Dr Bhabananda Biswas

Dr Bhabananda Biswas

Research Fellow

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (Environmental Engineering)

Career Summary

Biography

  • I have 9 years of total interdisciplinary experience with 3 years in PhD research, 0.5 year in teaching and 3.5 years in postdoctoral research at university,
  • From 2017, I hold a PhD in the area of environmental science and engineering. More specifically, I have been trained on the clay-microbe synergy for the remediation of contaminants in soil and wastewater,
  • I am experienced with mobility education & research in various countries including Khulna University (Bangladesh), Ghent University (Belgium, Masters by research), Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology (Germany, Masters research thesis), University of Oviedo (Spain, Masters by research) and the University of South Australia (Australia, PhD by publications),
  • I hold several prestigious awards and recognitions relative to the career opportunity; among them, South Australian Governor Award for Research Excellence, Top ten fresh science of South Australia in 2017, Research Grant by Clay Minerals Society, USA, Profile spotlight in the magazine Elements, The best oral presenter in top clay mineral conference, and Erasmus Mundus Fellowship (European Union) are achievement highlights.
  • I have a wide range of skills in soil and wastewater remediation using functionalised materials and microbes aka material-microbe interaction, including clays, nanoclays, biochar, microbial inocula,
  • I have expertise in material synthesis and characterisation including co-precipitation/hydrothermal synthesis of nanomaterials, understanding, operation and analysis of Transmission/Scanning Electron Microscopy (TEM/SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).
  • My research skills also cover a partial area of environmental biotechnology where molecular technology [DNA extraction-profiling-analysis with biostatistics] is used to understand microbial profile in soil and water.
  • My current research interest/responsibility with (i) developing cost-effective natural composite nanomaterials for various environmental applications, (ii) understanding chemical pollution in environment, (iii) microbial health in soil and water, (iv) supervising HDR students. 
  • I love talking science in public, science-graphic art as well as promoting the Early Career Researcher Forum.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of South Australia

Keywords

  • Biocompatible materials
  • Bioremediation
  • Clays, Nanoclays
  • ECR motivator
  • Functional materials
  • Healthy environment
  • Public speaker

Languages

  • Bengali (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
401605 Functional materials 50
410303 Bioremediation 15
410599 Pollution and contamination not elsewhere classified 35

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
3/10/2017 - 18/2/2021 Research Associate The University of South Australia
Future Industries Institute
Australia
10/6/2009 - 21/9/2009 Lecturer Jashore University of Science and Technology
Bangladesh

Awards

Award

Year Award
2019 ECR Development Scheme Award
Future Industries Institute (FII)
2017 Clay Minerals Society Travel Grant Award
The Clay Minerals Society
2017 American Society for Microbiology Travel Awards-postgraduate
American Society for Microbiology
2015 The best oral presentation
Euroclay2015
2015 The student travel grant
The Clay Minerals Society

Recipient

Year Award
2016 Mineralogical Society Bursary
Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland

Recognition

Year Award
2017 Top Ten Fresh Scientist - South Australia
Science in Public
2016 Research spotlight in Elements magazine
Elements, an international magazine of mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry

Research Award

Year Award
2015 The Governor award for International Students [Academic Excellence, Postgraduate Research]
StudyAdelaide Governor of South Australia

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2018 ECR development program (10 sessions)
This program, offered to selective Early Career Researcher (ECRs) comprises extensive training and lecture in various aspects of ECR development. The program duration was 1 year for 10 sessions which was equivalent to full day per session.

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2019 Breaking the wall of soil contamination

Patents

Number Title Patent Family Registered Approved
2020904343 Modified clays

Provisional 24/11/2020

Manuscript Reviews

Year Title Publication Type Publisher Description
2100 Check list in my Publons profile Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal (HERDC) https://publons.com/researcher/1351849/dr-bhabananda-biswas/ <a href="https://publons.com/researcher/1351849/dr-bhabananda-biswas/" target="_blank"></a><a href="https://publons.com/researcher/1351849/dr-bhabananda-biswas/" target="_blank">List of journals with my peer-review contributions.</a>

Prestigious works / other achievements

Year Commenced Year Finished Prestigious work / other achievement Role
2019 2021 Chair: Future Industries Institute-ECR group Networking and advocacy Chair
2019 2020 Guest Co-Editor: Special Issue Special Issue: Use of modified clays in remediating environmental pollutants. Editor
2019 2019 Co-convener: Session: clay and the environmental remediation, Euroclay2019 Session: clay and the environmental remediation, Euroclay, Paris, 2019 Chair
2016 2016 Session chair: RACI R&D topics conference RACI R&D topics conference, Sydney 2016 Chair

