Dr Beatrice Murawski

Dr Beatrice Murawski

Research Assistant

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Originally from Germany, Beatrice has earned BSc and MSc degrees from the University of Plymouth in England, UK and Lund University in Sweden. In 2019, she graduated from the University of Newcastle, Australia with a PhD in Behavioural Sciences.

Beatrice’s PhD research was focused on improving the physical activity levels and sleep health of Australian adults using a technology-based approach. Reductions in the high prevalence of physical inactivity and poor sleep health in adults will support the global battle against chronic disease, and this requires targeted health promotion.

Beatrice is determined to bring more health promotion initiatives to those who need it the most. She is hoping to trial a whole system approach to facilitate positive changes in health behaviour for optimal health and well-being in the adult population.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Behavioural Science, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Medical Science, Lund University - Sweden

Keywords

  • Behaviour change
  • Behavioural Science
  • Health promotion
  • Physical activity
  • Public health
  • Sleep Health

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • French (Working)
  • Spanish (Working)
  • Swedish (Working)
  • German (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111712 Health Promotion 100
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (18 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Rayward AT, Murawski B, Duncan MJ, Holliday EG, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'Efficacy of an m-Health Physical Activity and Sleep Intervention to Improve Sleep Quality in Middle-Aged Adults: The Refresh Study Randomized Controlled Trial', Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, 54 470-483 (2020) [C1]

© Society of Behavioral Medicine 2020. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. BACKGROUND: Poor sleep health is highly prevalent. Physic... [more]

© Society of Behavioral Medicine 2020. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. BACKGROUND: Poor sleep health is highly prevalent. Physical activity is known to improve sleep quality but not specifically targeted in sleep interventions. PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy of a combined physical activity and sleep intervention with a sleep-only intervention and a wait-list control, for improving sleep quality in middle-aged adults without a diagnosed sleep disorder. METHODS: Three-arm randomized controlled trial (Physical Activity and Sleep Health (PAS), Sleep Health Only (SO), Wait-list Control (CON) groups; 3-month primary time-point, 6-month follow-up) of 275 (PAS = 110, SO = 110, CON = 55) inactive adults (40-65 years) reporting poor sleep quality. The main intervention component was a smartphone/tablet "app" to aid goal setting and self-monitoring physical activity and/or sleep hygiene behaviors (including stress management), and a pedometer for PAS group. Primary outcome was Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) global score. Secondary outcomes included several self-reported physical activity measures and PSQI subcomponents. Group differences were examined stepwise, first between pooled intervention (PI = PAS + SO) and CON groups, then between PAS and SO groups. RESULTS: Compared with CON, PI groups significantly improved PSQI global and subcomponents scores at 3 and 6 months. There were no differences in sleep quality between PAS and SO groups. The PAS group reported significantly less daily sitting time at 3 months and was significantly more likely to report =2 days/week resistance training and meeting physical activity guidelines at 6 months than the SO group. CONCLUSIONS: PIs had statistically significantly improved sleep quality among middle-aged adults with poor sleep quality without a diagnosed sleep disorder. The adjunctive physical activity intervention did not additionally improve sleep quality. CLINICAL TRIAL INFORMATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12617000680369; Universal Trial number: U1111-1194-2680; Human Research Ethics Committee, Blinded by request of journal: H-2016-0267.

