Ms Cheryl Watterson

Ms Cheryl Watterson

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

As Director of Nutrition and Dietetics for the Acute Hospital Services in the Newcastle Sector of Hunter New England Local Health District, I led a team of dietitians and dietitian assistants at John Hunter Hospital and Belmont District Hospital during this time I reoriented our services to provide effective clinical teams within each patient care stream supported by an education and research dietitian. 

I evaluated and documented a gap analysis and risk assessment for establishing priorities, Key Performance Indicators and strategies for implementing the NSW Health Agency for Clinical Innovation Nutrition Care Policy at John Hunter Hospital against the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards.

I maintained my professional competence as a clinical dietitian during this time through the Accredited Practicing Dietitian certification processes of the Dietitians Association of Australia.

I am recognised as an Advanced practitioner by my professional body.  I have demonstrated my commitment to evidence based practice, and optimal patient outcomes in both acute hospitals and mental health hospitals through:

  • collaborations with other Managers of Nutrition and Dietetic Services at NSW tertiary hospitals to author and review important policy and publications for NSW Health and Agency for Clinical Innovation.  These documents are available at https://www.aci.health.nsw.gov.au/networks/nutrition
  • Initiation, conceptualisation, and ethics applications as co-investigator on the following research studies:
    • Can intensive dietitian counselling to moderate diabetes risk factors in early pregnancy for overweight women with previous gestational diabetes prevent re-occurrence in this pregnancy?
    • Australasian Nutrition Care Day Survey (site investigator only)
    • Nutrition and Trauma study into baseline nutritional status of elderly patients admitted to John Hunter Hospital with low impact trauma into a ward where there was no dietitian surveillance. 
    • Eating Matters: protected mealtimes and help with eating was a practice based multidisciplinary project to improve nutrition and hydration for patients in two wards at John Hunter Hospital.  The project used collaboration with nursing, other allied health and food services and innovative methods such as executive and clinical sponsors, local champions, stakeholder engagement, testing of simple solutions, breakthrough methodology, evidence based and best practice models, and relevant examples in like hospitals, evaluation and feedback.  It was highly successful and resulted in positive outcomes for the staff and patients.

I am a reviewer in the areas of adult malnutrition and nutrition in pregnancy for manuscript submitted to the journal Nutrition and Dietetics.

As a Conjoint Lecturer at University of Newcastle I have acted as a professional supervisor and mentor in the provision of clinical, community and food service placements for dietetic students as well as providing guests lecturers to students in Nutrition and Dietetics.

My research higher degree area of interest continues a long-term passion in helping women access and act on the best evidence in pregnancy nutrition and its effects on mother-baby outcomes.


Keywords

  • diet
  • food
  • nutrition
  • pregnancy

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
17/10/2000 -  Conjoint Lecturer Nutrition and Dietetics Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
17/11/2003 - 9/05/2014 Director Nutrition and Dietetics Acute Health Services Greater Newcastle Sector Hunter New England Local Health District NSW Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Watterson CA, Miller M, Ferguson M, Isenring E, Bauer J, Silvester C, et al., 'Beware: Screening is not assessment when it comes to malnutrition', Nutrition & Dietetics, 67 122-123 (2010) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-0080.2010.01436.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2009 Watterson C, Fraser A, Banks M, Isenring E, Miller M, Silvester C, et al., 'Evidence based practice guidelines for the nutritional management of malnutrition in adult patients across the continuum of care', Nutrition and Dietetics, 66 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-0080.2009.01383.x
Citations Scopus - 182
2008 Miller MD, Loh WN, Watterson C, Fraser A, Nowson C, 'Nutrition screening in long-term care facilities: An evaluation of the methodological quality of available instruments', CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources, 3 (2008)

A variety of nutrition screening instruments have been developed and implemented for identifying the risk of undernutrition among community and hospitalized older adults. Despite ... [more]

A variety of nutrition screening instruments have been developed and implemented for identifying the risk of undernutrition among community and hospitalized older adults. Despite the high prevalence of undernutrition amongst older adults in long-term care, few screening instruments have been developed or evaluated in this setting. This review aims to evaluate the validity, reproducibility and feasibility of nutrition screening instruments developed for use, or described as being used, with older adults in long-term care. Ten publications encompassing nine independent nutrition screening tools were identified using electronic databases and manual searches of reference lists. The Mini Nutritional Assessment - Short Form (MNA-SF) was the most widely evaluated nutrition screening instrument and met the requirements for a valid instrument (sensitivity and specificity >0.9) for use in the long-term care setting. Modified versions of the MNA for use in China and South Africa also demonstrated acceptable levels of sensitivity and specificity. Other nutrition screening instruments were found to have variable levels of sensitivity and specificity and while some demonstrated levels consistent with the MNA-SF, only two were evaluated across more than one study population, Body Mass Index (BMI) +weight loss and BMI+albumin. These same instruments reported the highest levels of inter-rater and test-retest reproducibility, although this was only tested in one other instrument (Chinese Nutrition Screen - modified MNA). In conclusion, it is evident from this review that further work in this area is needed. Based on validity, reproducibility and feasibility it appears that BMI+weight loss is the most suitable nutrition screening instrument for use in the long-term care setting at this time. MNA-SF is promising; however, there is currently no data for inter-rater or test-retest reproducibility in the long-term care setting. © CAB International 2008.

DOI 10.1079/PAVSNNR20083017
Citations Scopus - 2
1976 BOETTCHER B, NANRA RS, ROBERTS TK, MALLAN M, WATTERSON CA, 'SPECIFICITY AND POSSIBLE ORIGIN OF ANTI-N ANTIBODIES DEVELOPED BY PATIENTS UNDERGOING CHRONIC-HEMODIALYSIS', VOX SANGUINIS, 31 408-415 (1976)
DOI 10.1111/j.1423-0410.1976.tb04455.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Tim Roberts
1975 BOETTCHER B, HAY J, WATTERSON CA, BASHIR H, MACQUEEN JM, HARDY G, 'ASSOCIATION BETWEEN AN HL-A ANTIGEN AND AUSTRALIA-ANTIGEN IN AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINES', JOURNAL OF IMMUNOGENETICS, 2 151-161 (1975)
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 17
Show 2 more journal articles
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Research Projects

Practice-based Evidence in Nutrition (PEN) Knowledge Pathways 2016 - 2017

PEN is the web based "Global Resource for Nutrition Practice".  I participated as an author/ reviewer in an international collaboration of dietitians to review of best evidence for the following questions:  

Is modifying the organisation of nutrition care in hospitals (e.g. to include nutrition protocols, nutrition care teams) recommended for the prevention and treatment of malnutrition in adults?  and

Should adults with malnutrition be recommended nutrition intervention in hospitals?

The evidence quality and recommendations were made using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology.


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Ms Cheryl Watterson

Contact Details

Email cheryl.watterson@uon.edu.au
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