Dr David Savage

Dr David Savage

Lecturer

Newcastle Business School

Career Summary

Biography

I am a behavioural economist; my research specialisation revolves around the microeconomics of decision-making in extreme or high-risk life and death environments. While this stems from a behavioural economics viewpoint, it extends into the much broader social sciences as evident of my publications across economics, social science, medicine and the hard sciences. These works have included the development of emotions, the long run impact of stress on physical and mental health and the effect of stress on decision-making factors. I seek to marry the behavioural work of the social sciences with the empirical rigour of economics, resulting in multidisciplinary work with a clearer understanding of theory and a stronger empirical basis for the study of the decision-making under extreme environments and pressure. Generating new and important insights into the disaster and behavioural literature, covering the empirical analysis of decision-making, emotions, health and stress in these non-normal environments. I have a keen interest in undertaking field research, especially in relation to decision-making in disasters or extreme environments. I was part of one of the first teams to undertake a field experiment in the wake of a disaster, operating a few weeks after the 2011 Brisbane floods to examine the effect of large real losses on individual decision making (see Page et al., 2014). In 2013 and 2014 I organized and implemented two research trips to the Himalayan Mountains, specifically Namche Bazar on the trail to Mount Everest. 

In my pre-academic career, I worked in the mining industry (underground) which has given me a strong appreciation of the role that industry and government play in the development and implementation of successful policy. Towards these ends, I often collaborate across disciplines and with government agencies. Academically, I collaborate with the Science and Engineering Faculty (QUT) and Business School (QUT) to create an innovative new subject in the undergraduate Science curriculum. Additionally, I collaborate with Architecture and Built Environment (UoN) by teaching into the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) program and the Masters of Disaster Resiliency (Disaster Management Economics). I collaborate with the office of the Inspector General of Emergency Management (IGEM) and the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) and have recently engaged with the Queensland Reconstruction Authority (QRA). 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Queensland University of Technology

Keywords

  • Behavioural Economics
  • Decision Making
  • Euthanasia
  • Extreme Economics
  • Life and Death Environments
  • Microeconomics
  • Suicide

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
149999 Economics not elsewhere classified 30
140206 Experimental Economics 30
140299 Applied Economics not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
Newcastle Business School
Australia
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
Newcastle Business School
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/09/2014 - 31/08/2015 Teaching Fellow Bond University
Economics and Statistics
Australia
1/03/2014 -  Visiting Academic Queensland University of Technology
Science and Engineering
Australia

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2008 - 31/12/2013 Sessional Academic Queensland University of Technology
School of Economics and Finance
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2016 2016 Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence
Queensland University of Technology

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
ARBE6606 Economics of and for Disaster Recovery
Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte

The primary focus of this course is on the economic issues that impact disaster management. This course will develop an appreciation of economic principles in the context of disaster preparedness and redevelopment. 

Lecturer 1/02/2016 - 28/12/2016
ECON12-2002 Contemporary Macroeconomics Issues
Bond University

This subject examines the behaviour of aggregate economic variables like GDP, interest, inflation, exchange and unemployment rates and studies the aggregate demand and supply. Topics include fiscal and monetary policies, budget surplus and deficit, foreign trade and balance of payments and the determination of exchange rates. The subject applies macroeconomic principles to the firm's problem of predicting changes in its macroeconomic environment. We will develop some theoretical models that will help to understand how key economic variables in the economy are determined and how different types of government policies work. We will review and analyse different macroeconomic issues and events from the perspective of the business community as well as government policy-makers, including: business cycles and growth, interest rates and exchange rates, causes of trade deficits, consequences of government deficits, and short- and long-term effects of monetary policy. To achieve these objectives we will acquaint yourself with the set of tools - terminology, methodology, and the way of thinking - of an economist and practice using these. 

Lecturer 1/08/2014 - 28/08/2015
ECON3005 Economics of Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte

This course builds on the microeconomic principles developed in first and second year by extending students’ knowledge of markets and the firm to the role of the entrepreneur and their interaction with the wider economy.

