Mr Donovan Jones

Mr Donovan Jones

Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

Donovan started his nursing career as a theatre nurse before moving into midwifery, becoming interested in teaching and research. Continuing to maintain clinical currency as a registered midwife/nurse at the John Hunter Hospital, Donovan has been involved with the Bachelor of Midwifery program at University of Newcastle as a lecturer since 2010. With the current position of deputy program convenor actively involved in the development of new curriculum starting in 2016 for the bachelor of midwifery at the University of Newcastle.

As an early career researcher Donovan continues research for his PhD “mindfulness, fathers emotional well being during the perinatal journey into parenthood”.   As a member of the Hunter Medical Research Institute HMRI and BRICS nursing and midwifery research network Donovan is also involved with research teams currently researching, writing articles and grants for various research projects in the areas of perinatal mental health, teaching and learning innovations and men’s health primarily looking at fathers and improving the wellbeing of families. 

Research interest: My research focus is on perinatal mental health and psychosocial interventions that are used for both pregnant women and their partners, more specifically male partners. In Australia, mental health problems carry the highest burden of disease in 18-25 year olds, with males representing 23% of those affected. Research studies indicate that young men entering fatherhood encounter multiple emotional risk factors. Young fathers have been demonstrated to be as vulnerable to depression and emotional issues as young mothers, with a significant correlation between younger age and level of risk.

Pregnancy presents a unique opportunity for health professionals to engage not only with the mother-to-be but also the father-to-be, in programs that can have a positive impact on the family unit throughout the child-rearing years. Recent studies postulate significant links between the involvement and support of fathers and reductions in maternal anxiety and depressive symptoms in the postnatal period and beyond.

 Midwifery and mental health: My PhD research project commenced early in 2015 targets the emotional wellbeing of fathers during their partner’s pregnancy through participation in mindfulness classes. The project will evaluate the effectiveness of the mindfulness intervention utilising a mixed method research design collecting quantitative data pre and post intervention and focus group data post intervention. Data will provide the basis of further translational research and applications for funding for interventions to support young men about to become parents. 


Qualifications

  • Master of Midwifery Studies, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nursing, University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Diploma in Midwifery, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Midwifery
  • Perinatal Mental Health
  • Mindfulness
  • Mindfulness for Dads
  • Mens Health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111005 Mental Health Nursing 30
111006 Midwifery 70

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 2017 Vice-Chancellor's Award for Teaching Excellence and Contribution to Student learning
Centre for Teaching and Learning, The University of Newcastle
2016 Scholarship from Center for Brain and Mental Health Research University of Newcastle
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
2009 Hunter Valley Midwives award for clinical excellence
Hunter Valley Midwives Association

Nomination

Year Award
2016 Faculty Teaching and learning award
Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Everson N, Levett-Jones T, Pitt V, Lapkin S, Van Der Riet P, Rossiter R, et al., 'Analysis of the Empathic Concern Subscale of the Emotional Response Questionnaire in a Study Evaluating the Impact of a 3D Cultural Simulation.', International journal of nursing education scholarship, 15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1515/ijnes-2017-0003
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Pamela Vanderriet, Helen Courtney-Pratt, Conor Gilligan, Victoria Pitt
2018 Williams J, Jones D, Walker R, 'Consideration of using virtual reality for teaching neonatal resuscitation to midwifery students', Nurse Education in Practice, 31 126-129 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Within the last decade, there has been significant change in the way tertiary midwifery education has been delivered to students. The use of blended teaching methods and th... [more]

