not offered as clinic staff were not aware of the patient's symptom. Although the vast majority of patients accepted the help that was offered, more patients accepted help for physical symptoms (pain, 97%; fatigue, 95%; and other side effects, 98%) than emotional symptoms (87%). When care was provided, most patients experienced at least a little relief from pain (99%), fatigue (94%), and emotional distress (96%). Symptom management did not vary significantly by treatment center (P = 0.073). Conclusion Quality improvement initiatives must focus primarily on improving providers' awareness of their patients' symptoms and ensuring that patients are subsequently offered help.

DOI 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.04.018
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller, Alison Zucca
2015 Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, 'A systematic review of barriers to optimal outpatient specialist services for individuals with prevalent chronic diseases: What are the unique and common barriers experienced by patients in high income countries?', International Journal for Equity in Health, 14 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Fradgley et al. Health utilization and need assessment data suggest there is considerable variation in access to outpatient specialist care. However, it is unclear if the t... [more]

© 2015 Fradgley et al. Health utilization and need assessment data suggest there is considerable variation in access to outpatient specialist care. However, it is unclear if the types of barriers experienced are specific to chronic disease groups or experienced universally. This systematic review provides a detailed summary of common and unique barriers experienced by chronic disease groups when accessing and receiving care, and a synthesized list of possible health service initiatives to improve equitable delivery of optimal care in high-income countries. Quantitative articles describing barriers to specialist outpatient services were retrieved from CINAHL, MEDLINE, Embase, and PyscINFO. To be eligible for review, studies: were published from 2002 to May 2014; included samples with cancer, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, arthritis, ischaemic heart disease, stroke, asthma, chronic pulmonary disorder (COPD) or depression; and, were conducted in high-income countries. Using a previously validated model of access (Penchansky and Thomas' model of fit), barriers were grouped according to five overarching domains and defined in more detail using 33 medical subject headings. Results from reviewed articles, including the scope and frequency of reported barriers, are conceptualized using thematic analysis and framed as possible health service initiatives. A total of 3181 unique records were screened for eligibility, of which 74 studies were included in final analysis. The largest proportion of studies reported acceptability barriers (75.7 %), of which demographic disparities (44.6 %) were reported across all diseases. Other frequently reported barriers included inadequate need assessment (25.7 %), information provision (32.4 %), or health communication (20 %). Unique barriers were identified for oncology, mental health, and COPD samples. Based on the scope, frequency and measurement of reported barriers, eight key themes with associated implications for health services are presented. Examples include: common accommodation and accessibility barriers caused on service organization or physical structure, such as parking and appointment scheduling; common barriers created by poor coordination of care within the healthcare team; and unique barriers resulting from inadequate need assessment and referral practices. Consideration of barriers, across and within chronic diseases, suggests a number of specific initiatives are likely to improve the delivery of patient-centered care and increase equity in access to high-quality health services.

DOI 10.1186/s12939-015-0179-6
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Chris Paul
2015 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Regan T, Hobden B, Ackland SP, 'Oncology patients overwhelmingly support tissue banking.', BMC Cancer, 15 413 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1416-5
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Stephen Ackland, Jamie Bryant, Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Zucca AC, Fradgley EA, 'Measuring the quality of patient-centered care: Why patient-reported measures are critical to reliable assessment', Patient Preference and Adherence, 9 831-835 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al. Purpose: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified patient-centeredness as crucial to quality health care. The IOM endorsed six patient-centeredness dimens... [more]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al. Purpose: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified patient-centeredness as crucial to quality health care. The IOM endorsed six patient-centeredness dimensions that stipulated that care must be: respectful to patients¿ values, preferences, and expressed needs; coordinated and integrated; provide information, communication, and education; ensure physical comfort; provide emotional support; and involve family and friends. Patient-reported measures examine the patient¿s perspective and are essential to the accurate assessment of patient-centered care. This article¿s objectives are to: 1) use the six IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimensions as a framework to outline why patient-reported measures are crucial to the reliable measurement of patient-centered care; and 2) to identify existing patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centered care dimension. Methods: For each IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimension, the published literature was searched to highlight the essential role of patients in assessing patient-centered care and informing quality improvement efforts. Existing literature was also searched to identify examples of patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centeredness dimension. Conclusion: Patient-reported measures are arguably the best way to measure patient-centeredness. For instance, patients are best positioned to determine whether care aligns with patient values, preferences, and needs and the Measure of Patient Preferences is an example of a patient-reported measure that does so. Furthermore, only the patient knows whether they received the level of information desired, and if information was understood and can be recalled. Patient-reported measures that examine information provision include the Lung Information Needs Questionnaire and the EORTC QLQ-INFO25. In relation to physical comfort, only patients can report the severity of physical symptoms and whether medications provide adequate relief. Patient-reported measures that investigate physical comfort include the Pain Care Quality Survey and the Brief Pain Inventory. Using patient-reported measures to regularly measure patient-centered care is critical to identifying areas of health care where improvements are needed.