The course is structured into four parts:
(1) We examine who becomes an entrepreneur and why, by examining the theories of entrepreneurship, methods for applied entrepreneurial research, the incentives to become an entrepreneur and the entrepreneurship of specific groups.
(2) We examine the financing of entrepreneurial ventures, from debt (finance) to venture capital.
(3) The examination of entrepreneurial inputs, performance and the broader community including performance measures, wealth accumulation, job creation, innovation, returns to human capital and entrepreneurial survival.
(4) Finally, we explore the entrepreneur and their relationship to public policy including taxation, market regulation and their impact on the entrepreneur.

The course provides an economic understanding of entrepreneurs and the role that they play in the development of the wider economy. Additionally, the course provides an insight into the emerging field of the economics of entrepreneurship and a platform to undertake research or implement economic analysis of entrepreneurial endeavours. 

Lecturer 1/02/2016 - 28/12/2016
ECON71-104 Managerial Economics
Bond University

This subject is designed to develop an understanding of the value of economic reasoning in solving business problems and to develop the basic economic analytical skills required in managerial decision making. 

Lecturer 1/08/2014 - 28/08/2015
ECON2001 Intermediate Microeconomics
Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte

Intermediate micro-economics expands on the concepts and ideas developed in the previous subject (ECON1001), building an applicable models and tools for empirical analysis. The students build microeconomic models of the market including individual decision maker and the firm in order to measure and understand market forces, constraints and failures. Additionally, students analyze the impact of International Trade, Public Policy, Poverty and Welfare. By the end of the subject students should have an intermediate (more advanced) understanding of economic models and how to apply them to all conceivable economic problems from business, industry, politics, society and the environment.

The course is designed for students who have successfully completed an introductory economics course (such as ECON1001) and extends microeconomic principles in order to analyze and model economic events at the local, national and international levels. While the mathematics requirement for the subject is not extreme, is essential to be able to fully grasp and apply the material. This subject provides the entry point into the study of the more advanced economic specializations such as behavioral or experimental economics, industrial organization, labor economics or game theory.

Course Coordinator and Lecturer 27/02/2017 - 30/06/2017
ECON11-100 Principles of Economics
Bond University

Students are introduced to economic analysis and its applications. Topics include: decision making, analysis of constraints, analysis of benefits and costs, maximisation, competitive pressures and market forces, and public policy issues. By the end of the subject, successful students will be equipped with the tools of economics and prepared to address economic problems in their day to day lives, industry, politics, society, and the environment. 

Lecturer 1/08/2014 - 28/08/2015
ECON1001 Microeconomics for Business Decisions
Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte

The study of micro-economics is essential for understanding how decision are made across a multitude of areas that are highly relevant to the student and to the wider world. The microeconomic principles covered in this course apply to both the individual and the firm, as students are introduced to economic analysis and its applications in topics such as: Consumer-Choice, Competition, International Trade and Finance, Market Forces, Market Failures, Public Policy, Poverty and Welfare.

The course also addresses contemporary public policy issues such as pollution, resource depletion, provision of public goods and services, rental controls, minimum wages, and taxes and subsidies. It is designed for students with varied academic background and its low mathematics requirement allows students to be able to full grasp and apply the material. The course develops the students’ ability to critically analyze economic events at the local, national and international scale. By the end of the subject, successful students will be equipped with the tools of economics and prepared to address economic problems in their day-to-day lives, industry, politics, society, and the environment. 