DOI 10.1093/abm/kaz064
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Mitch Duncan, Ron Plotnikoff
2020 Nathan N, Murawski B, Hope K, Young S, Sutherland R, Hodder R, et al., 'The efficacy of workplace interventions on improving the dietary, physical activity and sleep behaviours of school and childcare staff: A systematic review', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 1-24 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. There is a need for effective interventions that improve the health and wellbeing of school and childcare staff. This rev... [more]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. There is a need for effective interventions that improve the health and wellbeing of school and childcare staff. This review examined the efficacy of workplace interventions to improve the dietary, physical activity and/or sleep behaviours of school and childcare staff. A secondary aim of the review was to assess changes in staff physical/mental health, productivity, and students¿ health behaviours. Nine databases were searched for controlled trials including randomised and non-randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental trials published in English up to October 2019. PRISMA guidelines informed screening and study selection procedures. Data were not suitable for quantitative pooling. Of 12,396 records screened, seven articles (based on six studies) were included. Most studies used multi-component interventions including educational resources, work-based wellness committees and planned group practice (e.g., walking groups). Multiple outcomes were assessed, findings were mixed and on average, there was moderate risk of bias. Between-group differences in dietary and physical activity behaviours (i.e., fruit/vegetable intake, leisure-time physical activity) favoured intervention groups, but were statistically non-significant for most outcomes. Some of the studies also showed differences favouring controls (i.e., nutrient intake, fatty food consumption). Additional robust studies testing the efficacy of workplace interventions to improve the health of educational staff are needed.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph17144998
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Kathryn L Reilly, Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Flora Tzelepis
2020 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Rayward AT, Brown WJ, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, 'Examining mediators of intervention efficacy in a randomised controlled m-health trial to improve physical activity and sleep health in adults.', Psychol Health, 1-22 (2020)
DOI 10.1080/08870446.2020.1756288
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Mitch Duncan, David Lubans
2020 Duncan MJ, Fenton S, Brown WJ, Collins CE, Glozier N, Kolt GS, et al., 'Efficacy of a Multi-component m-Health Weight-loss Intervention in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomised Controlled Trial.', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17176200
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Liz Holliday
2020 Duncan MJ, Oftedal S, Rebar AL, Murawski B, Short CE, Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, 'Patterns of physical activity, sitting time, and sleep in Australian adults: A latent class analysis', Sleep Health, (2020)

© 2020 National Sleep Foundation Objective: To identify the patterns of activity, sitting and sleep that adults engage in, the demographic and biological correlates of activity-sl... [more]

© 2020 National Sleep Foundation Objective: To identify the patterns of activity, sitting and sleep that adults engage in, the demographic and biological correlates of activity-sleep patterns and the relationship between identified patterns and self-rated health. Design and Setting: Online panel of randomly selected Australian adults (n = 2034) completing a cross-sectional survey in October-November 2013. Participants: Panel members who provided complete data on all variables were included (n = 1532). Measurements: Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, height, weight, self-rated health, duration of physical activity, frequency of resistance training, sitting time, sleep duration, sleep quality, and variability in bed and wake times. Activity-sleep patterns were determined using latent class analysis. Latent class regression was used to examine the relationships between identified patterns, demographic and biological characteristics, and self-rated health. Results: A 4-class model fit the data best, characterized by very active good sleepers, inactive good sleepers, inactive poor sleepers, moderately active good sleepers, representing 38.2%, 22.2%, 21.2%, and 18.4% of the sample, respectively. Relative to the very active good sleepers, the inactive poor sleepers, and inactive good sleepers were more likely to report being female, lower education, higher body mass index, and lower self-rated health, the moderately active good sleepers were more likely to be older, report lower education, higher body mass index and lower self-rated health. Associations between activity-sleep pattern and self-rated health were the largest in the inactive poor sleepers. Conclusions: The 4 activity-sleep patterns identified had distinct behavioral profiles, sociodemographic correlates, and relationships with self-rated health. Many adults could benefit from behavioral interventions targeting improvements in physical activity and sleep.

DOI 10.1016/j.sleh.2020.04.006
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2019 Duncan M, Oftedal S, Rebar A, Murawski B, Short C, Rayward A, Vandelanotte C, 'Patterns of physical activity, sitting time and sleep in Australian adults: a latent class analysis', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22 S56-S56 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.08.250
2019 Van der Horst K, Bucher T, Duncanson K, Murawski B, Labbe D, 'Consumer Understanding, Perception and Interpretation of Serving Size Information on Food Labels: A Scoping Review', Nutrients, 11 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu11092189
Co-authors Tamara Bucher, Kerith Duncanson
2019 Gordon S, Vandelanotte C, Rayward AT, Murawski B, Duncan MJ, 'Sociodemographic and behavioral correlates of insufficient sleep in Australian adults', SLEEP HEALTH, 5 12-17 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.sleh.2018.06.002
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2019 Oftedal S, Burrows T, Fenton S, Murawski B, Rayward AB, Duncan MJ, 'Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of an m-Health Intervention Targeting Physical Activity, Diet, and Sleep Quality in Shift-Workers', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16203810
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Mitch Duncan
2019 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Rayward AT, Oldmeadow C, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Duncan M, 'Efficacy of an m-health physical activity and sleep health intervention for adults: a randomized waitlist-controlled trial.', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 57 503-514 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2019.05.009
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Ron Plotnikoff, Mitch Duncan
2019 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Duncan MJ, 'Development and psychometric testing of an instrument to assess psychosocial determinants of sleep hygiene practice', JOURNAL OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY, (2019)
DOI 10.1177/1359105319891524
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Ron Plotnikoff
2018 Rayward A, Plotnikoff R, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Holliday E, Duncan MJJ, 'A randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy of an m-health delivered physical activity and sleep intervention to improve sleep quality in middle-aged adults: The Refresh Study Protocol', Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 73 36-50 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2018.08.007
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Liz Holliday, Ron Plotnikoff
2018 Duncan MJ, Brown WJ, Burrows TL, Collins CE, Fenton S, Glozier N, et al., 'Examining the efficacy of a multicomponent m-Health physical activity, diet and sleep intervention for weight loss in overweight and obese adults: randomised controlled trial protocol', BMJ OPEN, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026179
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, Liz Holliday, Michael Hensley, Mitch Duncan
2018 Murawski B, Wade L, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Duncan MJ, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of cognitive and behavioral interventions to improve sleep health in adults without sleep disorders', Sleep Medicine Reviews, 40 160-169 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.smrv.2017.12.003
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff, Mitch Duncan
2018 Bucher T, Murawski B, Duncanson K, Labbe D, Van der Horst K, 'The effect of the labelled serving size on consumption: A systematic review', Appetite, 128 50-57 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Guidance for food consumption and portion control plays an important role in the global management of overweight and obesity. Carefully conceptualised serving size labellin... [more]

