Dr Dane Lamb

Dr Dane Lamb

Research Fellow

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

Dane graduated from his PhD on heavy metal phytotoxicity in native vegetation in 2011 at the University of South Australia. The project focussed on applying a generalised equilibrium partitioning model to a range of soils. Phytotoxicity data was generated from studying native Australian plant species ranges to heavy metal stress in nutrient culture.  Following this he took a post-doctoral position exploring the potential for applying high biomass plant species and organic amendments as a means for making previously disused and abandoned landfill sites productive. During this time, Dane was able to lead a number of consultancy projects within the University of South Australia investigating bioavailability based assessments of environmental contaminants. These investigations ranged from abandoned gold mines and rehabilitation with endemic native plants, to Fe bioavailability in marine waters and urban contaminated land.  Over the last two years Dane has explored the difficult topic of ecotoxicity at mixed contaminant sites, including the multiple interactions between metals, such as arsenic, cadmium and copper, but also organic contaminants such as phenanthrene and benzo-a-pyrene. Dane’s future research includes the improved use of native plant species for mine site rehabilitation, the development of mechanistic physico-chemical models at the site of metal(loid) uptake, and an interdisciplinary application of methodologies to confirm and predict multiple contaminant influences on ecotoxicity. 


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of South Australia
  • Bachelor of Science, Griffith University

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
040202 Inorganic Geochemistry 30
090703 Environmental Technologies 30
039901 Environmental Chemistry (incl. Atmospheric Chemistry) 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Lamb D, Sanderson P, Wang L, Kader M, Naidu R, 'Phytocapping of mine waste at derelict mine sites in New South Wales', Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation, CRC PRESS, Boca Raton 215-240 (2017)
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Ravi Naidu, Kim Colyvas, Nanthi Bolan, Liang Wang, Peter Sanderson
2017 Gurung SR, Wijesekara H, Seshadri B, Stewart RB, Gregg PEH, Bolan NS, 'Sources and management of acid mine drainage', Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation 33-56 (2017)

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Acid mine drainage (AMD) from both active and abandoned mine sites is a major environmental issue for the mining industry in environme... [more]

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Acid mine drainage (AMD) from both active and abandoned mine sites is a major environmental issue for the mining industry in environmentally concerned regions of the world (Gray 1997, Lindsay et al. 2015). The term is used to describe any seepage, leachate, or drainage affected by the oxidation products of sulfide minerals in mine sites when exposed to air and water (Figure 3.1). Both chemical reactions and biological transformations are recognized as being responsible for generating AMD (Lindsay et al. 2015). AMD is typically characterized by low pH and high levels of dissolved metal salts, as well as high concentrations of acidity, sulfate, iron, and other metals (Gray 1997). Once the AMD process begins, it is difficult to control, often accelerates, and is likely to persist for decades or centuries. In the absence of natural or added neutralizing materials 34(carbonate minerals such as calcite or dolomite), the AMD is likely to contain toxic levels of heavy metals such as Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd, which can cause serious environmental problems in soil and water systems (Sengupta 1994)

DOI 10.1201/9781351247337
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu, Peter Sanderson, Kim Colyvas
2017 Bolan NS, Kirkham MB, Ok YS, 'Spoil to soil: Mine site rehabilitation and revegetation', 1-371 (2017)

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation presents both fundamental and practical aspects of remediation and revegetati... [more]

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation presents both fundamental and practical aspects of remediation and revegetation of mine sites. Through three major themes, it examines characterization of mine site spoils; remediation of chemical, physical and biological constraints of mine site spoils, including post mine-site land-use practices; and revegetation of remediated mine site spoils. Each theme includes chapters featuring case studies involving mine sites around the world. The final section focuses specifically on case studies with successful mine site rehabilitation. The book provides a narrative of how inert spoil can be converted to live soil. Instructive illustrations show mine sites before and after rehabilitation. The purpose of this book is to provide students, scientists, and professional personnel in the mining industry sensible, science-based information needed to rehabilitate sustainably areas disturbed by mining activities. This book is suitable for undergraduate and graduate students majoring in environmental, earth, and soil sciences; environmental and soil scientists; and mine site environmental engineers and regulators

DOI 10.1201/9781351247337
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Peter Sanderson, Ravi Naidu, Balaji Seshadri, Kim Colyvas
2017 Bolan NS, Kirkham MB, Ok YS, 'Preface', xi-xii (2017)
DOI 10.1201/9781351247337
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Kim Colyvas, Peter Sanderson, Ravi Naidu, Balaji Seshadri
2017 Murdoch D, Karunanithi R, 'Profitable beef cattle production on rehabilitated mine lands', Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation 111-122 (2017)

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. The Australian beef cattle industry is one of the most efficient and ranks third largest in beef export in the world, contributing 4% ... [more]

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. The Australian beef cattle industry is one of the most efficient and ranks third largest in beef export in the world, contributing 4% of beef supply. As on 2013, the meat value produced from beef cattle, in Australia is estimated to be $12.3 billion (Fastfacts, 2013). Beef cattle production ranges from intensive farms on fertile lands to extensive range lands. With the increase in human population and increase in affordability of meat-based food, the demand for beef cattle is also increasing

DOI 10.1201/9781351247337
Co-authors Peter Sanderson, Nanthi Bolan, Kim Colyvas, Ravi Naidu, Balaji Seshadri
2017 Wijesekara H, Bolan NS, Colyvas K, Seshadri B, Ok YS, Awad YM, et al., 'Use of biowaste for mine site rehabilitation: A meta-analysis on soil carbon dynamics', Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation 59-74 (2017)

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. ¿Mining¿ refers to the excavation of economically important resources from terrestrial landmasses, thereby generating a large quantity... [more]