Lecturer 1/02/2016 - 28/12/2016
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Savage D, Torgler B, The times they are a changin': The effect of institutional change on cooperative behaviour at 26,000ft over sixty years, Palgrave Macmillan, Hampshire, UK, 88 (2015) [A1]
DOI 10.1057/9781137525154
Citations Scopus - 4

Journal article (26 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Caruso R, Di Domizio M, Savage DA, 'Differences in National Identity, Violence and Conflict in International Sport Tournaments: Hic Sunt Leones!', Kyklos, (2017)
DOI 10.1111/kykl.12147
2017 Savage DA, Whyte S, Torgler B, 'Online sperm donors: the impact of family, friends, personality and risk perception on behaviour', REPRODUCTIVE BIOMEDICINE ONLINE, (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.rbmo.2017.08.023
2016 Savage DA, 'Those left behind: Euthanasia, suicide and other regarding preferences', Rationality and Society, 28 439-452 (2016) [C1]
2016 Savage DA, 'Surviving the Storm: Behavioural Economics in the Conflict Environment', Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy, 22 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1515/peps-2015-0047
2015 Caruso R, Di Domizio M, Savage DA, 'Determinants of aggressiveness in soccer: Evidence from FIFA and UEFA tournaments', Economics Bulletin, 35 2005-2011 (2015) [C1]
2014 Page L, Savage DA, Torgler B, 'Variation in risk seeking behaviour following large losses: A natural experiment', European Economic Review, 71 121-131 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. This study explores people's risk taking behaviour after having suffered large real-world losses following a natural disaster. Using the margins of the ... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. This study explores people's risk taking behaviour after having suffered large real-world losses following a natural disaster. Using the margins of the 2011 Australian floods (Brisbane) as a natural experimental setting, we find that homeowners who were victims of the floods and face large losses in property values are 50% more likely to opt for a risky gamble - a scratch card giving a small chance of a large gain ($500,000) - than for a sure amount of comparable value ($10). This finding is consistent with prospect theory predictions regarding the adoption of a risk-seeking attitude after a loss.

DOI 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2014.04.009
Citations Scopus - 7
2013 Savage DA, Torgler B, 'The emergence of emotions and religious sentiments during the September 11 disaster', Motivation and Emotion, 37 586-599 (2013)

Analyzing emotional states under duress or during heightened, life-and-death situations is extremely difficult, especially given the inability of laboratory experiments to replica... [more]

Analyzing emotional states under duress or during heightened, life-and-death situations is extremely difficult, especially given the inability of laboratory experiments to replicate the environment and given the inherent biases of post event surveys. This is where natural experiments, such as the pager communications from September 11th can provide the kind of natural experiment emotion researchers have been seeking. We demonstrate that positive and pro-social communications are the first to emerge followed by the slower and lower negative communications. Religious sentiment is the last to emerge, as individual attempt to make sense of event. Additionally we provide a methodological discussion about the preparation and analysis of such natural experiments (the pager message content) and show the importance of using multiple methods to extract the broadest possible understanding. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

DOI 10.1007/s11031-012-9330-5
Citations Scopus - 2
2013 Gächter M, Savage DA, Torgler B, 'Retaining the thin blue line', International Journal of Social Economics, 40 479-503 (2013)
DOI 10.1108/03068291311315359
2013 Gächter M, Savage DA, Torgler B, 'Retaining the thin blue line: What shapes workers' intentions not to quit the current work environment', International Journal of Social Economics, 40 479-503 (2013)

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between workplace factors and the intentions of police officers to quit their current department. Design/meth... [more]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between workplace factors and the intentions of police officers to quit their current department. Design/methodology/approach: Data from a survey of Baltimore officers, designed to examine the relationship between police stress and domestic violence in police families were used. Using multivariate regression analysis, the authors focus on the officers' stated intentions to look for alternative employment, with proxies for social and workplace factors. Findings: Higher levels of cooperation (trust), interactional justice and work-life-balance reduce police officers' intentions to quit. While high levels of physical and psychological strain and trauma are not correlated with intentions to quit. Research limitations/implications: A discernible limitation of this study is the age of the data analyzed and that many changes have occurred in recent times (policing and social). It would be of great interest to repeat this study to gauge the true effect. Practical implications: There are policy implications for retention and recruitment: it may possible to decrease the ethnic and gender gaps, through identifying officers at risk and creating programs to hold existing minorities, recruit more, whilst maintaining a strong, happy and healthy department. Originality/value: This study examines the impact of workplace factors on quitting intention for police officers. It is demonstrated that social capital, fairness and work-life balance are moderators for quitting, adding to the literature on worker retention, as little research has been done using multivariate analysis on quitting intentions. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/03068291311315359
Citations Scopus - 3
2013 Savage DA, Torgler B, 'The emergence of emotions and religious sentiments during the September 11 disaster', Motivation and Emotion, 37 586-599 (2013) [C1]
2012 Savage DA, Torgler B, 'Nerves of steel? Stress, work performance and elite athletes', Applied Economics, 44 2423-2435 (2012) [C1]