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
000 Aquatic ecology, Environmental pollution, Marine bioresources
Jashore University of Science and Technology
Lecturer 1/6/2009 - 18/9/2009
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Biswas B, Nirola R, Biswas JK, Pereg L, Willett IR, Naidu R, 'Environmental Microbial Health Under Changing Climates: State, Implication and Initiatives for High-Performance Soils', Sustainable Agriculture Reviews, Springer International Publishing 1-32 (2019)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-030-26265-5_1
2017 Sarkar S, Sarkar B, Basak BB, Mandal S, Biswas B, Srivastava P, 'Soil mineralogical perspective on immobilization/mobilization of heavy metals', Adaptive Soil Management: From Theory to Practices 89-102 (2017)

Knowledge on the fate and transport of heavy metals is essential for predicting the environmental impact of metal contamination on agricultural soils. This chapter presents an ove... [more]

Knowledge on the fate and transport of heavy metals is essential for predicting the environmental impact of metal contamination on agricultural soils. This chapter presents an overview of various factors that are involved in controlling the retention and mobility of heavy metals in soils with a special reference to soil mineralogy. The bioavailability of most elements, in particular heavy metals, in soils is governed by adsorption-desorption, complexation, precipitation and ionexchange processes. The most important surfaces involved in metal adsorption in soils are active inorganic colloids such as clay minerals, oxides and hydroxides of metals, metal carbonates and phosphates and organic colloids. In addition to soil mineralogy, other important parameters controlling heavy metal retention and their distribution are soil texture, structure, pH, redox condition, cation and anion concentration, ionic strength, organic matter, microbial and root activity and climatic conditions. However, the ultimate fate of elements depends on a combination of several factors that are working together in the soil system. Finally, several remediation strategies have also been highlighted based on the fundamental principles of metal immobilization on mineral containing soil amendments.

DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-3638-5_4
Citations Scopus - 5

Journal article (32 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Deb AK, Biswas B, Goswami N, Hilder EF, Naidu R, Rahman MM, 'Synthesis of environmentally benign ultra-small copper nanoclusters-halloysite composites and their catalytic performance on contrasting azo dyes', Applied Surface Science, 546 (2021) [C1]

Supported metal nanoclusters (NCs) are an ideal catalytic system from their ultra-small size (&lt;3 nm), reactivity and confinement on support materials. Whether synthesis of such... [more]

Supported metal nanoclusters (NCs) are an ideal catalytic system from their ultra-small size (<3 nm), reactivity and confinement on support materials. Whether synthesis of such composite is feasible using copper (Cu) as catalyst on nontoxic and inexpensive support material but without using any toxic reducing agent is yet to be explored. Here, synthesis of CuNCs using only biocompatible glutathione and localised them on halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) would be a sustainable catalyst composite. Following hydrothermal reaction, composites CuNCs@HNT and CuNCs@HNT-PS were synthesised by one-step and post-synthesis methods, respectively. State-of-the-art tools, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed NCs formation, chemical states, and confinement and stability as composite, while catalysis reaction was monitored by spectrophotometer. Both composites exhibited faster catalytic performance than did bare NCs for the degradation of contrasting model azo dyes, methylene blue (MB) and methyl orange (MO). CuNCs, CuNCs@HNT and CuNCs@HNT-PS required only 93 ± 1.0, 17.5 ± 2.5 and 27 ± 2.5 s, respectively for 100% degradation of MB whereas >90% degradation of MO occurred by 120 ± 5.21, 75 ± 3.15 and 90 ± 3.61 min, respectively. Composites showed excellent catalytic reusability and environmental nontoxicity. Therefore, as effective and safe catalysts, they can shed light on exploring further usage in the environment and industrial set-ups.