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. ¿Mining¿ refers to the excavation of economically important resources from terrestrial landmasses, thereby generating a large quantity of valuable precursors for commercial and industrial activities. Mineral products such as coal, aluminum, copper, iron, gold, and mineral sand are examples from the mining industry. Though mining advances global economic prosperity, this industry severely disturbs the land, water resources, and the environment (Figure 4.1). Mined waste materials such as tailings, subsoils, oxidized wastes, and fireclay are the main causes for land disturbance. Presence of potentially hazardous substances such as heavy metals in elevated concentrations in the mined waste materials has caused land contamination. Poor soil characteristics such as low-level organic matter and poor soil texture and structure have resulted in deterioration of the land, adversely affecting the establishment of plants and soil microbial flora and fauna (Boyer et al. 2011, Johnson 2003, Larney and Angers 2012, Sopper 1992). Disturbed mine sites are known to contaminate water resources 60 61in many countries, mainly from acid mine drainage (Bolan et al. 2003, Lindsay et al. 2015, Taylor et al. 1997). Therefore, these sites need to be rehabilitated to minimize potential environmental consequences, thereby enhancing their utilization. Revegetation of mine sites is one of the potential strategies that can be applied to improve these disturbed land masses. Here, infertile soil properties are improved by a series of processes such as land application of biowastes

DOI 10.1201/9781351247337
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Kim Colyvas, Balaji Seshadri, Peter Sanderson, Ravi Naidu
2017 Thangavel R, Karunanithi R, Wijesekara H, Yan Y, Seshadri B, Bolan NS, 'Phytotechnologies for mine site rehabilitation', Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation 203-214 (2017)

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Soils are a prime and very important natural resource, and soil fertility is a major concern for sustainable agriculture and economic ... [more]

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Soils are a prime and very important natural resource, and soil fertility is a major concern for sustainable agriculture and economic development of any country. In recent decades, problems of contaminated land sites, water bodies, groundwater, and air worldwide have increased manyfold due to anthropogenic activities. Mining is one of the anthropogenic activities that cause pollution problems in, around, and outside of mining areas. It results in the mobilization of metals and organic and inorganic substances into the environment, which causes pollution of air, soils, sediments, vegetation, and surface and groundwater. It also increases the morbidity and mortality of plant and animal species and results in the loss of visual, aesthetic characteristics of landscapes (Bolan et al. 2003; Pavli et al. 2015)

DOI 10.1201/9781351247337
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Ravi Naidu, Peter Sanderson, Nanthi Bolan, Kim Colyvas
2017 Sarkar B, Wijesekara H, Mandal S, Singh M, Bolan NS, 'Characterization and improvement in physical, chemical, and biological properties of mine wastes', Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation 3-16 (2017)

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Degradation of land resources as a result of mining activities poses serious threat to the environment. It has been estimated that aro... [more]

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Degradation of land resources as a result of mining activities poses serious threat to the environment. It has been estimated that around 0.4 × 106km2area of land is impacted by mining activities around the world (Hooke and Martín-Duque 2012). Unfortunately, a significant percentage of this area has never been reclaimed, which poses health risks to ecosystems and humans. Often, these wastes contain hazardous substances such as heavy metals, organic contaminants, radionuclides, and crushed limestone, where the latter could become a potential source of atmospheric CO2emission. Thus, they not only pose serious risk to the groundwater and surface water, but also to the atmosphere (Wijesekara et al. 2016). In order to tackle the issues related to mine wastes and manage the affected sites sustainably, an appropriate physical, chemical, and biological characterization of waste materials becomes very prudent. Due to the lack of both above- and below-ground biodiversity, mine waste sites are very poor in organic matter content. This in return leads to poor seed germination, plant growth, and vegetation establishment. In many cases, the associated toxic contaminants also seriously compromise the soil health, microbial life, and plant growth (Castillejo and Castelló 2010, Larney and Angers 2012). This chapter describes the physicochemical characteristics of mine wastes, including spoil, tailings, and overburden, by underpinning their source-property relationships. The value of readily available biowaste resources, including biosolids, composts, and manures, in improving such physicochemical properties of mining-impacted soils/sites is also discussed

DOI 10.1201/9781351247337
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan, Kim Colyvas, Peter Sanderson
2017 Lamb D, Sanderson P, Wang L, Kader M, Naidu R, 'Phytocapping of mine waste at derelict mine sites in New South Wales', Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation 215s-240s (2017)

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Historically, mining of metalliferous ore bodies was a relatively dispersed activity, with numerous small mines occurring throughout m... [more]

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Historically, mining of metalliferous ore bodies was a relatively dispersed activity, with numerous small mines occurring throughout many western countries including the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia (Soucek et al. 2000, Grant et al. 2002, Mayes et al. 2009). Many metalliferous mine sites began operation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and were abandoned in most instances before the environmental movement in Western countries. As such, there was very little recognition of the potential impacts caused by the dispersal of metal toxicants such as arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) into the surrounding environments from these sites. Many of these contaminants are cariogenic in humans (e.g., As), cause a range of human health-related impacts (Pb, Cd), and are toxic to ecological receptors in nearby streams and surrounding terrestrial environments (Cu, Zn, Mn, Ni). As a result of the lack of regard for potential impacts, much of the mining waste was discarded carelessly throughout mining sites, and in some cases, directly into nearby watercourses

DOI 10.1201/9781351247337
Co-authors Kim Colyvas, Balaji Seshadri, Ravi Naidu, Peter Sanderson, Nanthi Bolan, Liang Wang
2017 Adhikari T, Dharmarajan R, 'Nanoscale materials for mine site remediation', Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation 95-108 (2017)

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. In the era of global competition, mineral exploitation has been significantly increased resulting in pressure on the environment in th... [more]

© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. In the era of global competition, mineral exploitation has been significantly increased resulting in pressure on the environment in the form of massive deforestation, soil pollution, and erosion. Despite global economic importance, mineral industries have adversely affected the ecosystems across the world. The impact of mine waste in soil depends on its type and composition, commodity being mined, type of ore, and technologies used to process the ore. Mining types and activities are several, which include surface mining, underground mining, openpit mining, in situ mining, pillar mining, slope mining, block caving, and quarrying. And thus mine waste materials vary in their physical and chemical composition and potential for soil contamination. The different 96types of mine waste materials are overburden, waste rock, tailings, slags, mine water, sludge, and gaseous wastes. Overburden includes the soil and rock that are removed to gain access to the ore deposits at openpit mines. It is usually dumped on the surface at mine sites where it will not hinder further expansion of the mining operation. Waste rock contains minerals in concentrations considered too low to be extracted at a profit. It is often stored in heaps on the mine site. Tailings are finely ground rock and mineral waste products of mineral processing operations. They also contain leftover processing chemicals, and usually are deposited in the form of water-based slurry into tailings ponds. Slags are nonmetallic by-products from metal smelting. Mine water is produced in a number of ways at mine sites and varies in its quality and potential for environmental contamination. Sludge is produced at active water treatment plants used at some mine sites and consists of the solids that have been removed from the water as well as any chemicals. Gaseous wastes are produced during high-temperature chemical processing such as smelting, and consist of particulate matter and oxides of sulfur

DOI 10.1201/9781351247337
Co-authors Kim Colyvas, Balaji Seshadri, Peter Sanderson, Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
Show 7 more chapters

Journal article (43 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Wang L, Cheng Y, Lamb D, Dharmarajan R, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, 'Application of infrared spectrum for rapid classification of dominant petroleum hydrocarbon fractions for contaminated site assessment', Spectrochimica Acta Part A-Molecular And Biomolecular Spectroscopy, 207 183-188 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.saa.2018.09.024
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Raja Dharmarajan, Liang Wang, S Chadalavada
2018 Shilpi S, Seshadri B, Sarkar B, Bolan N, Lamb D, Naidu R, 'Comparative values of various wastewater streams as a soil nutrient source', CHEMOSPHERE, 192 272-281 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.10.118
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2018 Qi F, Lamb D, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Yan Y, Ok YS, et al., 'Cadmium solubility and bioavailability in soils amended with acidic and neutral biochar', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 610 1457-1466 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.228
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu, Mahmud Rahman
2018 Kader M, Lamb DT, Wang L, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Copper interactions on arsenic bioavailability and phytotoxicity in soil', Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 148 738-746 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2017.11.025
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu, Liang Wang
2017 Qi F, Yan Y, Lamb D, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Liu Y, et al., 'Thermal stability of biochar and its effects on cadmium sorption capacity', BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, 246 48-56 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2017.07.033
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Yanju Liu, Nanthi Bolan, Scott Donne
2017 Qi F, Kuppusamy S, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Ok YS, Lamb D, et al., 'Pyrogenic carbon and its role in contaminant immobilization in soils', CRITICAL REVIEWS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 47 795-876 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/10643389.2017.1328918
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2017 Wang L, Cheng Y, Lamb D, Lesniewski P, Chen Z, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Novel recalibration methodologies for ion-selective electrode arrays in the multi-ion interference scenario', Journal of Chemometrics, 31 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cem.2870
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen, Ravi Naidu, Liang Wang
2017 Qi F, Dong Z, Lamb D, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Ok YS, et al., 'Effects of acidic and neutral biochars on properties and cadmium retention of soils', CHEMOSPHERE, 180 564-573 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.04.014
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2017 Qi F, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Dong Z, Yan Y, Lamb D, et al., 'Pyrogenic carbon in Australian soils', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 586 849-857 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.064
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Luchun Duan, Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2017 Dong Z, Bahar MM, Jit J, Kennedy B, Priestly B, Ng J, et al., 'Issues raised by the reference doses for perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 105 86-94 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2017.05.006
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Mezbaul Bahar, Luchun Duan, Yanju Liu
2017 Xia Q, Lamb D, Peng C, Ng JC, 'Interaction effects of As, Cd and Pb on their respective bioaccessibility with time in co-contaminated soils assessed by the Unified BARGE Method', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 24 5585-5594 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-8292-7
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2017 Wijayawardena MAA, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Kuchel T, 'Evaluation of relative bioaccessibility leaching procedure for an assessment of lead bioavailability in mixed metal contaminated soils', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 7 229-238 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 This study investigates the effect of contaminant zinc (Zn) on lead (Pb) bioavailability and bioaccessibility in six contrasting soils spiked with 1500 mg Pb/kg and aged 12... [more]

