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Dr Benjamin Dascombe

Conjoint Associate Professor

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Applied Sciences)

Career Summary

Biography

Ben Dascombe is an Associate Professor in sports physiology at the Central Coast campus of the University of Newcastle. He currently is the the program convener for the Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Science and Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Science (Honours).

He completed his PhD in 2007 from Central Queensland University, before moving to the Western Australia Institute of Sport to work as a sports physiologist until 2009.

In 2009, Ben moved to the University of Newcastle as a lecturer in the newly established exercise and sports science program. His teaching interests lie predominately within exercise physiology, strength and conditioning and professional practice, but he has taught across many other disciplines. 

In 2011, Ben established the Applied Sports Science and Exercise Testing laboratory that consists of over a dozen student researchers and acts to focus on research that influences high performance practices. Ben has published over 50 published manuscripts or book chapters, 1 textbook on practical skills for exercise science students as well as numerous conference proceedings. Such research domains include investigating novel training practices, environmental physiology, applied sports performance and amino acid metabolism in athletes.

In 2013, Ben was awarded the Faculty of Science and IT Vice Chancellors Award for Researcher of the Year for his work. In addition to this, he has been invited to peer review research for over 15 international scientific journals and many industry consultancies. In his current role, Ben works with the strength and conditioning staff of a number professional sporting clubs in providing them with sports science advice and implementing new practices. Ben is an accredited exercise scientist with Exercise and Sports Science Australia and has held various other professional qualifications. 

Collaborations
Ben consults with various research entities around the Central Coast and Hunter regions. He as also developed research collaborations with various state, national and international entities.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Central Queensland
  • Bachelor of Human Movement Science, University of Central Queensland
  • Bachelor of Human Movement Science (Honours), University of Central Queensland

Keywords

  • Applied science
  • Applied sports science
  • Exercise
  • Exercise physiology
  • Professional practice
  • Strength and conditioning

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/2012 - 1/12/2012 Sports Physiologist/Strength and Conditioning Coach Sports Authority of India
Hockey
India
1/07/2007 - 1/03/2009 Sports Physiologist West Australian Institute of Sport
Athlete Support
Australia
1/07/2006 - 1/07/2007 Lecturer Central Queensland University
School of Health and Human Performance
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Reaburn P, Dascombe BJ, Reed R, Jones A, Weyers J, Practical skills in sport and exercise science, Pearson Education, Essex, 414 (2011) [A2]

Chapter (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Dascombe BJ, Elsworthy N, Scott B, Sculley DV, Reaburn PRJ, 'Physiological changes affecting performance of masters athletes', Nutrition and performance in masters athletes, CRC PRess, Boca Raton, FL 17-45 (2015) [B1]
Co-authors Dean Sculley
2011 Reaburn PRJ, Dascombe BJ, Janse De Jonge XA, 'Body composition and gender differences in performance', Nutritional Assessment of Athletes, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL 121-150 (2011) [B1]
Co-authors X Jansedejonge
2006 Dascombe BJ, Reaburn P R, Coutts A J, 'Understanding oxygen kinetics', Sport Science and Sport Medicine Reviews Selected Topics, CQU Publishing, Rockhampton 1-16 (2006)

Journal article (88 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Dunstan RH, Sparkes DL, Dascombe BJ, Stevens CJ, Murphy GR, Macdonald MM, et al., 'Sex differences in amino acids lost via sweating could lead to differential susceptibilities to disturbances in nitrogen balance and collagen turnover.', Amino Acids, 49 1337-1345 (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s00726-017-2431-4
Co-authors Tim Roberts, Diane Sparkes, Hugh Dunstan
2017 Stevens CJ, Taylor L, Dascombe BJ, 'Cooling During Exercise: An Overlooked Strategy for Enhancing Endurance Performance in the Heat', Sports Medicine, 47 829-841 (2017)

© 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. It is well established that endurance performance is negatively affected by environmental heat stress due to a complex inte... [more]

© 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. It is well established that endurance performance is negatively affected by environmental heat stress due to a complex interaction of physical, physiological and psychological alterations. Numerous scientific investigations have attempted to improve performance in the heat with pre-cooling (cooling prior to an exercise test), and as such this has become a well-established ergogenic practice for endurance athletes. However, the use of mid-cooling (cooling during an exercise test) has received considerably less research attention in comparison, despite recent evidence to suggest that the advantage gained from mid-cooling may outweigh that of pre-cooling. A range of mid-cooling strategies are beneficial for endurance performance in the heat, including the ingestion of cold fluids and ice slurry, both with and without menthol, as well as cooling of the neck and face region via a cooling collar or water poured on the head and face. The combination of pre-cooling and mid-cooling has also been effective, but few comparisons exist between the timing and type of such interventions. Therefore, athletes should experiment with a range of suitable mid-cooling strategies for their event during mock competition scenarios, with the aim to determine their individual tolerable limits and performance benefits. Based on current evidence, the effect of mid-cooling on core temperature appears largely irrelevant to any subsequent performance improvements, while cardiovascular, skin temperature, central nervous system function and psychophysiological factors are likely involved. Research is lacking on elite athletes, and as such it is currently unclear how this population may benefit from mid-cooling.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-016-0625-7
2017 Delaney JA, Thornton HR, Burgess DJ, Dascombe BJ, Duthie GM, 'Duration-specific running intensities of Australian Football match-play', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 20 689-694 (2017)

© 2017 Sports Medicine Australia Objectives To establish the position and duration-specific running demands of Australian Football (AF) competition for the prescription and monit... [more]

© 2017 Sports Medicine Australia Objectives To establish the position and duration-specific running demands of Australian Football (AF) competition for the prescription and monitoring of specific training drills. Design An observational time-motion analysis was performed on 40 professional AF players during 30 games throughout the 2014¿15 competitive seasons. Methods Player movements were collected and peak values were calculated for moving averages of between 1¿10¿min in duration for relative distance (m¿min -1 ), high-speed relative distance (HS¿m¿min -1 ), average acceleration/deceleration (m¿s 2 ) and metabolic power (P met ). A mixed-model analysis was used to detect positional differences, and differences were described using a magnitude-based network. Results Relative distance was likely greater for midfielders (MID), and mobile forwards (MF) compared to tall backs (TB) across all moving average durations assessed, with MF peaking at 223¿±¿35¿m¿min -1 for a 1-min window. High-speed relative distance was at least likely to be greater for MF compared to all other positions, across all moving average durations (ES¿=¿0.27¿0.94). Acceleration/deceleration demands were similar across positions. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that the peak running intensities of AF are well above previously reported peak intensities when considering the distance-based running requirements of match-play. Whilst the acceleration-based metric was unable to detect large differences between positions, it is important to note their contribution to the overall competition demands. This study presents a useful framework for the prescription and monitoring of drills specific to AF competition requirements.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2016.11.009
2017 Novak AR, Bennett KJM, Fransen J, Dascombe BJ, 'A multidimensional approach to performance prediction in Olympic distance cross-country mountain bikers', Journal of Sports Sciences, 1-8 (2017)

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group This study adopted a multidimensional approach to performance prediction within Olympic distance cross-country moun... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group This study adopted a multidimensional approach to performance prediction within Olympic distance cross-country mountain biking (XCO-MTB). Twelve competitive XCO-MTB cyclists (VO 2 max 60.8¿±¿6.7¿ml¿·¿kg -1 ¿ ·¿min -1 ) completed an incremental cycling test, maximal hand grip strength test, cycling power profile (maximal efforts lasting 6¿600¿s), decision-making test and an individual XCO-MTB time-trial (34.25¿km). A hierarchical approach using multiple linear regression analyses was used to develop predictive models of performance across 10 circuit subsections and the total time-trial. The strongest model to predict overall time-trial performance achieved prediction accuracy of 127.1¿s across 6246.8¿±¿452.0¿s (adjusted R 2 ¿=¿0.92; P¿ < ¿0.01). This model included VO 2 max relative to total cycling mass, maximal mean power across 5 and 30¿s, peak left hand grip strength, and response time for correct decisions in the decision-making task. A range of factors contributed to the models for each individual subsection of the circuit with varying predictive strength (adjusted R 2 : 0.62¿0.97; P¿ < ¿0.05). The high prediction accuracy for the total time-trial supports that a multidimensional approach should be taken to develop XCO-MTB performance. Additionally, individual models for circuit subsections may help guide training practices relative to the specific trail characteristics of various XCO-MTB circuits.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2017.1280611
Co-authors Job Fransen
2017 Dunstan RH, Sparkes DL, Macdonald MM, De Jonge XJ, Dascombe BJ, Gottfries J, et al., 'Diverse characteristics of the urinary excretion of amino acids in humans and the use of amino acid supplementation to reduce fatigue and sub-health in adults.', Nutr J, 16 19 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12937-017-0240-y
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Diane Sparkes, Tim Roberts, X Jansedejonge, Hugh Dunstan
2017 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Sculley DV, Smith SM, Peiffer JJ, Dascombe BJ, 'Acute physiological and perceptual responses to high-load resistance exercise in hypoxia', Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, (2017)

© Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. This study assessed whether hypoxia during high-load resistance exercise could enhance the acute physiological... [more]

© Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. This study assessed whether hypoxia during high-load resistance exercise could enhance the acute physiological responses related to muscular development. Twelve trained men performed exercise in three conditions: normoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen [F I O 2 ] = 21%), moderate-level hypoxia (F I O 2 = 16%) and high-level hypoxia (F I O 2 = 13%). Exercise comprised high-load squats and deadlifts (5 × 5 using 80% of 1-repetition maximum with 180-s rest). Muscle oxygenation and activation were monitored during exercise. Metabolic stress was estimated via capillary blood sampling. Perceived fatigue and soreness were also quantified following exercise. While the hypoxic conditions appeared to affect muscle oxygenation, significant differences between conditions were only noted for maximal deoxyhaemoglobin in the deadlift (P = 0·009). Blood lactate concentration increased from 1·1 to 1·2 mmol l -1 at baseline to 9·5-9·8 mmol l -1 after squats and 10·4-10·5 mmol l -1 after deadlifts (P=0·001), although there were no between-condition differences. Perceived fatigue and muscle soreness were significantly elevated immediately and at 24 h following exercise, respectively, by similar magnitudes in all conditions (P=0·001). Muscle activation did not differ between conditions. While metabolic stress is thought to moderate muscle activation and subsequent muscular development during hypoxic resistance training, it is not augmented during traditional high-load exercise. This may be explained by the low number of repetitions performed and the long interset rest periods employed during this training. These findings suggest that high-load resistance training might not benefit from additional hypoxia as has been shown for low- and moderate-load training.