There is a notable shortage of empirical research directed at measuring the magnitude and direction of stress effects on performance in a controlled environment. One reason for th... [more]

There is a notable shortage of empirical research directed at measuring the magnitude and direction of stress effects on performance in a controlled environment. One reason for this is the inherent difficulties in identifying and isolating direct performance measures for individuals. Additionally, most traditional work environments contain a multitude of exogenous factors impacting individual performance, but controlling for all such factors is generally unfeasible (omitted variable bias). Moreover, instead of asking individuals about their self-reported stress levels, we observe workers' behaviour in situations that can be classified as stressful. For this reason, we have stepped outside the traditional workplace in an attempt to gain greater controllability of these factors using the sports environment as our experimental space. We empirically investigate the relationship between stress and performance, in an extreme pressure situation (football penalty kicks) in a winner take all sporting environment (FIFA World Cup and UEFA European Cup competitions). Specifically, we examine all the penalty shootouts between 1976 and 2008 covering in total 16 events. The results indicate that extreme stressors can have a positive or negative impact on individuals' performance. On the other hand, more commonly experienced stressors do not affect professionals' performances. © 2012 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/00036846.2011.564150
Citations Scopus - 3
2012 Piatti M, Savage DA, Torgler B, 'The red mist? Red shirts, success and team sports', Journal of Technology in Human Services, 30 1209-1227 (2012)

Baron von Richthofen (the Red Baron) arguably the most famous fighter pilot of all time painted his plane the vividest of red hues, making it visible and identifiable at great dis... [more]

Baron von Richthofen (the Red Baron) arguably the most famous fighter pilot of all time painted his plane the vividest of red hues, making it visible and identifiable at great distance, showing an aggressive pronouncement of dominance to other pilots. Can colour affect aggression and performance and if so is it observable within team sports? This study explores the effect of red on sporting performances within a team sports arena, through empirical analysis of match results from the Australian Rugby League spanning a period of 30 years. Both the descriptive analysis and the multivariate analysis report a positive relationship. Nevertheless, more evidence is required to better understand whether teams in red do enjoy greater success controlling explicitly in a multivariate analysis for many factors that simultaneously affect performance. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/17430437.2012.690400
Citations Scopus - 7
2011 Savage DA, 'Identity Economics: How our Identities Shape our Work, Wages, and Well-being', Economic Record, 87 176-178 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1475-4932.2010.00716.x
2011 Frey BS, Savage DA, Schmidt SL, Torgler B, 'Implications of power on survival in tragic events: A comparison of the Titanic and Lusitania sinking', Kolner Zeitschrift fur Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie, 63 237-254 (2011)

Comparing the Titanic and Lusitania disaster the impact of financial and physical power as well as the emergence of social norms on survival during life-and-death situations is an... [more]

Comparing the Titanic and Lusitania disaster the impact of financial and physical power as well as the emergence of social norms on survival during life-and-death situations is analyzed. Despite the fact that some maritime disasters have become famous, a quantitative understanding of survival in life-and-death situations is still lacking. In a quasi-natural experiment multivariate probit estimations are conducted based on publicly available data. The paper suggests that in life-and-death situations differences in time restrictions are crucial. When time is scarce individual self-interested fight-or-flight behavior will predominate and result in a stronger competition for survival. In contrast, altruism and adherence to social norms emerge when there is sufficient time to reflect on the event and circumstances: Social norms require time to evolve, and they loose against physical strength in a shorter window of opportunity. © 2011 VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften.