© 2018 Within the last decade, there has been significant change in the way tertiary midwifery education has been delivered to students. The use of blended teaching methods and the introduction of simulated learning experiences has been observed in the literature to improve students¿ self-confidence, competence, clinical judgement and decision-making abilities. Simulation is seen to be particularly important when practising skills that may be infrequently encountered in practice, such as clinical emergencies. Neonatal resuscitation is the most common neonatal emergency encountered within midwifery today, with up to 15% of babies requiring some form of resuscitation at birth. Recent research describes the benefits of using a multi-modal approach to teaching neonatal resuscitation, utilising both theory and simulated learning methods. One emerging method of simulation is that of virtual reality (VR), which has been recognised for its enormous educational potential in risk-free clinical skills training. Currently, however, there is limited research looking at the use of VR in emergency skills training. This article examines the literature to highlight the potential benefits that VR simulation could provide for emergency skills training, as well as the potential challenges that should be acknowledged.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2018.05.016
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Jessica Williams
2017 Jones D, Ebert L, Hazelton M, 'Mindfulness for men with pregnant partners: An integrative literature review (Part two)', British Journal of Midwifery, 25 783-791 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 MA Healthcare Ltd Background Both men and women can experience depressive or anxious episodes when transitioning to parenthood. Mindfulness interventions are one way to tea... [more]

© 2017 MA Healthcare Ltd Background Both men and women can experience depressive or anxious episodes when transitioning to parenthood. Mindfulness interventions are one way to teach men coping strategies to manage these feelings. Aim This integrative review examined original research, evaluating mindfulness as an intervention for men during the perinatal period. Methods A comprehensive search resulted in 157 articles. After applying defined inclusion and exclusion criteria, 2 original research papers remained. Thematic analysis identified five themes, the first three of which were discussed in Part I of this article. Findings Mindfulness based stress reduction strategies for men have been shown to be effective across a range of health issues, although there is little research during the perinatal period. Research suggests that men engaged in mindfulness based stress reduction in the perinatal period experienced better regulation of emotions and stress, and felt more present for their pregnant partners. Conclusions To improve men¿s wellbeing, innovative ways of providing perinatal mindfulness based stress reduction are needed. New or adapted mindfulness based stress reduction programmes are needed to improve men¿s awareness, empathy, self-esteem and psychological wellbeing to better support their pregnant partners.

DOI 10.12968/bjom.2017.25.12.783
Co-authors Lyn Ebert, Michael Hazelton
2017 Jones D, Ebert L, Hazelton M, 'Mindfulness for men with pregnant partners: An integrative literature review (Part one)', British Journal of Midwifery, 25 707-714 (2017) [C1]

© MA Healthcare Ltd.Grant: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, not-for-profit, or commercial sector. Background Men are as likely to su... [more]

© MA Healthcare Ltd.Grant: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, not-for-profit, or commercial sector. Background Men are as likely to suffer stressors associated with pregnancy as their pregnant partners, but are less likely to receive support. Mindfulness interventions are a possible way to enable men to manage and reduce stress that may provoke anger and depression. Aim This integrative review examined original research into using mindfulness as an intervention for men during the perinatal period. Methods Using the question, 'Can mindfulness based stress reduction reduce stress in men with pregnant partners during the perinatal period?', a comprehensive search retrieved 157 articles. Following defined inclusion and exclusion criteria, 2 original research papers were included in the review. Thematic analysis identified five themes, the first three of which will be discussed here. Findings Research suggests that men engaged in mindfulnessbased stress reduction during the perinatal period experienced improvements in regulating emotions and handling stress, as well a deeper sense of connection with their pregnant partner. Conclusion To improve the wellbeing of men with pregnant partners, mindfulness-based stress reduction techniques are needed to help men to improve psychological wellbeing and better support their pregnant partners.

DOI 10.12968/bjom.2017.25.11.707
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Lyn Ebert, Michael Hazelton
2017 O'Brien AP, McNeil K, Fletcher R, Conrad A, Wilson A, Jones D, Chan W, 'New fathers¿ perinatal depression & anxiety - treatment options: an integrative review', American Journal of Men's Health, 11 863-876 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1557988316669047
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Sally Chan, Agatha Conrad, Richard Fletcher, Amanda Wilson, Tony Obrien
2016 Ebert L, Tierney O, Jones D, 'Learning to be a midwife in the clinical environment; tasks, clinical practicum hours or midwifery relationships', Nurse Education in Practice, 16 294-297 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2015.08.003
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Lyn Ebert
2016 Lavender TJ, Ebert L, Jones D, 'An evaluation of perinatal mental health interventions: An integrative literature review', Women and Birth, 29 399-406 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Australian College of Midwives Background National statistics related specifically to the mental health of women in the perinatal period is poorly acknowledged in Australia... [more]

