Ms Alexandra Denham

Ms Alexandra Denham

Casual Research Assistant

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Miss Alexandra Denham is a Doctoral student and research assistant at the University of Newcastle. Her primary research interests are the unmet needs, quality of life and health behaviours of informal carers, stroke, and social media research. 

Miss Denham's primary supervisor is Professor Billie Bonevski, and her co-supervisors are Professor Amanda Baker, Professor Neil Spratt and Dr. Olivia Wynne. Her scholarship is supported by a University of Newcastle Research Training Program (RTP) Scholarship, and by Emlyn and Jennie Thomas through the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI).


Keywords

  • Caregiver issues
  • Health behaviour change
  • Informal caregivers
  • Stroke
  • Unmet needs

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 30
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 70
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Baker AL, Denham A, Pohlman S, McCarter K, 'Treating comorbid substance use and psychosis', A Clinical Introduction to Psychosis Foundations for Clinical Psychologists and Neuropsychologists, Academic Press, United States 511-536 (2019) [B1]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Kristen Mccarter, Sonja Pohlman

Journal article (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Denham AMJ, Baker AL, Spratt NJ, Wynne O, Hunt SA, Bonevski B, Kumar R, 'YouTube as a resource for evaluating the unmet needs of caregivers of stroke survivors', Health Informatics Journal, 26 1599-1616 (2020) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2019. Content produced by caregivers of stroke survivors on the online video-sharing platform YouTube may be a good source of knowledge regarding caregivers¿ unmet... [more]

© The Author(s) 2019. Content produced by caregivers of stroke survivors on the online video-sharing platform YouTube may be a good source of knowledge regarding caregivers¿ unmet needs. We aimed to examine the content, quantity and quality of YouTube videos that target and discuss the needs and concerns of caregivers of stroke survivors. YouTube was systematically searched using six search strings, and the first 20 videos retrieved from each search were screened against the inclusion criteria. A pre-determined coding schedule was used to report the rate of unmet needs in each video. Twenty-six videos were included in the analysis. In total, 291 unmet needs were reported by caregivers of stroke survivors, an average of 11.2 unmet needs per video. The most common unmet needs domain was ¿Impact of Caregiving on Daily Activities¿ (44%). Most videos were developed in the United States (61.5%) and featured spouses of stroke survivors (65.47%). Content produced by caregivers of stroke survivors on YouTube may be used as a tool for caregivers to provide and receive support through online communication. YouTube videos offer insight into the unmet needs of caregivers of stroke survivors and may be used as an additional resource for stroke services to support caregivers.

DOI 10.1177/1460458219873538
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Olivia Wynne, Billie Bonevski, Neil Spratt, Amanda Baker, Sally Hunt
2020 Denham AMJ, Wynne O, Baker AL, Spratt NJ, Loh M, Turner A, et al., 'The long-term unmet needs of informal carers of stroke survivors at home: a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative studies.', Disabil Rehabil, 1-12 (2020)
DOI 10.1080/09638288.2020.1756470
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Olivia Wynne, Amanda Baker, Billie Bonevski, Parker Magin
2020 Denham AM, Wynne O, Baker AL, Spratt NJ, Bonevski B, 'The unmet needs of carers of stroke survivors: An evaluation of Google search results.', Health informatics journal, 26 934-944 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1460458219852530
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Billie Bonevski, Neil Spratt, Olivia Wynne
2020 Stuart AM, Baker AL, Denham AMJ, Lee NK, Hall A, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Psychological treatment for methamphetamine use and associated psychiatric symptom outcomes: A systematic review', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 109 61-79 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 The Authors Background: Regular methamphetamine use is associated with increased rates of psychiatric symptoms. Although there has been a substantial body of research repor... [more]

