Dr Andrea Mathe

Dr Andrea Mathe

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Mathe graduated with a Bachelor of Science (Molecular Biotechnology) with first class Honours from University of Technology Dresden, Germany. She then moved to Newcastle to undertake her PhD in Medical Genetics, from which she graduated 2016. She undertook postdoctoral research training in the Reproductive Science group at the University of Newcastle before joining the Gastrointestinal Research Group as a postdoctoral researcher at the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI). Dr. Mathe works under the lead of Associate Professor Simon Keely. Her research focuses on the development of colorectal cancer. Her aim is to understand the mechanisms that lead to the development of colorectal cancer.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • DNA methylation
  • breast cancer
  • colorectal cancer
  • gene expression
  • microRNA
  • tissue culture

Languages

  • German (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111201 Cancer Cell Biology 20
111203 Cancer Genetics 60
060405 Gene Expression (incl. Microarray and other genome-wide approaches) 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
26/11/2016 -  Postdoctoral Researcher University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
14/06/2016 - 25/11/2016 Postdoctoral researcher Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Avery-Kiejda KA, Mathe A, Scott RJ, 'Genome-wide miRNA, gene and methylation analysis of triple negative breast cancer to identify changes associated with lymph node metastases', Genomics Data, 14 1-4 (2017)

© 2017 Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a particularly important breast cancer subtype with an aggressive clinical phenotype that is associated with a higher likelihood of... [more]

© 2017 Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a particularly important breast cancer subtype with an aggressive clinical phenotype that is associated with a higher likelihood of metastasis. This subtype is characterized by an absence of the estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors, as well as the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/HER neu). The absence of the three receptors significantly reduces targeted treatment options for patients with TNBC and as such, there is an urgent need to identify novel treatment targets. Here, we provide detailed information regarding the design of a multi-platform dataset that describes genome-wide assessment of miRNA (assessed by microarray, GSE38167) and gene expression (assessed by microarray, GSE61723), as well as methylation (assessed by Illumina HM450K BeadChip, GSE78751) in TNBCs, matched normal adjacent tissues and matched lymph node metastases. The use of this multi-platform dataset is likely to uncover novel markers and key pathways involved in progression to lymph node metastasis in TNBC.

DOI 10.1016/j.gdata.2017.07.004
Co-authors Kelly Kiejda, Rodney Scott
2016 Mathe A, Wong-Brown M, Locke WJ, Stirzaker C, Braye SG, Forbes JF, et al., 'DNA methylation profile of triple negative breast cancer-specific genes comparing lymph node positive patients to lymph node negative patients', SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 6 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/srep33435
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Kelly Kiejda, Rodney Scott, John Forbes, Michelle Wong-Brown
2015 Mathe A, Scott RJ, Avery-Kiejda KA, 'MiRNAs and other epigenetic changes as biomarkers in triple negative breast cancer', International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 16 28347-28376 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterised by the lack of receptors for estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and... [more]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterised by the lack of receptors for estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2). Since it cannot be treated by current endocrine therapies which target these receptors and due to its aggressive nature, it has one of the worst prognoses of all breast cancer subtypes. The only treatments remain chemo- and/or radio-therapy and surgery and because of this, novel biomarkers or treatment targets are urgently required to improve disease outcomes. MicroRNAs represent an attractive candidate for targeted therapies against TNBC, due to their natural ability to act as antisense interactors and regulators of entire gene sets involved in malignancy and their superiority over mRNA profiling to accurately classify disease. Here we review the current knowledge regarding miRNAs as biomarkers in TNBC and their potential use as therapeutic targets in this disease. Further, we review other epigenetic changes and interactions of these changes with microRNAs in this breast c ancer subtype, which may lead to the discovery of new treatment targets for TNBC.

DOI 10.3390/ijms161226090
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Kelly Kiejda, Rodney Scott
2015 Mathe A, Wong-Brown M, Morten B, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Avery-Kiejda KA, Scott RJ, 'Novel genes associated with lymph node metastasis in triple negative breast cancer', Scientific Reports, 5 (2015) [C1]

Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the most aggressive breast cancer subtype with the worst prognosis and no targeted treatments. TNBC patients are more likely to develop met... [more]

Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the most aggressive breast cancer subtype with the worst prognosis and no targeted treatments. TNBC patients are more likely to develop metastases and relapse than patients with other breast cancer subtypes. We aimed to identify TNBC-specific genes and genes associated with lymph node metastasis, one of the first signs of metastatic spread. A total of 33 TNBCs were used; 17 of which had matched normal adjacent tissues available, and 15 with matched lymph node metastases. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to reveal genes that were differentially expressed between these groups. We identified and validated 66 genes that are significantly altered when comparing tumours to normal adjacent samples. Further, we identified 83 genes that are associated with lymph node metastasis and correlated these with miRNA-expression. Pathway analysis revealed their involvement in DNA repair, recombination and cell death, chromosomal instability and other known cancer-related pathways. Finally, four genes were identified that were specific for TNBC, of which one was associated with overall survival. This study has identified novel genes involved in LN metastases in TNBC and genes that are TNBC specific that may be used as treatment targets or prognostic indicators in the future.