© 2016 Australian College of Midwives Background National statistics related specifically to the mental health of women in the perinatal period is poorly acknowledged in Australia. Maternal deaths related to mental health in the perinatal period can be attributed to a lack of appropriate treatment and/or support. A barrier to women's help-seeking behaviors is the lack of discrete, perinatal specific interventions where women can self-assess and access support. Aim This review examines original research evaluating perinatal mental health interventions used by women to improve mental health. Method An integrative literature review was undertaken. A comprehensive search strategy using 5 electronic databases resulted in the retrieval of 1898 articles. Use of an inclusion and exclusion criteria and Critical Appraisal Skills Program tools resulted in 4 original research papers. Thematic analysis identified universal themes. Findings Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Behavioral Activation and Mindfulness-based interventions, specifically adapted to meet the needs of women in the perinatal period, demonstrate an overall improvement in mental health. Women involved in the interventions experienced both improvements in symptoms of anxiety and depression as well as secondary benefits from participating in the research. Conclusion To improve perinatal mental health outcomes, innovative modes of providing effective perinatal mental health interventions that address the unique needs of women in the perinatal period are needed. Future development of perinatal mental health interventions require adaptions of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Behavioral Activation and/or Mindfulness-based methods to address mental health outcomes for women in the perinatal period.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2016.04.004
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Lyn Ebert
2016 Jones D, Hazelton M, Ebert L, 'PERINATAL MENTAL HEALTH AND MINDFULNESS FOR MEN WITH PREGNANT PARTNERS, PILOT PROJECT', Australian nursing & midwifery journal, 24 35 (2016)

Currently an online pilot project is underway through the University of Newcastle examining the benefits of an online mindfulness program for men with pregnant partners at www.min... [more]

Currently an online pilot project is underway through the University of Newcastle examining the benefits of an online mindfulness program for men with pregnant partners at www.mindfulnessfordads.com.

Co-authors Lyn Ebert, Michael Hazelton
2015 Jones DP, Hazelton M, Ebert L, 'Perinatal mental health and men', Australian Nursing & Midwifery Journal, 23 41-41 (2015) [C3]
Co-authors Michael Hazelton, Lyn Ebert
2015 Everson N, Levett-Jones T, Lapkin S, Pitt V, van der Riet P, Rossiter R, et al., 'Measuring the impact of a 3D simulation experience on nursing students' cultural empathy using a modified version of the Kiersma-Chen Empathy Scale', Journal of Clinical Nursing, (2015) [C1]

Aims and objectives: To determine the effect of immersive 3D cultural simulation on nursing students' empathy towards culturally and linguistically diverse patients. Backgrou... [more]

Aims and objectives: To determine the effect of immersive 3D cultural simulation on nursing students' empathy towards culturally and linguistically diverse patients. Background: Accelerated globalisation has seen a significant increase in cultural diversity in most regions of the world over the past forty years. Clinical encounters that do not acknowledge cultural factors contribute to adverse patient outcomes and health care inequities for culturally and linguistically diverse people. Cultural empathy is an antecedent to cultural competence. Thus, appropriate educational strategies are needed to enhance nursing students' cultural empathy and the capacity to deliver culturally competent care. Design: A one-group pretest, post-test design was used for this study. The simulation exposed students to an unfolding scene in a hospital ward of a developing county. Methods: A convenience sample of second-year undergraduate nursing students (n = 460) from a semi-metropolitan university in Australia were recruited for the study. Characteristics of the sample were summarised using descriptive statistics. T-tests were performed to analyse the differences between pre- and post simulation empathy scores using an eight item modified version of the Kiersma-Chen Empathy Scale. Results: Students' empathy towards culturally and linguistically diverse patients significantly improved after exposure to the 3D simulation experience. The mean scores for the Perspective Taking and Valuing Affective Empathy subscales also increased significantly postsimulation. Conclusions: The immersive 3D simulation had a positive impact on nursing students' empathy levels in regards to culturally and linguistically diverse groups. Research with other cohorts and in other contexts is required to further explore the impact of this educational approach. Relevance to clinical practice: Immersive cultural simulation experiences offer opportunities to enhance the cultural empathy of nursing students. This may in turn have a positive impact on their cultural competence and consequently the quality of care they provide to culturally and linguistically diverse patients.