DOI 10.2147/PPA.S81975
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Alison Zucca, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis
2014 Yergens D, Fradgley E, Aiyar R, Lang E, Rowe BH, Ghali WA, 'An environmental scan of medical assessment units in Canada.', Healthc Q, 17 28-33 (2014) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, Roos IA, Henskens FA, Paul DJ, 'Consumer participation in quality improvements for chronic disease care: development and evaluation of an interactive patient-centered survey to identify preferred service initiatives.', Journal of medical Internet research, 16 e292 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.3545
Citations Scopus - 10
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Jamie Bryant, Chris Paul
2012 Fradgley EA, Ma I, Bacchus M, Glow J, Brass C, Fisher M, et al., 'Implementation of a Comprehensive Procedural Skills Examination for Internal Medicine at the University of Calgary: A Descriptive Report', Canadian Journal of General Internal Medicine, 4 120-121 (2012)
2011 Ngwakongnwi E, Fradgley E, Quan H, Lu M, Cawthorpe D, 'Referrals, language proficiency, and enrolment for children's mental health services', CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES REVIEW, 33 1994-1998 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.childyouth.2011.05.030
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Show 20 more journal articles

Conference (17 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Fradgley EA, Byrnes E, Mccarter K, Britton B, Rankin N, Carter G, et al., 'A report card on Australian cancer services' distress screening and management practices: A pass mark or time to go back to school?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Kristen Mccarter, Benjamin Britton, Chris Paul, Gregory Carter
2018 Fradgley E, Byrnes E, Rankin N, McCarter K, Britton B, Carter G, et al., 'Exploring the evidence-practice gap in distress management: Are Australian cancer services aware of and benefiting from evidence-based guidelines?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Benjamin Britton, Gregory Carter, Chris Paul, Kristen Mccarter
2018 Rankin N, Fradgley E, Geerligs L, Hack T, Shepherd H, Paul C, Butow P, 'Making sense of implementation research in psycho-oncology: Process mapping frameworks to inform best practice research in anxiety, depression and distress', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Chris Paul
2018 Lane K, Roach D, Fradgley E, Miller A, Bridge P, Boltong A, et al., 'Patient and caregiver satisfaction with cancer council 13 11 20 information and support services: An outstanding report-card on the provision of empathetic, person-centred supportive care', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Chris Paul
2018 Fradgley E, Lane K, Roach D, Miller A, Bridge P, Boltong A, et al., 'Developing strategic and collaborative research partnerships: Case-studies demonstrating strategies to identify additional research questions and priorities - the START trial experience', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Chris Paul
2018 McCarter K, Fradgley EA, Baker AL, Paul C, Carlson M, 'Distress Management for Patients with Cancer - Why Aren't We Doing It?', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Kristen Mccarter, Chris Paul, Amanda Baker
2017 Byrnes E, Fradgley E, Paul C, Carter G, Britton B, McCarter K, Bellamy D, 'Distress Screening and Management for Australian Cancer Patients: The Evidence Practice Gap and Potential Bridges', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Chris Paul, Benjamin Britton
2017 Taylor J, Fradgley E, Clinton-McHarg T, Roach D, Krish J, Lane K, Paul C, 'Uptake and Acceptability of Supportive Care Referrals: Survey Data from Distressed Cancer Patients and Caregivers Accessing Cancer Council 13 11 20 Services', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul
2016 Fradgley E, Byrnes E, Paul C, Carter G, Jacobsen P, Ben B, et al., 'QUANTIFYING THE UPTAKE OF DISTRESS SCREENING AND MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES IN AUSTRALIAN CANCER SERVICES: A PROTOCOL FOR A NATIONAL CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Kristen Mccarter, Gregory Carter, Chris Paul
2015 Fradgley E, Paul C, Bryant J, Oldmeadow C, 'AIMING FOR THE RIGHT QUALITY IMPROVEMENT TARGET: CROSS-SECTIONAL DATA EXPLORING OUTPATIENTS' PRIORITIES AND PREFERENCES FOR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IN TERTIARY CLINICS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Christopher Oldmeadow, Chris Paul
2015 Fradgley E, Paul C, Bryant J, Collins N, Ackland S, Bellamy D, Levi C, 'ADVANCING COLLABORATIVE QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IN TERTIARY SETTINGS: DO CHRONIC DISEASE OUTPATIENTS AND HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IDENTIFY SIMILAR TYPES AND NUMBERS OF QUALITY INITIATIVES?', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Jamie Bryant, Stephen Ackland, Christopher Levi
2014 Henskens FA, Paul DJ, Wallis M, Bryant J, Carey M, Fradgley E, et al., 'Web-based support for population-based medical research: Presenting the QuON survey system', HEALTHINF 2014 - 7th International Conference on Health Informatics, Proceedings; Part of 7th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies, BIOSTEC 2014 (2014) [E1]