DOI 10.1007/s11577-011-0131-8
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Frey BS, Savage DA, Torgler B, 'Erratum: Interaction of natural survival instincts and internalized social norms exploring the Titanic and Lusitania disasters (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2010) 107, 11, (4862-4865) DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0911303107)', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108 17234 (2011)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1114360108
2011 Savage DA, 'The unthinkable: who survives when disaster strikes - and why', Disasters, 35 284-286 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-7717.2010.01225.x
2011 Frey BS, Savage DA, Torgler B, 'Who perished on the titanic? The importance of social norms', Rationality and Society, 23 35-49 (2011)

This paper seeks to empirically identify what factors make it more or less likely for people to survive in a life-threatening situation. Three factors relate to individual attribu... [more]

This paper seeks to empirically identify what factors make it more or less likely for people to survive in a life-threatening situation. Three factors relate to individual attributes of the persons onboard: physical strength, economic resources, and nationality. Tw o relate to social aspects: social support and social norms. The Titanic disaster is a life-or-death situation. Otherwise-disregarded aspects of human nature become apparent in such a dangerous situation. The empirical analysis supports the notion that social norms are a key determinant in extreme situations of life or death. © The Author(s) 2011.

DOI 10.1177/1043463110396059
Citations Scopus - 5
2011 Gächter M, Savage DA, Torgler B, 'Gender variations of physiological and psychological strain amongst police officers', Gender Issues, 28 66-93 (2011)

This paper analyses the gender effect on reported-perceived levels of stress through examination of physical and psychological indicators. It is interesting to work with police da... [more]

This paper analyses the gender effect on reported-perceived levels of stress through examination of physical and psychological indicators. It is interesting to work with police data due to high stress levels and the male dominated work environment. This paper explores both gender differences in (perceived) stress levels as well as the underlying gender-specific sensitivity to environmental factors, such as unit cooperation, trust in the work partner, higher levels of work-lifebalance and home stability, and interactional fairness. Using multivariate regression analysis we find that female officers are significantly more likely to report physical strains than males, while no gender diff erences are observable in regards to psychological strains. Moreover, higher levels of trust and interactional fairness at work are not able to absorb physical strain among females, but have a strong impact on males. Alternatively for both female and male officers, work-life balance and stability at home appear to reduce physical strain. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.

DOI 10.1007/s12147-011-9100-9
Citations Scopus - 9
2011 Gächter M, Savage DA, Torgler B, 'The relationship between stress, strain and social capital', Policing, 34 515-540 (2011)

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of social capital with the negative externalities associated with stress, or the psychological and physiological ... [more]

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of social capital with the negative externalities associated with stress, or the psychological and physiological strains experienced by police officers. Design/methodology/approach: Using data collected in 1999 from a survey of Baltimore Police officers designed to examine questions about the relationship between police stress and domestic violence in police families and using multivariate regression analysis, the paper focuses on five different proxies for stress and strain, and two proxies for social capital and conducting several robustness checks. Findings: Results show that an increase in social capital is significantly correlated to a decrease in the level of strain, in the psychological, physical, burnout and health areas. Research limitations/implications: While this study examines the social capital/strain relationship with US officers, more research is needed, as these findings may not extrapolate well into other national settings. It may also be interesting to further explore sub-cultures within departments. Additionally, the data may be dated and, as major changes and events have occurred since the survey, a newer study of officers would be needed to observe whether these changes have had significant impact. Practical implications: From a policy perspective, the findings suggest that stress reduction programs should actively engage employees to build stronger social networks. Originality/value: This study comprehensively examines the ability of social capital at negating the impacts of strains, and significantly reduces the impact of major trauma events. This paper adds to the literature as there are few multivariate analyses of the social capital/strain relationship. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/13639511111157546
Citations Scopus - 6
2011 Frey BS, Savage DA, Torgler B, 'Behavior under extreme conditions: The titanic disaster', Journal of Economic Perspectives, 25 209-222 (2011)
DOI 10.1257/jep.25.1.209
Citations Scopus - 13
2011 Savage DA, Torgler B, Gachter M, 'Gender Variations of Physiological and Psychological Stress in Police Officers', Gender Issues, 28 66-93 (2011)
2010 Frey BS, Savage DA, Torglerb B, 'Interaction of natural survival instincts and internalized social norms exploring the Titanic and Lusitania disasters', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107 4862-4865 (2010)