DOI 10.1111/cpf.12451
Co-authors Dean Sculley
2017 Stevens CJ, Bennett KJM, Novak AR, Kittel AB, Dascombe BJ, 'The Cycling Power Profile Characteristics Of National Level Junior Triathletes.', J Strength Cond Res, (2017)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001876
2017 Vickery W, Dascombe B, Duffield R, 'The Association Between Internal and External Measures of Training Load in Batsmen and Medium-Fast Bowlers During Net-Based Cricket Training.', Int J Sports Physiol Perform, 12 247-253 (2017)
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0770
2017 Thornton HR, Delaney JA, Duthie GM, Dascombe BJ, 'Effects of Pre-Season Training on the Sleep Characteristics of Professional Rugby League Players.', Int J Sports Physiol Perform, 1-23 (2017)
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2017-0119
2017 Novak AR, Bennett KJM, Fransen J, Dascombe BJ, 'Predictors of performance in a 4-h mountain-bike race', Journal of Sports Sciences, 1-7 (2017)

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group This study aimed to cross validate previously developed predictive models of mountain biking performance in a new c... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group This study aimed to cross validate previously developed predictive models of mountain biking performance in a new cohort of mountain bikers during a 4-h event (XC4H). Eight amateur XC4H cyclists completed a multidimensional assessment battery including a power profile assessment that consisted of maximal efforts between 6 and 600¿s, maximal hand grip strength assessments, a video-based decision-making test as well as a XC4H race. A multiple linear regression model was found to predict XC4H performance with good accuracy (R 2 ¿=¿0.99; P¿ < ¿0.01). This model consisted of (Formula presented.) relative to total cycling mass (body mass including competition clothing and bicycle mass), maximum power output sustained over 60¿s relative to total cycling mass, peak left hand grip strength and two-line decision-making score. Previous models for Olympic distance MTB performance demonstrated merit (R 2 ¿=¿0.93; P¿ > ¿0.05) although subtle changes improved the fit, significance and normal distribution of residuals within the model (R 2 ¿=¿0.99; P¿ < ¿0.01), highlighting differences between the disciplines. The high level of predictive accuracy of the new XC4H model further supports the use of a multidimensional approach in predicting MTB performance. The difference between the new, XC4H and previous Olympic MTB predictive models demonstrates subtle differences in physiological requirements and performance predictors between the two MTB disciplines.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2017.1313999
Co-authors Job Fransen
2017 Novak AR, Bennett KJM, Pluss MA, Fransen J, Watsford ML, Dascombe BJ, 'Power profiles of competitive and non-competitive mountain bikers.', J Strength Cond Res, (2017)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002003
Co-authors Job Fransen
2017 Stevens CJ, Kittel A, Sculley DV, Callister R, Taylor L, Dascombe BJ, 'Running performance in the heat is improved by similar magnitude with pre-exercise cold-water immersion and mid-exercise facial water spray', Journal of Sports Sciences, 35 798-805 (2017)

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This investigation compared the effects of external pre-cooling and mid-exercise cooling methods on running time t... [more]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This investigation compared the effects of external pre-cooling and mid-exercise cooling methods on running time trial performance and associated physiological responses. Nine trained male runners completed familiarisation and three randomised 5¿km running time trials on a non-motorised treadmill in the heat (33°C). The trials included pre-cooling by cold-water immersion (CWI), mid-exercise cooling by intermittent facial water spray (SPRAY), and a control of no cooling (CON). Temperature, cardiorespiratory, muscular activation, and perceptual responses were measured as well as blood concentrations of lactate and prolactin. Performance time was significantly faster with CWI (24.5¿±¿2.8¿min; P¿=¿0.01) and SPRAY (24.6¿±¿3.3¿min; P¿=¿0.01) compared to CON (25.2¿±¿3.2¿min). Both cooling strategies significantly (P¿ < ¿0.05) reduced forehead temperatures and thermal sensation, and increased muscle activation. Only pre-cooling significantly lowered rectal temperature both pre-exercise (by 0.5¿±¿0.3°C; P¿ < ¿0.01) and throughout exercise, and reduced sweat rate (P¿ < ¿0.05). Both cooling strategies improved performance by a similar magnitude, and are ergogenic for athletes. T he observed physiological changes suggest some involvement of central and psychophysiological mechanisms of performance improvement.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2016.1192294
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Robin Callister, Dean Sculley
2017 Tredrea M, Dascombe B, Sanctuary CE, Scanlan AT, 'The role of anthropometric, performance and psychological attributes in predicting selection into an elite development programme in older adolescent rugby league players', Journal of Sports Sciences, 35 1897-1903 (2017)

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study aimed to identify attributes that discriminate selected from non-selected players and predict selection... [more]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study aimed to identify attributes that discriminate selected from non-selected players and predict selection into a rugby league development programme in older adolescent players. Anthropometric, performance and psychological attributes were measured in under-16 (N¿=¿100) and under-18 (N¿=¿60) rugby league players trialling for selection into a development programme with a professional Australian club. Sprint times (P¿ < ¿0.001), predicted VO 2max (P¿=¿0.002) and push-ups 1 ¿ min (P¿=¿0.004) were superior in selected under-16 players, and sprint times (P¿=¿0.045), push-ups 1 ¿ min (P¿ < ¿0.001) and chin-ups 1 ¿ min (P¿=¿0.013) were superior in selected under-18 players. Further, 10-m sprint (ß¿=¿-7.706, standard error [SE]¿=¿2.412), VO 2max (ß¿=¿0.168, SE¿=¿0.052) and body mass (ß¿=¿0.071, SE¿=¿0.023) significantly predicted selection (R 2 ¿=¿0.339) in under-16 players, while push-ups 1 ¿ min (ß¿=¿0.564, SE¿=¿0.250), 10-m sprint (ß¿=¿-68.477, SE¿=¿28.107), body mass (ß¿=¿0.360, SE¿=¿0.155) and chronological age (ß¿=¿-3.577, SE¿=¿1.720) significantly predicted selection (R 2 ¿=¿0.894) in under-18 players. These findings emphasise the importance of performance attributes in junior rugby league and indicate talent identification test batteries should be age-specific in older adolescent players.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2016.1241418
2017 Scanlan AT, Fox JL, Borges NR, Dascombe BJ, Dalbo VJ, 'Cumulative Training Dose's Effects on Interrelationships Between Common Training-Load Models During Basketball Activity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS PHYSIOLOGY AND PERFORMANCE, 12 168-174 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0708
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nattai Borges
2017 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Sculley DV, Lockhart C, Dascombe BJ, 'Acute Physiological Responses to Moderate-Load Resistance Exercise in Hypoxia.', J Strength Cond Res, 31 1973-1981 (2017)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001649
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Dean Sculley
2016 Delaney JA, Duthie GM, Thornton HR, Scott TJ, Gay D, Dascombe BJ, 'Acceleration-Based Running Intensities of Professional Rugby League Match Play', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS PHYSIOLOGY AND PERFORMANCE, 11 802-809 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0424
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2016 Thornton HR, Delaney JA, Duthie GM, Scott BR, Chivers WJ, Sanctuary CE, Dascombe BJ, 'Predicting Self-Reported Illness for Professional Team-Sport Athletes.', International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 11 543-550 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0330
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors William Chivers
2016 Scott BR, Duthie GM, Thornton HR, Dascombe BJ, 'Training Monitoring for Resistance Exercise: Theory and Applications', Sports Medicine, 46 687-698 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Resistance exercise is difficult to quantify owing to its inherent complexity with numerous training variables contributing... [more]