© 2017 This study investigates the effect of contaminant zinc (Zn) on lead (Pb) bioavailability and bioaccessibility in six contrasting soils spiked with 1500 mg Pb/kg and aged 12 months under laboratory conditions. Zn was added to the soils (7500 mgZn/kg soil) and aged for a further two weeks. In vivo studies were conducted using juvenile swine as a surrogate model for young children. Two compartment pharmacokinetic models were used to analyze the biological response produced by Pb oral solution and spiked soils. Absolute and relative bioavailability of Pb in soils (oral dose of 100 µ g Pb/kg body weight/day) were estimated by comparing them with intravenously administered soluble Pb salt (25 µ g Pb/kg/day) and orally administered the same Pb salt [Pb acetate =(CH3COO)2Pb·3H2O] administered to 3 juvenile pigs per treatment. Lead bioaccessibility was calculated using the in vitro RBALP (i.e. relative bioaccessibility leaching procedure) method. The in vitro results of RBALP were compared to in vivo relative Pb bioavailability to ascertain whether the changes in bioaccessibility correlated with the in vivo data. Although the in vivo Pb relative bioavailability (RB) in all soils except in MLA (Mount Lofty Acidic) revealed an increase (18%¿159%) in the presence of Zn, the in vitro RBALP bioaccessibility results indicated otherwise (1%¿38% decrease). In vivo RB of Pb in MLA declined by 37% in the presence of Zn. However, the RBALP in vitro bioaccessible Pb did not correlate with the relative bioavailabilities of Pb in the juvenile swine dosing experiment. Caution is therefore needed when predicting Pb bioavailability/bioaccessibility in the presence of metal mixtures. The literature contains much information on the correlation of metal and metalloid bioaccessibility with their bioavailability. There is, however, a paucity of studies investigating the effects of other metals on Pb and their IVIVC (in vitro and in vivo correlations). The current study addresses this knowledge gap by assessing in vivoand in vitro bioavailability of Pb in the presence of Zn.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.02.007
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Ravi Naidu, Thava Palanisami
2017 Kader M, Lamb DT, Wang L, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Zinc-arsenic interactions in soil: Solubility, toxicity and uptake', Chemosphere, 187 357-367 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Arsenic (As) and zinc (Zn) are common co-contaminants in mining impacted soils. Their interaction on solubility and toxicity when present concurrently is not w... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Arsenic (As) and zinc (Zn) are common co-contaminants in mining impacted soils. Their interaction on solubility and toxicity when present concurrently is not well understood in natural systems. The aim of this study was to observe their interaction in solubility (soil-solution), bioaccumulation (shoot uptake) and toxicity to cucumber (Cucumis sativa L) conducting 4 weeks pot study in 5 different soils spiked with As (0, 2, 4, 8 to 1024 mg kg-1) individually and with Zn at two phytotoxic doses. The As pore-water concentration was significantly reduced (df = 289, Adjusted R2= 0.84, p < 0.01) in the presence of Zn in the whole dataset, whereas Zn and Zn2+activity in pore-water was reduced significantly only in the two alkaline soils. This outcome may be due to adsorption/surface precipitation or tertiary bridging complexation. No homogenous precipitation of zinc arsenate could be established using electron microscopy, XRD or even equilibrium calculations. For bioaccumulation phase, no significant effect of Zn on As uptake was observed except acidic MG soil whereas, Zn uptake was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by As in whole dataset. However, an additive response was observed mostly except acidic MG soil. The synergistic response (more than additive) was predominant in this soil for a wide range of inhibition concentration (0¿80%) at both Zn EC10 and EC50 levels. Since additive response is mostly considered in risk assessment for mixtures, precautions should be implemented for assessment of toxicity for As-Zn mixture in acidic soil due to their synergistic response in some soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.08.093
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu, Liang Wang
2016 Lamb DT, Kader M, Wang L, Choppala G, Rahman MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Pore-Water Carbonate and Phosphate As Predictors of Arsenate Toxicity in Soil', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 50 13062-13069 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.6b03195
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Liang Wang, Ravi Naidu, Mahmud Rahman
2016 Abbasi S, Lamb DT, Palanisami T, Kader M, Matanitobua V, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioaccessibility of barium from barite contaminated soils based on gastric phase in vitro data and plant uptake', Chemosphere, 144 1421-1427 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Barite contamination of soil commonly occurs from either barite mining or explorative drilling operations. This work reported in vitro data for barite contami... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Barite contamination of soil commonly occurs from either barite mining or explorative drilling operations. This work reported in vitro data for barite contaminated soils using the physiologically based extraction test (PBET) methodology. The existence of barite in plant tissue and the possibility of 'biomineralised' zones was also investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Soils with low barium (Ba) concentrations showed a higher proportion of Ba extractability than barite rich samples. Barium uptake to spinach from soil was different between short term spiking studies and field weathered soils. Furthermore, Ba crystals were not evident in spinach tissue or acid digest solutions grown in barium nitrate spiked soils despite high accumulation. Barite was found in the plant digest solutions from barite contaminated soils only. Results indicate that under the conservative assumptions made, a child would need to consume extreme quantities of soil over an extended period to cause chronic health problems.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.10.031
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Xia Q, Peng C, Lamb D, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, Ng JC, 'Bioaccessibility of arsenic and cadmium assessed for in vitro bioaccessibility in spiked soils and their interaction during the Unified BARGE Method (UBM) extraction', Chemosphere, 147 444-450 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Recent decades have seen a growing popularity of in vitro bioaccessibility being utilised as a screening tool in human health risk assessment. However the exi... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Recent decades have seen a growing popularity of in vitro bioaccessibility being utilised as a screening tool in human health risk assessment. However the existing bioaccessibility studies only focus on single contaminant. Considering human are likely to ingest multi-contaminants, these contaminants could interact within human gastrointestinal tract which may lead to an increase or decrease in bioaccessibility. In this study, seven different types of soil were spiked with arsenic (As) or cadmium (Cd) and aged for one year. The effects of soil properties on the bioaccessibility were examined. Moreover, the interaction between As and Cd in simulated human digestive system was studied by mixing As-spiked soil with Cd-spiked soil of the same type during bioaccessibility test. Results shows the bioaccessibility of As ranged from 40 ± 2.8 to 95 ± 1.3% in the gastric phase and 16 ± 2.0 to 96 ± 0.8% in the intestinal phase whilst a significant difference was observed between Cd gastric bioaccessibility (72 ± 4.3 to 99 ± 0.8%) and intestinal bioaccessibility (6.2 ± 0.3 to 45 ± 2.7%). Organic carbon, iron oxide and aluminium oxide were key parameters influencing the bioaccessibility of As (gastric and intestinal phases) and Cd (intestinal phase). No interactions between As and Cd during bioaccessibility test were observed in any soils, which indicates As and Cd may age independently and did not interact while being solubilised during bioaccessibility test. Thus additive effect may be proposed when estimating the bioaccessibility of mixtures of independently-aged As and Cd in soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.12.091
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kader M, Lamb DT, Wang L, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Predicting copper phytotoxicity based on pore-water pCu', ECOTOXICOLOGY, 25 481-490 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10646-015-1605-7
