Mr Aaron Bezzina

Mr Aaron Bezzina

Reseach Assistant

Office of the PVC Health and Medicine

Career Summary

Biography

Aaron Bezzina is a Higher Degree by Research (HDR) student at the University of Newcastle and an Accredited Practicing Dietitian (APD).  Aaron graduated with a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics with Honours in 2017 from the University of Newcastle. Aaron's research area is focused on sex differences in dietary patterns and population nutrition. Aaron also works as a Research Assistant in the Centre for Resources Health and Safety. 


Keywords

  • Dietary Patterns
  • Dietetics
  • Gender Difference
  • Health
  • Population Nutrition
  • Sex Differences

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 100
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Ashton LM, Sharkey T, Whatnall MC, Williams RL, Bezzina A, Aguiar EJ, et al., 'Effectiveness of interventions and behaviour change techniques for improving dietary intake in young adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs', Nutrients, 11 (2019)

© 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Poor eating habits are common during young adulthood and influence chronic disease morbidity. This systematic review eval... [more]

© 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Poor eating habits are common during young adulthood and influence chronic disease morbidity. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of interventions aiming to improve dietary intake among young adults and, identifies which behaviour change techniques (BCTs) are most effective. Six electronic databases were searched for RCTs published until October 2018, and evaluating behavioural interventions assessing change in dietary intake in young adults (17-35 years). Of the 18,779 articles identified, 54 were included. Forty studies focused on fruit and/or vegetable intake, of which 63% showed a significant between-group difference in favour of the intervention group. Meta-analysis (n = 17) demonstrated a significant increase in fruit and vegetable intake of +68.6 g/day after three months of intervention and +65.8 g/day for interventions >3 months when compared to control. A meta-analysis (n = 5) on total energy intake found no significant differences between groups. The BCTs with the highest effectiveness ratio were habit formation (100%), salience of consequences (83%) and adding objects to the environment (70%). The review highlights the potential of behavioural interventions to improve young adults¿ fruit and vegetable intake but was less convincing for other dietary outcomes. Due to the lack of studies including each BCT, the BCTs imperative to success could not be identified.

DOI 10.3390/nu11040825
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Megan Whatnall Uon, Lee Ashton
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Mr Aaron Bezzina

Positions

Reseach Assistant
Office of the PVC Health and Medicine
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Research Assistant
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email aaron.bezzina@newcastle.edu.au
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