© 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Resistance exercise is difficult to quantify owing to its inherent complexity with numerous training variables contributing to the training dose (type of exercise, load lifted, training volume, inter-set rest periods, and repetition velocity). In addition, the intensity of resistance training is often inadequately determined as the relative load lifted (% 1-repetition maximum), which does not account for the effects of inter-set recovery periods, repetition velocity, or the number of repetitions performed in each set at a given load. Methods to calculate the volume load associated with resistance training, as well as the perceived intensity of individual sets and entire training sessions have been shown to provide useful information regarding the actual training stimulus. In addition, questionnaires to subjectively assess how athletes are coping with the stressors of training and portable technologies to quantify performance variables such as concentric velocity may also be valuable. However, while several methods have been proposed to quantify resistance training, there is not yet a consensus regarding how these methods can be best implemented and integrated to complement each other. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to provide practical information for strength coaches to highlight effective methods to assess resistance training, and how they can be integrated into a comprehensive monito ring program.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-015-0454-0
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2016 Taylor L, Watkins SL, Marshall H, Dascombe BJ, Foster J, 'The impact of different environmental conditions on cognitive function: A focused review', Frontiers in Physiology, 6 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Taylor, Watkins, Marshall, Dascombe and Foster. Cognitive function defines performance in objective tasks that require conscious mental effort. Extreme environments, namel... [more]

© 2016 Taylor, Watkins, Marshall, Dascombe and Foster. Cognitive function defines performance in objective tasks that require conscious mental effort. Extreme environments, namely heat, hypoxia, and cold can all alter human cognitive function due to a variety of psychological and/or biological processes. The aims of this Focused Review were to discuss; (1) the current state of knowledge on the effects of heat, hypoxic and cold stress on cognitive function, (2) the potential mechanisms underpinning these alterations, and (3) plausible interventions that may maintain cognitive function upon exposure to each of these environmental stressors. The available evidence suggests that the effects of heat, hypoxia, and cold stress on cognitive function are both task and severity dependent. Complex tasks are particularly vulnerable to extreme heat stress, whereas both simple and complex task performance appear to be vulnerable at even at moderate altitudes. Cold stress also appears to negatively impact both simple and complex task performance, however, the research in this area is sparse in comparison to heat and hypoxia. In summary, this focused review provides updated knowledge regarding the effects of extreme environmental stressors on cognitive function and their biological underpinnings. Tyrosine supplementation may help individuals maintain cognitive function in very hot, hypoxic, and/or cold conditions. However, more research is needed to clarify these and other postulated interventions.

DOI 10.3389/fphys.2015.00372
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 6
2016 Elsworthy N, Burke D, Dascombe BJ, 'Physical and psychomotor performance of Australian football and rugby league officials during a match simulation', JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES, 34 420-428 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1057208
Co-authors Darren Burke
2016 Bennett KJM, Fransen J, Scott BR, Sanctuary CE, Gabbett TJ, Dascombe BJ, 'Positional group significantly influences the offensive and defensive skill involvements of junior representative rugby league players during match play', Journal of Sports Sciences, 34 1542-1546 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. This study examined the skill involvements of three positional groups across a junior representative rugby league season. Data were collected from 45 r... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. This study examined the skill involvements of three positional groups across a junior representative rugby league season. Data were collected from 45 rugby league players (mean ± SD; age = 16.5 ± 1.0 years) currently participating in the Harold Matthews and SG Ball Cup. Players were subdivided into hit-up forwards, adjustables and outside backs. The frequency (n · min -1 ) of offensive, defensive and overall involvements was coded for each group using a notation system and a practical coach skill analysis tool. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed a significant effect of playing position on skill involvements (F = 9.06; P < 0.001; ES = 0.41). Hit-up forwards performed a significantly greater frequency of offensive (0.31 ± 0.10), defensive (0.42 ± 0.15) and overall involvements (0.74 ± 0.19) when compared to adjustables (0.20 ± 0.08, 0.28 ± 0.08 and 0.52 ± 0.15, respectively) and outside backs (0.20 ± 0.12, 0.11 ± 0.07 and ± 0.31 ± 0.17, respectively). Further, adjustables performed a significantly greater number of defensive (0.28 ± 0.08) and overall involvements (0.52 ± 0.15) when compared to outside backs (0.11 ± 0.07 and 0.31 ± 0.17, respectively). The findings of this study suggest that it is important to consider a junior player¿s positional group when analysing their skill involvements. Information gained from this study could assist in the design of specific training methodologies for junior rugby league players in high-level talent development programmes.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1122206
Co-authors Job Fransen
2016 Scott BR, Loenneke JP, Slattery KM, Dascombe BJ, 'Blood flow restricted exercise for athletes: A review of available evidence', JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT, 19 360-367 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.04.014
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 Delaney JA, Thornton HR, Scott TJ, Ballard DA, Duthie GM, Wood LG, Dascombe BJ, 'Validity of skinfold-based measures for tracking changes in body composition in professional rugby league players', International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 11 261-266 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Human Kinetics, Inc. High levels of lean mass are important in collision-based sports for the development of strength and power, which may also assist during contact situa... [more]

© 2016 Human Kinetics, Inc. High levels of lean mass are important in collision-based sports for the development of strength and power, which may also assist during contact situations. While skinfold-based measures have been shown to be appropriate for cross-sectional assessments of body composition, their utility in tracking changes in lean mass is less clear. Purpose: To determine the most effective method of quantifying changes in lean mass in rugby league athletes. Methods: Body composition of 21 professional rugby league players was assessed on 2 or 3 occasions separated by = 6 wk, including bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), leanmass index (LMI), and a skinfold-based prediction equation (SkF). Dual-X-ray absorptiometry provided a criterion measure of fat-free mass (FFM). Correlation coefficients (r) and standard errors of the estimate (SEE) were used as measures of validity for the estimates. Results: All 3 practical estimates exhibited strong validity for cross-sectional assessments of FFM (r > .9, P < .001). The correlation between change scores was stronger for the LMI (r = .69, SEE 1.3 kg) and the SkF method (r = .66, SEE = 1.4 kg) than for BIA (r = .50, SEE = 1.6 kg). Conclusions: The LMI is probably as accurate in predicting changes in FFM as SkF and very likely to be more appropriate than BIA. The LMI offers an adequate, practical alternative for assessing in FFM among rugby league athletes.

DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0244
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Lisa Wood
2016 Thornton HR, Delaney JA, Duthie GM, Dascombe BJ, 'Importance of Various Training Load Measures on Injury Incidence of Professional Rugby League Athletes.', Int J Sports Physiol Perform, 1-17 (2016)
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2016-0326
2016 Thornton HR, Duthie GM, Pitchford NW, Delaney JA, Benton DT, Dascombe BJ, 'Effects of a Two-week High Intensity Training Camp on Sleep Activity of Professional Rugby League Athletes.', Int J Sports Physiol Perform, 1-19 (2016)
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2016-0414
2016 Delaney JA, Thornton HR, Pryor JF, Stewart AM, Dascombe BJ, Duthie GM, 'Peak Running Intensity of International Rugby: Implications for Training Prescription.', Int J Sports Physiol Perform, 1-22 (2016)
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2016-0469
2016 Vickery W, Duffield R, Crowther R, Beakley D, Blanch P, Dascombe BJ, 'Comparison of the physical and technical demands of cricket players during training and match-play.', J Strength Cond Res, (2016)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001528
2016 Scott BR, Hodson JA, Govus AD, Dascombe BJ, 'The 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test: can it predict outcomes in field tests of anaerobic performance?', J Strength Cond Res, (2016)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001563
2016 Delaney JA, Thornton HR, Duthie GM, Dascombe BJ, 'Factors that influence running intensity in interchange players in professional rugby league', International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 11 1047-1052 (2016)

© 2016 Human Kinetics, Inc. Background: Rugby league coaches adopt replacement strategies for their interchange players to maximize running intensity; however, it is important to... [more]

© 2016 Human Kinetics, Inc. Background: Rugby league coaches adopt replacement strategies for their interchange players to maximize running intensity; however, it is important to understand the factors that may influence match performance. Purpose: To assess the independent factors affecting running intensity sustained by interchange players during professional rugby league. Methods: Global positioning system (GPS) data were collected from all interchanged players (starters and nonstarters) in a professional rugby league squad across 24 matches of a National Rugby League season. A multilevel mixed-model approach was employed to establish the effect of various technical (attacking and defensive involvements), temporal (bout duration, time in possession, etc), and situational (season phase, recovery cycle, etc) factors on the relative distance covered and average metabolic power (P met ) during competition. Significant effects were standardized using correlation coefficients, and the likelihood of the effect was described using magnitude-based inferences. Results: Superior intermittent running ability resulted in very likely large increases in both relative distance and P met . As the length of a bout increased, both measures of running intensity exhibited a small decrease. There were at least likely small increases in running intensity for matches played after short recovery cycles and against strong opposition. During a bout, the number of collision-based involvements increased running intensity, whereas time in possession and ball time out of play decreased demands. Conclusions: These data demonstrate a complex interaction of individual- and match-based factors that require consideration when developing interchange strategies, and the manipulation of training loads during shorter recovery periods and against stronger opponents may be beneficial.

DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0559
2016 Aldous JWF, Chrismas BCR, Akubat I, Dascombe B, Abt G, Taylor L, 'Hot and hypoxic environments inhibit simulated soccer performance and exacerbate performance decrements when combined', Frontiers in Physiology, 6 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Aldous, Chrismas, Akubat, Dascombe, Abt and Taylor. The effects of heat and/or hypoxia have been well-documented in match-play data. However, large match-to-match variatio... [more]

© 2016 Aldous, Chrismas, Akubat, Dascombe, Abt and Taylor. The effects of heat and/or hypoxia have been well-documented in match-play data. However, large match-to-match variation for key physical performance measures makes environmental inferences difficult to ascertain from soccer match-play. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the hot (HOT), hypoxic (HYP), and hot-hypoxic (HH) mediated-decrements during a non-motorized treadmill based soccer-specific simulation. Twelve male University soccer players completed three familiarization sessions and four randomized crossover experimental trials of the intermittent Soccer Performance Test (iSPT) in normoxic-temperate (CON: 18°C 50% rH), HOT (30°C; 50% rH), HYP (1000 m; 18°C 50% rH), and HH (1000 m; 30°C; 50% rH). Physical performance and its performance decrements, body temperatures (rectal, skin, and estimated muscle temperature), heart rate (HR), arterial blood oxygen saturation (S a O 2 ), perceived exertion, thermal sensation (TS), body mass changes, blood lactate, and plasma volume were all measured. Performance decrements were similar in HOT and HYP [Total Distance (-4%), High-speed distance (~-8%), and variable run distance (~-12%) covered] and exacerbated in HH [total distance (-9%), high-speed distance (-15%), and variable run distance (-15%)] compared to CON. Peak sprint speed, was 4% greater in HOT compared with CON and HYP and 7% greater in HH. Sprint distance covered was unchanged (p > 0.05) in HOT and HYP and only decreased in HH (-8%) compared with CON. Body mass (-2%), temperatures (+2-5%), and TS (+18%) were altered in HOT. Furthermore, S a O 2 (-8%) and HR (+3%) were changed in HYP. Similar changes in body mass and temperatures, HR, TS, and S a O 2 were evident in HH to HOT and HYP, however, blood lactate (p < 0.001) and plasma volume (p < 0.001) were only significantly altered in HH. Perceived exertion was elevated (p < 0.05) by 7% in all conditions compared with CON. Regression analysis identified that absolute TS and absolute rise in skin and estimated muscle temperature (r = 0.82, r = 0.84 r = 0.82, respectively; p < 0.05) predicted the hot-mediated-decrements in HOT. The hot, hypoxic, and hot-hypoxic environments impaired physical performance during iSPT. Future interventions should address the increases in TS and body temperatures, to attenuate these decrements on soccer performance.

DOI 10.3389/fphys.2015.00421
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Taylor L, Chrismas BCR, Dascombe B, Chamari K, Fowler PM, 'Sleep medication and athletic performance-The evidence for practitioners and future research directions', Frontiers in Physiology, 7 (2016)
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2016.00083
Citations Scopus - 4
2016 Taylor L, Chrismas BCR, Dascombe B, Chamari K, Fowler PM, 'The importance of monitoring sleep within adolescent athletes: Athletic, academic, and health considerations', Frontiers in Physiology, 7 (2016)
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2016.00101
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Stevens CJ, Bennett KJ, Sculley DV, Callister R, Taylor L, Dascombe BJ, 'A comparison of mixed-method cooling interventions on pre-loaded running performance in the heat.', Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association, (2016)
Co-authors Robin Callister, Dean Sculley
2016 Scott TJ, Duthie GM, Delaney JA, Sanctuary CE, Ballard DA, Hickmans JA, Dascombe BJ, 'The validity and contributing physiological factors to 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test performance in Rugby League.', J Strength Cond Res, (2016)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001702
2016 Bennett KJM, Scott BR, Fransen J, Elsworthy N, Sanctuary CE, Gabbett TJ, Dascombe BJ, 'Examining the skill involvements of under-16 rugby league players during a small-sided game and match-play', International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching, 11 532-537 (2016) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2016. This study investigated the correlations between the skill demands of an 'on-side' small-sided game (SSG) and match-play in under-16 junior rugby league pla... [more]

© The Author(s) 2016. This study investigated the correlations between the skill demands of an 'on-side' small-sided game (SSG) and match-play in under-16 junior rugby league players. Fifteen Harold Matthews players undertook a SSG (10 vs. 10 on a 68 m by 40 m playing surface for 3 min) in the week leading up to round 6 of their competitive season. The frequency of skill involvements (i.e. offensive, defensive and total) was manually coded using a specific criterion. The defensive and total skill involvements were significantly higher per minute of play in the SSG when compared to match-play. A significant, very large, positive correlation was observed between offensive and total skill involvements during a SSG and offensive skill involvements during a match (r (s) = 0.80, p < 0.01; r (s) = 0.71, p < 0.01, respectively). No significant correlations were evident for defensive skill involvements during SSG and match-play. Overall, it appears that the selected SSG provided players with ample opportunity to practice match-specific skills. In addition, the transfer of these opportunities seems confined to offensive rather then defensive skills.

DOI 10.1177/1747954116654780
Co-authors Job Fransen
2016 Novak AR, Dascombe BJ, 'Agreement of Power Measures between Garmin Vector and SRM Cycle Power Meters', MEASUREMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND EXERCISE SCIENCE, 20 167-172 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/1091367X.2016.1191496
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 Dunstan RH, Sparkes DL, Dascombe BJ, Macdonald MM, Evans CA, Stevens CJ, et al., 'Sweat facilitated amino acid losses in male athletes during exercise at 32-34°C', PLoS ONE, 11 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Dunstan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and re... [more]

© 2016 Dunstan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Sweat contains amino acids and electrolytes derived from plasma and athletes can lose 1-2L of sweat per hour during exercise. Sweat may also contain contributions of amino acids as well as urea, sodium and potassium from the natural moisturizing factors (NMF) produced in the stratum corneum. In preliminary experiments, one participant was tested on three separate occasions to compare sweat composition with surface water washings from the same area of skin to assess contributions from NMF. Two participants performed a 40 minute self-paced cycle session with sweat collected from cleansed skin at regular intervals to assess the contributions to the sweat load from NMF over the period of exercise. The main study investigated sweat amino acid composition collected from nineteen male athletes following standardised endurance exercise regimes at 32-34°C and 20-30% RH. Plasma was also collected from ten of the athletes to compare sweat and plasma composition of amino acids. The amino acid profiles of the skin washings were similar to the sweat, suggesting that the NMF could contribute certain amino acids into sweat. Since the sweat collected from athletes contained some amino acid contributions from the skin, this fluid was subsequently referred to as "faux" sweat. Samples taken over 40 minutes of exercise showed that these contributions diminished over time and were minimal at 35 minutes. In the main study, the faux sweat samples collected from the athletes with minimal NMF contributions, were characterised by relatively high levels of serine, histidine, ornithine, glycine and alanine compared with the corresponding levels measured in the plasma. Aspartic acid was detected in faux sweat but not in the plasma. Glutamine and proline were lower in the faux sweat than plasma in all the athletes. Three phenotypic groups of athletes were defined based on faux sweat volumes and composition profiles of amino acids with varying relative abundances of histidine, serine, glycine and ornithine. It was concluded that for some individuals, faux sweat resulting from exercise at 32-34°C and 20-30% RH posed a potentially significant source of amino acid loss.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0167844
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Craig Evans, Diane Sparkes, Hugh Dunstan, Tim Roberts
2016 Stevens CJ, Thoseby B, Sculley DV, Callister R, Taylor L, Dascombe BJ, 'Running performance and thermal sensation in the heat are improved with menthol mouth rinse but not ice slurry ingestion', Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 26 1209-1216 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a cooling strategy designed to predominately lower th... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a cooling strategy designed to predominately lower thermal state with a strategy designed to lower thermal sensation on endurance running performance and physiology in the heat. Eleven moderately trained male runners completed familiarization and three randomized, crossover 5-km running time trials on a non-motorized treadmill in hot conditions (33 °C). The trials included ice slurry ingestion before exercise (ICE), menthol mouth rinse during exercise (MEN), and no intervention (CON). Running performance was significantly improved with MEN (25.3 ± 3.5 min; P = 0.01), but not ICE (26.3 ± 3.2 min; P = 0.45) when compared with CON (26.0 ± 3.4 min). Rectal temperature was significantly decreased with ICE (by 0.3 ± 0.2 °C; P < 0.01), which persisted for 2 km of the run and MEN significantly decreased perceived thermal sensation (between 4 and 5 km) and ventilation (between 1 and 2 km) during the time trial. End-exercise blood prolactin concentration was elevated with MEN compared with CON (by 25.1 ± 24.4 ng/mL; P = 0.02). The data demonstrate that a change in the perception of thermal sensation during exercise from menthol mouth rinse was associated with improved endurance running performance in the heat. Ice slurry ingestion reduced core temperature but did not decrease thermal sensation during exercise or improve running performance.

DOI 10.1111/sms.12555
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Dean Sculley, Robin Callister
2015 Scott TJ, Delaney JA, Duthie GM, Sanctuary CE, Ballard DA, Hickmans JA, Dascombe BJ, 'Reliability and Usefulness of the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test in Rugby League', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 29 1985-1990 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. This study examined the reliability and usefulness of the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (30-15 IFT) within rugby league. ... [more]

© 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. This study examined the reliability and usefulness of the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (30-15 IFT) within rugby league. Fifty-five young rugby league players participated in the study. These included representative players from Under 16s (n 19; 15.6 ± 0.3 years; 78.1 ± 10.9 kg), Under 18s (n 21; 17.4 ± 0.5 years; 86.9 ± 11.2 kg), and Under 20s (n 15; 19.4 ± 0.5 years; 95.9 ± 8.7 kg) squads within a professional rugby league club. Players performed the 30-15 IFT twice within 9 days of each other. Maximal intermittent running velocity (V IFT) and heart rate at exhaustion (HR peak) were collected for both tests. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for the "Combined" and Under 20s were very large (r > 0.7), whereas the ICCs for Under 16s and Under 18s were almost perfect (r > 0.9). Coefficients of variation were 1.9% (95% confidence interval, 1.6-2.4) for the combined test-retest of the 30-15 IFT and 0.6% (0.5-1.0) for HR peak. As the typical error of measurement (TE) (0.36 km·h -1) was greater than the smallest worthwhile change (SWC) (0.21 km·h -1) value, the usefulness of the V IFT was rated as "marginal." The TE for HR peak was similar to the SWC, rating the usefulness of this variable as "OK." Despite the usefulness of the 30-15 IFT being deemed Marginal, a change as small as 0.5 km·h -1 (1 stage) in V IFT could be considered substantial or "real." As a cons equence, the 30-15 IFT presents as both a reliable and useful field test in the assessment of intermittent fitness for rugby league players.

DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000846
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2015 Stevens CJ, Hacene J, Wellham B, Sculley DV, Callister R, Taylor L, Dascombe BJ, 'The validity of endurance running performance on the Curve 3

© 2014, © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Abstract: This study aimed to test the validity of a non-motorised treadmill (NMT) for the measurement of self-paced overground endurance runn... [more]

© 2014, © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Abstract: This study aimed to test the validity of a non-motorised treadmill (NMT) for the measurement of self-paced overground endurance running performance. Ten male runners performed randomised 5-km running time trials on a NMT and an outdoor athletics track. A range of physiological and perceptual responses was measured, and foot strike was classified subjectively. Performance time was strongly correlated (r¿=¿0.82, ICC¿=¿0.86) between running modes, despite running time being significantly longer on the NMT (1264¿±¿124¿s vs. 1536¿±¿130¿s for overground and NMT, respectively; P¿ < ¿0.001). End blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion were significantly higher on the NMT compared to overground. Integrated electromyography was significantly lower on the NMT for three muscles (P¿ < ¿0.05), and mean stride rate was also significantly lower on the NMT (P¿=¿0.04). Cardiorespiratory responses of heart rate, oxygen uptake and expired air volume demonstrated strong correlations (r¿=¿0.68¿0.96, ICC¿=¿0.75¿0.97) and no statistical differences (P¿ > ¿0.05). Runners were consistently slower on the NMT, and as such it should not be used to measure performance over a specific distance. However, the strong correlations suggest that superior overground performance was reflected in relative terms on the NMT, and therefore, it is a valid tool for the assessment of endurance running performance in the laboratory.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2014.986502
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Robin Callister, Dean Sculley
2015 Scanlan AT, Tucker PS, Dascombe BJ, Berkelmans DM, Hiskens MI, Dalbo VJ, 'Fluctuations in activity demands across game quarters in professional and semiprofessional male basketball', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 29 3006-3015 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. Examination of activity demands and stoppage durations across game periods provides useful insight concerning fatigue, tact... [more]

© 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. Examination of activity demands and stoppage durations across game periods provides useful insight concerning fatigue, tactical strategies, and playing pace in team sports such as basketball. Therefore, the aims of this study were to quantify and compare game activity fluctuations across quarters in professional and semiprofessional basketball players. Video-based time-motion analyses were conducted across multiple games. Frequencies, total durations (in seconds), total distances (in meters), and mean velocities (in meters per second) were calculated for low-intensity movement (=3 m·s -1), high-intensity movement ( > 3 m·s -1), shuffling, and dribbling activity. Frequencies were determined for jumping and upper-body activity; stoppage durations were also calculated. Separate repeated-measures analysis of variance and Cohen's d were used to identify significant differences and quantify the effect sizes between game quarters for all outcome measures, respectively. Pearson correlation analyses were performed to determine the relationship between stoppage duration and all activity measures. The results showed significantly (p = 0.05) reduced dribbling (3.09 ± 0.03 m·s -1 vs. 2.81 ± 0.01 m·s -1) and total (2.22 ± 0.04 m·s -1 vs. 2.09 ± 0.03 m·s -1) activity velocities during the third compared with the first quarter in professional players. Furthermore, effect size analyses showed greater decreases in high-intensity (professional: d 1.7-5.4; semiprofessional: d 0.3-1.7), shuffling (professional: d 2.3-3.2; semiprofessional: d 1.4-2.1), and total (professional: d 1.0-4.9; semiprofessional: d 0.3-0.8) activity and increases in dribbling (professional: d 1.4-4.7; semiprofessional: d 2.5-2.8) with game progression in professional players. In semiprofessional players, stoppage duration was significantly (p = 0.05) related to various low-intensity (R 0.64-0.72), high-intensity (R 0.65-0.72), and total (R 0.63-0.73) activity measures. Although not directly measured, the observed game activity fluctuations were likely because of a combination of physiological (e.g., muscle glycogen depletion, de hydration), tactical (e.g., ball control, game pace), and game-related (e.g., time-outs, player fouls) factors. Basketball coaches can use the provided data to (a) develop more precise training plans and management strategies, (b) elevate semiprofessional player performance closer to the professional level, and (c) incorporate tactical strategies to maximize the benefits of stoppages.

DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000967
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2015 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Sculley DV, Hodson JA, Dascombe BJ, 'Physical performance during high-intensity resistance exercise in normoxic and hypoxic conditions', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 29 807-815 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. This study aimed to determine whether different levels of hypoxia affect physical performance during high-intensity resista... [more]

© 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. This study aimed to determine whether different levels of hypoxia affect physical performance during high-intensity resistance exercise or subsequent cardiovascular and perceptual responses. Twelve resistance-trained young men (age, 25.3 ± 4.3 years; height, 179.0 ± 4.5 cm; body mass, 83.4 ± 9.1 kg) were tested for 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in the back squat and deadlift. Following this, participants completed 3 separate randomized trials of 5 × 5 repetitions at 80% 1RM, with 3 minutes rest between sets, in normoxia (NORM; fraction of inspired oxygen [F I O 2 ] 0.21), moderate-level hypoxia (F I O 2 0.16), or high-level hypoxia (F I O 2 0.13) by a portable hypoxic unit. Peak and mean force and power variables were monitored during exercise. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO 2), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed immediately following each set. No differences in force or power variables were evident between conditions. Similar trends were evident in these variables across each set and across the exercise session in each condition. SpO 2 was lower in hypoxic conditions than in NORM, whereas HR was higher following sets performed in hypoxia. There were no differences between conditions in RPE. These results indicate that a hypoxic stimulus during high-intensity resistance exercise does not alter physical performance during repetitions and sets or affect how strenuous exercise is perceived to be. This novel training strategy can be used without adversely affecting the physical training dose experienced and may provide benefits over the equivalent training in NORM.

DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000680
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Dean Sculley
2015 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Dascombe BJ, 'Intermittent hypoxic resistance training: Is metabolic stress the key moderator?', Medical Hypotheses, 84 145-149 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Traditionally, researchers and practitioners have manipulated acute resistance exercise variables to elicit the desired responses to training. However, recen... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Traditionally, researchers and practitioners have manipulated acute resistance exercise variables to elicit the desired responses to training. However, recent research indicates that altering the muscular environment during resistance training, namely by implementing a hypoxic stimulus, can augment muscle hypertrophy and strength. Intermittent hypoxic resistance training (IHRT), whereby participants inspire hypoxic air during resistance training, has been previously demonstrated to increase muscle cross-sectional area and maximum strength by significantly greater amounts than the equivalent training in normoxia. However, some recent evidence has provided conflicting results, reporting that the use of systemic hypoxia during resistance training provided no added benefit. While the definitive mechanisms that may augment muscular responses to IHRT are not yet fully understood, an increased metabolic stress is thought to be important for moderating many downstream processes related to hypertrophy. It is likely that methodological differences between conflicting IHRT studies have resulted in different degrees of metabolic stress during training, particularly when considering the inter-set recovery intervals used. Given that the most fundamental physiological stresses resulting from hypoxia are disturbances to oxidative metabolism, it becomes apparent that resistance training may only benefit from additional hypoxia if the exercise is structured to elicit a strong metabolic response. We hypothesize that for IHRT to be more effective in producing muscular hypertrophy and increasing strength than the equivalent normoxic training, exercise should be performed with relatively brief inter-set recovery periods, with the aim of providing a potent metabolic stimulus to enhance anabolic responses.

DOI 10.1016/j.mehy.2014.12.001
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2015 Coull NA, Watkins SL, Aldous JWF, Warren LK, Chrismas BCR, Dascombe B, et al., 'Effect of tyrosine ingestion on cognitive and physical performance utilising an intermittent soccer performance test (iSPT) in a warm environment', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY, 115 373-386 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00421-014-3022-7
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2015 Secomb JL, Sheppard JM, Dascombe BJ, 'Reductions in Sprint Paddling Ability and Countermovement Jump Performance after Surfing Training', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 29 1937-1942 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. The present study aimed to determine whether any meaningful change in a surfer's sprint paddling ability and countermovemen... [more]

© 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. The present study aimed to determine whether any meaningful change in a surfer's sprint paddling ability and countermovement jump (CMJ) performance developed after a 2-hour surfing training session and also whether any physical demands of the surfing session were related to the resultant changes in the capacities. Fifteen competitive male surfing athletes (age, 22.1 ± 3.9 years; height, 175.4 ± 6.4 cm; body mass, 72.5 ± 7.7 kg) performed a 2-hour surfing training session, with 15-m sprint paddle and CMJ trials performed both before and after the surfing session. Pre- to posttesting measures were analyzed using magnitude-based inferences. Likely declines were observed in the velocity achieved at the 5-, 10-, and 15-m splits of the 15-m sprint paddle, as well as peak velocity. Similarly, likely declines were calculated for CMJ peak force, relative peak force, and jump height. Furthermore, large correlations were calculated between presurfing session peak velocity and the change in 5, 10, 15 m, and peak velocity of the 15-m sprint paddle and total distance covered, wave riding bouts, and success rate. Surfing athletes and coaches may need to consider implementing shorter duration training sessions to reduce the decline in sprint paddling ability and CMJ performance. Furthermore, surfing athletes should possess highly developed sprint paddling ability because this may allow them to undertake a greater workload and catch more waves, which will increase the opportunity for technical refinement of maneuvers and skill acquisition.

DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000843
2015 Delaney JA, Scott TJ, Thornton HR, Bennett KJ, Gay D, Duthie GM, Dascombe BJ, 'Establishing Duration-Specific Running Intensities From Match-Play Analysis in Rugby League.', Int J Sports Physiol Perform, 10 725-731 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0092
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2015 Borges TO, Dascombe B, Bullock N, Coutts AJ, 'Physiological characteristics of well-trained junior sprint kayak athletes', International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 10 593-599 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc. This study aimed to profile the physiological characteristics of junior sprint kayak athletes (n = 21, VO < inf > 2 < /inf > max 4.10.7 L/min, trainin... [more]

© 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc. This study aimed to profile the physiological characteristics of junior sprint kayak athletes (n = 21, VO < inf > 2 < /inf > max 4.10.7 L/min, training experience 2.71.2 y) and to establish the relationship between physiological variables (VO < inf > 2 < /inf > max, VO < inf > 2 < /inf > kinetics, muscleoxygen kinetics, paddling efficiency) and sprint kayak performance. VO < inf > 2 < /inf > max, power at VO < inf > 2 < /inf > max, power:weight ratio, paddling efficiency, VO < inf > 2 < /inf > at lactate threshold, and whole-body and muscle oxygen kinetics were determined on a kayak ergometer in the laboratory. Separately, on-water time trials (TT) were completed over 200 m and 1000 m. Large to nearly perfect (-.5 to-.9) inverse relationships were found between the physiological variables and on-water TT performance across both distances. Paddling efficiency and lactate threshold shared moderate to very large correlations (-.4 to-.7) with 200- and 1000-m performance. In addition, trivial to large correlations (-.11 to-.5) were observed between muscle-oxygenation parameters, muscle and whole-body oxygen kinetics, and performance. Multiple regression showed that 88% of the unadjusted variance for the 200-m TT performance was explained by VO < inf > 2 < /inf > max, peripheral muscle deoxygenation, and maximal aerobic power (P < .001), whereas 85% of the unadjusted variance in 1000-m TT performance was explained by VO < inf > 2 < /inf > max and deoxyhemoglobin (P < .001). The current findings show that well-trained junior sprint kayak athletes possess a high level of relative aerobic fitness and highlight the importance of the peripheral muscle metabolism for sprint kayak performance, particularly in 200-m races, where finalists and nonfinalists are separated by very small margins. Such data highlight the relative aerobic-fitness variables that can be used as benchmarks for talent-identification programs or monitoring longitudinal athlete development. However, such approaches need further investigation.

DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2014-0292
Citations Web of Science - 1
2015 Secomb JL, Sheppard JM, Dascombe BJ, 'Time-motion analysis of a 2-hour surfing training session.', Int J Sports Physiol Perform, 10 17-22 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2014-0002
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2015 Scott BR, Loenneke JP, Slattery KM, Dascombe BJ, 'Exercise with Blood Flow Restriction: An Updated Evidence-Based Approach for Enhanced Muscular Development', Sports Medicine, 45 313-325 (2015) [C1]

© 2014, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. A growing body of evidence supports the use of moderate blood flow restriction (BFR) combined with low-load resistance exer... [more]

© 2014, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. A growing body of evidence supports the use of moderate blood flow restriction (BFR) combined with low-load resistance exercise to enhance hypertrophic and strength responses in skeletal muscle. Research also suggests that BFR during low-workload aerobic exercise can result in small but significant morphological and strength gains, and BFR alone may attenuate atrophy during periods of unloading. While BFR appears to be beneficial for both clinical and athletic cohorts, there is currently no common consensus amongst scientists and practitioners regarding the best practice for implementing BFR methods. If BFR is not employed appropriately, there is a risk of injury to the participant. It is also important to understand how variations in the cuff application can affect the physiological responses and subsequent adaptation to BFR training. The optimal way to manipulate acute exercise variables, such as exercise type, load, volume, inter-set rest periods and training frequency, must also be considered prior to designing a BFR training programme. The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence-based approach to implementing BFR exercise. These guidelines could be useful for practitioners using BFR training in either clinical or athletic settings, or for researchers in the design of future studies investigating BFR exercise.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0288-1
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
2015 Scanlan AT, Dascombe BJ, Kidcaff AR, Peucker JL, Dalbo VJ, 'Gender-Specific Activity Demands Experienced During Semiprofessional Basketball Game Play', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS PHYSIOLOGY AND PERFORMANCE, 10 618-625 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2014-0407
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2015 Delaney JA, Scott TJ, Ballard DA, Duthie GM, Hickmans JA, Lockie RG, Dascombe BJ, 'Contributing Factors to Change-of-Direction Ability in Professional Rugby League Players.', J Strength Cond Res, 29 2688-2696 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000960
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Robert Lockie
2015 Stevens CJ, Hacene J, Sculley DV, Taylor L, Callister R, Dascombe B, 'The Reliability of Running Performance in a 5 km Time Trial on a Non-motorized Treadmill', International Journal of Sports Medicine, 36 705-709 (2015) [C1]

The purpose of the study was to establish the reliability of performance and physiological responses during a self-paced 5 km running time trial on a non-motorized treadmill. 17 m... [more]

The purpose of the study was to establish the reliability of performance and physiological responses during a self-paced 5 km running time trial on a non-motorized treadmill. 17 male runners (age: 32±13 years, height: 177±7 cm, body mass: 71±9 kg, sum of 7 skinfolds: 55±21 mm) performed familiarization then 2 separate maximal 5 km running time trials on a non-motorized treadmill. Physiological responses measured included heart rate, oxygen uptake, expired air volume, blood lactate concentration, tissue saturation index and integrated electromyography. Running time (1 522±163 s vs. 1 519±162 s for trials 1 and 2, respectively) demonstrated a low CV of 1.2% and high ICC of 0.99. All physiological variables had CVs of less than 4% and ICCs of > 0.92, with the exception of blood lactate concentration (7.0±2 mmol·L -1 vs. 6.5±1.5 mmol·L -1 for trials 1 and 2, respectively; CV: 12%, ICC: 0.83) and the electromyography measures (CV: 8-27%, ICC: 0.71-0.91). The data demonstrate that performance time in a 5 km running time trial on a non-motorized treadmill is a highly reliable test. Most physiological responses measured across the 5 km run also demonstrated good reliability.

DOI 10.1055/s-0034-1398680
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Robin Callister, Dean Sculley
2015 Stevens CJ, Dascombe BJ, 'The Reliability and Validity of Protocols for the Assessment of Endurance Sports Performance: An Updated Review', Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 19 177-185 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Sports performance testing is one of the most common and important measures used in sport science. Performance testing protocols must have h... [more]

© 2015 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Sports performance testing is one of the most common and important measures used in sport science. Performance testing protocols must have high reliability to ensure any changes are not due to measurement error or inter-individual differences. High validity is also important to ensure test performance reflects true performance. Time-trial protocols commonly have a coefficient of variation (CV) of < 5%, however, familiarization, well-trained subjects and/or conducting the trial outdoors in the athletes most familiar environment can lead to CVs of < 1%. Long duration time-trials or the inclusion of sprints within a time-trial appears to not negatively influence reliability. Few studies have assessed the validity of endurance performance tests, and as such more research should evaluate different ways of simulating outdoor performances in the laboratory. The use of warm-up, simulation of convection load, and implementation of race specific hydration practices are important considerations for researchers regarding test validity.