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Liang Wang, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Xia Q, Peng C, Lamb D, Kader M, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, Ng JC, 'Effects of arsenic and cadmium on bioaccessibility of lead in spiked soils assessed by Unified BARGE Method', CHEMOSPHERE, 154 343-349 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.03.133
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Kader M, Lamb DT, Mahbub KR, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Predicting plant uptake and toxicity of lead (Pb) in long-term contaminated soils from derived transfer functions', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 23 15460-15470 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-6696-z
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Wang L, Fang C, Cheng Y, Lamb D, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'A practical way to make solid-state reference electrodes', Journal of Bioanalytical Techniques, 1 1-5 (2016)
DOI 10.16966/jbt.101
Co-authors Liang Wang, Cheng Fang, Zuliang Chen, Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Wang L, Cheng Y, Lamb D, Chen Z, Lesniewski P, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Simultaneously determining multi-metal ions using an Ion Selective Electrode array system', Environmental Technology & Innovation, 6 165-176 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.10.001
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Zuliang Chen, Liang Wang, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Lamb DT, Kader M, Ming H, Wang L, Abbasi S, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Predicting plant uptake of cadmium: validated with long-term contaminated soils', ECOTOXICOLOGY, 25 1563-1574 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10646-016-1712-0
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Liang Wang, Ravi Naidu
2016 Kader M, Lamb DT, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Sorption parameters as a predictor of arsenic phytotoxicity in Australian soils', Geoderma, 265 103-110 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Arsenic (As) is a mobile and ecotoxic metalloid that is of serious concern to the environment. In this study, As phytotoxicity was studied using a dose-respon... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Arsenic (As) is a mobile and ecotoxic metalloid that is of serious concern to the environment. In this study, As phytotoxicity was studied using a dose-response approach for seven contrasting soils considering 3 end-points (shoot biomass, root elongation and chlorophyll content) and focusing on predictors of toxicity. Root elongation study was carried out for 4days using both Cucumis sativus L. (cucumber) and Triticum aestivum L. (wheat) and shoot end-points with a 4week a pot study using cucumber only. Root elongation of cucumber was a substantially less sensitive indicator to As than data from the 4weeks pot study. Effective concentrations (50%)(EC50) from cucumber root elongation studies were overall 1.6 times higher than the 4week shoot data. Cucumber was however considerably more sensitive to wheat. Given the large discrepancy in phytotoxicity end points for 7 soils, root elongation data for ecotoxicological assessment should be treated with some caution. Arsenic phytotoxicity was strongly related to the sorption constants of each of the seven soils in our study. Both root elongation and shoot data were related strongly to Freundlich partitioning constants (Kf) (L/kg). Wheat and cucumber root elongation had R2values 0.90 and 0.91 respectively, while cucumber shoot data was 0.79. The Kfvalues were related to soil pH and also EC50data and, thus, shows that As phytotoxicity in our study was primarily controlled by sorption reactions. The rate of As bioaccumulation to cucumber shoots depended heavily on the soil under consideration. Chlorophyll and carotenoid content of cucumber shoots increased with As content in 3 soils and decreased in other soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2015.11.019
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Ming H, Naidu R, Sarkar B, Lamb DT, Liu Y, Megharaj M, Sparks D, 'Competitive sorption of cadmium and zinc in contrasting soils', Geoderma, 268 60-68 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. The sorption behavior of cadmium (Cd(II)) and zinc (Zn(II)) on two virgin soils with different pH levels was studied using single metal and competitive dual m... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. The sorption behavior of cadmium (Cd(II)) and zinc (Zn(II)) on two virgin soils with different pH levels was studied using single metal and competitive dual metal systems. In the single metal system, Zn exhibited a greater affinity for the alkaline soil, as indicated by the Langmuir constant (KL= 8.85 L/kg) compared with Cd (KL= 1.79 L/kg). However, much less sorption of both Zn (KL= 0.19 L/kg) and Cd (KL= 0.07 L/kg) was observed in the acidic soil. The competitive sorption data were modeled using two-metal Freundlich and Langmuir functions. The competition for metal sorption occurred in the alkaline soil only at a higher concentration of the competing metals, whereas the effect was significant even at lower concentrations in the acidic soil. The cumulative amount of both metals sorbed in the soil was similar to that of single metal systems in the studied concentration range, demonstrating that the number of sites available for sorption remained constant irrespective of the competition. This study indicated that Cd might be more mobile in a mixed-metal system than in a single-metal scenario and thus poses a serious ecotoxicological threat. This study is important for assessing the risks and developing management strategies for multiple heavy metal contaminated soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2016.01.021
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Wijayawardena MAA, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Kuchel T, 'Influence of ageing on lead bioavailability in soils: a swine study', Environmental science and pollution research international, 22 8979-8988 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-014-3577-1
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Ravi Naidu, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Wijayawardena MAA, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Kuchel T, 'Using soil properties to predict in vivo bioavailability of lead in soils', CHEMOSPHERE, 138 422-428 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.06.073
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2015 Wang L, Yang D, Lamb D, Chen Z, Lesniewsk PJ, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Application of mathematical models and genetic algorithm to simulate the response characteristics of an ion selective electrode array for system recalibration', Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, 144 24-30 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemolab.2015.03.007
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Liang Wang, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Kader M, Lamb DT, Correll R, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Pore-water chemistry explains zinc phytotoxicity in soil', Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 122 252-259 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Zinc (Zn) is a widespread soil contaminant arising from a numerous anthropogenic sources. However, adequately predicting toxicity of Zn to ecological receptor... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Zinc (Zn) is a widespread soil contaminant arising from a numerous anthropogenic sources. However, adequately predicting toxicity of Zn to ecological receptors remains difficult due to the complexity of soil characteristics. In this study, we examined solid-solution partitioning using pore-water data and toxicity of Zn to cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) in spiked soils. Pore-water effective concentration (ECx, x=10%, 20% and 50% reduction) values were negatively related to pH, indicating lower Zn pore water concentration were needed to cause phytotoxicity at high pH soils. Total dissolved zinc (Zn<inf>pw</inf>) and free zinc (Zn<sup>2+</sup>) in soil-pore water successfully described 78% and 80.3% of the variation in relative growth (%) in the full dataset. When the complete data set was used (10 soils), the estimated EC50<inf>pw</inf> was 450 and 79.2µM for Zn<inf>pw</inf> and Zn<sup>2+</sup>, respectively. Total added Zn, soil pore water pH (pH<inf>pw</inf>) and dissolve organic carbon (DOC) were the best predictors of Zn<inf>pw</inf> and Zn<sup>2+</sup> in pore-water. The EC10 (total loading) values ranged from 179 to 5214mg/kg, depending on soil type. Only pH measurements in soil were related to ECx total Zn data. The strongest relationship to ECx overall was pH<inf>ca</inf>, although pH<inf>w</inf> and pH<inf>pw</inf> were in general related to Zn ECx. Similarly, when a solution-only model was used to predict Zn in shoot, DOC was negatively related to Zn in shoot, indicating a reduction in uptake/ translocation of Zn from solution with increasing DOC.

DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2015.08.004
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Wang L, Liu E, Cheng Y, Bekele DN, Lamb D, Chen Z, et al., 'Novel methodologies for automatically and simultaneously determining BTEX components using FTIR spectra', Talanta, 144 1104-1110 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. This study introduced a patented novel methodological system for automatically analysis of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) spectrum data locate... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. This study introduced a patented novel methodological system for automatically analysis of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) spectrum data located at 'fingerprint' region (wavenumber 670-800 cm<sup>-1</sup>), to simultaneously determinate multiple petroleum hydrocarbons (PHs) in real mixture samples. This system includes: an object oriented baseline correction; Band decomposition (curve fitting) method with mathematical optimization; and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for determination, which is suitable for the characteristics of this IR regions, where the spectra are normally with low signal to noise ratio and high density of peaks. BTEX components are potentially lethal carcinogens and contained in many petroleum products. As a case study, six BTEX components were determinate automatically and simultaneously in mixture vapor samples. The robustness of the BTEX determination was validated using real petroleum samples, and the prediction results were compared with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

DOI 10.1016/j.talanta.2015.07.044
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Dawit Bekele, Zuliang Chen, Liang Wang, Ravi Naidu
2014 Lamb DT, Venkatraman K, Bolan N, Ashwath N, Choppala G, Naidu R, 'Phytocapping: An alternative technology for the sustainable management of landfill sites', Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, 44 561-637 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/10643389.2012.728823
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2013 Choppala G, Bolan N, Lamb D, Kunhikrishnan A, 'Comparative sorption and mobility of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) species in a range of soils: Implications to bioavailability topical collection on remediation of site contamination', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013) [C1]

The sorption of chromium (Cr) species to soil has become the focus of research as it dictates the bioavailability and also the magnitude of toxicity of Cr. The sorption of two env... [more]

The sorption of chromium (Cr) species to soil has become the focus of research as it dictates the bioavailability and also the magnitude of toxicity of Cr. The sorption of two environmentally important Cr species [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)] was examined using batch sorption, and the data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The effects of soil properties such as pH, CEC, organic matter (OM), clay, water-extractable SO42-and PO43-, surface charge, and different iron (Fe) fractions of 12 different Australian representative soils on the sorption, and mobility of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were examined. The amount of sorption as shown by Kfwas higher for Cr(III) than Cr(VI) in all tested soils. Further, the amount of Cr(III) sorbed increased with an increase in pH, CEC, clay, and OM of soils. Conversely, the chemical properties of soil such as positive charge and Fe (crystalline) had a noticeable influence on the sorption of Cr(VI). Desorption of Cr(VI) occurred rapidly and was greater than desorption of Cr(III) in soils. The mobility of Cr species as estimated by the retardation factor was higher for Cr(VI) than for Cr(III) in all tested soils. These results concurred with the results from leaching experiments which showed higher leaching of Cr(VI) than Cr(III) in both acidic and alkaline soils indicating the higher mobility of Cr(VI) in a wide range of soils. This study demonstrated that Cr(VI) is more mobile and will be bioavailable in soils regardless of soil properties and if not remediated may eventually pose a severe threat to biota. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1699-6
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Lamb DT, Matanitobua VP, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability of Barium to Plants and Invertebrates in Soils Contaminated by Barite', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 47 4670-4676 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es302053d
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Lamb DT, Heading S, Bolan N, Naidu R, 'Use of Biosolids for Phytocapping of Landfill Soil', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 223 2695-2705 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-011-1060-x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Lamb DT, Naidu R, Ming H, Megharaja M, 'Copper phytotoxicity in native and agronomical plant species', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 85 23-29 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2012.08.018
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Ming H, He W, Lamb DT, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability of lead in contaminated soil depends on the nature of bioreceptor', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 78 344-350 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2011.11.045
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Murtaza G, Haynes RJ, Naidu R, Belyaeva ON, Kim K-R, Lamb DT, Bolan NS, 'Natural Attenuation of Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd in Three Biosolids-Amended Soils of Contrasting pH Measured Using Rhizon Pore Water Samplers', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 221 351-363 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-011-0795-8
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2011 Park JH, Lamb D, Paneerselvam P, Choppala G, Bolan N, Chung JW, 'Role of organic amendments on enhanced bioremediation of heavy metal(loid) contaminated soils', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 185 549-574 (2011) [C1]

