Conjoint Professor Andrew Searles

Conjoint Professor Andrew Searles

Conjoint Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Until 2011, my employment experience was with industry – as an economist with a major bank and as a consulting economist with a private sector not-for-profit research group where I was also appointed Director of Research. In this role I was responsible for a research budget that averaged three million dollars per year, based mostly on commercial contracts. I was responsible for developing the strategic research direction of the organisation; reported to the Board on research outcomes; developed responses to research briefs; conducted media presentations; and was the organisation’s lead public presenter. In this role I published over 150 consultancy reports. 

In late 2011 I joined the University of Newcastle as an Associate Professor in Health Economics. This position transitioned to HMRI in 2014. In 2015, I became Acting Lead for HMRI’s Health Research Economics (HRE) unit. In August 2016 I was appointed as an Associate Director at HMRI, and lead of the HRE unit. The core requirement for this role is applied economics: to provide expertise in health economics to frontline clinicians and researchers undertaking evaluations of health technologies. Since 2014, these applied services have contributed to the attraction of approximately $17 million in research funding. 

In September 2017 I was appointed to represent the NSW Regional Health Partners (NSWRHP), Centre for Innovation in Regional Health (CIRH) on the Australian Health Research Alliance (AHRA) National Steering Committee for Health Services Research (Health Economics). I Co-Chair a National Working Group on healthcare evaluation and I am leading a national MRFF funded project to design a national framework for health systems evaluation. In January 2018 I was awarded a NSWRHP Fellowship to work on the MRFF project. 

At HMRI I have led work to develop significant areas of evaluation infrastructure. The first is a framework to measure and encourage research translation and research impact. The framework is referred to as the Framework to Assess the Impact from Translational health research (FAIT). As part of this project I liaise frequently with international experts, other Medical Research Institutes (MRIs) and senior representatives from state and federal government organisations. The second area was the development of a platform to improve health technology assessment within the NSW Regional Health Partners. 



Qualifications

  • PhD (Community Medicine & Clinical Epidemiology), University of Newcastle
  • Diploma in Education, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Medical Statistics, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Applied economics
  • Budget impact analysis (for health services)
  • Cost studies
  • Cost-benefit analysis
  • Cost-consequence analysis
  • Cost-effective analysis
  • Health economics
  • Policy impact
  • Research impact
  • Research translation
  • Social return on investment

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
160508 Health Policy 10
140299 Applied Economics not elsewhere classified 50
140208 Health Economics 40

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/2011 - 30/12/2013 Associate Professor

In December 2011 I joined the University of Newcastle as an Associate Professor in Health Economics. This role was to develop expertise in health economics at the University and to establish linkages with industry partners in health. This role transitioned to Hunter Medical Research Institute in 2014.

The Faculty of Health, The University of Newcastle
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/2015 -  Associate Director and Head of Health Economics

In 2015, I became Acting Lead for HMRI’s Health Research Economics (HRE) unit. In 2016 I was appointed as an Associate Director at HMRI, and lead of the HRE unit. The unit consists of five economists and one impact assessment analyst. The core requirement for this unit is applied economics: to provide expertise in health economics to front line clinicians, health staff and researchers who are undertaking evaluations of health technologies. Since 2014, these applied services have contributed to the attraction of approximately $17 million in research funding from the NHMRC.

Hunter Medical Research Institute
Health Research Economics
1/01/2014 - 1/10/2015 Associate Professor - Health Economist

Develop a program for health research economics to assist the competitive advantage of Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI), Hunter New England Health and The University of Newcastle  health researchers; develop a program of research in health research economics that is valued regionally, nationally and internationally; contribute to growing the expertise and capacity of the HMRI health research economics team.

Hunter Medical Research Institute
Health Research Economics
1/01/2007 - 1/11/2011 Director of Research

Develop the organisation's economics program, undertake economic analyses, train new economists, present economic data at seminars and business events. Overall management and leadership of the research staff; strategically develop economic and other research programs to address community need; recruit workforce, train new staff; develop management models in business performance, costing and performance indicators. In this role I was the organisation's lead presenter in community and business forums, and led media interviews and appearances.

Hunter Valley Research Foundation
Australia
1/01/1990 - 30/12/2006 Senior economist

Develop economics program, undertake economic analyses, train new economists, present economic data at employer’s seminars and business events. Develop the organisation's expertise in input-output modelling and economic evaluation.

Hunter Valley Research Foundation
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Searles AM, Henry D, 'Pharmaceutical Pricing policy', MDS-3 Managing Access to Medicines and Health Technologies, Kumarian Press, US (2013)

Journal article (43 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Ramanathan S, Reeves P, Deeming S, Bernhardt J, Nilsson M, Cadilhac DA, et al., 'Implementing a protocol for a research impact assessment of the Centre for Research Excellence in Stroke Rehabilitation and Brain Recovery', HEALTH RESEARCH POLICY AND SYSTEMS, 16 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s12961-018-0349-2
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Michael Nilsson
2018 Deeming S, Reeves P, Ramanathan S, Attia J, Nilsson M, Searles A, 'Measuring research impact in medical research institutes: a qualitative study of the attitudes and opinions of Australian medical research institutes towards research impact assessment frameworks.', Health research policy and systems, 16 28 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12961-018-0300-6
Co-authors John Attia, Michael Nilsson
2018 Ling R, Rush A, Carter C, Carpenter J, Watson PH, Byrne JA, Searles A, 'An Australian Biobank Certification Scheme: A Study of Economic Costs to Participating Biobanks', Biopreservation and Biobanking, 16 53-58 (2018) [C1]

Copyright © 2018, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Biobanks face increasing demands for research materials of consistent quality, which can be used in collaborative studies. Several countri... [more]