DOI 10.1080/1091367X.2015.1062381
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2015 Dunstan RH, Sparkes DL, Dascombe BJ, Evans CA, Macdonald MM, Crompton M, et al., 'Sweat facilitated losses of amino acids in Standardbred horses and the application of supplementation strategies to maintain condition during training', Comparative Exercise Physiology, 11 201-212 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3920/CEP150027
Co-authors Tim Roberts, Hugh Dunstan, Diane Sparkes, Craig Evans
2014 Vickery WM, Dascombe BJ, Baker JD, Higham DG, Spratford WA, Duffield R, 'Accuracy and reliability of GPS devices for measurement of sports-specific movement patterns related to cricket, tennis, and field-based team sports.', J Strength Cond Res, 28 1697-1705 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000285
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
2014 Scanlan AT, Dascombe BJ, Reaburn PRJ, 'Development of the basketball exercise simulation test: A match-specific basketball fitness test', Journal of Human Sport and Exercise, 9 700-712 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.14198/jhse.2014.93.03
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Dascombe BJ, Sculley DV, 'Hypoxia and Resistance Exercise: A Comparison of Localized and Systemic Methods', Sports Medicine, (2014) [C1]

It is generally believed that optimal hypertrophic and strength gains are induced through moderate- or high-intensity resistance training, equivalent to at least 60 % of an indivi... [more]

It is generally believed that optimal hypertrophic and strength gains are induced through moderate- or high-intensity resistance training, equivalent to at least 60 % of an individual's 1-repetition maximum (1RM). However, recent evidence suggests that similar adaptations are facilitated when low-intensity resistance exercise (~20-50 % 1RM) is combined with blood flow restriction (BFR) to the working muscles. Although the mechanisms underpinning these responses are not yet firmly established, it appears that localized hypoxia created by BFR may provide an anabolic stimulus by enhancing the metabolic and endocrine response, and increase cellular swelling and signalling function following resistance exercise. Moreover, BFR has also been demonstrated to increase type II muscle fibre recruitment during exercise. However, inappropriate implementation of BFR can result in detrimental effects, including petechial haemorrhage and dizziness. Furthermore, as BFR is limited to the limbs, the muscles of the trunk are unable to be trained under localized hypoxia. More recently, the use of systemic hypoxia via hypoxic chambers and devices has been investigated as a novel way to stimulate similar physiological responses to resistance training as BFR techniques. While little evidence is available, reports indicate that beneficial adaptations, similar to those induced by BFR, are possible using these methods. The use of systemic hypoxia allows large groups to train concurrently within a hypoxic chamber using multi-joint exercises. However, further scientific research is required to fully understand the mechanisms that cause augmented muscular changes during resistance exercise with a localized or systemic hypoxic stimulus. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0177-7
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Dean Sculley
2014 Slattery KM, Dascombe B, Wallace LK, Bentley DJ, Coutts AJ, 'Effect of N-acetylcysteine on cycling performance after intensified training', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 46 1114-1123 (2014) [C1]

PURPOSE: This investigation examined the ergogenic effect of short-term oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) supplementation and the associated changes in redox balance and inflammation du... [more]

PURPOSE: This investigation examined the ergogenic effect of short-term oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) supplementation and the associated changes in redox balance and inflammation during intense training. METHODS: A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled crossover design was used to assess 9 d of oral NAC supplementation (1200 mg·d) in 10 well-trained triathletes. For each supplement trial (NAC and placebo), baseline venous blood and urine samples were taken, and a presupplementation cycle ergometer race simulation was performed. After the loading period, further samples were collected preexercise, postexercise, and 2 and 24 h after the postsupplementation cycle ergometer race simulation. Changes in total antioxidant capacity, ferric reducing ability of plasma, reduced glutathione, oxidized glutathione, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, interleukin 6, xanthine oxidase, hypoxanthine, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, nuclear factor ¿B, and urinary 15-isoprostane F2t concentration were assessed. The experimental procedure was repeated with the remaining supplement after a 3-wk washout. Eight participants completed both supplementation trials. RESULTS: NAC improved sprint performance during the cycle ergometer race simulation (P < 0.001, ¿p = 0.03). Supplementation with NAC also augmented postexercise plasma total antioxidant capacity (P = 0.005, ¿p = 0.19), reduced exercise-induced oxidative damage (plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, P = 0.002, ¿p = 0.22; urinary 15-isoprostane F2t concentration, P = 0.010, ¿p = 0.431), attenuated inflammation (plasma interleukin 6, P = 0.002, ¿p = 0.22; monocyte chemotactic protein 1, P = 0.012, ¿p = 0.17), and increased postexercise nuclear factor ¿B activity (P < 0.001, ¿p = 0.21). CONCLUSION: Oral NAC supplementation improved cycling performance via an improved redox balance and promoted adaptive processes in well-trained athletes undergoing strenuous physical training. © 2014 by the American College of Sports Medicine.

DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000222
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
2014 Vickery W, Dascombe B, Duffield R, 'Physiological, movement and technical demands of centre-wicket Battlezone, traditional net-based training and one-day cricket matches: a comparative study of sub-elite cricket players', JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES, 32 722-737 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2013.861605
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2014 Scott BR, Dascombe BJ, Delaney JA, Elsworthy N, Lockie RG, Sculley DV, Slattery KM, 'The Validity and Reliability of a Customized Rigid Supportive Harness During Smith Machine Back Squat Exercise', JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, 28 636-642 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182a362df
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Dean Sculley, Robert Lockie
2014 Elsworthy N, Burke D, Scott BR, Stevens CJ, Dascombe BJ, 'Physical and decision-making demands of Australian football umpires during competitive matches.', Journal of strength and conditioning research, 28 3502-3507 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Darren Burke
2014 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Sculley DV, Lockie RG, Dascombe BJ, 'Reliability of telemetric electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy during high-intensity resistance exercise', Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 24 722-730 (2014) [C1]

This study quantified the inter- and intra-test reliability of telemetric surface electromyography (EMG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during resistance exercise. Twelve w... [more]

This study quantified the inter- and intra-test reliability of telemetric surface electromyography (EMG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during resistance exercise. Twelve well-trained young men performed high-intensity back squat exercise (12 sets at 70-90% 1-repetition maximum) on two occasions, during which EMG and NIRS continuously monitored muscle activation and oxygenation of the thigh muscles. Intra-test reliability for EMG and NIRS variables was generally higher than inter-test reliability. EMG median frequency variables were generally more reliable than amplitude-based variables. The reliability of EMG measures was not related to the intensity or number of repetitions performed during the set. No notable differences were evident in the reliability of EMG between different agonist muscles. NIRS-derived measures of oxyhaemoglobin, deoxyhaemoglobin and tissue saturation index were generally more reliable during single-repetition sets than multiple-repetition sets at the same intensity. Tissue saturation index was the most reliable NIRS variable. Although the reliability of the EMG and NIRS measures varied across the exercise protocol, the precise causes of this variability are not yet understood. However, it is likely that biological variation during multi-joint isotonic resistance exercise may account for some of the variation in the observed results. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.jelekin.2014.07.008
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Dean Sculley, Robert Lockie
2014 Scott BR, Slattery KM, Dascombe BJ, 'Intermittent hypoxic resistance training: does it provide added benefit?', FRONTIERS IN PHYSIOLOGY, 5 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2014.00397
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Dunstan RH, Sparkes DL, Roberts TK, Dascombe BJ, 'Preliminary Evaluations of a Complex Amino Acid Supplement, Fatigue Reviva, to Reduce Fatigue in a Group of Professional Male Athletes and a Group of Males Recruited from the General Public', Food and Nutrition Sciences, 5 231-235 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.4236/fns.2014.52028
Co-authors Hugh Dunstan, Diane Sparkes, Tim Roberts
2014 Elsworthy N, Burke DC, Dascombe BJ, 'Factors relating to the decision-making performance of Australian football officials', International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, 14 401-410 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Darren Burke
2013 Stevens CJ, Dascombe B, Boyko A, Sculley D, Callister R, 'Ice slurry ingestion during cycling improves Olympic distance triathlon performance in the heat', Journal of Sports Sciences, 31 1271-1279 (2013) [C1]

This study investigated the effect of ice slurry ingestion during a triathlon on intragastric temperature and 10 km running performance in the heat. Nine well-trained male triathl... [more]