DOI 10.1111/jocn.12893
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Conor Gilligan, Helen Courtney-Pratt, Pamela Vanderriet, Victoria Pitt
2014 Fletcher R, Dowse E, Bennett E, Chan W, O¿Brien A, Jones D, 'The paternal perinatal depression initiative', Australian Nursing & Midwifery Journal, 22 40-40 (2014)
Co-authors Sally Chan, Richard Fletcher, Eileen Dowse, Tony Obrien
2014 Courtney-Pratt H, Levett-Jones T, Lapkin S, Pitt V, Gilligan C, Van der Riet P, et al., 'Development and psychometric testing of the satisfaction with Cultural Simulation Experience Scale', Nurse Education in Practice, (2014) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Decreasing the numbers of adverse health events experienced by people from culturally diverse backgrounds rests, in part, on the ability of education provider... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Decreasing the numbers of adverse health events experienced by people from culturally diverse backgrounds rests, in part, on the ability of education providers to provide quality learning experiences that support nursing students in developing cultural competence, an essential professional attribute. This paper reports on the implementation and evaluation of an immersive 3D cultural empathy simulation.The Satisfaction with Cultural Simulation Experience Scale used in this study was adapted and validated as the first stage of this study. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were undertaken to investigate the psychometric properties of the scale using two randomly-split sub-samples. Cronbach's Alpha was used to examine internal consistency reliability. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis of mean satisfaction scores and qualitative comments to open-ended questions were analysed and coded.A purposive sample (n=497) of second of nursing students participated in the study. The overall Cronbach's alpha for the scale was 0.95 and each subscale demonstrated high internal consistency: 0.92; 0.92; 0.72 respectively. The mean satisfaction score was 4.64 (SD 0.51) out of a maximum of 5 indicating a high level of participant satisfaction with the simulation. Three factors emerged from qualitative analysis: "Becoming culturally competent", "Learning from the debrief" and "Reflecting on practice".The cultural simulation was highly regarded by students. Psychometric testing of the Satisfaction with Cultural Simulation Experience Scale demonstrated that it is a reliable instrument. However, there is room for improvement and further testing in other contexts is therefore recommended.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2015.07.009
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Victoria Pitt, Helen Courtney-Pratt, Pamela Vanderriet, Conor Gilligan
2014 Jones D, Rossiter R, 'Research project supports the emotional wellbeing of young fathers during the perinatal journey in parenthood', Australian nursing & midwifery journal, 22 37 (2014)

In Australia, mental health problems carry the highest burden of disease in 18-25 year olds, with males representing 23% of those affected (Australian Institute of health and Welf... [more]

In Australia, mental health problems carry the highest burden of disease in 18-25 year olds, with males representing 23% of those affected (Australian Institute of health and Welfare [AIHW] 2011).

Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Jones D, 'The life of men in midwifery: Male midwives changing the rules', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 26 S32-S32 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2013.08.193
Show 11 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 O'Brien AP, McNeil K, Fletcher R, Conrad A, Wilson A, Jones D, Chan S, 'Should fathers¿ postnatal depression be part of maternal and newborn health services? (2017)
Co-authors Amanda Wilson, Richard Fletcher, Tony Obrien, Agatha Conrad

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Williams J, Jones D, Ebert L, Williams C, 'Exploring the use of Virtual Reality technology in neonatal resuscitation simulation for midwifery students', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2017.08.035
Co-authors Jessica Williams, Lyn Ebert
2017 Fealy S, Jones D, Ebert L, Dowse EM, Wynne O, Chan W, '¿Supporting new Mums¿ ¿ Developing a postnatal psycho-educational smartphone application for first time mothers', ¿Supporting new Mums¿ ¿ Developing a postnatal psycho-educational smartphone application for first time mothers, Adelaide, South Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2017.08.079
Co-authors Eileen Dowse, Sally Chan, Shanna Fealy, Olivia Wynne, Lyn Ebert
2016 Fealy S, Jones D, Ebert L, Dowse E, Wynne O, Zhang M, Chan S, 'Developing a ¿Postnatal Psychoeducational¿ smartphone application for first time mothers', Developing a ¿Postnatal Psychoeducational¿ smartphone application for first time mothers, HMRI (2016)
Co-authors Sally Chan, Lyn Ebert, Shanna Fealy, Olivia Wynne, Eileen Dowse