DOI 10.1016/j.apsusc.2021.149122
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Ravi Naidu
2021 Khodabakhshloo N, Biswas B, Moore F, Du J, Naidu R, 'Organically functionalized bentonite for the removal of perfluorooctane sulfonate, phenanthrene and copper mixtures from wastewater', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 200 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2020.105883
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Jianhua Du
2021 Naidu R, Biswas B, Willett IR, Cribb J, Kumar Singh B, Paul Nathanail C, et al., 'Chemical pollution: A growing peril and potential catastrophic risk to humanity', Environment International, 156 (2021) [C1]

Anthropogenic chemical pollution has the potential to pose one of the largest environmental threats to humanity, but global understanding of the issue remains fragmented. This art... [more]

Anthropogenic chemical pollution has the potential to pose one of the largest environmental threats to humanity, but global understanding of the issue remains fragmented. This article presents a comprehensive perspective of the threat of chemical pollution to humanity, emphasising male fertility, cognitive health and food security. There are serious gaps in our understanding of the scale of the threat and the risks posed by the dispersal, mixture and recombination of chemicals in the wider environment. Although some pollution control measures exist they are often not being adopted at the rate needed to avoid chronic and acute effects on human health now and in coming decades. There is an urgent need for enhanced global awareness and scientific scrutiny of the overall scale of risk posed by chemical usage, dispersal and disposal.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2021.106616
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, John Aitken
2021 Deb AK, Biswas B, Naidu R, Rahman MM, 'Mechanistic insights of hexavalent chromium remediation by halloysite-supported copper nanoclusters.', J Hazard Mater, 421 126812 (2021)
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2021.126812
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Mahmud Rahman
2021 Uz-Zaman KA, Biswas B, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'Smectite-supported chain of iron nanoparticle beads for efficient clean-up of arsenate contaminated water', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 407 (2021) [C1]

Prolonged exposure to inorganic arsenic (As) via drinking water is a major concern as it poses significant human health risks. Removal of As is crucial but requires effective and ... [more]

Prolonged exposure to inorganic arsenic (As) via drinking water is a major concern as it poses significant human health risks. Removal of As is crucial but requires effective and environment-friendly clean-up technology to avoid any additional risk to the environment. In this study, we developed Australian smectite (smec)-supported nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) composite for arsenate i.e., As(V) sorption. We used a range of tools, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and energy dispersion X-ray (EDS) spectroscopy to characterise the material. SEM and TEM images and elemental mapping of the composite reflect that the smectite layer was surrounded by a chain of iron nanobeads evenly distributed on clay particles, which is quite exceptional among currently available nZVIs. The maximum As(V) sorption capacity of this composite was 23.12 mg/g in the ambient conditions. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we unveiled chemical states of As and Fe before and after the sorption process. Additionally, the release of iron nanoparticles from the composite at various pHs (3-10) were found negligible, which demonstrates the effectiveness of smec-nZVI to remove As(V) from contaminated water without posing any secondary pollutant.

DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.124396
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Ravi Naidu
2020 Naidu R, Nadebaum P, Fang C, Cousins I, Pennell K, Conder J, et al., 'Per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS): Current status and research needs', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 19 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2020.100915
Citations Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Anthony Umeh, Luchun Duan, Megh Mallavarapu, Dawit Bekele, Sreenivasulu Chadalavada, Yanju Liu, Cheng Fang, Ravi Naidu, Fangjie Qi
2020 Biswas B, Juhasz AL, Mahmudur Rahman M, Naidu R, 'Modified clays alter diversity and respiration profile of microorganisms in long-term hydrocarbon and metal co-contaminated soil', Microbial Biotechnology, 13 522-534 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1751-7915.13510
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Ravi Naidu
2020 Biswas B, Labille J, Prelot B, 'Clays and modified clays in remediating environmental pollutants', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 27 38381-38383 (2020)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-020-09828-4
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Biswas B, Warr LN, Hilder EF, Goswami N, Rahman MM, Churchman JG, et al., 'Biocompatible functionalisation of nanoclays for improved environmental remediation.', Chemical Society Reviews, 48 3740-3770 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c8cs01019f
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Mahmud Rahman
2019 Goswami N, Biswas B, Naidu R, Vasilev K, 'Spatially Localized Synthesis of Metal Nanoclusters on Clay Nanotubes and Their Catalytic Performance', ACS SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY & ENGINEERING, 7 18350-18358 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acssuschemeng.9b03887
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2019 España VAA, Sarkar B, Biswas B, Rusmin R, Naidu R, 'Environmental applications of thermally modified and acid activated clay minerals: Current status of the art', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 13 383-397 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.11.005
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2019 Goswami N, Bright R, Visalakshan RM, Biswas B, Zilm P, Vasilev K, 'Core-in-cage structure regulated properties of ultra-small gold nanoparticles', NANOSCALE ADVANCES, 1 2356-2364 (2019)
DOI 10.1039/c9na00211a
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2018 Biswas JK, Banerjee A, Rai M, Naidu R, Biswas B, Vithanage M, et al., 'Potential application of selected metal resistant phosphate solubilizing bacteria isolated from the gut of earthworm (Metaphire posthuma) in plant growth promotion', Geoderma, 330 117-124 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2018.05.034
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2018 Wijayawardena MAA, Biswas B, Qi F, Biswas JK, Khan MAI, Naidu R, 'The Fate of Chemical Pollutants with Soil Properties and Processes in the Climate Change Paradigm- a review', Soil Systems, 2 51-71 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/soilsystems2030051
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Fangjie Qi, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Ravi Naidu
2018 Khan MAI, Biswas B, Smith E, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Toxicity assessment of fresh and weathered petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soil- a review.', Chemosphere, 212 755-767 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.08.094
Citations Scopus - 76Web of Science - 61
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2018 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Faustorilla MV, Naidu R, 'Effect of surface-tailored biocompatible organoclay on the bioavailability and mineralization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in long-term contaminated soil', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 10 152-161 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2018.01.013
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2018 Khan MAI, Biswas B, Smith E, Mahmud SA, Hasan NA, Khan MAW, et al., 'Microbial diversity changes with rhizosphere and hydrocarbons in contrasting soils.', Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 156 434-442 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2018.03.006
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2018 Nirola R, Biswas B, Megharaj M, Subramanian A, Thavamani P, Aryal R, Saint C, 'Assessment of chromium hyper-accumulative behaviour using biochemical analytical techniques of greenhouse cultivated Sonchus asper on tannery waste dump site soils', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 25 26992-26999 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-018-2740-5
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Naidu R, 'Bacterial mineralization of phenanthrene on thermally activated palygorskite: A C-14 radiotracer study', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 579 709-717 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.037
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Biswas B, Chakraborty A, Sarkar B, Naidu R, 'Structural changes in smectite due to interaction with a biosurfactant-producing bacterium Pseudoxanthomonas kaohsiungensis', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 136 51-57 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2016.11.008
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Rusmin R, Naidu R, 'Mild acid and alkali treated clay minerals enhance bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in long-term contaminated soil: A C-14-tracer study', ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION, 223 255-265 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.01.022
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Singh M, Sarkar B, Biswas B, Bolan NS, Churchman GJ, 'Relationship between soil clay mineralogy and carbon protection capacity as influenced by temperature and moisture', SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY, 109 95-106 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.soilbio.2017.02.003
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2017 Biswas B, Sarkar B, McClure S, Naidu R, 'Modified osmium tracer technique enables precise microscopic delineation of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in clay aggregates', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 7 12-20 (2017) [C1]

Clay minerals can support bacterial proliferation, induce the formation of clay¿bacterial aggregates, and finally a clay-based biofilm. However, how these abiotic and biotic entit... [more]

Clay minerals can support bacterial proliferation, induce the formation of clay¿bacterial aggregates, and finally a clay-based biofilm. However, how these abiotic and biotic entities interact in a microhabitat is not fully understood. Visualization of the clay¿bacterial micro-aggregate under scanning electron microscope (SEM) and profiling the associated elemental signature through energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) can potentially unravel the mechanisms of a complex clay¿bacterial interaction. Osmium (Os) was used previously to enhance the visualization of microbial substances, but the delineation of bacterial cells from clay particles in a micro-aggregate was not tried before. In this study, bacterial cells in a clay¿bacterial aggregate (Burkholderia sartisoli with montmorillonite and kaolinite) were specifically stained with osmium (Os) which served as the EDS tracer of the biotic component of the interaction. Simultaneously silicon (Si) provided the signature of the clay minerals. X-ray elemental profiling (line and field mapping) successfully delineated the individual components of the clay¿bacterial aggregate. Thus, this study presented a simple Os-based SEM-EDS technique which could facilitate the microanalysis of bacterial microhabitat within a complex environmental substrate.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.11.002
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2016 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Mandal A, Naidu R, 'Specific adsorption of cadmium on surface-engineered biocompatible organoclay under metal-phenanthrene mixed-contamination', WATER RESEARCH, 104 119-127 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2016.08.009
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2016 Rusmin R, Sarkar B, Biswas B, Churchman J, Liu Y, Naidu R, 'Structural, electrokinetic and surface properties of activated palygorskite for environmental application', Applied Clay Science, 134 95-102 (2016) [C1]