As land application becomes one of the important waste utilization and disposal practices, soil is increasingly being seen as a major source of metal(loid)s reaching food chain, m... [more]

As land application becomes one of the important waste utilization and disposal practices, soil is increasingly being seen as a major source of metal(loid)s reaching food chain, mainly through plant uptake and animal transfer. With greater public awareness of the implications of contaminated soils on human and animal health there has been increasing interest in developing technologies to remediate contaminated sites. Bioremediation is a natural process which relies on soil microorganisms and higher plants to alter metal(loid) bioavailability and can be enhanced by addition of organic amendments to soils. Large quantities of organic amendments, such as manure compost, biosolid and municipal solid wastes are used as a source of nutrients and also as a conditioner to improve the physical properties and fertility of soils. These organic amendments that are low in metal(loid)s can be used as a sink for reducing the bioavailability of metal(loid)s in contaminated soils and sediments through their effect on the adsorption, complexation, reduction and volatilization of metal(loid)s. This review examines the mechanisms for the enhanced bioremediation of metal(loid)s by organic amendments and discusses the practical implications in relation to sequestration and bioavailability of metal(loid)s in soils. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2010.09.082
Citations Scopus - 333Web of Science - 299
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2010 Lamb DT, Ming H, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Phytotoxicity and Accumulation of Lead in Australian Native Vegetation', ARCHIVES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 58 613-621 (2010)
DOI 10.1007/s00244-009-9460-2
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2010 Lamb DT, Ming H, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Relative Tolerance of a Range of Australian Native Plant Species and Lettuce to Copper, Zinc, Cadmium, and Lead', ARCHIVES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 59 424-432 (2010)
DOI 10.1007/s00244-010-9481-x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2009 Lamba DT, Ming H, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Heavy metal (Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) partitioning and bioaccessibility in uncontaminated and long-term contaminated soils', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 171 1150-1158 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2009.06.124
Citations Scopus - 74Web of Science - 63
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2005 Burton ED, Phillips IR, Hawker DW, Lamb DT, 'Copper behaviour in a Podosol. 1. pH-dependent sorption-desorption, sorption isotherm analysis, and aqueous speciation modelling', Australian Journal of Soil Research, 43 491-501 (2005)

The effects of pH and Cu loading on the solid/solution partitioning of Cu in a Podosol from south-east Queensland, Australia was examined. Sorption-desorption of Cu exhibited maxi... [more]

The effects of pH and Cu loading on the solid/solution partitioning of Cu in a Podosol from south-east Queensland, Australia was examined. Sorption-desorption of Cu exhibited maximum linear distribution coefficients (KD) at approximately pH 5. Observed decrease in KDvalues at pH >5 was attributed to increased solubility of native dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at higher pH and subsequent formation of non-sorbing Cu-DOC complexes. Speciation modelling with the MINTEQA2 code indicated that >90% of aqueous Cu was present as Cu-DOC complexes at pH >5.5. The effect of Cu loading was examined with sorption isotherm analysis at pH 5 using solid:solution ratio approaches that were both constant (1:2 and 1:10) and variable. As the solid:solution ratio increased, the proportion of Cu sorbed decreased due to the formation of Cu-DOC complexes. However, this effect was negligible once these Cu-DOC complexes were accounted for via free Cu2+sorption isotherms. This indicated that Cu2+sorption at concentrations <0.08 mg/L was described by a KDvalue of approximately 3000 L/kg. Despite this relatively high KDvalue for Cu2+sorption, the results indicate that Cu-DOC complexes significantly enhance Cu solubility in soils high in DOC. © CSIRO 2005.

DOI 10.1071/SR04117
Citations Scopus - 11
2005 Burton ED, Phillips IR, Hawker DW, Lamb DT, 'Copper behaviour in a Podosol. 2. Sorption reversibility, geochemical partitioning, and column leaching', Australian Journal of Soil Research, 43 503-513 (2005)

The sorption-desorption and leaching behaviour of Cu in a Podosol from south-east Queensland, Australia, was examined. Copper sorption was described by a linear distribution coeff... [more]

The sorption-desorption and leaching behaviour of Cu in a Podosol from south-east Queensland, Australia, was examined. Copper sorption was described by a linear distribution coefficient at low sorption levels (KDCa¿0) of 481 L/kg and a sorption capacity (CS,Max) of 382 mg/kg. Selective removal of soil organic matter reduced these values by approximately 95%, indicating that Cu was sorbed predominantly to soil organic matter. The KDCa¿0and CS,Maxvalues from Cu desorption experiments were 934 L/kg and 516 mg/kg, respectively, which indicates that sorption was not fully reversible. This irreversibility was related to aqueous Cu speciation (modelled with MINTEQA2), showing that aqueous complexes between Cu and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) comprised 28.3-72.8% and 21.3-45.4% of aqueous Cu in the sorption and desorption experiment, respectively. Sorption irreversibility was not evident when the corresponding data was presented as free Cu2+isotherms. Both sorption and desorption experiments with free Cu2+<0.2 mg/L were described by a KDCa¿0value of approximately 3000 L/kg. Sequential extraction of sorbed Cu indicated that at low concentrations, sorption occurred primarily via specific interactions, with non-specific sorption becoming increasing important at higher concentrations. Desorption of Cu in a column leaching experiment was attributable to exchange of sorbed Cu2+with Na+. Leaching with a DOC solution of pH 7 and 135 mg/L greatly enhanced Cu mobility due to the formation of aqueous Cu-DOC complexes. © CSIRO 2005.

