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Professor Tracy Levett-Jones

Professor

School of Nursing and Midwifery (Nursing)

Safety first

Professor Tracy Levett-Jones is working towards evidence-based curricula redesign to ensure future health professionals are equipped to provide safe, effective and person-centred care.

Professor Tracy Levett-Jones 

When compared to international healthcare systems, Australia has one of the safest.  Yet Levett-Jones' research, along with multiple patient safety reports, indicates it is safer to go hang-gliding or to work in the nuclear power industry than it is to be a patient in an Australian hospital.

'The statistics are quite staggering,' she concedes.

As a clinician and more recently as an educator and researcher, Levett-Jones' primary emphasis has been on patient safety and preventing adverse patient outcomes. Combined with her commitment to improving the learning experiences of healthcare students, the internationally published author is working with an interdisciplinary team to design and undertake research that addresses patient safety concerns.

'I lead a large, extremely dedicated team who collaborates with academics from other countries, universities and clinical contexts,' she states.

'This ensures the international relevance of our research and optimises its translation to practice.'

Multipronged and multipurpose

Levett-Jones' team has expertise in a wide range of research methodologies, including quasi-experimental designs, case studies, cross-sectional surveys, Delphi technique, systematic reviews and narrative inquiry, as well as many other qualitative and quantitative approaches.

The University of Newcastle's world-renowned and award winning simulation program is excellent for teaching and research into patient safety. Sessions are conducted using high fidelity manikins, actors, masked educators, 3D cultural simulations, disaster simulations and inter-professional simulations. Each scenario is linked to a specific learning outcome and integrated into the curriculum.

'These simulation strategies create authentic learning situations that expose students to real practice but in a safe environment,' Levett-Jones explains.

'While some research can be undertaken in healthcare settings, it's not always ethical or safe for patients, so we prefer to recreate authentic simulated environments and scenarios instead.'

Seeking to put evidence into practice, the multiple-award winner is working collaboratively with researchers and educators across Australia and internationally to implement and evaluate patient safety simulations.

'In healthcare, when we teach and research, we are focused on both the here and now,' she reveals.

'But we're also looking beyond the horizon to ensure our work influences the recipients of our care, such as residents in aged-care facilities, the community, and many other health services. Without this focus the work we do has little meaning or relevance.  We are committed to truly making a difference.'

Moral courage and patient safety

Levett-Jones first began examining the relationship between education and patient safety during her PhD candidateship nearly ten years ago. While exploring the clinical learning experiences of nursing students in Australia and the United Kingdom, it became apparent that students who didn't experience a strong sense of belonging were constantly preoccupied with trying to fit in.

'While they identified practices that were unsafe, they were too afraid of 'rocking the boat' to speak up,' she disclosed.

'Essentially, students chose to conform and comply, rather than risk exclusion from the team.'

By contrast, students who experienced a strong sense of belonging were much more likely to demonstrate moral courage and address issues that may have threatened patient safety.

'So it became apparent that one of the most effective ways to improve patient safety is to empower students to become agents of change.'

Thinking about thinking

Post PhD, Levett-Jones has continued to work with her team to identify and address patient safety issues that could be improved through meaningful educational initiatives.

'We've identified that nearly 60% of adverse patient incidents in healthcare are related to the way health professionals think, or fail to think, about the complex data they are presented with during emergent clinical situations,' Levett-Jones asserts.

'For many years university nursing and other health programs failed to teach and research these cognitive processes effectively.'

'But over the last five or six years, we have turned our attention to the relationship between clinical reasoning and patient safety, and this has had a significant impact not only on our own curriculum, but also on health professional curricula in Australia and internationally.'

Describing the term 'clinical reasoning' as one that necessitates an awareness of the assumptions, biases and preconceptions health professionals often hold, Levett-Jones is a firm believer in the importance of teaching students to think 'differently and deeply' to improve patient safety.

'Through our research, simulations, classroom and online teaching, we have given considerable attention to enhancing graduates' clinical reasoning skills, and this has resulted in measurable improvements,' she conveys.

Adding to this body of work, the Director of the University's Research Centre for Health Professional Education is currently working with researchers and clinicians to improve medication safety in Australia.  Together with a team from the University of Western Sydney, Levett-Jones is designing simulations to help registered nurses and students confidently prevent and manage interruptions.

'There is growing evidence that they lead to significant numbers of medication errors each day,' she explains.

This research is part of a broader agenda to improve the inter-professional and therapeutic communication skills of health professional students.

'Lack of communication is implicated in 70 to 80% of all sentinel events,' she admits.

'Again, there hasn't been enough research on the most effective way to teach students and health professionals how to communicate in a manner that prevents errors from occurring.'

Cultural competence

Culturally and linguistically diverse patients experience twice as many adverse outcomes in Australian hospitals as English-speaking patients.  This is another area that needs much more attention in the education of health professionals, and in the research sphere.  While most educators focus on cultural competence, Levett-Jones' team is looking at cultural empathy as an antecedent to cultural competence.

'We have found that cultural empathy may be the key to changing attitudes and the way health professionals care for patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds,' she advises.

To this end, Levett-Jones' team has undertaken a number of research projects specifically designed to enhance students' cultural empathy and competence, with very encouraging results. Levett-Jones is also collaborating with Flinders University to create a set of interactive resources that focus on the mental illness experiences of people from different cultural backgrounds.

The interactive resources include a young Aboriginal man with depression, an older Chinese immigrant with dementia, and a woman from Middle Eastern background with postnatal depression.  The modules also address issues associated with stigma and social justice, and take learners on a journey that helps them to reflect on their own biases and preconceptions.

What matters most

When asked about her future research directions, Levett-Jones is quick to answer.

'There is a real need for evidence-based education,' she enthuses.

'We need to work collaboratively to invest in the education of future health professionals so that they make a tangible difference to the way graduates' practice, and ultimately, to patient safety.' 

'Our education and research agenda must lead to knowledgeable, effective, safe, compassionate and person-centred health professionals.'

Professor Tracy Levett-Jones

Safety first

Professor Tracy Levett-Jones is working towards evidence-based curricula redesign to ensure future health professionals are equipped to provide safe, effective

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Career Summary

Biography

Professor Tracy Levett-Jones is the Deputy Head of School (Teaching and Learning),  School of Nursing and Midwifery and the Director of the Research Centre for Health Professional Education in the at the University of Newcastle. Her research interests include: clinical reasoning, interprofessional education, cultural competence, simulation and patient safety. Tracy has authored ten books, the most recent being “Clinical Reasoning: Learning to think like a nurse” and Critical Conversations for Patient Safety; as well as over 150 book chapters, reports and peer reviewed journal articles. Tracy has been awarded ten research and teaching and learning awards including a New South Wales Minister for Education Quality Teaching Award, an Australian Learning and Teaching Council Award for Teaching Excellence. She has also led and been involved in a number of Category 1 funded projects.

Research Expertise
2007: Research Academic - Older Person Care Research Team I have expertise in: Qualitative and quantitative approaches, mixed methods, evaluation studies, cases studies, cross sectional surveys, Delphi technique, cost-benefit analysis and experimental designs.

Teaching Expertise
Teaching and Learning Fellow 2007-2008 I have expertise in: Undergraduate and honours teaching using online, face-to-face and simulation approaches.