© 2019 The Authors Background: Regular methamphetamine use is associated with increased rates of psychiatric symptoms. Although there has been a substantial body of research reporting on the effectiveness of psychological treatments for reducing methamphetamine use, there is a paucity of research examining the effects of these treatments on co-occurring psychiatric symptoms. We addressed this gap by undertaking a systematic review of the evidence of the effectiveness of psychological treatments for methamphetamine use on psychiatric symptom outcomes in randomized controlled trials. Methods: A narrative synthesis of studies was conducted following the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement to inform methodology. Eight electronic peer-reviewed databases were searched. Ten eligible studies were assessed. Results: Most studies found an overall reduction in levels of methamphetamine use and psychiatric symptoms among samples as a whole. Although brief interventions were effective, there is evidence that more intensive interventions have greater impact on methamphetamine use and/or psychiatric symptomatology. Intervention attendance was variable. Conclusions: The evidence suggests that a variety of psychological treatments are effective in reducing levels of methamphetamine use and improving psychiatric symptoms. Future research should consider how psychological treatments could maximize outcomes in the co-occurring domains of methamphetamine use and psychiatric symptoms, with increasing treatment attendance as a focus. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42016043657.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2019.09.005
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors A Dunlop, Christopher Oldmeadow, Jenny Bowman, Kristen Mccarter, Amanda Baker, Alix Hall
2019 Denham AMJ, Wynne O, Baker AL, Spratt NJ, Turner A, Magin P, et al., 'An online cross-sectional survey of the health risk behaviours among informal caregivers', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, (2019)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.296
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Olivia Wynne, Billie Bonevski, Parker Magin, Neil Spratt
2019 Denham AMJ, Wynne O, Baker AL, Spratt NJ, Turner A, Magin P, et al., '"This is our life now. Our new normal": A qualitative study of the unmet needs of carers of stroke survivors', PLOS ONE, 14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0216682
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Parker Magin, Amanda Baker, Olivia Wynne, Coralie English, Neil Spratt, Heidi Janssen
2019 Guillaumier A, McCrabb S, Spratt NJ, Pollack M, Baker AL, Magin P, et al., 'An online intervention for improving stroke survivors' health-related quality of life: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial', TRIALS, 20 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-019-3604-0
Co-authors Parker Magin, Neil Spratt, Christopher Oldmeadow, Olivia Wynne, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Amanda Baker, Christopher Levi, Sam Mccrabb, Billie Bonevski, Andrew Searles, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2019 Denham AMJ, Guillaumier A, McCrabb S, Turner A, Baker AL, Spratt NJ, et al., 'Development of an online secondary prevention programme for stroke survivors: Prevent 2nd Stroke', BMJ Innovations, 5 35-42 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Author(s). Background Stroke events often result in long-term negative health outcomes. People who experience a first stroke event are 30%-40% more likely to experience a s... [more]

© 2019 Author(s). Background Stroke events often result in long-term negative health outcomes. People who experience a first stroke event are 30%-40% more likely to experience a second stroke event within 5 years. An online secondary prevention programme for stroke survivors may help stroke survivors improve their health risk behaviours and lower their risk of a second stroke. Objectives This paper describes the development and early iteration testing of the usability and acceptability of an online secondary prevention programme for stroke survivors (Prevent 2nd Stroke, P2S). P2S aims to address six modifiable health risk behaviours of stroke: blood pressure, physical activity, nutrition, depression and anxiety, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Methods P2S was developed as an eight-module online secondary prevention programme for stroke survivors. Modelled on the DoTTI (Design and development, Testing early iterations, Testing for effectiveness, Integration and implementation) framework for the development of online programmes, the following stages were followed during programme development: (1) content development and design; and (2) testing early iteration. The programme was pilot-tested with 15 stroke survivors who assessed P2S on usability and acceptability. Results In stage 1, experts provided input for the content development of P2S. In stage 2, 15 stroke survivors were recruited for usability testing of P2S. They reported high ratings of usability and acceptability of P2S. P2S was generally regarded as easy to use' and relevant to stroke survivors'. Participants also largely agreed that it was appropriate to offer lifestyle advice to stroke survivors through the internet. Conclusions The study found that an online secondary prevention programme was acceptable and easily usable by stroke survivors. The next step is to conduct a randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of the programme regarding behaviour change and determine the cost-effectiveness of the intervention.