Copyright © 2018, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Biobanks face increasing demands for research materials of consistent quality, which can be used in collaborative studies. Several countries and some international agencies have made formal efforts to standardize biobank operations and outputs. These include the establishment of best practice guidelines for collection management, and certification programs. Such guidelines and programs increase biobanks' opportunities for participation in high impact research and funding. However, they also impose economic and time costs, which may burden biobanks. This study aimed to estimate the costs of gaining certification and maintaining certification (i.e., committing extra resources to continue standards) for three cancer biobanks participating in a biobank certification program in New South Wales, Australia. To gather cost data for a range of cancer biobanks, we recruited three with different full time equivalent (FTE) staff levels (1.0-3.0), recognizing FTE staff level as an indicator of resources and operating scale. In extended interviews with staff, we gathered biobanks' expected costs in obtaining and annually maintaining certification. The biobank with the highest staff level reported the lowest expected costs in gaining certification, due to the strong prealignment of its present operations with certification requirements. The other biobanks expected higher costs as their operations required greater adjustments. Overall, relative costs of gaining certification were between 2% and 6% of current total annual wage costs. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first such costing study of a biobank certification program. Supplementary Data include the interview schedule that other biobanks may use to estimate their own economic certification costs.

DOI 10.1089/bio.2017.0095
Co-authors Rod Ling
2018 Rush A, Ling R, Carpenter JE, Carter C, Searles A, Byrne JA, 'Research governance review of a negligible-risk research project: Too much of a good thing?', Research Ethics, 14 1-12 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1747016117739937
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Rod Ling
2018 Porsbjerg C, Sverrild A, Baines KJ, Searles A, Maltby S, Foster PS, et al., 'Advancing the management of obstructive airways diseases through translational research.', Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 48 493-501 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/cea.13112
Co-authors Katherine Baines, Paul Foster, Peter Gibson, Steven Maltby
2018 Major GAC, Ling R, Searles A, Niddrie F, Kelly A, Holliday E, et al., 'The Costs of Confronting Osteoporosis: Cost Study of an Australian Fracture Liaison Service', Journal of Bone and Mineral Research Plus, (2018)
DOI 10.1002/jbm4.10046.
Co-authors John Attia, Liz Holliday
2018 Tzelepis F, Wiggers J, Paul CL, Byaruhanga J, Byrnes E, Bowman J, et al., 'A randomised trial of real-time video counselling for smoking cessation in regional and remote locations: study protocol', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 74 70-75 (2018)

© 2018 Elsevier Inc. Background: Real-time video communication technology (e.g. Skype) may be an effective mode for delivering smoking cessation treatment to regional and remote r... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Inc. Background: Real-time video communication technology (e.g. Skype) may be an effective mode for delivering smoking cessation treatment to regional and remote residents. This randomised trial examines the effectiveness of real-time video counselling compared to: 1) telephone counselling; and 2) written materials (control) in achieving smoking abstinence in regional and remote residents. Design: A three-arm, parallel group, randomised trial will be conducted with smokers residing in regional and remote areas of New South Wales, Australia. Potential participants will complete an online screening survey and if eligible an online baseline survey. Participants will be randomly allocated into: 1) real-time video counselling; 2) telephone counselling; or 3) written materials (control). In the video counselling intervention an advisor will deliver up to six video sessions (e.g. via Skype) to participants. Those who nominate a quit date within a month during the initial video session will be offered sessions on the quit date, 3-, 7-, 14- and 30-days after the quit date. Those not ready to set a quit date within a month during the initial video session will be offered sessions 2-, 4- and 6-weeks later. Other than delivery mode, the video counselling and telephone counselling will be identical in content and callback schedules. Control group participants will be mailed one-off written materials. Follow-up surveys will occur at 4-months, 7-months and 13-months post-baseline. The primary outcome will be 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 13-months post-baseline. Discussion: Real-time video counselling may be an effective strategy for smoking cessation that could be integrated into quitlines globally.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2018.10.001
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, John Wiggers, Rod Ling, Chris Paul, Jenny Bowman
2018 Sanson-Fisher RW, Noble NE, Searles AM, Deeming S, Smits RE, Oldmeadow CJ, Bryant J, 'A simple filter model to guide the allocation of healthcare resources for improving the treatment of depression among cancer patients', BMC CANCER, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12885-018-4009-2
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Natasha Noble, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Kingsland M, Doherty E, Anderson AE, Crooks K, Tully B, Tremain D, et al., 'A practice change intervention to improve antenatal care addressing alcohol consumption by women during pregnancy: research protocol for a randomised stepped-wedge cluster trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 13 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s13012-018-0806-x
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Amy Anderson, John Wiggers, Ian Symonds, A Dunlop, John Attia
2018 Edmunds K, Ling R, Shakeshaft A, Doran C, Searles A, 'Systematic review of economic evaluations of interventions for high risk young people', BMC Health Services Research, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3450-x
Co-authors Rod Ling
2018 Ling R, Searles A, Hewitt J, Considine R, Turner C, Thomas S, et al., 'Cost analysis of an integrated aged care program for residential aged care facilities.', Aust Health Rev, (2018)
DOI 10.1071/AH16297
Co-authors Rod Ling, Isabel Higgins
2018 Lahiry S, Levi C, Kim J, Cadilhac DA, Searles A, 'Economic Evaluation of a Pre-Hospital Protocol for Patients with Suspected Acute Stroke.', Frontiers in Public Health, 6 1-9 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fpubh.2018.00043
Co-authors Christopher Levi
2017 Ramanathan S, Reeves P, Deeming S, Bailie RS, Bailie J, Bainbridge R, et al., 'Encouraging translation and assessing impact of the Centre for Research Excellence in Integrated Quality Improvement: rationale and protocol for a research impact assessment', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018572
Citations Web of Science - 2
2017 Kepreotes E, Whitehead B, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, Collison A, Searles A, et al., 'High-flow warm humidified oxygen versus standard low-flow nasal cannula oxygen for moderate bronchiolitis (HFWHO RCT): an open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial', The Lancet, 389 930-939 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background Bronchiolitis is the most common lung infection in infants and treatment focuses on management of respiratory distress and hypoxia. High-flow warm h... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background Bronchiolitis is the most common lung infection in infants and treatment focuses on management of respiratory distress and hypoxia. High-flow warm humidified oxygen (HFWHO) is increasingly used, but has not been rigorously studied in randomised trials. We aimed to examine whether HFWHO provided enhanced respiratory support, thereby shortening time to weaning off oxygen. Methods In this open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial, we recruited children aged less than 24 months with moderate bronchiolitis attending the emergency department of the John Hunter Hospital or the medical unit of the John Hunter Children's Hospital in New South Wales, Australia. Patients were randomly allocated (1:1) via opaque sealed envelopes to HFWHO (maximum flow of 1 L/kg per min to a limit of 20 L/min using 1:1 air¿oxygen ratio, resulting in a maximum FiO2of 0·6) or standard therapy (cold wall oxygen 100% via infant nasal cannulae at low flow to a maximum of 2 L/min) using a block size of four and stratifying for gestational age at birth. The primary outcome was time from randomisation to last use of oxygen therapy. All randomised children were included in the primary and secondary safety analyses. This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, number ACTRN12612000685819. Findings From July 16, 2012, to May 1, 2015, we randomly assigned 202 children to either HFWHO (101 children) or standard therapy (101 children). Median time to weaning was 24 h (95% CI 18¿28) for standard therapy and 20 h (95% CI 17¿34) for HFWHO (hazard ratio [HR] for difference in survival distributions 0·9 [95% CI 0·7¿1·2]; log rank p=0·61). Fewer children experienced treatment failure on HFWHO (14 [14%]) compared with standard therapy (33 [33%]; p=0·0016); of these children, those on HFWHO were supported for longer than were those on standard therapy before treatment failure (HR 0·3; 95% CI 0·2¿0·6; p<0·0001). 20 (61%) of 33 children who experienced treatment failure on standard therapy were rescued with HFWHO. 12 (12%) of children on standard therapy required transfer to the intensive care unit compared with 14 (14%) of those on HFWHO (difference -1%; 95% CI -7 to 16; p=0·41). Four adverse events occurred (oxygen desaturation and condensation inhalation in the HFWHO group, and two incidences of oxygen tubing disconnection in the standard therapy group); none resulted in withdrawal from the trial. No oxygen-related serious adverse events occurred. Secondary effectiveness outcomes are reported in the Results section. Interpretation HFWHO did not significantly reduce time on oxygen compared with standard therapy, suggesting that early use of HFWHO does not modify the underlying disease process in moderately severe bronchiolitis. HFWHO might have a role as a rescue therapy to reduce the proportion of children requiring high-cost intensive care. Funding Hunter Children's Research Foundation, John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust, and the University of Newcastle Priority Research Centre GrowUpWell.

DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30061-2
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 27
Co-authors John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, Joerg Mattes, Adam Collison
2017 Yoong SL, Grady A, Wiggers J, Flood V, Rissel C, Finch M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an online menu planning intervention to improve childcare service adherence to dietary guidelines: a study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017498
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Alison A Fielding, Serene Yoong
2017 Reeves P, Deeming S, Ramanathan S, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Searles A, 'Measurement of the translation and impact from a childhood obesity trial programme: rationale and protocol for a research impact assessment', HEALTH RESEARCH POLICY AND SYSTEMS, 15 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12961-017-0266-9
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Kinchin I, Doran CM, McCalman J, Jacups S, Tsey K, Lines K, et al., 'Delivering an empowerment intervention to a remote Indigenous child safety workforce: Its economic cost from an agency perspective', Evaluation and Program Planning, 64 85-89 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background The Family Wellbeing (FWB) program applies culturally appropriate community led empowerment training to enhance the personal development of Aborigin... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background The Family Wellbeing (FWB) program applies culturally appropriate community led empowerment training to enhance the personal development of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in life skills. This study sought to estimate the economic cost required to deliver the FWB program to a child safety workforce in remote Australian communities. Method This study was designed as a retrospective cost description taken from the perspective of a non-government child safety agency. The target population were child protection residential care workers aged 24 or older, who worked in safe houses in five remote Indigenous communities and a regional office during the study year (2013). Resource utilization included direct costs (personnel and administrative) and indirect or opportunity costs of participants, regarded as absence from work. Results The total cost of delivering the FWB program for 66 participants was $182,588 ($2766 per participant), with 45% ($82,995) of costs classified as indirect (i.e., opportunity cost of participants time). Training cost could be further mitigated (~30%) if offered on-site, in the community. The costs for offering the FWB program to a remotely located workforce were high, but not substantial when compared to the recruitment cost required to substitute a worker in remote settings. Conclusion An investment of $2766 per participant created an opportunity to improve social and emotional wellbeing of remotely located workforce. This cost study provided policy relevant information by identifying the resources required to transfer the FWB program to other remote locations. It also can be used to support future comparative cost and outcome analyses and add to the evidence base around the cost-effectiveness of empowerment programs.