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 O'Brien AP, Fletcher R, Chan S, Conrad A, Jones D, Wilson A, 'CBT to address new fathers¿ depression and anxiety', ( pp.1): Family Action Centre, The University of Newcastle15th August (2014) [O1]
Co-authors Sally Chan, Richard Fletcher, Tony Obrien
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 10
Total funding $140,697

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20183 grants / $75,000

Early Career Research grant Neonatal VR$50,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Scheme Faculty Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

CSIRO National Innovation Accelerator 4 Program$15,000

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project Team

Donovan Jones, Shanna Fealy, Rohan Walker

Scheme Australia's National Innovation Accelerator Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

CSIRO Australia's National Innovation Accelerator Program performance bonus grant $10,000

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project Team

Donovan Jones, Shanna Fealy, Rohan Walker

Scheme Australia's National Innovation Accelerator Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20175 grants / $42,697

Supporting postnatal first-time mothers – An RCT of a new mobile$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Sally Chan, Doctor Lyn Ebert, Mr Donovan Jones, Doctor Eileen Dowse, Ms Shanna Fealy
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700189
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

An app-based postnatal psychoeducational program for first-time mothers – A randomized controlled trial$17,697

Funding body: Mid North Coast Local Health District

Funding body Mid North Coast Local Health District
Project Team Ms Shanna Fealy, Professor Sally Chan, Doctor Eileen Dowse, Mr Donovan Jones, Doctor Olivia Wynne
Scheme Research Support Grant Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600633
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

CSIRO OnPrime grant$3,000

CSIRO ONPrime 3 2017 Accelerate 

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project Team

Donovan Jones, Shanna Fealy, Rohan Walker

Scheme Australia's National Innovation Accelerator Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Faculty of Health and Medicine travel grant University of Newcastle$1,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Scheme Faculty Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Center for Brain and Mental Health Research (CBMHR) University of Newcastle$1,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Scheme Faculty of Health and Medicine Conference Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20151 grants / $18,000

Supporting student success through connecting and belonging$18,000

This study aims to explore the student experience of two health disciplines, nursing and

midwifery. These programs have a higher than average UON number of low SES and

Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander students. Students' sense of connectedness to the

academic environment and learning activities as well as the development of a sense of

professional belongingness within different models of clinical placement and linked academic

support will be examined.

Funding body: The Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education

Funding body The Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education
Project Team

Dr Lyn Ebert

Scheme The Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20131 grants / $5,000

Developing models of clinical learning that meets national guidelines and improves the student experience $5,000

Developing models of clinical learning that meets national guidelines and improves the student experience 

Funding body: Centre for Teaching and Learning, University of Newcastle

Funding body Centre for Teaching and Learning, University of Newcastle
Scheme Teaching and Learning Project Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current2

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Understanding the Facilitators and Barriers to Accessing Maternal Health Care Services for Childbearing Women in Rural Villages of Asembo, Kenya PhD (Midwifery), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Exploring the Use of Virtual Reality Technology in Neonatal Resuscitation Simulation for Second Year Bachelor of Midwifery Students PhD (Midwifery), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 12
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News

Road to Birth delivers world-first virtual window into pregnancy

March 2, 2018

A ground-breaking development in virtual reality technology at UON has given world-first visual insight into the internal stages of childbearing and its effect on the human body, signifying a huge step for health practitioners and expectant parents globally

A new world in sight: virtual reality to advance human health

May 26, 2017

Virtual reality set to advance human health through innovative midwifery project at UON.

Mr Donovan Jones

Position

Lecturer
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email donovan.jones@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6940
Links Facebook
Personal webpage
Twitter

Office

Room RW225
Building Richardson Wing
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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