DOI 10.1136/bmjinnov-2017-000257
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Olivia Wynne, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Christopher Oldmeadow, Neil Spratt, Amanda Baker, Robin Callister, Billie Bonevski, Clare Collins, Sam Mccrabb, Mark Wallis, Parker Magin
2018 Denham AMJ, Baker AL, Spratt N, Guillaumier A, Wynne O, Turner A, et al., 'The unmet needs of informal carers of stroke survivors: a protocol for a systematic review of quantitative and qualitative studies', BMJ OPEN, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019571
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski, Parker Magin, Neil Spratt, Olivia Wynne, Amanda Baker
2018 Wynne O, Guillaumier A, Twyman L, McCrabb S, Denham AMJ, Paul C, et al., 'Signs, fines and compliance officers: A systematic review of strategies for enforcing smoke-free policy', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15071386
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Olivia Wynne, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Amanda Baker, Sam Mccrabb, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2018 Denham A, Halpin S, Twyman L, Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, 'Prevent 2nd stroke: a pilot study of an online secondary prevention program for stroke survivors', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 484-490 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12794
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Sean Halpin, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2017 Stuart A, Baker AL, Bowman J, McCarter K, Denham AMJ, Lee N, et al., 'Protocol for a systematic review of psychological treatment for methamphetamine use: an analysis of methamphetamine use and mental health symptom outcomes', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015383
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Kim Colyvas, Jenny Bowman, Kristen Mccarter, Amanda Baker, A Dunlop
2017 Wilson A, Guillaumier A, George J, Denham A, Bonevski B, 'A systematic narrative review of the effectiveness of behavioural smoking cessation interventions in selected disadvantaged groups (2010-2017)', Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine, 11 617-630 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Introduction: Tobacco remains the key modifiable risk factor for the development of a number of diseases, inclu... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Introduction: Tobacco remains the key modifiable risk factor for the development of a number of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, lower respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tuberculosis and cancer. Among priority populations, smoking prevalence remains high, smokers tend to relapse more often and earlier and fewer are able to sustain quit attempts. This systematic review provides an update on the literature. Areas covered: Twenty-four randomized controlled trials published from 2010¿2017, in English language, were identified after searching on Medline, Ovid, Embase and PsycINFO databases. Studies reported on the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions among six disadvantaged groups known to have high smoking rates: (i) homeless, (ii) prisoners, (iii) indigenous populations, (iv) at-risk youth, (v) people with low income, and (vi) those with a mental illness. Narrative review and assessment of methodological quality of included papers was undertaken. Expert commentary: There is a growing evidence base of methodologically robust studies evaluating a variety of behavioural smoking cessation interventions for priority populations. Multi-component interventions and those examining behavioural interventions incorporating mindfulness training, financial incentives, motivational interviewing and extended telephone-delivered counseling may be effective in the short-term, particularly for smokers on low incomes and people with a mental illness.

DOI 10.1080/17476348.2017.1340836
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier
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Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Denham AMJ, Wynne O, Baker AL, Spratt NJ, Bonevski B, 'The unmet needs of carers of stroke survivors: An evaluation of Google search results', HEALTH INFORMATICS JOURNAL (2020)
DOI 10.1177/1460458219852530
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Neil Spratt, Billie Bonevski, Olivia Wynne
2018 Denham A, Baker A, Spratt N, Hunt S, Sharma R, Bonevski B, 'YouTube as a source of information on the needs and concerns of caregivers of stroke survivors', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2018)
Co-authors Sally Hunt, Amanda Baker, Billie Bonevski, Neil Spratt
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $118,727

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20201 grants / $96,000

FoCCuS4HEART: Female Carers Co-produce Support 4 Heart and Emotional health to Address Risk facTors$96,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Ms Alexandra Denham, Doctor Heidi Janssen, Professor Billie Bonevski, Professor Neil Spratt, Doctor Kirsti Haracz, Dr Marie-Louise Bird
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G2000972
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

20182 grants / $22,727

Emlyn and Jennie Thomas Postgraduate Medical Research Scholarship$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Scheme Emlyn and Jennie Thomas Postgraduate Medical Research Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Research Consultancy$2,727

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project Team Doctor Ashleigh Guillaumier, Miss Brigid Clancy, Ms Alexandra Denham, Professor Billie Bonevski
Scheme ON Prime
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1801364
Type Of Funding C2120 - Aust Commonwealth - Other
Category 2120
UON Y
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Ms Alexandra Denham

Positions

Casual Research Assistant
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Research Assistant
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email alexandra.denham@newcastle.edu.au
Link Personal webpage

Office

Room Room 5015 Level 5
Building McAuley Building
Location Calvary Mater Hospital

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