DOI 10.1016/j.evalprogplan.2017.05.017
2017 Parker V, Giles M, Graham L, Suthers B, Watts W, O'Brien AP, Searles A, 'Avoiding inappropriate urinary catheter use and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI): a pre-post control intervention study', BMC Health Services Research, 17 1-9 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2268-2
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tony Obrien
2017 Deeming S, Searles A, Reeves P, Nilsson M, 'Measuring research impact in Australia's medical research institutes: a scoping literature review of the objectives for and an assessment of the capabilities of research impact assessment frameworks', HEALTH RESEARCH POLICY AND SYSTEMS, 15 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12961-017-0180-1
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Michael Nilsson
2016 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Hobden B, Zucca A, Henskens F, et al., 'A consumer register: an acceptable and cost-effective alternative for accessing patient populations', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 16 1-10 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however, they have several limitations including low c... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however, they have several limitations including low consent and participation rates, and potential selection bias. To improve access to samples for research, the utility of a new model of recruitment termed the 'Consumer Register', that allows for direct patient recruitment from hospitals, was examined. This paper reports: (i) consent rates onto the register; (ii) preferred methods and frequency of contact; and (iii) the feasibility of establishing the register, including: (a) cost per person recruited to the register; (b) the differential cost and consent rates of volunteer versus paid data collectors; and (c) participant completion rates. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five outpatient clinics in Australia. Patients were approached by volunteers or paid data collectors and asked to complete a touch-screen electronic survey. Consenting individuals were asked to indicate their willingness and preferences for enrolment onto a research register. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patient preferences and linear regression used to model the success of volunteer versus paid data collectors. The opportunity and financial costs of establishing the register were calculated. Results: A total of 1947 patients (80.6 %) consented to complete the survey, of which, 1486 (76.3 %) completed the questionnaire. Of the completers, the majority (69.4 %, or 1032 participants) were willing to be listed on the register and preferred to be contacted by email (50.3 %). Almost 39 % of completers were willing to be contacted three or more times in a 12 month period. The annual opportunity cost of resources consumed by the register was valued at $37,187, giving an opportunity cost per person recruited to the register of $36. After amortising fixed costs, the annual financial outlay was $23,004 or $22 per person recruited to the register. Use of volunteer data collectors contributed to an annual saving of $14,183, however paid data collectors achieved significantly higher consent rates. Successful enrolment onto the register was completed for 42 % of the sample. Conclusions: A Consumer Register is a promising and feasible alternative to population-based registries, with the majority of participants willing to be contacted multiple times via low-resource methods such as email. There is an effectiveness/cost trade off in the use of paid versus volunteer data collectors.

DOI 10.1186/s12874-016-0238-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Elizabeth Fradgley, Alison Zucca, Frans Henskens, Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Stewart Williams J, Ling R, Searles AM, Doran CM, Byles J, 'Identification of higher hospital costs and more frequent admissions among mid-aged Australian women who self-report diabetes mellitus', Maturitas, 90 58-63 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Objective To ascertain whether the hospital costs for mid-aged Australian women who self-reported diabetes mellitus (DM) and who ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Objective To ascertain whether the hospital costs for mid-aged Australian women who self-reported diabetes mellitus (DM) and who had one or more hospital admission during an eight and a half year period were higher than the hospital costs for other similarly aged non-DM women. Methods The sample comprised 2,392 mid-aged women, resident in New South Wales (NSW) Australia and participating in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), who had any NSW hospital admissions during the eight and a half year period 1 July 2000 to 31 December 2008. Analyses were conducted on linked data from ALSWH surveys and the NSW Admitted Patient Data Collection (APDC). Hospital costs were compared for the DM and non-DM cohorts of women. A generalized linear model measured the association between hospital costs and self-reported DM. Results Eight and a half year hospital costs were 41% higher for women who self-reported DM in the ALSWH surveys (p < 0.0001). On average, women who self-reported DM had significantly (p < 0.0001) more hospital admissions (5.3) than women with no reported DM (3.4). The average hospital stay per admission was not significantly different between the two groups of women. Conclusions Self-reported DM status in mid-aged Australian women is a predictor of higher hospital costs. This simple measure can be a useful indicator for public policy makers planning early-stage interventions that target people in the population at risk of DM.

DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.04.008
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Stewartwilliams, Rod Ling
2016 Murphy VE, Jensen ME, Mattes J, Hensley MJ, Giles WB, Peek MJ, et al., 'The Breathing for Life Trial: a randomised controlled trial of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO)-based management of asthma during pregnancy and its impact on perinatal outcomes and infant and childhood respiratory health', BMC PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH, 16 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-0890-3
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors John Attia, Vanessa Murphy, Megan Jensen, Joerg Mattes, Michael Hensley, Peter Gibson
2016 Doran CM, Ling R, Searles A, Hill P, 'Does evidence influence policy? Resource allocation and the Indigenous Burden of Disease study', Australian Health Review, 40 705-715 (2016) [C1]

Objective The Indigenous Burden of Disease (IBoD) report is the most comprehensive assessment of Indigenous disease burden in Australia. The aim of the present study was to invest... [more]