Unlike smectite, the surface characteristics of palygorskite remain underexplored for its potential application in environmental remediation. In this study, palygorskite from West... [more]

Unlike smectite, the surface characteristics of palygorskite remain underexplored for its potential application in environmental remediation. In this study, palygorskite from Western Australia was activated through thermal (300 °C for 4 h), acid (4 M HCl for 2 h at 70 °C) and acid-thermal (acid treatment followed by heating at 300 °C for 4 h) treatments, and the structural and physico-chemical characteristics were examined against the raw clay mineral. The influence of activation was systematically investigated using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption measurements and solid state 27Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy. The XRD patterns indicated preservation of the crystalline structure of palygorskite following all the treatments. These findings were supported by the Al (IV) and Al (VI) coordination peaks (chemical shift ~ 55 and 2.9 ppm, respectively) which were unaltered in the 27Al MAS NMR spectra of the samples. The acid-thermal activated palygorskite exhibited the highest specific surface area (152.7 m2 g- 1) and pore volume (0.2137 cm3 g- 1) which respectively were 3-fold and 69% greater than the raw palygorskite. The potentiometric titration analyses highlighted the possible role of Al derivatives towards development of the surface charge of the activated palygorskites. Electrokinetic studies described the stability of the activated products (zeta potential values ranging from - 5 mV to - 32 mV) at different electrolyte (NaNO3) concentrations. Combined acid-thermal activated palygorskite displayed a stronger specific adsorption of multivalent cations, and held a direct relevance to environmental remediation. Findings of this study will assist in the development of palygorskite-based adsorbents for heavy metal contaminants remediation.

DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2016.07.012
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Naidu R, 'Influence of thermally modified palygorskite on the viability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria', Applied Clay Science, 134 153-160 (2016) [C1]

Thermal activation of palygorskite is considered as a simple and cost-effective method for modifying its structural and surface properties, which can be congenial for the adsorpti... [more]

Thermal activation of palygorskite is considered as a simple and cost-effective method for modifying its structural and surface properties, which can be congenial for the adsorptive removal of environmental contaminants. However, for a more efficient removal of organic contaminants like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), clay-microbial synergy combining both adsorption and biodegradation is an emerging strategy. In this study, we investigated the compatibility of heat treated palygorskite products (100¿900 °C) with a PAH-degrading soil bacterium Burkholderia sartisoli. The mineralogical and physico-chemical properties were characterised in detail, and the bacterial adhesion to the substrate and their growth were observed in relation to these properties. The major variation in the cation exchange capacity (CEC), surface area, water content and the elemental dissolution in the aqueous medium occurred in the palygorskite products heated at extreme temperature (700¿900 °C). These changes significantly influenced the bacterial growth and attachment. The maximum viability was imparted by the palygorskite product obtained at 400 °C. Dissolution of Al from products heated above 500 °C also posed inhibitory effect on bacterial growth in the aqueous media. This study provided valuable information about the mechanisms of bacterial viability as affected by modified clay minerals, which is important for developing a novel clay-modulated-bioremediation technology.

DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2016.07.003
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2016 Singh M, Sarkar B, Biswas B, Churchman J, Bolan NS, 'Adsorption-desorption behavior of dissolved organic carbon by soil clay fractions of varying mineralogy', Geoderma, 280 47-56 (2016) [C1]

Soil clay minerals significantly influence the accumulation and stabilization of organic carbon (OC). However, the effect of interactions among phyllosilicate clay minerals, nativ... [more]

Soil clay minerals significantly influence the accumulation and stabilization of organic carbon (OC). However, the effect of interactions among phyllosilicate clay minerals, native OC and sesquioxides (Fe/Al oxides) on the adsorption-desorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) under different background electrolyte types and concentration is poorly understood. A set of batch adsorption-desorption experiments were conducted using pedogenic clays extracted from soils dominated by kaolinite-illite (Kaol-Ill), smectite (Smec) and allophane (Allo). The clay samples were sequentially treated to remove native OC and sesquioxides, and tested for adsorption-desorption of DOC under various solution conditions. All the experiments were conducted at pH 7 using water extractable fraction of OC from wheat residues. DOC adsorption increased with increasing background electrolyte concentration, and the presence of Ca2+ significantly enhanced the uptake in comparison to Na+ due to a possible cationic bridging effect. Under all electrolyte conditions, the maximum DOC adsorption capacity (Qmax) (mg g-1) of the soil clay fractions (SCF) maintained the order: Allo > Smec > Kaol-Ill. A similar order was also observed when the adsorption capacities were normalized to the specific surface area (SSA) of the SCFs (mg m-2). DOC adsorption showed a positive relationship with SSA, and sesquioxides and allophanic minerals provided the largest contributions to the SSA in the SCF. Removal of sesquioxides from the SCF resulted in a decrease in SSA and thus DOC adsorption, whereas removal of native OC increased the SSA and subsequent DOC adsorption. Because this study used pedogenic SCFs which represented soils formed in different environments instead of processed clays from geological deposits, it provided realistic information about the interaction of DOC with SCF in relation to their native OC and sesquioxide contents. It also revealed the importance of Ca2+ in enhancing the carbon adsorption capacities of these SCFs.

DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2016.06.005
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Mandal A, Biswas B, Sarkar B, Patra AK, Naidu R, 'Surface tailored organobentonite enhances bacterial proliferation and phenanthrene biodegradation under cadmium co-contamination', Science of the Total Environment, 550 611-618 (2016) [C1]

Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated mi... [more]

Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated microbial degradation provides a novel insight in addressing this issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and phenanthrene degradation performance of Mycobacterium gilvum VF1 in the presence of a palmitic acid (PA)-grafted Arquad® 2HT-75-based organobentonite in cadmium (Cd)-phenanthrene co-contaminated water. The PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) adsorbed a slightly greater quantity of Cd than bentonite at up to 30 mg L-1 metal concentration, but its highly negative surface charge imparted by carboxylic groups indicated the potential of being a significantly superior adsorbent of Cd at higher metal concentrations. In systems co-contained with Cd (5 and 10 mg L-1), the Arquad® 2HT-75-modified bentonite (AB) and PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) resulted in a significantly higher (72-78%) degradation of phenanthrene than bentonite (62%) by the bacterium. The growth and proliferation of bacteria were supported by ABP which not only eliminated Cd toxicity through adsorption but also created a congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. The macromolecules produced during ABP-bacteria interaction could form a stable clay-bacterial cluster by overcoming the electrostatic repulsion among individual components. Findings of this study provide new insights for designing clay modulated PAH bioremediation technologies in mixed-contaminated water and soil.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.01.164
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2016 Sarkar B, Choi HL, Zhu K, Mandal A, Biswas B, Suresh A, 'Monitoring of soil biochemical quality parameters under greenhouse spinach cultivation through animal waste recycling', CHEMISTRY AND ECOLOGY, 32 407-418 (2016)
DOI 10.1080/02757540.2016.1150457
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2015 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Rusmin R, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of PAHs and VOCs: Advances in clay mineral-microbial interaction', Environment International, 85 168-181 (2015) [C1]

Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced biore... [more]

Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced bioremediation implies that biotic agents are more efficient in degrading the contaminants completely. Bioremediation by microbial degradation is often employed and to make this process efficient, natural and cost-effective materials can serve as supportive matrices. Clay/modified clay minerals are effective adsorbents of PAHs/VOCs, and readily available substrate and habitat for microorganisms in the natural soil and sediment. However, the mechanism underpinning clay-mediated biodegradation of organic compounds is often unclear, and this requires critical investigation. This review describes the role of clay/modified clay minerals in hydrocarbon bioremediation through interaction with microbial agents in specific scenarios. The vision is on a faster, more efficient and cost-effective bioremediation technique using clay-based products. This review also proposes future research directions in the field of clay modulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbons.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2015.09.017
Citations Scopus - 77Web of Science - 74
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2015 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Mandal A, Naidu R, 'Heavy metal-immobilizing organoclay facilitates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in mixed-contaminated soil', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 298 129-137 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.05.009
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 43
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2013 Roy D, Biswas B, Islam HMR, Ahmed MS, Rasheduzzaman M, Sarower MG, 'Rapid identification of enterovirulent Escherichia coli strains using polymerase chain reaction from shrimp farms', Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences, 16 1260-1269 (2013)

Although, Escherichia coli is widely distributed in the environment, only a small percentage is pathogenic to humans. The most commonly encountered are those belonging to the Ente... [more]