Administrative Expertise
2008-present: Deputy Head of School (Teaching and Learning) 2006-2008: Bachelor of Nursing Program Convenor 2004-2005: Director of Clinical Education 2007-2010 Academic Senate 2008-2010 University Teaching and Learning Committee 2007-2010 Faculty of Health Board 2010-ongoing Faculty of Health Teaching and Learning Committee 2008-ongoing SONM Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Committee (Chair) 2006-ongoing SONM Bachelor of Nursing Program Committee 2004-2008 School of Nursing and Midwifery Executive Committee 2007-ongoing Hunter New England Nursing & Midwifery Leadership Council 2009 -2010 Mental Health Advisory and Curriculum Committee



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Diploma of Health Sciences, Avondale College
  • Bachelor of Nursing, Avondale College
  • Master of Education and Work, Macquarie University

Keywords

  • belongingness
  • clinical reasoning
  • cultural competence
  • interprofessional education
  • medication safety
  • patient safety
  • person centred care
  • simulation
  • virtual community

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
111099Nursing not elsewhere classified90
120299Building not elsewhere classified5
170101Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)5

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
12/09/2014 - ProfessorUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/08/2013 - 29/11/2013Casual AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/01/2013 - 31/01/2013Casual AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
30/05/2007 - 30/05/2007Casual AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
Centre for Teaching and Learning
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2010 - Membership - Australian Society for Simulation in HealthcareAustralian Society for Simulation in Healthcare
Australia
1/01/2008 - Membership - Australian Nurse Teachers Society Australian Nurse Teachers Society (ANTS)
Australia
1/01/2007 - Membership - Royal College of Nursing AustraliaRoyal College of Nursing Australia
Australia
1/01/2006 - Honorary Research FellowUniversity of Southampton
School of Nursing and Midwifery
United Kingdom

Awards

Recipient

YearAward
2004Award for Exceptional Leadership, Teaching and Adminstration on the Central Coast
University of Newcastle

Recognition

YearAward
2010Award for Teaching Excellence
Australian Learning and Teaching Council
2008Citation
Australian Learning and Teaching Council
2008Faculty of Health Indigenous Collaborations Award
University of Newcastle
2008Vice-Chancellor's Award for Teaching Excellence and Learning Support
Unknown
2007Quality teaching award
Australian College of Educators
2007VC citation
University of Newcastle
2000Graham Hermann Memorial Prize for Academic Excellence
Macquarie University
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (8 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Levett-Jones T, Critical conversations for patient safety : an essential guide for health professionals, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW, 251 (2014) [A3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2013Levett-Jones TL, Clinical Reasoning : Learning to Think Like a Nurse, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW, 294 (2013) [A3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2012Simmons CA, Williams AP, Sher WD, Levett-Jones TL, Work Ready: E-Portfolios to Support Professional Placements, Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney, NSW, 145 (2012) [A3]
Co-authorsTony Williams, Tracy Levett-Jones, Willy Sher
2011Levett-Jones TL, Bourgeois S, The Clinical Placement : An Essential Guide for Nursing Students, Elsevier Australia, Chatswood, NSW, 251 (2011) [A4]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Lemone P, Burke KM, Dwyer T, Levett-Jones TL, Moxham L, Reid-Searl K, et al., Medical Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Client Care, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW, 1902 (2011) [A3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Berman A, Harvey N, Snyder SJ, Luxford Y, Kozier B, Moxham L, et al., Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW, 1554 (2010) [A3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2009Levett-Jones TL, Bourgeis S, The Clinical Placement: A Nursing Survival Guide, Bailliere Tindall Elsevier, Edinburgh, Scotland, 216 (2009) [A3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2007Levett-Jones TL, Bourgeois S, The Clinical placement: an essential guide for nursing students, Elsevier, Australia, Marrickville, NSW, 253 (2007) [A2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
Show 5 more books

Chapter (17 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Day J, Levett-Jones T, Kenny R, 'Communicating and Relating', Kozier & Erb¿s fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson, Frenchs Forrest, NSW 509-543 (2015)
Co-authorsJenny Day, Tracy Levett-Jones
2014Levett-Jones T, Gilligan C, Outram S, Horton G, 'Key Attributes of Patient-Safe Communication', Critical Conversations for Patient Safety: An Essential Guide for Health Professionals, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 12-25 (2014) [B2]
Co-authorsSue Outram, Tracy Levett-Jones, Conor Gilligan, Graeme Horton
2014Levett-Jones TL, 'Person-centred care (in nursing): Seek first to understand and then to be understood', Health Practice Relationships, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam 111-118 (2014) [B1]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2013Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, 'Clinical reasoning: What is it and why it matters', Clinical Reasoning : Learning to Think Like a Nurse, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 2-14 (2013) [B2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2013Levett-Jones TL, Newby DA, 'Caring for a person experiencing an adverse drug event', Clinical Reasoning : Learning to Think Like a Nurse, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 16-29 (2013) [B2]
Co-authorsDavid Newby, Tracy Levett-Jones
2013Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Dempsey IJ, Sinclair PM, 'Caring for a person with fluid and electrolyte imbalance', Clinical Reasoning : Learning to Think Like a Nurse, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 30-52 (2013) [B2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2013Levett-Jones TL, Phelan CM, 'Caring for a person experiencing pain', Clinical Reasoning : Learning to Think Like a Nurse, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 180-202 (2013) [B2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2013Levett-Jones TL, Smith M, 'Providing clinical education: working across sectors', Educating Health Professionals: Becoming a University Teacher, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam 103-114 (2013) [B1]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2013Smith M, Loftus S, Levett-Jones TL, 'Teaching clinical reasoning', Educating Health Professionals: Becoming a University Teacher, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam 269-276 (2013) [B1]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2012Levett-Jones TL, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Teaching and learning', Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 558-586 (2012) [B2]
Co-authorsPamela Vanderriet, Tracy Levett-Jones
2012Levett-Jones TL, Stone TE, 'Writing for publication: Turning the conference paper into publishable works', Writing for Publication in Nursing and Healthcare, Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester, West Sussex 145-161 (2012) [B2]
Co-authorsTeresa Stone, Tracy Levett-Jones
2012Levett-Jones TL, Bowen LJ, Simmons CA, Sher WD, 'The professional nursing and construction curricula', Work Ready: E-Portfolios to Support Professional Placements, Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney, NSW 13-29 (2012) [B1]
Co-authorsLynette Bowen, Tracy Levett-Jones, Willy Sher
2012Day JL, Levett-Jones TL, Kenny RP, 'Communicating', Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 521-557 (2012) [B2]
Co-authorsJenny Day, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Bellchambers HL, Levett-Jones TL, 'Health and illness in the adult client', Medical Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Client Care, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 17-36 (2011) [B2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Helen Bellchambers
2011Levett-Jones TL, Bellchambers HL, 'Medical-surgical nursing', Medical Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Client Care, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 3-16 (2011) [B2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Helen Bellchambers
2010Day JL, Levett-Jones TL, 'Communicating', Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 482-516 (2010) [B2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Jenny Day
2010Levett-Jones TL, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Teaching', Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 517-545 (2010) [B2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Pamela Vanderriet
Show 14 more chapters

Journal article (79 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Ashktorab T, Hasanvand S, Seyedfatemi N, Zayeri F, Levett-Jones T, Pournia Y, 'Psychometric testing of the Persian version of the Belongingness Scale - Clinical Placement Experience', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 35 439-443 (2015)
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2014.11.006Author URL
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2015Ashktorab T, Hasanvand S, Seyedfatemi N, Zayeri F, Levett-Jones T, Pournia Y, 'Psychometric testing of the Persian version of the Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience', Nurse Education Today, 35 439-443 (2015)