Objective The Indigenous Burden of Disease (IBoD) report is the most comprehensive assessment of Indigenous disease burden in Australia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential effect of the IBoD report on Australian Indigenous health policy, service expenditure and research funding. Findings have significance for understanding factors that may influence Indigenous health policy. Methods The potential effect of the IBoD report was considered by: (1) conducting a text search of pertinent documents published by the federal government, Council of Australian Governments and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) and observing the quantity and quality of references to IBoD; (2) examining data on government Indigenous healthcare expenditure for trends consistent with the findings and policy implications of the IBoD report; and (3) examining NHMRC Indigenous grant allocation trends consistent with the findings and policy implications of the IBoD report. Results Of 110 government and NHMRC documents found, IBoD was cited in 27. Immediately after publication of the IBoD report, federal and state governments increased Indigenous health spending (relative to non-Indigenous), notably for community health and public health at the state level. Expenditure on Indigenous hospital separations for chronic diseases also increased. These changes are broadly consistent with the findings of the IBoD report on the significance of chronic disease and the need to address certain risk factors. However, there is no evidence that such changes had a causal connection with the IBoD study. After publication of the IBoD report, changes in NHMRC Indigenous research funding showed little consistency with the findings of the IBoD report. Conclusions The present study found only indirect and inconsistent correlational evidence of the potential influence of the IBoD report on Indigenous health expenditure and research funding. Further assessment of the potential influence of the IBoD report on Indigenous health policy will require more targeted research, including interviews with key informants involved in developing health policy. What is known about the topic? There are currently no publications that consider the potential effed of the IBoD study on Indigenous health expenditure and research funding. What does this paper add? This paper offers the first consideration of the potential effect of the IBoD report. It contains analyses of data from readily available sources, examining national expenditures on Indigenous health and NHMRC Indigenous research, before and after the publication of the IBoD report. What are the implications for practitioners? The paper is relevant to analysts interested in drivers of Indigenous health policy. Although it finds correlations between the release of the IBoD report and some subsequent health spending decisions, other factors should be investigated to better understand the complexity of processes that drive government efforts to improve Indigenous health.

DOI 10.1071/AH15105
Co-authors Rod Ling
2016 Searles A, Doran C, Attia J, Knight D, Wiggers J, Deeming S, et al., 'An approach to measuring and encouraging research translation and research impact', HEALTH RESEARCH POLICY AND SYSTEMS, 14 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12961-016-0131-2
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Joerg Mattes, Rod Ling, Michael Nilsson, Darryl Knight, John Wiggers, John Attia
2016 Paul CL, Boyes A, Searles A, Carey M, Turon H, 'The impact of loss of income and medicine costs on the financial burden for cancer patients in Australia', Journal of Community and Supportive Oncology, 14 307-313 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Frontline Medical Communications. Background The cost of medicines may prove prohibitive for some cancer patients, potentially reducing the ability of a health system to fu... [more]

© 2016 Frontline Medical Communications. Background The cost of medicines may prove prohibitive for some cancer patients, potentially reducing the ability of a health system to fully deliver best practice care. Objective To identify nonuse or nonpurchase of cancer-related medicines due to cost, and to describe the perceived financial burden of such medicines and associated patient characteristics. Methods A cross-sectional pen- And-paper questionnaire was completed by oncology outpatients at 2 hospitals in Australia; 1 in regional New South Wales and 1 in metropolitan Victoria. Results Almost 1 in 10 study participants had used over- The-counter medicines rather than prescribed medicines for cancer and obtained some but not all of the medicines prescribed in relation to their cancer. 63% of the sample reported some level of financial burden associated with obtaining these medicines, with 34% reporting a moderate or heavy financial burden. 11.8% reported using alternatives to prescribed medicines. People reporting reduced income after being diagnosed with cancer had almost 4 times the odds (OR, 3.73; 95% CI, 1.1-12.1) of reporting a heavy or extreme financial burden associated with prescribed medicines for cancer. Limitations Study response rate, narrow survey population, self-reported survey used. Conclusion This study identifies that a number of cancer patients, especially those with a reduced income after their diagnosis, experience financial burden associated with the purchase of medicines and that some go as far as to not use or to not purchase medicines. It seems likely that limiting the cost of medicines for cancer may improve patient ability to fully participate in the intended treatment. Funding Cancer Council NSW, National Health and Medical Research Council, and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Australia.

DOI 10.12788/jcso.0273
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey
2016 Edmunds K, Searles A, Neville J, Ling R, McCalman J, Mein J, 'Apunipima baby basket program: a retrospective cost study', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1133-3
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rod Ling
2016 Doran CM, Ling R, Byrnes J, Crane M, Shakeshaft AP, Searles A, Perez D, 'Benefit Cost Analysis of Three Skin Cancer Public Education Mass-Media Campaigns Implemented in New South Wales, Australia', PLOS ONE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0147665
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Rod Ling
2016 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'An organisational change intervention for increasing the delivery of smoking cessation support in addiction treatment centres: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial', TRIALS, 17 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-016-1401-6
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, A Dunlop, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul
2016 Ling R, Kelly B, Considine R, Tynan R, Searles A, Doran CM, 'The economic impact of psychological distress in the Australian coal mining industry', Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 58 e171-e176 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the economic impact of psychological distress among employees ... [more]

© 2016 American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the economic impact of psychological distress among employees of the Australian Coal Mining Industry. Methods: Sample data were gathered from 1456 coal mining staff across eight sites in two Australian states. Two measures were taken of work time lost over four weeks due to psychological distress: (1) full-day absences; (2) presenteeism. Lost work time was valued using hourly wages. Sample data was modeled to estimate annual monetary losses for the Australian Coal Mining Industry. Results: For the sample, estimated annual value of time lost due to psychological distress was $4.9 million ($AUS2015) ($0.61 million per mine), and for the Australian Coal Mining Industry, $153.8 million ($AUS2015). Conclusion: Psychological distress is a significant cost for the Australian Coal Mining Industry. Relevant intervention programs are potentially cost-effective.