This paper discusses the needs of medical researchers working in the area of patient-centred medicine, in particular their use of survey data in measuring patient opinions, needs,... [more]

This paper discusses the needs of medical researchers working in the area of patient-centred medicine, in particular their use of survey data in measuring patient opinions, needs, perceived quality of care received, and priorities of health service interventions. Until quite recently, collection of survey data has been either paper-based, or achieved using computer software that largely duplicated paper-based processes with limited additional functionality. The authors investigate the use of web-based technology to support collection of such data from patients, including experiences and observations on enhanced/additional functionality made possible by its adoption. A novel software design termed QuON is presented, together with examples of its capabilities and uses in current research projects. Copyright © 2014 SCITEPRESS - Science and Technology Publications. All rights reserved.

Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alison Zucca, Mark Wallis, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Frans Henskens
2014 Henskens FA, Paul DJ, Wallis M, Bryant J, Carey M, Fradgley E, et al., 'How Do Health Researchers Benefit From Web-Based Survey Systems?', Proceedings of e-Health 2014, Lisbon, Portugal (2014) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Chris Paul, Mark Wallis, Mariko Carey, Alison Zucca, Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Fradgley E, Paul C, Bryant J, Zucca A, 'A Multi-site Study to Explore Patient-identified and Prioritized Health Service Initiatives to Improve Oncology Outpatient Care: Are We Aiming for the Right Targets?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Chris Paul, Alison Zucca
2014 Fradgley E, Paul C, Bryant J, Roos I, 'Optimising New Technologies to Enable Consumer Participation in Quality Improvements for Oncology Care: Development and Evaluation of an Interactive Survey of Preferences and Priorities', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Chris Paul
2014 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley L, Regan T, Hobden B, Ackland S, Turon H, 'ONCOLOGY PATIENTS OVERWHELMINGLY SUPPORT TISSUE BANKING', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Stephen Ackland
2009 Ngwakongnwi E, Fradgley E, Cawthorpe D, Quan H, 'ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PREFERRED LANGUAGE OF SERVICE AND ENROLMENT FOR CHILDREN'S MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, Anaheim, CA (2009) [E3]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 13
Total funding $1,663,229

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


Highlighted grants and funding

A multi-component implementation strategy to improve evidence-based distress management practices of Australian cancer services: the effectiveness and cost of online Training and EducatioNal OutReach$700,000

Funding body: Cancer Instititue NSW

Funding body Cancer Instititue NSW
Scheme Early Career Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

COgnitive impairment in People with glioma and distress in their INformal care-Givers: feasibility and acceptability of a systematic screening process and structured referral process$100,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Liz Fradgley, Professor Christine Paul, Conjoint Professor Peter Schofield, Doctor Craig Gedye, Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Associate Professor Helen Wheeler, Ms Marina Kastelan, Sandy Nixon, Mrs Alisha Gooley, Associate Professor Fiona Schulte
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1801423
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

A randomised trial to implement systematic distress screening and structured care for callers using Cancer Councils' telephone services$446,774

Distress can interfere with the ability to cope effectively with cancer, its symptoms and treatment. Guidelines for distress management recommend pathways of support or structured care based on testing for distress; more simply, individuals should be asked standardised questions about their distress and then be matched with the services able to help with mild, moderate or severe distress. Structured care models have not been tested in community-based services like the Cancer Council 13 11 20 telephone service which provides support for people affected by cancer. The 13 11 20 service is staffed by trained consultants who can offer callers a wide range of services which provide informational, instrumental and emotional support. This randomised trial will assess the effectiveness of a structured care model in improving callers’ use of offered services and reducing levels of distress. 