Background: Belongingness has been identified both as a fundamental human need and as a prerequisite for nursing students' clinical learning. Belongingness has also been associated with students' academic achievement, retention, self-esteem, self-directed learning, and self-efficacy. The Belongingness Scale - Clinical Placement Experience is a valid and reliable measure of nursing students' belongingness scores; however, a Persian version of this scale is not currently available. Aim: This study aimed to translate the Belongingness Scale. -. Clinical Placement Experience into Persian, to evaluate its psychometric properties, and to measure the belongingness experiences of Iranian nursing students. Methods: Following translation and initial validity and reliability testing of the scale, 300 nursing students from three universities in Iran completed the survey. Further psychometric testing was undertaken followed by analysis of descriptive statistics. Results: Based on the results of confirmatory factor analysis two items were removed from the scale. The mean score of Persian version of the Belongingness Scale. -. Clinical Placement Experience was 3.21 (0.57). The whole scale had a high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha. = 0.92). The alpha coefficients of the subscales of "self-esteem", "connectedness", and "efficacy" were 0.85, 0.86, and 0.80 respectively. Conclusion: Similar to previous versions of the Belongingness Scale. -. Clinical Placement Experience, the Persian version demonstrated strong psychometric properties with strong validity and reliability, indicating its utility and appropriateness when measuring Iranian nursing students' belongingness experiences. Further testing with other cohorts would strengthen these results.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2014.11.006
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2015Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'The influence of critical thinking skills on performance and progression in a pre-registration nursing program', Nurse Education Today, 35 125-131 (2015)

Background: The importance of developing critical thinking skills in preregistration nursing students is recognized worldwide. Yet, there has been limited exploration of how students' critical thinking skill scores on entry to pre-registration nursing education influence their academic and clinical performance and progression. Aim: The aim of this study was to: i) describe entry and exit critical thinking scores of nursing students enrolled in a three year bachelor of nursing program in Australia in comparison to norm scores; ii) explore entry critical thinking scores in relation to demographic characteristics, students' performance and progression. Method: This longitudinal correlational study used the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) to measure critical thinking skills in a sample (. n=. 134) of students, at entry and exit (three years later). A one sample t-test was used to determine if differences existed between matched student critical thinking scores between entry and exit points. Academic performance, clinical performance and progression data were collected and correlations with entry critical thinking scores were examined. Results: There was a significant relationship between critical thinking scores, academic performance and students' risk of failing, especially in the first semester of study. Critical thinking scores were predictive of program completion within three years. The increase in critical thinking scores from entry to exit was significant for the 28 students measured. In comparison to norm scores, entry level critical thinking scores were significantly lower, but exit scores were comparable. Critical thinking scores had no significant relationship to clinical performance. Conclusion: Entry critical thinking scores significantly correlate to academic performance and predict students risk of course failure and ability to complete a nursing degree in three years. Students' critical thinking scores are an important determinant of their success and as such can inform curriculum development and selection strategies.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2014.08.006
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2015Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'The influence of critical thinking skills on performance and progression in a pre-registration nursing program', Nurse Education Today, 35 125-131 (2015)
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2014.08.006
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2015Levett-Jones T, Bowen L, Morris A, 'Enhancing nursing students' understanding of threshold concepts through the use of digital stories and a virtual community called 'Wiimali'', Nurse Education in Practice, 15 91-96 (2015)

Wiimali is a dynamic virtual community developed in 2010 and first implemented into our Bachelor of Nursing (BN) program in 2011. The word Wiimali comes from the Gumiluraai Aboriginal language. Wiimali and the digital stories it comprises were designed to engage nursing students and enhance their understanding of the threshold concepts integral to safe and effective nursing practice.In this paper we illustrate some of the key features of Wiimali with web links to a virtual tour of the community and a selection of digital stories. We explain how this innovative educational approach has the potential to lead to transformative learning about concepts such as social justice, person-centred care and patient safety.Consistent feedback about Wiimali attests to the positive impact of this educational approach. Students have commented on how Wiimali caused them to think differently about the concepts of community and social justice; how it brings the health-related problems of community members to life; and how the digital stories enhance their learning about person-centred care and patient safety.

DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2014.11.014
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Lynette Bowen
2015Levett-Jones T, Pitt V, Courtney-Pratt H, Harbrow G, Rossiter R, 'What are the primary concerns of nursing students as they prepare for and contemplate their first clinical placement experience?', Nurse Education in Practice, (2015)

Nursing students' first clinical placement experience can be a critical turning point -reinforcing professional aspirations for some, and for others, a time of emotional turbulence. There is a paucity of research focusing on students' perceptions and concerns prior to their first placement experience. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the concerns of first year bachelor of nursing students from one Australian university as they prepared for their first clinical placement.Participants completed an online 'readiness for practice' survey consisting of 22 items. This paper focuses on participants' responses to the one open ended question: 'Please comment on any concerns that you have in relation to being prepared for your first clinical placement'. Summative qualitative content analysis was used for analysis.144 students (55%) responded to the open ended question. Responses were categorised into six themes including: Not prepared for placement; feeling nervous, anxious and worried; bullying and belonging; practicalities; patient safety and making mistakes; and working outside of my scope of practice.It appears that activities designed to equip students with the capacity to manage the inherent challenges of undertaking a clinical placement may sometimes have a paradoxical effect by increasing students' level of stress and anxiety. An enhanced understanding of students' concerns may help educators implement appropriate support strategies.

DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2015.03.012
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Helen Courtney-Pratt
2015Lapkin S, Levett-Jones T, Gilligan C, 'Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour to examine health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice', Nurse Education Today, (2015)

Background: Safe medication practices depend upon, not only on individual responsibilities, but also effective communication and collaboration between members of the medication team. However, measurement of these skills is fraught with conceptual and practical difficulties. Aims: The aims of this study were to explore the utility of a Theory of Planned Behaviour-based questionnaire to predict health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice; and to determine the contribution of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control to behavioural intentions. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional survey based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour was designed and tested. Participants: A convenience sample of 65 undergraduate pharmacy, nursing and medicine students from one semi-metropolitan Australian university were recruited for the study. Methods: Participants' behavioural intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control to behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety were measured using an online version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour Medication Safety Questionnaire. Results: The Questionnaire had good internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.844. The three predictor variables of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control accounted for between 30 and 46% of the variance in behavioural intention; this is a strong prediction in comparison to previous studies using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Data analysis also indicated that attitude was the most significant predictor of participants' intention to collaborate with other team members to improve medication safety. Conclusion: The results from this study provide preliminary support for the Theory of Planned Behaviour-Medication Safety Questionnaire as a valid instrument for examining health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2015.03.018
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Conor Gilligan
2015Levett-Jones T, Andersen P, Reid-Searl K, Guinea S, McAllister M, Lapkin S, et al., 'Tag team simulation: An innovative approach for promoting active engagement of participants and observers during group simulations', Nurse Education in Practice, (2015)

Active participation in immersive simulation experiences can result in technical and non-technical skill enhancement. However, when simulations are conducted in large groups, maintaining the interest of observers so that they do not disengage from the learning experience can be challenging.We implemented Tag Team Simulation with the aim of ensuring that both participants and observers had active and integral roles in the simulation. In this paper we outline the features of this innovative approach and provide an example of its application to a pain simulation.Evaluation was conducted using the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale. A total of 444year nursing students participated from a population of 536 (response rate 83%). Cronbach's alpha for the Scale was .94 indicating high internal consistency. The mean satisfaction score for participants was 4.63 compared to 4.56 for observers. An independent sample t test revealed no significant difference between these scores (t (300)=-1.414, p=0.16).Tag team simulation is an effective approach for ensuring observers' and participants' active involvement during group-based simulations and one that is highly regarded by students. It has the potential for broad applicability across a range of leaning domains both within and beyond nursing.

DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2015.03.014
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2015Maclellan L, Higgins I, Levett-Jones T, 'Medical acceptance of the nurse practitioner role in Australia: A decade on', Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, 27 152-159 (2015)

Purpose: In Australia, nurse practitioners (NPs) were first endorsed in 2000. After more than a decade, the number of NPs remains relatively small with previous research suggesting medical resistance as a key reason for this. This article presents a selection of narratives from a study that explored the transition experiences of newly endorsed NPs with particular attention to relationships with their medical colleagues. Data sources: A critical ethnographic approach was undertaken to explore the experiences of 10 Australian NPs who were interviewed three to four times for up to an hour throughout their first year of practice. Conclusions: Participants' narratives provide insight into their transition to practice and the barriers and facilitators to their new role. In contrast to previous research, medical colleagues were generally supportive and collegial while resistance was demonstrated most often by senior nurses yielding positions of power. Implications for practice: This study provides insight into the influences that key health professionals have over the transition of NPs. Despite the fact there are still negative attitudes being expressed by some medical associations, in this study medical colleagues were largely supportive of the NP role and that integral to the development of these interprofessional relationships was mutual respect and effective communication.

DOI10.1002/2327-6924.12141
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Isabel Higgins
2015Lapkin S, Levett-Jones T, Gilligan C, 'Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour to examine health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice', Nurse Education Today, 35 935-940 (2015)

Background: Safe medication practices depend upon, not only on individual responsibilities, but also effective communication and collaboration between members of the medication team. However, measurement of these skills is fraught with conceptual and practical difficulties. Aims: The aims of this study were to explore the utility of a Theory of Planned Behaviour-based questionnaire to predict health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice; and to determine the contribution of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control to behavioural intentions. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional survey based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour was designed and tested. Participants: A convenience sample of 65 undergraduate pharmacy, nursing and medicine students from one semi-metropolitan Australian university were recruited for the study. Methods: Participants' behavioural intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control to behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety were measured using an online version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour Medication Safety Questionnaire. Results: The Questionnaire had good internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.844. The three predictor variables of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control accounted for between 30 and 46% of the variance in behavioural intention; this is a strong prediction in comparison to previous studies using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Data analysis also indicated that attitude was the most significant predictor of participants' intention to collaborate with other team members to improve medication safety. Conclusion: The results from this study provide preliminary support for the Theory of Planned Behaviour-Medication Safety Questionnaire as a valid instrument for examining health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2015.03.018
Co-authorsConor Gilligan, Tracy Levett-Jones
2014MacLellan L, Levett-Jones T, Higgins I, 'Nurse practitioner role transition: A concept analysis.', J Am Assoc Nurse Pract, (2014)
DOI10.1002/2327-6924.12165Author URL
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins, Tracy Levett-Jones
2014Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'Nursing students' personal qualities: a descriptive study.', Nurse Educ Today, 34 1196-1200 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2014.05.004Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2014Reid-Searl K, Levett-Jones T, Cooper S, Happell B, 'The implementation of Mask-Ed: reflections of academic participants.', Nurse Educ Pract, 14 485-490 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2014.05.008Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2014Day J, Levett-Jones T, Taylor ACT, 'Using a virtual community to enhance nursing student's understanding of primary health care', Collegian, 21 143-150 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.colegn.2013.09.006
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Ann Taylor, Jenny Day
2014Ebert L, Hoffman K, Levett-Jones T, Gilligan C, '"They have no idea of what we do or what we know": Australian graduates' perceptions of working in a health care team', Nurse Education in Practice, 14 544-550 (2014) [C1]

Globally it has been suggested that interprofessional education can lead to improvements in patient safety as well as increased job satisfaction and understanding of professional roles and responsibilities. In many health care facilities staff report being committed to working collaboratively, however their practice does not always reflect their voiced ideologies. The inability to work effectively together can, in some measure, be attributed to a lack of knowledge and respect for others' professional roles, status and boundaries. In this paper, we will report on the findings of an interpretative study undertaken in Australia, focussing specifically on the experiences of new graduate nurses, doctors and pharmacists in relation to 'knowing about' and 'working with' other health care professionals. Findings indicated there was little understanding of the roles of other health professionals and this impacted negatively on communication and collaboration between and within disciplines. Furthermore, most new graduates recall interprofessional education as intermittent, largely optional, non-assessable, and of little value in relation to their roles, responsibilities and practice as graduate health professionals. Interprofessional education needs to be integrated into undergraduate health programs with an underlying philosophy of reciprocity, respect and role valuing, in order to achieve the proposed benefits for staff and patients.

DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2014.06.005
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
Co-authorsLyn Ebert, Conor Gilligan, Tracy Levett-Jones
2014Palmer L, Levett-Jones T, Smith R, McMillan M, 'Academic literacy diagnostic assessment in the first semester of first year at university', The International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education, 5 67-78 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.5204/intjfyhe.v5i1.201
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Ros Smith
2014Stone TE, Levett-Jones T, 'A comparison of three types of stimulus material in undergraduate mental health nursing education', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 34 586-591 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2013.07.014Author URL
Co-authorsTeresa Stone, Tracy Levett-Jones
2014Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'The influence of personal qualities on performance and progression in a pre-registration nursing programme', Nurse Education Today, 34 866-871 (2014) [C1]

Background: Research conducted primarily with psychology and medical students has highlighted that personal qualities play an important role in students' academic performance. In nursing there has been limited investigation of the relationship between personal qualities and performance. Yet, reports of student incivility and a lack of compassion have prompted appeals to integrate the assessment of personal qualities into pre-registration nursing student selection. Before this can be done research is needed to explore the influence of students' personal qualities on programme performance and progression. Aim: This study explores the relationships between students' personal qualities and their academic and clinical performance, behaviours and progression through a pre-registration nursing programme in Australia. Method: This longitudinal descriptive correlational study was undertaken with a sample of Australian pre-registration nursing students (n=138). Students' personal qualities were assessed using three personal qualities assessment (PQA) instruments. Outcome measures included grades in nursing theory and clinical courses, yearly grade point average, final clinical competency, progression (completion), class attendance and levels of life event stress. Results: Significant correlations were found between academic performance and PQA scores for self-control, resilience and traits of aloofness, confidence and involvement. Final clinical competence was predicted by confidence and self-control scores. Students with higher empathy had higher levels of life event stress in their first year and class attendance had a positive correlation with self-control. Completing the programme in three years was weakly predicted by the measure of resilience. No difference was noted between extreme or non-extreme scorers on the PQA scales with respect to performance or progression. Conclusion: This sample of students' personal qualities was found to influence their academic and clinical performance and their ability to complete a pre-registration programme in three years. However, further research is required with larger cohorts to confirm the use of personal qualities assessment during selection. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2013.10.011
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2014Levett-Jones T, Lapkin S, 'A systematic review of the effectiveness of simulation debriefing in health professional education', Nurse Education Today, 34 (2014) [C1]