DOI 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000714
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Rod Ling
2016 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Hobden B, Zucca A, Henskens F, et al., 'A consumer register: an acceptable and cost-effective alternative for accessing patient populations', BMC medical research methodology, 16 134 (2016)

BACKGROUND: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however,¿they have several limitations including low consent and participati... [more]

BACKGROUND: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however,¿they have several limitations including low consent and participation rates, and potential selection bias. To improve access to samples for research, the utility of a new model of recruitment termed the 'Consumer Register', that allows for direct patient recruitment from hospitals, was examined. This paper reports: (i) consent rates onto the register; (ii) preferred methods and frequency of contact; and (iii) the feasibility of establishing the register, including: (a) cost per person recruited to the register; (b) the differential cost and consent rates of volunteer versus paid data collectors; and (c) participant completion rates. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five outpatient clinics in Australia. Patients were approached by volunteers or paid data collectors and asked to complete a touch-screen electronic survey. Consenting individuals were asked to indicate their willingness and preferences for enrolment onto a research register. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patient preferences and linear regression used to model the success of volunteer versus paid data collectors. The opportunity and financial costs of establishing the register were calculated. RESULTS: A total of 1947 patients (80.6¿%) consented to complete the survey, of which, 1486 (76.3¿%) completed the questionnaire. Of the completers, the majority (69.4¿%, or 1032 participants) were willing to be listed on the register and preferred to be contacted by email (50.3¿%). Almost 39¿% of completers¿were willing to be contacted three or more times in a 12¿month period. The annual opportunity cost of resources consumed by the register was valued at $37,187, giving an opportunity cost per person recruited to the register of $36. After amortising fixed costs, the annual financial outlay was $23,004 or $22 per person recruited to the register. Use of volunteer data collectors contributed to an annual saving of $14,183, however paid data collectors achieved significantly higher consent rates. Successful enrolment onto the register was completed for 42 % of the sample. CONCLUSIONS: A Consumer Register is a promising and feasible alternative to population-based registries, with the majority of participants willing to be contacted multiple times via low-resource methods such as email. There is an effectiveness/cost trade off in the use of paid versus volunteer data collectors.

Co-authors Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Frans Henskens, Elizabeth Fradgley, Jamie Bryant, Alison Zucca, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 McCalman J, Searles A, Bainbridge R, Ham R, Mein J, Neville J, et al., 'Empowering families by engaging and relating Murri way: A grounded theory study of the implementation of the Cape York Baby Basket program', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 15 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 McCalman et al. Background: Evaluating program outcomes without considering how the program was implemented can cause misunderstandings and inefficiencies when initiating p... [more]

© 2015 McCalman et al. Background: Evaluating program outcomes without considering how the program was implemented can cause misunderstandings and inefficiencies when initiating program improvements. In conjunction with a program evaluation, reported elsewhere, this paper theorises the process of implementing an Indigenous Australian maternal and child health program. The Baby Basket program was developed in 2009 for the remote Cape York region and aimed to improve the attendance and engagement of Indigenous women at antenatal and postnatal clinics through providing three baskets of maternal and baby goods and associated health education. Methods: Constructivist grounded theory methods were used to generate and analyse data from qualitative interviews and focus groups with Indigenous women who received the baskets, their extended family members, and healthcare workers who delivered them. Data was coded in NVivo with concepts iteratively compared until higher order constructs and their relationships could be modelled to explain the common purpose for participants, the process involved in achieving that purpose, key strategies, conditions and outcomes. Theoretical terms are italicised. Results: Program implementation entailed empowering families through a process of engaging and relating Murri (Queensland Indigenous) way. Key influencing conditions of the social environment were the remoteness of communities, keeping up with demand, families' knowledge, skills and roles and organisational service approaches and capacities. Engaging and relating Murri way occurred through four strategies: connecting through practical support, creating a culturally safe practice, becoming informed and informing others, and linking at the clinic. These strategies resulted in women and families taking responsibility for health through making healthy choices, becoming empowered health consumers and advocating for community changes. Conclusions: The theoretical model was applied to improve and revise Baby Basket program implementation, including increased recognition of the importance of empowering families by extending the home visiting approach up to the child's third birthday. Engaging and relating Murri way was strengthened by formal recognition and training of Indigenous health workers as program leaders. This theoretical model of program implementation was therefore useful for guiding program improvements, and could be applicable to other Indigenous maternal and child health programs.

DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0543-y
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2015 Doran CM, Ling R, Byrnes J, Crane M, Searles A, Perez D, Shakeshaft A, 'Estimating the economic costs of skin cancer in New South Wales, Australia', BMC Public Health, 15 1-10 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2267-3
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Rod Ling
2015 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'Targeting multiple health risk behaviours among vocational education students using electronic feedback and online and telephone support: Protocol for a cluster randomised trial Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al. Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adul... [more]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al. Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adults, a period when health risk behaviours become established. Furthermore, high rates of smoking, risky alcohol consumption, inadequate fruit and vegetable intake and insufficient physical activity have been reported in TAFE students. There have been no intervention studies targeting multiple health risk behaviours simultaneously in this population. The proposed trial will examine the effectiveness of providing TAFE students with electronic feedback regarding health risk behaviours and referral to a suite of existing online and telephone services addressing smoking, risky alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable intake, and physical activity levels. Methods/Design: A two arm, parallel, cluster randomised trial will be conducted within TAFE campuses in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. TAFE classes will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition (50 classes per condition). To be eligible, students must be: enrolled in a course that runs for more than 6 months; aged 16 years or older; and not meet Australian health guideline recommendations for at least one of the following: smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and/or vegetable intake, or physical activity. Students attending intervention classes, will undertake via a computer tablet a risk assessment for health risk behaviours, and for behaviours not meeting Australian guidelines be provided with electronic feedback about these behaviours and referral to evidence-based online programs and telephone services. Students in control classes will not receive any intervention. Primary outcome measures that will be assessed via online surveys at baseline and 6 months post-recruitment are: 1) daily tobacco smoking; 2) standard drinks of alcohol consumed per week; 3) serves of fruit consumed daily; 4) serves of vegetables consumed daily; and 5) metabolic equivalent minutes of physical activity per week. Discussion: Proactive enrolment to existing online and telephone services has the potential to address modifiable determinants of disease. This trial will be the first to examine a potentially scalable intervention targeting multiple health risk behaviours among students in the vocational training setting.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1898-8
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Patrick Mcelduff, Luke Wolfenden, Billie Bonevski, John Wiggers, Marita Lynagh, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Kypros Kypri
2014 Paul CL, Levi CR, D'Este CA, Parsons MW, Bladin CF, Lindley RI, et al., 'Thrombolysis ImPlementation in Stroke (TIPS): Evaluating the effectiveness of a strategy to increase the adoption of best evidence practice - protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial in acute stroke care', Implementation Science, 9 (2014) [C3]