© 2018 Guidance for food consumption and portion control plays an important role in the global management of overweight and obesity. Carefully conceptualised serving size labelling can contribute to this guidance. However, little is known about the relationship between the information that is provided regarding serving sizes on food packages and levels of actual food consumption. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate how serving size information on food packages influences food consumption. We conducted a systematic review of the evidence published between 1980 and March 2018. Two reviewers screened titles and abstracts for relevance and assessed relevant articles for eligibility in full-text. Five studies were considered eligible for the systematic review. In three of the included studies, changes in serving size labelling resulted in positive health implications for consumers, whereby less discretionary foods were consumed, if serving sizes were smaller or if serving size information was provided alongside contextual information referring to the entire package. One study did not find significant differences between the conditions they tested and one study suggested a potentially negative impact, if the serving size was reduced. The influence of labelled serving size on consumption of non-discretionary foods remains unclear, which is partially due to the absence of studies specifically focusing on non-discretionary food groups. Studies that investigate the impact of serving size labels within the home environment and across a broad demographic cross-section are required.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2018.05.137
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Kerith Duncanson, Tamara Bucher
2018 Murawski B, Plotnikoff RC, Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Duncan MJ, 'Randomised controlled trial using a theory-based m-health intervention to improve physical activity and sleep health in adults: the Synergy Study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018997
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Ron Plotnikoff
2017 Duncan M, Murawski B, Short CE, Rebar AL, Schoeppe S, Alley S, et al., 'Activity Trackers Implement Different Behavior Change Techniques for Activity, Sleep, and Sedentary Behaviors.', Interactive journal of medical research, 6 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/ijmr.6685
Citations Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2016 Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Trost SG, Rebar AL, Rogers N, Burton NW, et al., 'Balanced: a randomised trial examining the efficacy of two self-monitoring methods for an app-based multi-behaviour intervention to improve physical activity, sitting and sleep in adults', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3256-x
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
Show 15 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Bucher T, Duncanson K, Murawski B, van der Horst K, Labbe D, 'Consumer understanding, perception and interpretation of serving size information on food labels: A scoping review', Verona, Italy (2018)
Co-authors Kerith Duncanson, Tamara Bucher
2018 Bucher T, Ducnanson K, Murawski B, van der Horst K, Labbe D, 'How do consumers understand and interpret the serving size information on food labels', Hong Kong (2018)
Co-authors Tamara Bucher
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $39,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $39,000

Review of scientific literature on the influence of portion size food labels on consumer behaviour$39,000

Funding body: Nestec Ltd

Funding body Nestec Ltd
Project Team Doctor Tamara Bucher, Doctor Beatrice Murawski
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701336
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON Y
Edit

Dr Beatrice Murawski

Position

Research Assistant
Hunter New England Population Health Research Group
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email beatrice.murawski@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 02 4924 6601
Link Twitter

Office

Room Room 2213
Building Booth Building
Location Wallsend Health Services, Loongworth Avenue, Wallsend

,
Edit