Objective: The objective of this review was to identify, appraise and synthesise the best available evidence for the effectiveness of debriefing as it relates to simulation-based learning for health professionals. Background: Simulation is defined as a technique used to replace or amplify real experiences with guided experiences that evoke or replace substantial aspects of the real world in a fully interactive manner. The use of simulation for health professional education began decades ago with the use of low-fidelity simulations and has evolved at an unprecedented pace. Debriefing is considered by many to be an integral and critical part of the simulation process. However, different debriefing approaches have developed with little objective evidence of their effectiveness. Inclusion Criteria: Studies that evaluated the use of debriefing for the purpose of simulation-based learning for health professionals were included. Simulation studies not involving health professionals and those conducted in other settings such as such as military or aviation were excluded. Review Methods: A review protocol outlining the inclusion and exclusion criteria was submitted, peer reviewed by the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) for Evidence Based Practice, and approved prior to undertaking the review. A comprehensive search of studies published between January 2000 and September 2011 was conducted across ten electronic databases. Two independent reviewers assessed each paper prior to inclusion or exclusion using the standardised critical appraisal instruments for evidence of effectiveness developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Results: Ten randomised controlled trials involving various debriefing methods were included in the review. Meta-analysis was not possible because of the different outcomes, control groups and interventions in the selected studies. The methods of debriefing included: post simulation debriefing, in-simulation debriefing, instructor facilitated debriefing and video-assisted instructor debriefing. In the included studies there was a statistically significant improvement pre-test to post-test in the performance of technical and nontechnical skills such as: vital signs assessment; psychomotor skills; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; task management; team working; and situational awareness, regardless of the type of debriefing conducted. Additionally, only one study reported consistent improvement in these outcomes with the use of video playback during debriefing. In two studies the effect of the debrief was evident months after the initial simulation experiences. Conclusion: These results support the widely held assumption that debriefing is an important component of simulation. It is recommended therefore that debriefing remains an integral component of all simulation-based learning experiences. However, the fact that there were no clinical or practical differences in outcomes when instructor facilitated debriefing was enhanced by video playback is an important finding since this approach is currently considered to be the 'gold standard' for debriefing. This finding therefore warrants further research. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2013.09.020
CitationsScopus - 9
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2014Reid-Searl K, Levett-Jones T, Cooper S, Happell B, 'The implementation of Mask-Ed: Reflections of academic participants', Nurse Education in Practice, 14 485-490 (2014) [C1]

This paper profiles the findings from a study that explored the perspectives and experiences of nurse educators who implemented a novel simulation approach termed Mask-Ed. The technique involves the educator wearing a silicone mask and or body parts and transforming into a character. The premise of this approach is that the masked educator has domain specific knowledge related to the simulation scenario and can transmit this to learners in a way that is engaging, realistic, spontaneous and humanistic.Nurse educators charged with the responsibility of implementing Mask-Ed in three universities were invited to participate in the study by attending an introductory workshop, implementing the technique and then journaling their experiences, insights and perspectives over a 12 month period. The journal entries were then thematically analysed. Key themes were categorised under the headings of Preparation, Implementation and Impact; Reflexivity and Responsiveness; Student Engagement and Ownership; and Teaching and Learning.Mask-Ed is a simulation approach which allows students to interact with the 'characters' in humanistic ways that promote person-centred care and therapeutic communication. This simulation approach holds previously untapped potential for a range of learning experiences, however, to be effective, adequate resourcing, training, preparation and practice is required.

DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2014.05.008
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2014Day JL, Levett-Jones T, Thorington Taylor A, 'Using a virtual community to enhance nursing student's understanding of primary health care', Collegian, 0-0 (2014)
DOI10.1016/j.colegn.2013.09.006
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsAnn Taylor, Jenny Day, Tracy Levett-Jones
2014Ebert L, Hoffman K, Levett-Jones T, Gilligan C, '"They have no idea of what we do or what we know": Australian graduates' perceptions of working in a health care team.', Nurse education in practice, 14 544-550 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2014.06.005
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
Co-authorsConor Gilligan, Tracy Levett-Jones, Lyn Ebert
2014Gilligan C, Outram S, Levett-Jones T, 'Recommendations from recent graduates in medicine, nursing and pharmacy on improving interprofessional education in university programs: a qualitative study.', BMC Med Educ, 14 52 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1472-6920-14-52Author URL
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsConor Gilligan, Sue Outram, Tracy Levett-Jones
2014Levett-Jones T, Bowen L, Morris A, 'Enhancing nursing students' understanding of threshold concepts through the use of digital stories and a virtual community called 'Wiimali'', Nurse Education in Practice, (2014)

Wiimali is a dynamic virtual community developed in 2010 and first implemented into our Bachelor of Nursing (BN) program in 2011. The word Wiimali comes from the Gumiluraai Aboriginal language. Wiimali and the digital stories it comprises were designed to engage nursing students and enhance their understanding of the threshold concepts integral to safe and effective nursing practice.In this paper we illustrate some of the key features of Wiimali with web links to a virtual tour of the community and a selection of digital stories. We explain how this innovative educational approach has the potential to lead to transformative learning about concepts such as social justice, person-centred care and patient safety.Consistent feedback about Wiimali attests to the positive impact of this educational approach. Students have commented on how Wiimali caused them to think differently about the concepts of community and social justice; how it brings the health-related problems of community members to life; and how the digital stories enhance their learning about person-centred care and patient safety.

DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2014.11.014
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Lynette Bowen
2014Reid-Searl K, Levett-Jones T, Cooper S, Happell B, 'The implementation of Mask-Ed: Reflections of academic participants', Nurse Education in Practice, 14 485-490 (2014) [C1]

This paper profiles the findings from a study that explored the perspectives and experiences of nurse educators who implemented a novel simulation approach termed Mask-Ed. The technique involves the educator wearing a silicone mask and or body parts and transforming into a character. The premise of this approach is that the masked educator has domain specific knowledge related to the simulation scenario and can transmit this to learners in a way that is engaging, realistic, spontaneous and humanistic.Nurse educators charged with the responsibility of implementing Mask-Ed in three universities were invited to participate in the study by attending an introductory workshop, implementing the technique and then journaling their experiences, insights and perspectives over a 12 month period. The journal entries were then thematically analysed. Key themes were categorised under the headings of Preparation, Implementation and Impact; Reflexivity and Responsiveness; Student Engagement and Ownership; and Teaching and Learning.Mask-Ed is a simulation approach which allows students to interact with the 'characters' in humanistic ways that promote person-centred care and therapeutic communication. This simulation approach holds previously untapped potential for a range of learning experiences, however, to be effective, adequate resourcing, training, preparation and practice is required.

DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2014.05.008
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2014Ebert L, Hoffman K, Levett-Jones T, Gilligan C, '"They have no idea of what we do or what we know": Australian graduates' perceptions of working in a health care team', Nurse Education in Practice, 14 544-550 (2014)

Globally it has been suggested that interprofessional education can lead to improvements in patient safety as well as increased job satisfaction and understanding of professional roles and responsibilities. In many health care facilities staff report being committed to working collaboratively, however their practice does not always reflect their voiced ideologies. The inability to work effectively together can, in some measure, be attributed to a lack of knowledge and respect for others' professional roles, status and boundaries. In this paper, we will report on the findings of an interpretative study undertaken in Australia, focussing specifically on the experiences of new graduate nurses, doctors and pharmacists in relation to 'knowing about' and 'working with' other health care professionals. Findings indicated there was little understanding of the roles of other health professionals and this impacted negatively on communication and collaboration between and within disciplines. Furthermore, most new graduates recall interprofessional education as intermittent, largely optional, non-assessable, and of little value in relation to their roles, responsibilities and practice as graduate health professionals. Interprofessional education needs to be integrated into undergraduate health programs with an underlying philosophy of reciprocity, respect and role valuing, in order to achieve the proposed benefits for staff and patients.

DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2014.06.005
Co-authorsLyn Ebert, Tracy Levett-Jones, Conor Gilligan
2013Lapkin S, Levett-Jones T, Gilligan C, 'A systematic review of the effectiveness of interprofessional education in health professional programs', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 33 90-102 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2011.11.006Author URL
CitationsScopus - 13Web of Science - 9
Co-authorsConor Gilligan, Tracy Levett-Jones
2013McCoy MA, Levett-Jones T, Pitt V, 'Development and psychometric testing of the Ascent to Competence Scale', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 33 15-23 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2011.11.003Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2013Arthur C, Levett-Jones T, Kable A, 'Quality indicators for the design and implementation of simulation experiences: A Delphi study', Nurse Education Today, 33 1357-1361 (2013) [C1]

Simulation is widely used in nursing education. Previous studies have examined the impact of simulation on the acquisition of psychomotor skills, knowledge, critical thinking and non-technical skills such as teamwork.Challenges associated with the integration of simulation into nursing curricula have also been examined, however only limited research addresses the most effective simulation design and teaching strategies for quality educational outcomes.This paper reports a Delphi study that synthesises expert opinion on the pedagogical principles and teaching strategies that are indicative of quality in simulation based learning activities. The resultant set of Quality Indicator Statements is presented and opportunities for application and further research are discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2012.07.012
CitationsScopus - 6
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2013Kable AK, Arthur C, Levett-Jones T, Reid-Searl K, 'Student evaluation of simulation in undergraduate nursing programs in Australia using quality indicators', NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES, 15 235-243 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1111/nhs.12025Author URL
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2013Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'Can an existing personal qualities measure be used to examine nursing students' professional and personal attributes?', Focus on Health Professional Education: A Multi-disciplinary Journal, 15 41-54 (2013) [C1]
Co-authorsSharyn Hunter, Tracy Levett-Jones
2013McAllister M, Levett-Jones T, Arthur C, Downer T, Harrison P, Layh J, et al., 'Snapshots of simulation: Creative strategies used by Australian educators to enhance simulation learning experiences for nursing students', Nurse Education in Practice, (2013) [C2]