Background: Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability internationally. One of the three effective interventions in the acute phase of stroke care is thrombolytic therapy w... [more]

Background: Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability internationally. One of the three effective interventions in the acute phase of stroke care is thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), if given within 4.5 hours of onset to appropriate cases of ischaemic stroke.Objectives: To test the effectiveness of a multi-component multidisciplinary collaborative approach compared to usual care as a strategy for increasing thrombolysis rates for all stroke patients at intervention hospitals, while maintaining accepted benchmarks for low rates of intracranial haemorrhage and high rates of functional outcomes for both groups at three months.Methods and design: A cluster randomised controlled trial of 20 hospitals across 3 Australian states with 2 groups: multi- component multidisciplinary collaborative intervention as the experimental group and usual care as the control group. The intervention is based on behavioural theory and analysis of the steps, roles and barriers relating to rapid assessment for thrombolysis eligibility; it involves a comprehensive range of strategies addressing individual-level and system-level change at each site. The primary outcome is the difference in tPA rates between the two groups post-intervention. The secondary outcome is the proportion of tPA treated patients in both groups with good functional outcomes (modified Rankin Score (mRS <2) and the proportion with intracranial haemorrhage (mRS =2), compared to international benchmarks.Discussion: TIPS will trial a comprehensive, multi-component and multidisciplinary collaborative approach to improving thrombolysis rates at multiple sites. The trial has the potential to identify methods for optimal care which can be implemented for stroke patients during the acute phase. Study findings will include barriers and solutions to effective thrombolysis implementation and trial outcomes will be published whether significant or not.Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12613000939796. © 2014 Paul et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1748-5908-9-38
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Mark Parsons, John Attia, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Levi, Frans Henskens
2014 Nair BKR, Searles AM, Ling RI, Wein J, Ingham K, 'Workplace-based assessment for international medical graduates: At what cost?', Medical Journal of Australia, 200 41-44 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To estimate the cost of resources required to deliver a program to assess international medical graduates (IMGs) in Newcastle, Australia, known as the Workplace Based A... [more]

Objective: To estimate the cost of resources required to deliver a program to assess international medical graduates (IMGs) in Newcastle, Australia, known as the Workplace Based Assessment (WBA) Program. Design and setting: A costing study to identify and evaluate the resources required and the overheads of delivering the program for a cohort of 15 IMGs, based on costs in 2012. Main outcome measures: Labour-related costs. Results: The total cost in 2012 for delivering the program to a typical cohort of 15 candidates was $243 384. This equated to an average of $16226 per IMG. After allowing for the fees paid by IMGs, the WBA Program had a deficit of $153384, or $10226 per candidate, which represents the contribution made by the health system. Conclusion: The cost per candidate to the health system of this intensive WBA program for IMGs is small.

DOI 10.5694/mja13.10849
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Kichu Nair, Rod Ling
2013 Searles A, Doran E, Faunce TA, Henry D, 'The affordability of prescription medicines in Australia: are copayments and safety net thresholds too high?', AUSTRALIAN HEALTH REVIEW, 37 32-40 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/AH11153
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Mddah01, Evan Doran
2011 Ramanathan SA, Baratiny G, Stocks NP, Searles AM, Redford RJ, 'General practitioner referral patterns for women with gynaecological symptoms: a randomised incomplete block study design', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 195 602-606 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.5694/mja10.10867
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2009 Searles AM, 'The PBS in a globalised world: Free trade and reference pricing', Australian Health Review, 33 186-191 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
2008 Doran E, Henry DA, Faunce TA, Searles AM, 'Australian pharmaceutical policy and the idea of innovation', Journal of Australian Political Economy, 62 39-61 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Evan Doran, Mddah01
2007 Searles AM, Jefferys S, Doran E, Henry DA, 'Reference pricing, generic drugs and proposed changes to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme', Medical Journal of Australia, 187 236-239 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Evan Doran, Mddah01
2006 Muscatello DJ, Searles A, Macdonald R, Jorm L, 'Communicating population health statistics through graphs: a randomised controlled trial of graph design interventions', BMC MEDICINE, 4 (2006)
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-4-33
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
2005 Faunce T, Doran E, Henry DA, Drahos P, Searles A, Pekarsky B, Neville W, 'Assessing the impact of the Australian-United States free trade agreement on Australian and global medicines policy', Globalization and Health, 1 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1744-8603-1-15
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Mddah01, Evan Doran
1998 Streever WJ, Callaghan-Perry M, Searles A, Stevens T, Svoboda P, 'Public attitudes and values for wetland conservation in New South Wales, Australia', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, 54 1-14 (1998)
DOI 10.1006/jema.1998.0224
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 28
Show 40 more journal articles

Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'A PILOT CLUSTER RANDOMISED TRIAL OF ELECTRONIC FEEDBACK, ONLINE AND TELEPHONE SUPPORT ON MULTIPLE HEALTH BEHAVIOURS AMONG VOCATIONAL EDUCATION STUDENTS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Philip Morgan, Patrick Mcelduff, Luke Wolfenden, Billie Bonevski, John Wiggers, Marita Lynagh, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Kypros Kypri
2016 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'TOBACCO SMOKING CESSATION INTENTIONS AND PREFERENCES FOR QUIT SUPPORT AMONG CLIENTS OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SERVICES IN AUSTRALIA', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Flora Tzelepis, A Dunlop
2016 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'TOBACCO SMOKING CESSATION INTENTIONS AND PREFERENCES FOR QUIT SUPPORT AMONG CLIENTS OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SERVICES IN AUSTRALIA', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2016)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Billie Bonevski, Flora Tzelepis, Eliza Skelton, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Chris Paul
2016 Gabor M, Rod L, Searles A, Ayano N, Nikolai B, 'FRACTURE LIAISON SERVICE: REAL WORLD CONFIRMATION OF COST SAVING', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL (2016)
2016 Major G, Ling R, Searles A, Niddrie F, Nakayama A, Holliday E, et al., 'The Cost of Confronting Osteoporosis: Cost Study of a Fracture Liaison Service', ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors John Attia
2015 Searles AM, Nilsson M, Bernhardt J, Cadilhac D, Doran C, Webb B, Deeming S, 'Applying a framework to access the impact from transnational health-research (FAIT)', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER, Sydney, NSW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Nilsson
2015 Doran C, Searles A, Nilsson M, Webb B, Deeming S, 'HMRI framework to assess the impact from transnational research (FAIT)', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER, Sydney, NSW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Nilsson
2015 Paul CL, Boyes A, Searles A, Carey M, Turon H, Hall A, Bisquera A, 'CANCER MEDICINE AFFORDABILITY AND FINANCIAL IMPACTS OF CANCER IN AUSTRALIA: IMPACTS ON DECISION-MAKING AND PERCEIVED FINANCIAL BURDEN', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Allison Boyes
2014 Deeming S, Nilsson M, Webb B, Searles A, Doran C, 'DEVELOPING THE HMRI FRAMEWORK FOR MEASURING RESEARCH IMPACT', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Nilsson
Show 6 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 14
Total funding $17,538,599

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $3,046,293

Addressing health and care needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with dementia and their communities: A cluster RCT$3,046,293

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Targeted Call for Research - Dementia in Indigenous Australians
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2023
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20176 grants / $5,745,124

Aboriginal child and adolescent health improvement through Aboriginal leadership and collaborative research teams$2,499,588

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Centres of Research Excellence (CRE) - Centres of Indigenous Researcher Capacity Building
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Partnering with local government councils for scalable physical activity promotion in community parks$1,060,745

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Improving arm function after stroke using task specific training$832,596

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Improving outcomes for people with depression in community settings: A cluster RCT$803,554

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Does a targeted intervention improve medication safety after discharge and improve outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?$544,096

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Ashley Kable, Professor Dimity Pond, Professor John Attia, Conjoint Professor Andrew Searles, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Doctor Carolyn Hullick, Anne Fullerton
Scheme Dementia and Aged Care Services Research and Innovation Funding Round (DACS)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1601301
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Health technology evaluation$4,545

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project Team Professor John Attia, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Vijay Varadharajan, Dr Craig Dalton, Conjoint Professor Andrew Searles, Ms Jane Gray
Scheme ON Prime
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701038
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

20163 grants / $3,531,539

Title: ‘Indigenous Counselling and Nicotine (ICAN) QUIT in Pregnancy’ - a cluster randomised trial to implement culturally competent evidence-based smoking cessation for pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers$2,259,016

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

HELP - A healthy lifestyle intervention for patients with chronic low back pain$686,127

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

A randomised trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of a state-wide school physical activity policy.$586,396

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20153 grants / $5,195,643

The Centre of Research Excellence (CRE) in stroke rehabilitation$2,500,000

Affiliate investigator

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Centres of Research Excellence (CRE) - Centres of Clinical Research Excellence
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

An Innovation Platform for Systems-Wide Improvement in Indigenous Primary Health Care$2,496,643

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Centres of Research Excellence (CRE) - Centres of Clinical Research Excellence
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Long term evaluation of uptake, impact and outcomes of the 75+ Health Assessment$199,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20141 grants / $20,000

The Quit-STAIR: Is a stepped care model cost-effective for increasing smoking cessation success at a community level? $20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Professor John Wiggers, Ms Jenny Knight, Conjoint Professor Andrew Searles
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301402
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Measuring Research Impact in Australia's Medical Research Institutes PhD (Health Economics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 Masters Economic Evaluation of a Pre-hospital Protocol for Patients with Suspected Acute Stroke in Australia M Philosophy (ComMed&ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Embedding Economics in Public Health Research: Refining the Quality of Economic Evidence and Enhancing the Translation of Effective and Cost-effective Research Outputs into Policy and Practice. PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD The Aim of the Study is to Compare Quality and Cost of Care in the Public and Private Systems for a Number of Common Conditions. PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Prenatal Nutrition Interventions and Infant Health Outcomes PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Projects

Health Technology Assessment - applied economics 2014 - 2030

The health research Economics team I lead is running a national project, funded by the MRFF, to design a better platform for evaluating health technology at the local level. The project's findings will be presented at the end of 2018. This project follows a recently completed framework to improve health technology assessment within the NSW Regional Health Partners (NSWRHP). 


Impact Assessment 2014 - 2030

At HMRI I have led work to develop a framework to measure and encourage research translation and research impact. The framework is referred to as the Framework to Assess the Impact from Translational health research (FAIT). As part of this project I liaise frequently with international experts, other Medical Research Institutes (MRIs) and senior representatives from state and federal government organisations. 


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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 49
United Kingdom 5
Canada 3
United States 2
Denmark 1
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Conjoint Professor Andrew Searles

Position

Conjoint Professor
HMRI Health Research Economists
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email andrew.searles@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0494
Mobile 0407 874 971
Fax (02) 4042 0001
Link Personal webpage

Office

Room HMRI, New Lambton
Building HMRI
Location HMRI Building, John Hunter Campus

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