To understand human behavior, it is important to know under what conditions people deviate from selfish rationality. This study explores the interaction of natural survival instin... [more]

To understand human behavior, it is important to know under what conditions people deviate from selfish rationality. This study explores the interaction of natural survival instincts and internalized social norms using data on the sinking of the Titanic and the Lusitania. We show that time pressure appears to be crucial when explaining behavior under extreme conditions of life and death. Even though the two vessels and the composition of their passengers were quite similar, the behavior of the individuals on board was dramatically different. On the Lusitania, selfish behavior dominated (which corresponds to the classical homo economicus); on the Titanic, social norms and social status (class) dominated, which contradicts standard economics. This difference could be attributed to the fact that the Lusitania sank in 18 min, creating a situation in which the short-run flight impulse dominated behavior. On the slowly sinking Titanic (2 h, 40 min), there was time for socially determined behavioral patterns to reemerge. Maritime disasters are traditionally not analyzed in a comparative manner with advanced statistical (econometric) techniques using individual data of the passengers and crew. Knowing human behavior under extreme conditions provides insight into how widely human behavior can vary, depending on differing external conditions.

DOI 10.1073/pnas.0911303107
Citations Scopus - 24
2010 Frey BS, Savage DA, Torgler B, 'Noblesse oblige? Determinants of survival in a life-and-death situation', Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 74 1-11 (2010)

This paper explores what determines the survival of people in a life-and-death situation. The sinking of the Titanic allows us to inquire whether pro-social behavior matters in su... [more]

This paper explores what determines the survival of people in a life-and-death situation. The sinking of the Titanic allows us to inquire whether pro-social behavior matters in such extreme situations. This event can be considered a quasi-natural experiment. The empirical results suggest that social norms such as 'women and children first' persevered during such an event. Women of reproductive age and crew members had a higher probability of survival. Passenger class, fitness, group size, and cultural background also mattered. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.jebo.2010.02.005
Citations Scopus - 10
2010 Savage DA, Torgler B, 'Perceptions of Fairness and Allocation Systems', Economic Analysis and Policy, 40 229-248 (2010)

© 2010 Economic Society of Australia (Queensland) Inc. This paper explores the conditions of acceptability of differing allocation systems under scarcity and evaluates what makes... [more]

© 2010 Economic Society of Australia (Queensland) Inc. This paper explores the conditions of acceptability of differing allocation systems under scarcity and evaluates what makes a price system more or less fair. We find that fairness in an allocation arrangement depend on the institutional settings inherent in the situation, such as information, transparency and competition and the perceived institutional quality (e.g., fiscal exchange and institutional trust). Results also indicate that the solution "weak people first" is seen as the fairest approach to an excess demand situation, followed by "first come, first serve", the price system and an auction system. On the other hand, a random procedure or an allocation through the government is not perceived to be fair. Moreover, economics students seemed to be less sceptical towards the price system than other subjects although we observe that female students are more sceptical than male students.

DOI 10.1016/S0313-5926(10)50026-2
Citations Scopus - 6
2010 Savage DA, Torgler B, 'Fairness and Allocations Systems.', Economic Analysis and Policy, 40 229-248 (2010)
2010 Savage DA, Torgler B, Gachter M, 'The Role of Social Capital in Reducing Negative Health Outcomes among Police Officers', International Journal of Social Inquiry, 3 141-161 (2010)
Show 23 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Savage DA, Bryan S, MacKenzie I, Nickerson P, Mehta A, 'Enhancing resilience through education: Delivery of a collaborative teaching and research model for disaster management' (2017)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $489,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $6,500