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

A/Prof Christine Paul, Dr Allison Boyes, Prof Paul Jacobsen, Ms Lorna O'Brien, Dr Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Dr Anna Boltong, Dr Elizabeth Fradgley, Ms Katherine Lane

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Quantifying and addressing the evidence-practice gap in distress screening: a national environmental scan and short pilot-test to determine improvement areas and acceptability of implementation strategies for Australian cancer services.$29,795

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) defines distress as a multifactorial unpleasant emotional experience of a psychological, social and/or spiritual nature that may interfere with an individual’s ability to cope with a cancer diagnosis, symptoms and treatment. Up to 45% of patients will experience distress during their cancer journey, which if left untreated, can be associated with the development of clinically significant disorders such as depression and anxiety. Distressed cancer patients are more likely to report lower quality of life with relatively worse survival rates, decreased treatment compliance, and longer length of hospital stays.

Due to the complex and evolving nature of distress, health professionals often fail to detect distress in time- or resource-poor clinical settings. Distress screening is the standardised assessment of patients with the intent to inform referral decisions, specifically if more extensive assessment and psychosocial support services are warranted. There are limited data about the extent to which Australian cancer services have implemented distress-screening guidelines.

This project will identify: (1) the proportion of cancer services who adhere to evidence-based guidelines; (2) potential areas of improvement (i.e. use of validated screening measure, timing of screening, or referral protocols based on distress); (3) barriers and facilitators to implementing distress screening (including lack of care options for identified cases); and (4) whether quality improvement techniques, such as mentoring and bench-marking, are acceptable to services who wish to improve screening rates. 

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Project Team

Dr Elizabeth Fradgley, A/Prof Christine Paul, Dr Greg Carter, Prof Paul Jacobsen, Dr Ben Britton, Dr Kerrie Clover, Mr Douglas Bellamy, Dr Kristen McCarter, Ms Martine Cox

Scheme HCRA Implementation Flagship program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20193 grants / $1,075,294

A multi-component implementation strategy to improve evidence-based distress management practices of Australian cancer services: the effectiveness and cost of online Training and EducatioNal OutReach$700,000

Funding body: Cancer Instititue NSW

Funding body Cancer Instititue NSW
Scheme Early Career Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

HMRI MRSP Infrastructure Funding Cancer Program 2019$275,294

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Professor Xu Dong Zhang, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Associate Professor Nikki Verrills, Doctor Peter Pockney, Doctor Steve Smith, Doctor Liz Fradgley, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland
Scheme Medical Research Support Program (MRSP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1900048
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

COgnitive impairment in People with glioma and distress in their INformal care-Givers: feasibility and acceptability of a systematic screening process and structured referral process$100,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Liz Fradgley, Professor Christine Paul, Conjoint Professor Peter Schofield, Doctor Craig Gedye, Conjoint Professor Stephen Ackland, Associate Professor Helen Wheeler, Ms Marina Kastelan, Sandy Nixon, Mrs Alisha Gooley, Associate Professor Fiona Schulte
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1801423
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20183 grants / $65,000

Qualitative sub-study to investigate health professionals' perspectives on current and ideal referral processes and meeting organisation$30,000

Funding body: HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance

Funding body HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
Project Team

Prof Christine Paul, Dr Elizabeth Fradgley, Prof Tony Prietto, Ms Jill Lack, Ms Rachel Pitt, Ms Denise Kaminiski, Dr Nick Zdenkowski

Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

A cross-sectional study to explore patterns of use and perceptions towards cannabis in the NSW cancer population$30,000

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Project Team

Dr James Lynam, Dr Ben Britton, Dr Elizabeth Fradgley, Prof Jennifer Martin, Dr Gareth Watts

Scheme HCRA Implementation Flagship program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Referral uptake by distressed cancer patients and caregivers$5,000

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Project Team

Ms Joanne Taylor, Dr Elizabeth Fradgley, Prof Chris Paul, Dr Tara Clinton-McHarg

Scheme HCRA Implementation Flagship program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20173 grants / $31,366