This study investigated the effect of ice slurry ingestion during a triathlon on intragastric temperature and 10 km running performance in the heat. Nine well-trained male triathletes performed two randomised trials of a simulated Olympic distance triathlon in hot conditions (32-34°C). Exercise intensity during the swim (1500 m) and cycle (1 hr) legs was standardised, and the 10 km run leg was a self-paced time trial. During the cycle leg, either 10 g · kgBM -1 of ice slurry ( < 1°C) or room temperature fluid (32-34°C) was ingested. In the run leg of the ice slurry trial, performance time (43.4 ± 3.7 vs. 44.6 ± 4.0 min; P = 0.03), intragastric temperature (at 1.5 km; 35.5 ± 1.2 vs. 37.5 ± 0.4°C; P = 0.002) and perceived thermal stress (at 5 km; 73 ± 9 vs. 80 ± 7 mm; P = 0.04) were significantly lower. Oxygen consumption was significantly higher in the ice trial between 9.5-10 km (52.4 ± 3.4 vs. 47.8 ± 5.4 mL · kg -1 · min -1 ; P = 0.04). The results suggest ice slurry ingestion was an effective ergogenic aid for triathlon running performance in the heat. The attenuation of intragastric temperature and perceived thermal stress were likely contributors to the self-selection of a higher running intensity and improved performance time. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2013.779740
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Robin Callister, Dean Sculley
2013 Vickery W, Dascombe B, Duffield R, Kellett A, Portus M, 'Battlezone: An examination of the physiological responses, movement demands and reproducibility of small-sided cricket games', Journal of Sports Sciences, 31 77-86 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2012.720706
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2013 Vickery W, Dascombe B, Duffield R, Kellett A, Portus M, 'The influence of field size, player number and rule changes on the physiological responses and movement demands of small-sided games for cricket training', Journal of Sports Sciences, 31 629-638 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2012.744080
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2013 Dunstan RH, Sparkes DL, Roberts TK, Crompton MJ, Gottfries J, Dascombe BJ, 'Development of a complex amino acid supplement, Fatigue Reviva (TM), for oral ingestion: initial evaluations of product concept and impact on symptoms of sub-health in a group of males', NUTRITION JOURNAL, 12 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1475-2891-12-115
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Tim Roberts, Diane Sparkes, Hugh Dunstan
2013 Dascombe B, Laursen P, Nosaka K, Polglaze T, 'No effect of upper body compression garments in elite flat-water kayakers', European Journal of Sport Science, 13 341-349 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17461391.2011.606842
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
2012 Scanlan AT, Dascombe BJ, Reaburn PRJ, 'The construct and longitudinal validity of the basketball exercise simulation test', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 26 523-530 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2012 Scanlan AT, Dascombe BJ, Reaburn P, Dalbo VJ, 'The physiological and activity demands experienced by Australian female basketball players during competition', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15 341-347 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 32
2011 Dascombe BJ, Hoare TK, Sear JA, Reaburn PR, Scanlan AT, 'The effects of wearing undersized lower-body compression garments on endurance running performance', International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 6 160-173 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 15
2011 Elsworthy N, Dascombe BJ, 'The match demands of Australian Rules Football umpires in a state-based competition', International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 6 559-571 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
2011 Scanlan AT, Dascombe BJ, 'The anthropometric and performance characteristics of high-performance junior life savers', Serbian Journal of Sports Sciences, 5 61-66 (2011) [C1]
2011 Scanlan A, Dascombe BJ, Reaburn P, 'A comparison of the activity demands of elite and sub-elite Australian men's basketball competition', Journal of Sports Sciences, 29 1153-1160 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2011.582509
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 28
2011 Goh SS, Laursen PB, Dascombe BJ, Nosaka K, 'Effect of lower body compression garments on submaximal and maximal running performance in cold (10 degrees C) and hot (32 degrees C) environments', European Journal of Applied Physiology, 111 819-826 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00421-010-1705-2
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 23
2010 Dascombe BJ, Karunaratna M, Cartoon J, Fergie B, Goodman C, 'Nutritional supplementation habits and perceptions of elite athletes within a state-based sporting institute', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 13 274-280 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2009.03.005
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 43
2010 Sear JA, Hoare TK, Scanlan AT, Abt GA, Dascombe BJ, 'The effects of whole-body compression garments on prolonged high-density intermittent exercise', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 24 1901-1910 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181db251b
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 24
2009 Reaburn P, Dascombe BJ, Reaburn P, 'Anaerobic performance in masters athletes', European Review of Aging and Physical Activity, 6 39-53 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11556-008-0041-6
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 13
2008 Spencer M, Dawson B, Goodman C, Dascombe BJ, Bishop D, 'Performance and metabolism in repeated sprint exercise: Effect of recovery intensity', European Journal of Applied Physiology, 103 545-552 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00421-008-0749-z
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 37
2008 Scanlan A, Reaburn P, Osborne M, Dascombe BJ, 'The effects of wearing lower-body compression garments during endurance cycling', International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 3 424-438 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 40
2008 Reaburn P, Dascombe BJ, 'Endurance performance in masters athletes', European Review of Aging and Physical Activity, 5 31-42 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11556-008-0029-2
Citations Scopus - 65Web of Science - 47
2008 Reaburn P, Dascombe B, 'Do metropolitan Queensland firefighters meet the international firefighting standards for aerobic fitness?', Journal of Occupational Health and Safety - Australia and New Zealand, 24 321-327 (2008) [C1]

The aim of this study was to compare the physical fitness levels of 48 metropolitan Queensland firefighters with those of a normal, age-matched Australian population and the aerob... [more]

The aim of this study was to compare the physical fitness levels of 48 metropolitan Queensland firefighters with those of a normal, age-matched Australian population and the aerobic fitness standards recommended by the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF). Measures of physical fitness were determined using standardised procedures. Using a single-sample t-test and an alpha level of 0.05, results for four age groups were statistically compared with existing Australian fitness norms and aerobic capacity standards recommended by the IAFF. The results demonstrated that metropolitan Queensland firefighters have significantly higher body mass and body mass index values, but similar aerobic capacities to those of age-matched Australian males. The aerobic capacities were equal to or below those recommended by the IAFF. The risk of falling below these standards increased with age. Taken together, these findings suggest that many operational firefighters in metropolitan Queensland do not meet the aerobic fitness standards recommended by the IAFF.

Citations Scopus - 1
2007 Dascombe BJ, Reaburn PRJ, Sirotic AC, Coutts AJ, 'The reliability of the i-STAT clinical portable analyser', JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT, 10 135-140 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2006.05.023
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 32
2007 Duncan MJ, Mummery WK, Dascombe BJ, 'Utility of global positioning system to measure active transport in urban areas', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, 39 1851-1857 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/mss.0b013e31811ff31e
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2004 Coutts AJ, Murphy AJ, Dascombe BJ, 'Effect of direct supervision of a strength coach on measures of muscular strength and power in young rugby league players', JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, 18 316-323 (2004) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 67Web of Science - 64
2002 Stanton R, Evans G, Dascombe BJ, Peddle M, 'Biometric and biomechanical correlates to outrigger canoe paddling', Journal of Australian Strength and Conditioning, 10 19-26 (2002) [C1]
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Conference (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Dalbo VJ, Fox JL, Borges NR, Dascombe BJ, Young KC, Scanlan AT, 'Cumulative Training Dose Augments The Interrelationships Between Common Training Load Models During Basketball Activity: 1601 Board #254 June 2, 9: 00 AM - 10: 30 AM.', Medicine and science in sports and exercise (2016)
Co-authors Nattai Borges
2014 Taylor L, Watkins SL, Aldous JWF, Warren LK, Chrismas BCR, Dascombe B, et al., 'Effect Of Tyrosine Ingestion On Physical And Cognitive Performance During iSPT In A Warm Environment', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE (2014) [E3]
2012 Callister R, Giles AK, Dascombe BJ, Baker AL, Nasstasia Y, Halpin SA, et al., 'Healthy Body Healthy Mind: Development of an exercise intervention for the management of youth depression', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Brian Kelly, Sean Halpin, Robin Callister
2012 Scanlan A, Dascombe BJ, Reaburn P, Tucker P, Dalbo V, 'The development of the Basketball Exercise Simulation Test', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
2011 Elsworthy N, Dascombe BJ, 'The association between physical performance measures and decision making ability in Australian football umpires: A pilot study', 2011 Fatigue Symposium: The Future of Fatigue: Defining the Problem (2011) [E3]
2010 Callister R, Miller A, Aguiar EJ, Dascombe B, Smith C, Clark L, Rogers T, 'Blood lactate levels support classification of the 300 m shuttle run as an anaerobic capacity field test', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2010, 13(S1): e30-31. (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2010.10.525
Co-authors Robin Callister, Andrew Miller
2009 Dascombe BJ, Laursen P, Nosaka K, Reaburn P, Anderson R, 'The relationship between forearm oxygenation and selected physiological parameters in elite kayak paddlers', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2009) [E3]
Show 4 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $301,473

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $60,000

Ongoing researcher and technical support for Year 2 of the research project: "Can amino acid supplementation reduce fatigue in CFS patients? A randomized double-blind placebo-based trial."$60,000

Funding body: The Mason Foundation

Funding body The Mason Foundation
Project Team Professor Hugh Dunstan, Doctor Benjamin Dascombe, Doctor Tim Roberts
Scheme Medical and Scientific Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500976
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20151 grants / $90,000

Can amino acid supplementation reduce fatigue in CFS patients? A randomized double-blind placebo-based trial.$90,000

Funding body: The Mason Foundation

Funding body The Mason Foundation
Project Team Professor Hugh Dunstan, Doctor Benjamin Dascombe, Doctor Tim Roberts, Doctor Margaret MacDonald, Doctor Diane Sparkes
Scheme Medical and Scientific Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1400814
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20142 grants / $101,370

Susceptibility to significant sweat facilitated loss of amino acids in association with fatigue$99,370

Funding body: The Mason Foundation

Funding body The Mason Foundation
Project Team Professor Hugh Dunstan, Doctor Benjamin Dascombe, Doctor Tim Roberts
Scheme Medical and Scientific Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300910
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

2013 Vice Chancellor's Award for Research Excellence - FSIT$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Benjamin Dascombe
Scheme Award for Research Excellence
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301444
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20122 grants / $45,103

The Relationship Between Performance and Athlete Training Load within Rugby League: A Comparison Between Elite and Sub-Elite Players$43,683

Funding body: Hunter Sports Group Pty Ltd

Funding body Hunter Sports Group Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Benjamin Dascombe
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1200140
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Faculty ECA Networking/Conference Grant 2012$1,420

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project Team Doctor Benjamin Dascombe
Scheme Early Career Academic (ECA) Networking/Conference Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1401108
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20101 grants / $5,000

Development of a research strand aimed at developing non-invasive physiological monitoring during exercise $5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Benjamin Dascombe
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000624
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed4
Current2

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.9

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD The Loss of Amino Acids Via Sweat: Implications for Recovery From Exercise PhD (Biological Sciences), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Development of Valid Performance Testing Protocols for Mountain Bikers PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Performance, Physiological and Perceptual Effects of Cooling Endurance Athletes in the Heat PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD The Acute Physiological Physical and Perceptual Responses to Intermittent Hypoxic Resistance Training PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Factors Influencing the Physiological and Perceptual Decision-Making Demands of Australian Football Field Umpires PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD The Use of Game-Based Training to Provide a Match-Specific Environment for Cricket Players PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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Dr Benjamin Dascombe

Position

Conjoint Associate Professor
Exercise and Sport Science
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Applied Sciences

Contact Details

Email ben.dascombe@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4348 4150
Fax (02) 4348 4145

Office

Room SO.E1.39.
Building Science Offices
Location Ourimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
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