Microeconomic Impacts of Australian Natural Disasters$6,500

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor David Johnston, Professor Benno Torgler, Associate Professor Peter Siminski, Dr Silvia Mendolia, Doctor David Savage
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700182
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20163 grants / $483,000

Microeconomic Impacts of Australian Natural Disasters$403,000

Natural disasters have profound economic and social impacts on individuals and communities; but a comprehensive understanding of these impacts is missing from academic literatures and policy inquiries. This project aims to describe and identify the impacts of Australian natural disasters – such as the Black Saturday bushfires and Brisbane floods – on important microeconomic outcomes, including health, education and employment. Specific goals are to better understand the variation in outcomes, determinants of resilience, and how impacts evolve over time. The project will provide policy-relevant causal estimates by applying modern econometric techniques to field, survey and administrative data that tracks individuals across time. The frequency, impacts and costs of natural disasters are predicted to rise in the future, and accordingly Australian governments are developing new mitigation and support policies. Such initiatives, however, are hindered by inadequate evidence on how disasters negatively impact individuals and how the impacts can be lessened. The project will inform policy-makers on these critical issues by analysing field, survey and administrative data on individuals before and after past disaster events. 

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

A/Prof David Johnston, Prof Benno Torgler, A/Prof Peter Siminski, Dr Silvia Mendolia, Dr David Savage

Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Early Career Higher Education Research Grant$75,000

  1. This grant supports the University’s commitment to fostering and developing Early Career Researchers’ research and research leadership through the provision of fully funded Higher Degree by Research scholarships. These scholarships are intended to enhance Early Career Researcher projects and bring together quality research candidates with committed Early Career Researchers for their mutual benefit. This initiative is an element of Research Advantage and aligns with the NeW Futures Strategic Plan 2016-2025 focus on supporting researchers’ endeavours and attracting high calibre research candidates. 

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Morris Altman

Scheme The University of Newcastle/Australia
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

New Staff Grant$5,000

This grant is to facilitate the conversion of a research paper to a book, which outlines how behavioural economic can provide insight to the analysis of disasters and understanding individual behaviour within the event. Empirical analysis of events using economic modelling and econometric methodology can deliver rigorous and robust results. The underdevelopment of the behavioural theory within these environments has resulted in sub-optimal models and policy. This work provides an overview or the application of behavioural economics in examination of decision-making of individuals within the context of disasters. Drawing together concepts from biology, economics, endocrinology, sociology, socio-biology and psychology. Concluding with a general discussion on policy and potential avenues for further study.

Funding body: Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte

Funding body Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte
Project Team

Dr David Savage

Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current10

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.5
PhD2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Learning and Collaborating in Crowdfunding and Crowdsourcing Environments
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Economics, Queensland University of Technology Co-Supervisor
2017 Masters A Behavioural Economics Approach into the analysis of socioeconomic factors driving Euthanasia/Suicide trends in Religious and Non-Religious nations Economics, University of Newcastle, Newcastle Business School Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Analysis of Credit Efficiency of Rural Rice Farmers in Northern Ghana PhD (Economics), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Human Behavior in Extreme Environments and Disasters: A Discrete Choice Experiment. PhD (Economics), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD An Experimental Investigation on Inequality, Trust and Trustworthiness PhD (Economics), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD A DYNAMIC APPROACH TO TECHNOLOGY INTERACTION IN THE ERA OF FERMENT Economics, Newcastle Business School - The University of Newcaslte Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD The Economics of Education PhD (Economics), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 Masters Gender, Poverty Alleviation and Social Policy: The Role of Labour Intensive Public Work Program in Upper West Ghana M Philosophy (Economics), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Comprehensive Cybernetic Model for Innovation Network Management (C2MINM) PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD An interdisciplinary exploration of large scale decision making: In human mate choice settings Economics, Queensland University of Technology Co-Supervisor
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Dr David Savage

Positions

Lecturer
Newcastle Business School
Faculty of Business and Law

Casual Academic
Newcastle Business School
Faculty of Business and Law

Contact Details

Email david.savage@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4033 9149
Link Research Networks

Office

Room X-822
Building NeW Space
Location City Campus

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