A scoping review of the current state of health services research in Australia$24,866

Funding body: Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand

Funding body Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand
Project Team Professor Christine Paul, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Doctor Melissa Harris, Doctor Liz Fradgley
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601330
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Publication Grant: "Enlisting the willing: A study of healthcare professional-initiated and opt-in biobanking consent reveals improvement opportunities throughout the registration process"$5,000

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Project Team

Dr Elizabeth Fradgley, Dr Shu-Er Chong, Ms Martine Cox, Prof Chris Paul, Dr Craig Gedye

Scheme Publication Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Conference travel grant$1,500

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Project Team

Dr Elizabeth Fradgley

Scheme Conference Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20163 grants / $486,569

A randomised trial to implement systematic distress screening and structured care for callers using Cancer Councils' telephone services$446,774

Distress can interfere with the ability to cope effectively with cancer, its symptoms and treatment. Guidelines for distress management recommend pathways of support or structured care based on testing for distress; more simply, individuals should be asked standardised questions about their distress and then be matched with the services able to help with mild, moderate or severe distress. Structured care models have not been tested in community-based services like the Cancer Council 13 11 20 telephone service which provides support for people affected by cancer. The 13 11 20 service is staffed by trained consultants who can offer callers a wide range of services which provide informational, instrumental and emotional support. This randomised trial will assess the effectiveness of a structured care model in improving callers’ use of offered services and reducing levels of distress. 

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Project Team

A/Prof Christine Paul, Dr Allison Boyes, Prof Paul Jacobsen, Ms Lorna O'Brien, Dr Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Dr Anna Boltong, Dr Elizabeth Fradgley, Ms Katherine Lane

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Quantifying and addressing the evidence-practice gap in distress screening: a national environmental scan and short pilot-test to determine improvement areas and acceptability of implementation strategies for Australian cancer services.$29,795

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) defines distress as a multifactorial unpleasant emotional experience of a psychological, social and/or spiritual nature that may interfere with an individual’s ability to cope with a cancer diagnosis, symptoms and treatment. Up to 45% of patients will experience distress during their cancer journey, which if left untreated, can be associated with the development of clinically significant disorders such as depression and anxiety. Distressed cancer patients are more likely to report lower quality of life with relatively worse survival rates, decreased treatment compliance, and longer length of hospital stays.

Due to the complex and evolving nature of distress, health professionals often fail to detect distress in time- or resource-poor clinical settings. Distress screening is the standardised assessment of patients with the intent to inform referral decisions, specifically if more extensive assessment and psychosocial support services are warranted. There are limited data about the extent to which Australian cancer services have implemented distress-screening guidelines.

This project will identify: (1) the proportion of cancer services who adhere to evidence-based guidelines; (2) potential areas of improvement (i.e. use of validated screening measure, timing of screening, or referral protocols based on distress); (3) barriers and facilitators to implementing distress screening (including lack of care options for identified cases); and (4) whether quality improvement techniques, such as mentoring and bench-marking, are acceptable to services who wish to improve screening rates. 

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Project Team

Dr Elizabeth Fradgley, A/Prof Christine Paul, Dr Greg Carter, Prof Paul Jacobsen, Dr Ben Britton, Dr Kerrie Clover, Mr Douglas Bellamy, Dr Kristen McCarter, Ms Martine Cox

Scheme HCRA Implementation Flagship program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Systematic review of the individual characteristics of effective change champions in health services $10,000

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Project Team

Prof Chris Paul, Dr Ann Dadich, Ms Annika Ryan, Dr Elizabeth Fradgley

Scheme HCRA Implementation Flagship program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20151 grants / $5,000

HDR Completion Grant $5,000

Funding body: Faculty of Medicine and Public Health

Funding body Faculty of Medicine and Public Health
Project Team

Dr Elizabeth Fradgley

Scheme HDR Completion Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 37
Canada 4
United States 4
United Kingdom 3
New Zealand 1
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News

Funding awarded for innovative cancer research

February 14, 2019

Three University of Newcastle researchers have been awarded career fellowships worth more than $1.6 million for research into innovative cancer treatment.

Dr Liz Fradgley

Position

CINSW Early Career Fellow
Health Behaviour Research Group
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email elizabeth.fradgley@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0642
Fax (02) 4042 0040
Links Research Networks
Research Networks
Google+

Office

Building HMRI Building L4 West
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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