Simulation in nursing is a flourishing area for nurse educators' practice. Defined as learning that amplifies, mimics or replaces real-life clinical situations, simulation aims to give students opportunity to reason through a clinical problem and make decisions, without the potential for harming actual patients. Educators in nursing are contributing to simulation learning in diverse and creative ways. Yet much of their craft is not being widely disseminated because educators are not always confident in publishing their work. This paper aims to stimulate creative development in simulation by providing short summaries, or snapshots, of diverse approaches that nurse educators are using. The objective is to inspire others to share other ideas in development or in practice that are improving learning for nursing students and practitioners, so that simulation scholarship is advanced. The snapshots presented range from approaches that: better support educators to attend to the whole process of simulation education, give students quick access to short skill-based videos, orientate students to the laboratory environment, harness the power of the group to develop documentation skills, use simulation to enrich lectures, develop multidisciplinary knowledge, and finally, which teach therapeutic communication with children in a fun and imaginative way. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2013.04.010
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2012MacDonald-Wicks L, Levett-Jones T, 'Effective teaching of communication to health professional undergraduate and postgraduate students: A systematic review', JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 10 S172-S183 (2012)
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Lesley Wicks
2012Levett-Jones TL, Gilligan C, Lapkin S, Hoffman KA, 'Interprofessional education for the quality use of medicines: Designing authentic multimedia learning resources', Nurse Education Today, 32 934-938 (2012) [C2]
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Conor Gilligan
2012Pitt VL, Powis DA, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, 'Factors influencing nursing students' academic and clinical performance and attrition: An integrative literature review', Nurse Education Today, 32 903-913 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 21Web of Science - 14
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2012Brown RA, Guinea S, McAllister M, Levett-Jones TL, Kelly M, Reid-Searl K, et al., 'Clinical simulation in Australia and New Zealand: Through the lens of an advisory group', Collegian, 19 177-186 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2012Lapkin S, Levett-Jones TL, Gilligan C, 'A cross-sectional survey examining the extent to which interprofessional education is used to teach nursing, pharmacy and medical students in Australian and New Zealand Universities', Journal of Interprofessional Care, 26 390-396 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authorsConor Gilligan, Tracy Levett-Jones
2012Levett-Jones TL, Lapkin S, 'The effectiveness of debriefing in simulation-based learning for health professionals: A systematic review', JBI Library of Systematic Reviews, 10 3295-3337 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 2
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Levett-Jones TL, Gersbach J, Arthur C, Roche JM, 'Implementing a clinical competency assessment model that promotes critical reflection and ensures nursing graduates' readiness for professional practice', Nurse Education in Practice, 11 64-69 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2010.07.004
CitationsScopus - 22
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Van Der Riet PJ, Francis LM, Levett-Jones TL, 'Complementary therapies in healthcare: Design, implementation and evaluation of an elective course for undergraduate students', Nurse Education in Practice, 11 146-152 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2010.10.002
CitationsScopus - 3
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Pamela Vanderriet
2011Levett-Jones TL, Lapkin S, Hoffman KA, Arthur C, Roche JM, 'Examining the impact of high and medium fidelity simulation experiences on nursing students' knowledge acquisition', Nurse Education in Practice, 11 380-383 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2011.03.014
CitationsScopus - 12
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Sinclair PM, Levett-Jones TL, 'The evolution of the Nephrology Educators' Network', Journal of Renal Care, 37 40-46 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1755-6686.2011.00208.x
CitationsScopus - 7
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Lapkin S, Levett-Jones TL, Gilligan C, 'The effectiveness of interprofessional education in university-based health professional programs: A systematic review', Joanna Briggs Institute Library of Systematic Reviews, 9 1917-1970 (2011) [C1]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Conor Gilligan
2011Arthur C, Kable AK, Levett-Jones TL, 'Human patient simulation manikins and information communication technology use in Australian schools of nursing: A cross-sectional survey', Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 7 e219-e227 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.ecns.2010.03.002
CitationsScopus - 9
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2011Gidding HF, Law MG, Amin J, MacDonald GA, Sasadeusz JJ, Levett-Jones TL, et al., 'Predictors of deferral of treatment for hepatitis C infection in Australian clinics', Medical Journal of Australia, 194 398-402 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 22Web of Science - 18
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Hoffman KA, Dempsey J, Levett-Jones TL, Noble DI, Hickey N, Jeong Y-S, et al., 'The design and implementation of an Interactive Computerised Decision Support Framework (ICDSF) as a strategy to improve nursing students' clinical reasoning skills', Nurse Education Today, 31 587-594 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2010.10.012
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authorsSarah Jeong, Sharyn Hunter, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Levett-Jones TL, Moorby MA, Lapkin S, Noble DI, Hoffman KA, Dempsey J, et al., 'The development and psychometric testing of the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale', Nurse Education Today, 31 705-710 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2011.01.004
CitationsScopus - 19Web of Science - 13
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Jeong Y-S, Hickey N, Levett-Jones TL, Pitt VL, Hoffman KA, Norton CA, Ohr SO, 'Understanding and enhancing the learning experiences of culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students in an Australian bachelor of nursing program', Nurse Education Today, 31 238-244 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2010.10.016
CitationsScopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authorsSarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Bembridge ER, Levett-Jones TL, Jeong Y-S, 'The transferability of information and communication technology skills from university to the workplace: A qualitative descriptive study', Nurse Education Today, 31 245-252 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2010.10.020
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsSarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Lapkin S, Levett-Jones TL, 'A cost-utility analysis of medium vs. high-fidelity human patient simulation manikins in nursing education', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 20 3543-3552 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03843.x
CitationsScopus - 14Web of Science - 8
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Lapkin S, Levett-Jones TL, Bellchambers HL, Fernandez R, 'Effectiveness of patient simulation manikins in teaching clinical reasoning skills to undergraduate nursing students: A systematic review', Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6 e207-e222 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.ecns.2010.05.005
CitationsScopus - 48
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Helen Bellchambers
2010Bembridge ER, Levett-Jones TL, Jeong Y-S, 'The transferability of information and communication technology skills from university to the workplace: A qualitative descriptive study', HNE Handover. For Nurses and Midwives, 3 34-41 (2010) [C2]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2010.10.020
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sarah Jeong
2010Jeong Y-S, Hickey N, Levett-Jones TL, Pitt VL, Hoffman KA, Norton CA, Ohr SO, 'Understanding and enhancing the learning experiences of culturally diverse nursing students in a bachelor of nursing program', HNE Handover. For Nurses and Midwives, 3 21-27 (2010) [C2]
Co-authorsSarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Levett-Jones TL, Sundin DJ, Bagnall M, Hague KJ, Schumann WA, Taylor CJ, Wink J, 'Learning to think like a nurse', HNE Handover. For Nurses and Midwives, 3 15-20 (2010) [C2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Dempsey J, Jeong Y-S, Noble DI, Norton CA, et al., 'The 'five rights' of clinical reasoning: An educational model to enhance nursing students' ability to identify and manage clinically 'at risk' patients', Nurse Education Today, 30 515-520 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2009.10.020
CitationsScopus - 32Web of Science - 23
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sarah Jeong
2010Stone TE, Levett-Jones TL, Harris MA, Sinclair PM, 'The genesis of 'the Neophytes': A writing support group for clinical nurses', Nurse Education Today, 30 657-661 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2009.12.020
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Teresa Stone
2010Hunter S, Levett-Jones TL, 'The practice of nurses working with older people in long term care: An Australian perspective', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 19 527-536 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2702.2009.02967.x
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2010Bembridge ER, Levett-Jones TL, Jeong Y-S, 'The preparation of technologically literate graduates for professional practice', Contemporary Nurse, 35 18-25 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.5172/conu.2010.35.1.018
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsSarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Stone TE, Francis LM, Levett-Jones TL, 'Profanity, expletives, swearing and offensive language: All in a day's work?', HNE Handover for Nurses and Midwives, 2 12-15 (2009) [C2]
Co-authorsTeresa Stone, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Stone TE, Levett-Jones TL, Harris MA, 'The genesis of 'The neophytes': A writing support group for clinical nurses', HNE Handover for Nurses and Midwives, 2 32-36 (2009) [C2]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2009.12.020
Co-authorsTeresa Stone, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, 'Don't rock the boat: Nursing students' experiences of conformity and compliance', Nurse Education Today, 29 342-349 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2008.10.009
CitationsScopus - 28Web of Science - 19
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2009Levett-Jones TL, Kenny RP, Van Der Riet PJ, Hazelton MJ, Kable AK, Bourgeois S, Luxford Y, 'Exploring the information and communication technology competence and confidence of nursing students and their perception of its relevance to clinical practice', Nurse Education Today, 29 612-616 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2009.01.007
CitationsScopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authorsPamela Vanderriet, Tracy Levett-Jones, Michael Hazelton, Ashley Kable
2009Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, Higgins IJ, McMillan MA, 'Staff-student relationships and their impact on nursing students' belongingness and learning', Journal of Advanced Nursing, 65 316-324 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2648.2008.04865.x
CitationsScopus - 69Web of Science - 53
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Isabel Higgins
2009Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, 'The ascent to competence conceptual framework: An outcome of a study of belongingness', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 18 2870-2879 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02593.x
CitationsScopus - 27Web of Science - 21
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2009Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, 'Response to Watson R (2009) Commentary on Levett-Jones T & Lathlean J (2009) The ascent to competence conceptual framework: an outcome of a study of belongingness', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 18 2920-2921 (2009) [C3]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2702.2009.02819.x
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2009Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, Higgins IJ, McMillan MA, 'Development and psychometric testing of the Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience: An international comparative study', Collegian, 16 153-162 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.colegn.2009.04.004
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins, Tracy Levett-Jones
2008Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, 'Belongingness: A prerequisite for nursing students' clinical learning', Nurse Education in Practice, 8 103-111 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2007.04.003
CitationsScopus - 82
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2008Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, Higgins IJ, McMillan MA, 'The duration of clinical placements: A key influence on nursing students' experience of belongingness', The Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 26 8-16 (2008) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 25Web of Science - 16
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins, Tracy Levett-Jones
2008Myall M, Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, 'Mentorship in contemporary practice: The experiences of nursing students and practice mentors', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 17 1834-1842 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2702.2007.02233.x
CitationsScopus - 58Web of Science - 44
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2007Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, McMillan MA, Higgins IJ, 'Belongingness: A montage of nursing students' stories of their clinical placement experiences', Contemporary Nurse, 24 1 (2007) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 35Web of Science - 26
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Isabel Higgins
2007Levett-Jones TL, 'Facilitating reflective practice and self-assessment of competence through the use of narratives', Nurse Education in Practice, 7 112-119 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2006.10.002
CitationsScopus - 28
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2007Levett-Jones TL, 'Researching the implementation of pioneering roles in nursing and midwifery: Empirical insights about lecturer practitioners, consultant nurses and nurse registrars', Journal of Research in Nursing, 12 41-42 (2007) [C3]
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2007Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, Maquire J, McMillan MA, 'Belongingness: A critique of the concept and implications for nursing education', Nurse Education Today, 27 210-218 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2006.05.001
CitationsScopus - 38Web of Science - 33
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Jane Maguire
2006Lathlean J, Burgess A, Coldham T, Gibson C, Herbert L, Levett-Jones TL, et al., 'Experiences of service user and career participation in health care education', Nurse Education Today, 26 732-737 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2006.07.017
CitationsScopus - 23Web of Science - 10
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2006Lathlean J, Burgess A, Coldham T, Gibson C, Herbert L, Levett-Jones T, et al., 'Experiences of service user and carer participation in health care education', Nurse Education in Practice, 6 424-429 (2006)

The agenda of involving service users and their carers more meaningfully in the development, delivery and evaluation of professional education in health is gaining in importance. The paper reports on a symposium3The symposium was prepared by a team of nurse educators, service users and researchers from the UK and an academic from Australia.3 which presented three diverse initiatives, established within a school of nursing and midwifery in the United Kingdom. These represent different approaches and attempts to engage service users and in some instances carers more fully in professional education aimed at developing mental health practitioners. Each is presented as achieving movement on a continuum of participation from service users as passive recipients to service users as collaborators and co-researchers. The paper concludes with a discussion of the lessons to be learnt which will hopefully stimulate service user involvement on a wider basis. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI10.1016/j.nepr.2006.07.012
CitationsScopus - 12
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2006Levett-Jones TL, Fahy KM, Parsons K, Mitchell A, 'Enhancing nursing students' clinical placement experiences: A quality improvement project', Contemporary Nurse, 23 58-71 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.5172/conu.2006.23.1.58
CitationsScopus - 30
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2005Levett-Jones TL, 'Continuing education for nurses: a necessity or a nicety?', The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 36 229-233 (2005) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 34
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2005Levett-Jones TL, Fitzgerald GM, 'A review of graduate nurse transition programs in Australia', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 23 40-45 (2005) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 39Web of Science - 30
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2004Levett-Jones TL, 'Clinical assessment increases confidence', Australian Nursing Journal, 12 31 (2004) [C2]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
Show 76 more journal articles