Although, Escherichia coli is widely distributed in the environment, only a small percentage is pathogenic to humans. The most commonly encountered are those belonging to the Enterotoxigenic (ETEC), Enteroinvasive (EIEC), Enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC) and Enteropathogenic (EPEC) subtypes. Aquaculture premises specially shrimp farm in tropical and subtropical countries largely susceptive to different types of E. coli strains. With the PCR system, an attempt was taken to identify the virulent E. coli in a rapid basis from water, sediment and live shrimp from different shrimp farms established in the shrimp production areas of southwest part of Bangladesh. The target genes chosen for this investigation included the PhoA, a housekeeping gene in all E. coli and thereafter the virulent genes LT1, LT1 and ST1 of ETEC, the VT of EHEC and EAE of EPEC, which were amplified with the primers designed for their specific genes. The restriction enzyme conformation and the gel electrophoresis bands showed the presence of E. coli, among which ETEC and EPEC groups were present in the environmental and biological samples of shrimp farms, brings up into the human health concern. The sanitation conditions amid farm were also investigated to find the link of pathogenic E. coli, which came into the result of less infection if the farm maintains improved sanitation. This study has clearly urged the exigency of periodical quick check of virulent E. coli with the versatile PCR system from brood management to post-harvest handling of shrimp. © 2013 Asian Network for Scientific Information.

DOI 10.3923/pjbs.2013.1260.1269
Citations Scopus - 3
Show 29 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Naidu R, Biswas B, Umeh A, 'PFAS from an Australian Perspective', The University Consortium for Field-Focused Groundwater Research, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada (2021)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Juhasz A, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'Microbe-Clay Mineral Synergy for Environmental Remediation: Microscopic, Metabolic and Metagenomic Approaches', New Orleans, USA (2017)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Mahmud Rahman

Patent (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Biswas B, Naidu R, Clay sorbents for phosphate removal (2021)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2020 Biswas B, Naidu R, Modified clay sorbents (2020)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
khodabakhshloo N, Biswas B, Moore F, Du J, Wijayawardena A, Arabzadeh M, 'Surface dispersal, emission source and human health risk assessment of heavy metal(loid)s in an active gas field, Southern Iran', Research Square Platform LLC [O1]
DOI 10.21203/rs.3.rs-442451/v1

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Naidu R, Biswas B, Chen Z-S, Jit J, Rahman MM, Duan L, et al., 'Status of Soil Pollution in Asia and the Pacific', FAO and UNEP (2021)
DOI 10.4060/cb4894en
Co-authors Ayanka Wijayawardena, Ravi Naidu, Mahmud Rahman, Luchun Duan
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $440,200

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $436,000

Modified clays for environmental remediation$436,000

Funding body: Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE)

Funding body Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE)
Project Team

Bhabananda Biswas, Emily Hilder, Ravi Naidu

Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N

20161 grants / $4,200

The Student Research Grant$4,200

Funding body: The Clay Minerals Society

Funding body The Clay Minerals Society
Scheme The Student Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Study of behavior of selected pesticides in agricultural soil and effect of modified clay and calcite in retention of them Soil Science, Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Modified clays and zeolite for remediating emerging contaminants from wastewater Environmental Engineering, shiraz university Consultant Supervisor
2017 PhD Implication of Nanotechnology for Water Treatment and Purification PhD (Environment Remediation), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Multifunctional and Biocompatible Clay Nanocomposites for the Remediation of Industrial Wastewater Materials Engineering, Global Centre for Environmental Remediation Co-Supervisor
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Research Projects

Modified clays for environmental remediation 2017 - 2020

Several modified clays have been developed, fully characterised and tested for their applications as adsorbents and soil supplements for the immobilisation of PFOS/PFOA and heavy metals. Three visiting PhD students were also supported under this project at Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia. They were: 1 year project undertaking research on Halloysite-supported nanoclusters for degradation of organic and adsorption of heavy metals; another student completed 6 months completed bentonite-supported iron nanoparticles for groundwater remediation, and pesticide behaviour in agriculture soil amended with modified bentonite and calcite. Publication/patent outputs: one patent of two materials has been filed; six peer-reviewed articles have been published.

Collaborators

Name Organisation
Emily Hilder The University of South Australia
Professor Ravi Naidu University of Newcastle

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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 36
India 10
United States 7
Bangladesh 5
United Kingdom 4
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Dr Bhabananda Biswas

Position

Research Fellow
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Focus area

Environmental Engineering

Contact Details

Email bhabananda.biswas@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4985 4501
Links Twitter
Research Networks

Office

Building Advanced Technology Centre
Location ATC building, Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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