DOI 10.1038/srep15832
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors John Forbes, Kelly Kiejda, Michelle Wong-Brown, Rodney Scott
2014 Avery-Kiejda KA, Braye SG, Mathe A, Forbes JF, Scott RJ, 'Decreased expression of key tumour suppressor microRNAs is associated with lymph node metastases in triple negative breast cancer', BMC Cancer, 14 (2014) [C1]

Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy that develops in women, responsible for the highest cancer-associated death rates. Triple negative breast cancers represent... [more]

Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy that develops in women, responsible for the highest cancer-associated death rates. Triple negative breast cancers represent an important subtype that have an aggressive clinical phenotype, are associated with a higher likelihood of metastasis and are not responsive to current targeted therapies. miRNAs have emerged as an attractive candidate for molecular biomarkers and treatment targets in breast cancer, but their role in the progression of triple negative breast cancer remains largely unexplored.Methods: This study has investigated miRNA expression profiles in 31 primary triple negative breast cancer cases and in 13 matched lymph node metastases compared with 23 matched normal breast tissues to determine miRNAs associated with the initiation of this disease subtype and those associated with its metastasis.Results: 71 miRNAs were differentially expressed in triple negative breast cancer, the majority of which have previously been associated with breast cancer, including members of the miR-200 family and the miR-17-92 oncogenic cluster, suggesting that the majority of miRNAs involved in the initiation of triple negative breast cancer are not subtype specific. However, the repertoire of miRNAs expressed in lymph node negative and lymph node positive triple negative breast cancers were largely distinct from one another. In particular, miRNA profiles associated with lymph node negative disease tended to be up-regulated, while those associated with lymph node positive disease were down-regulated and largely overlapped with the profiles of their matched lymph node metastases. From this, 27 miRNAs were identified that are associated with metastatic capability in the triple negative breast cancer subtype.Conclusions: These results provide novel insight into the repertoire of miRNAs that contribute to the initiation of and progression to lymph node metastasis in triple negative breast cancer and have important implications for the treatment of this breast cancer subtype. © 2014 Avery-Kiejda et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-14-51
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Kelly Kiejda, John Forbes
2014 Avery-Kiejda KA, Morten B, Wong-Brown MW, Mathe A, Scott RJ, 'The relative mRNA expression of p53 isoforms in breast cancer is associated with clinical features and outcome.', Carcinogenesis, 35 586-596 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/carcin/bgt411
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Kelly Kiejda, Michelle Wong-Brown
Show 3 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Mathe A, Wong-Brown M, Locke W, Stirzaker C, Braye S, Forbes J, et al., 'DNA METHYLATION PROFILE OF TRIPLE NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER-SPECIFIC GENES COMPARING LYMPH NODE POSITIVE PATIENTS TO LYMPH NODE NEGATIVE PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Michelle Wong-Brown, John Forbes
2014 Mathe A, Avery-Kiejda KA, Wong-Brown M, Morten B, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott RJ, 'IDENTIFICATION OF NOVEL TRANSCRIPTS SPECIFIC TO TRIPLE NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER THAT ARE ASSOCIATED WITH LYMPH NODE METASTASIS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/ajco.12335
Co-authors Rodney Scott, John Forbes, Kelly Kiejda, Michelle Wong-Brown
2014 Mathe A, Avery-Kiejda KA, Wong-Brown M, Forbes JF, Braye SG, Scott RJ, 'Eight microRNAs as biomarkers for metastatic spread in triple negative breast cancer', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER (2014) [E3]
Co-authors John Forbes, Michelle Wong-Brown, Kelly Kiejda, Rodney Scott
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $10,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20131 grants / $10,000

miRNA regulation of growth, invasion and treatment response in triple negative breast cancer$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Kelly Kiejda, Doctor Andrea Mathe
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300728
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD The Impact of Surgery, Inflammation and Sepsis on Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) Formation and Subsequent Metastatic Disease in Colorectal Cancer PhD (Surgical Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Andrea Mathe

Position

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email andrea.mathe@newcastle.edu.au
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