DOI 10.1071/SR04118
Citations Scopus - 7
2004 Phillips IR, Lamb DT, Hawker DW, Burton ED, 'Effects of pH and salinity on copper, lead, and zinc sorption rates in sediments from Moreton Bay, Australia', Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 73 1041-1048 (2004)
DOI 10.1007/s00128-004-0530-x
Citations Scopus - 23
Show 40 more journal articles

Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Lamb D, Wang L, Abbasi S, Rahman M, Kader M, Sanderson P, et al., 'Towards a coherent toxicity prediction framework for metals and metalloids: competitive, multi-species and other models for terrestrial environments.', Athens, USA (2018)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Liang Wang, Mahmud Rahman, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Wijayawardena AMA, Naidu R, Mallavarapu M, Lamb D, Palanisami T, Kuchel T, 'Can lead enter independently in the presence of zinc into human body? A study on effect of zinc on lead bioavailability', Melbourne, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Thava Palanisami, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Lamb D, Kader M, Wang L, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Competitive and multispecies models for development of terrestrial biotic ligand models', No, Zurich (2017)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Liang Wang
2016 Peng C, Xia Q, Muthusamy S, Lal V, Ng J, Lamb D, et al., 'Metal interaction on arsenic toxicity in both in vivo and in vitro biological systems including human cells' (2016)
DOI 10.1201/b20466-159
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Wijayawardena MAA, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Naidu R, Kuchel T, Wijayawardena AMA, 'Influence of soil ageing on lead bioavailability', International Contaminated Site Remediation Conference (Cleanup 2015), Melbourne, Australia (2015)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Thava Palanisami
2014 Kader M, Lamb DT, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Does cadmium influence arsenic phytotoxicity?', One Century of the Discovery of Arsenicosis in Latin America (1914-2014): As 2014 - Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment (2014)

Arsenic (As) and Cadmium (Cd) phytotoxicity was studied individually and as a mixture in solution as well as in soil. The effective concentrations causing a 50% reduction in growt... [more]

Arsenic (As) and Cadmium (Cd) phytotoxicity was studied individually and as a mixture in solution as well as in soil. The effective concentrations causing a 50% reduction in growth for root elongation to pot study was significantly varied though having significant correlation. The interaction of As and Cd was antagonistic in solution. In addition, As toxicity was significantly negatively affected in soil. The reduced binding ability of acidic soils for Cd may have impacted As phytotoxicity as the binding constant is 3-4 times less in alkaline soil. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group.

Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2014 Lamb DT, Kader M, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Arsenic phytotoxicity in Australian soils', One Century of the Discovery of Arsenicosis in Latin America (1914-2014): As 2014 - Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment (2014)

Arsenic phytotoxicity was studied using two tests in a range of soils. The effective concentrations causing a 50% reduction in growth (EC50) for the 4 week growth study was 13 to ... [more]

Arsenic phytotoxicity was studied using two tests in a range of soils. The effective concentrations causing a 50% reduction in growth (EC50) for the 4 week growth study was 13 to 235 mg/kg compared to 42 to 452 mg/kg using root elongation. Phytotoxicity thresholds for both tests were strongly correlated to each other. The EC50values were related strongly to soil pH and the Freundlich partitioning (Kf) constants. The EC50values were most consistently related to Kfvalues. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group.

Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2006 Burton E, Phillips I, Hawker D, Lamb D, 'Copper geochemistry in an acidic, sandy soil: sorption-desorption, aqueous speciation and mobility', Philadelphia (2006)
Show 5 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Naidu R, Lamb D, Bolan N, Gawandar J, 'Recovery and reuse of phosphorus from wastewater soruces', Massey University, 5 (2012)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $1,318,473

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20183 grants / $639,373

Enhanced phytoremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils using native Australia plant species$446,873

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dane Lamb, Professor Ravi Naidu
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1801037
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Biophysical processes for unlocking the soil nutrient bank to increase soil productivity$180,000

Funding body: CRC for High Performance Soils

Funding body CRC for High Performance Soils
Project Team Doctor Dane Lamb, Doctor Anitha Kunhikrishnan, Dr Lukas Van Zwieten, Dr Terry Rose, Dr Chengrong Chen, Ms Helen McMillian
Scheme RAAP Special Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800592
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Potential avenues for brine wastewater remediation$12,500

Funding body: Restech Australia Pty Ltd

Funding body Restech Australia Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dane Lamb, Doctor Balaji Seshadri
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800904
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

20171 grants / $307,100

Risk-based land management of weatherboard hydrocarbon contaminated sited by coupling in situ FTIR measurements with GIS models$307,100

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Liang Wang, Doctor Dane Lamb, Doctor Raja Dharmarajan, Professor Ravi Naidu, Dr Prashant Srivastava, Dr Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1700898
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

20162 grants / $372,000

Development of a risk based land management tool to assist decision making at derelict mine sites$354,000

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dane Lamb
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601052
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

NSW Mine Rehabilitation$18,000

Funding body: NSW Minerals Council

Funding body NSW Minerals Council
Project Team Professor Richard Bush, Doctor Dane Lamb, Doctor Peter Sanderson
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600975
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current7

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Risk Assessment of Heavy Metal Contamination and Phytoremediation of Major Farm Land Soil, Plant, and Grain in Australia PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Characterisation of Heavy Metals (As, Cd, Pb) Contaminated Soil and Their Remediation by Using Different Methods PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Bioavailability and Toxicity of Metalloids in Mixed Contaminant Environments using Australian Native Plants PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Indigenous Community Dietary Intake and Associated Health Implications PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Applicability of Modified Biochar Materials for Remediation of Arsenate and Arsenite Contaminated Waters PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Risk Assessment of Australian Biosolids Containing Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Applied to Agricultural Land PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Modelling of dry spray desulfurization and denitrification reactors for integrated combustion flue gas cleaning PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Predicting Phytotoxicity of Metal(loid)s and Their Mixtures in Soil using Pore-Water based Transfer Functions PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Dane Lamb

Position

Research Fellow
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email dane.lamb@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room ATC
Building Advanced Technology Center.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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