Conference (68 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Kable AK, Arthur C, Levett-Jones T, Reid-Searl K, 'Student Evaluation of Simulation in Undergraduate Nursing Programs using Quality Indicators: A Pilot Study', Proceedings of the 5th International Clinical Skills Conference, Prato (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsAshley Kable, Tracy Levett-Jones
2013Kable AK, Humphreys M, Walsh P, Levett-Jones T, 'The Evaluation of Quality Indicators for the Design and Implementation of Simulation within the Undergraduate Nursing Programme', Valuing Safe Professional Practice, Harrogate (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2012Hoffman KA, Levett-Jones TL, 'Cue acquisition, interpretation and decision-making of nursing students during high fidelity simulated patient experiences', Conference Proceedings. 4th International Nurse Education Conference, Baltimore, MD (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2012Levett-Jones TL, Day JL, 'Wiimali: A virtual community that engages nursing students in learning about primary health care', Conference Proceedings. 4th International Nurse Education Conference, Baltimore, MD (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsJenny Day, Tracy Levett-Jones
2012Palmer L, Levett-Jones TL, 'Assessing the academic literacy of undergraduate nursing students: A pilot study using the MASUS diagnostic tool', Conference Proceedings. 4th International Nurse Education Conference, Baltimore, MD (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2012O'Donnell JM, Levett-Jones TL, Decker S, Howard VM, 'NLN-Jeffries Simulation Framework Project - Outcomes of simulation education', Clinical Simulation in Nursing, San Antonio, Texas (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2012Arthur C, Kable AK, Levett-Jones TL, 'The application and testing of quality indicators for the design and implementation of simulation experiences', 14th National Nurse Education Conference 2012. Speaker Abstracts, Perth, WA (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2012Levett-Jones TL, 'The paradox of being a 'casual academic' in an Australian university', 14th National Nurse Education Conference 2012. Speaker Abstracts, Perth, WA (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2012Noble DI, Levett-Jones TL, Budgell B, 'Nursing language - what is the language?', 14th National Nurse Education Conference 2012. Speaker Abstracts, Perth, WA (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2012Maclellan LI, Higgins IJ, Levett-Jones TL, 'The personal experiences of Australian nurse practitioners during transition to practice: Stories from the field', 2nd Australian Capital Region Nursing & Midwifery Research Conference. Conference Proceedings, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Arthur C, Levett-Jones TL, Kable AK, 'Quality indicators for the design and implementation of simulation experiences', 4th International Clinical Skills Conference: Showcasing Innovation and Evidenced Based Clinical Skills Education and Practice: Abstracts, Prato, Tuscany (2011) [E3]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2012.07.012
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable
2011Dempsey J, Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Bourgeois S, Jeong Y-S, Hunter S, et al., 'Pandoras Box: simulation, reflection, cognitive errors and clinical reasoning', 4th International Clinical Skills Conference: Showcasing Innovation and Evidenced Based Clinical Skills Education and Practice: Abstracts, Prato, Tuscany (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsSarah Jeong, Sharyn Hunter, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Hoffman KA, Dempsey J, Levett-Jones TL, Jeong Y-S, Noble DI, Kenny RP, et al., 'Examining the relationship between interpersonal communication skills and nursing students' clinical reasoning ability', 4th International Clinical Skills Conference: Showcasing Innovation and Evidenced Based Clinical Skills Education and Practice: Abstracts, Prato, Tuscany (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsSarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Hunter S, Arthur C, Roche JM, Levett-Jones TL, Kable AK, 'Prudent use of simulation dollars to achieve good learning outcomes', 4th International Clinical Skills Conference: Showcasing Innovation and Evidenced Based Clinical Skills Education and Practice: Abstracts, Prato, Tuscany (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Ashley Kable, Sharyn Hunter
2011Levett-Jones TL, Bellchambers HL, Gilligan C, 'Interprofessional education: Enhancing the teaching of medication safety to nursing, pharmacy and medical students', 4th International Clinical Skills Conference: Showcasing Innovation and Evidenced Based Clinical Skills Education and Practice: Abstracts, Prato, Tuscany (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsHelen Bellchambers, Conor Gilligan, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Williams AP, Simmons CA, Gu N, Sher WD, Levett-Jones TL, Bowen LJ, 'Exploring students' demonstration of professional work integrated learning through e-portfolios', 2011 International Conference on E -Business and E -Government (ICEE) Proceedings, Shanghai, China (2011) [E1]
DOI10.1109/ICEBEG.2011.5881518
Co-authorsWilly Sher, Lynette Bowen, Tony Williams, Ning Gu, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Hoffman KA, Dempsey J, Levett-Jones TL, Andersen P, Brown R, Crookes P, et al., 'Examining the relationship between interpersonal communication skills and nursing students' clinical reasoning ability', Innovations in Nursing Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead: 15th Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2011, Hamilton, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Pitt VL, Powis DA, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, 'Moving towards tomorrow's workforce: Using personal qualities to guide selection', Innovations in Nursing Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead: 15th Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2011, Hamilton, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2011Palmer L, Levett-Jones TL, 'Intuition versus reason: Implications for the teaching and learning of moral reasoning and ethical decision-making in undergraduate nurse education', Innovations in Nursing Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead: 15th Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2011, Hamilton, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Noble DI, Budgell B, Levett-Jones TL, 'A corpus linguistics study of the undergraduate nursing curriculum', Innovations in Nursing Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead: 15th Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2011, Hamilton, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Hunter S, Pitt VL, Levett-Jones TL, 'Improving nursing students' clinical reasoning', Innovations in Nursing Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead: 15th Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2011, Hamilton, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsSharyn Hunter, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Hoffman KA, Dempsey J, Levett-Jones TL, Andersen P, Brown R, Crookes P, et al., 'A model to develop interpersonal and teamwork skills in undergraduate nursing students', Innovations in Nursing Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead: 15th Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2011, Hamilton, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Dempsey J, Hoffman KA, Levett-Jones TL, Crookes P, Brown R, Andersen P, et al., 'An innovative model for teaching critical reflection and debriefing', nnovations in Nursing Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead: 15th Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2011, Hamilton, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Hoffman KA, Roche JM, Levett-Jones TL, 'Is cue acquisition and clinical reasoning influenced by the use of high fidelity human patient simulation manikins?', 2010 International Nursing Conference. Abstracts, Beijing, China (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Noble DI, Levett-Jones TL, 'The nursing language: Is it like learning a second language?', 2010 International Nursing Conference. Abstracts, Beijing, China (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Maclellan LI, Higgins IJ, Levett-Jones TL, 'Transition to nurse practitioner practice in Australia: What really happens on the journey to the top?', 25th National Conference of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, Phoenix, AZ (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Maclellan LI, Higgins IJ, Levett-Jones TL, 'Challenges to nurse practitioner practice in Australia', 25th National Conference of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. Abstracts, Phoenix, AZ (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Arthur C, Levett-Jones TL, Kable AK, 'Australian simulation and technology survey', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsAshley Kable, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Bellchambers HL, Reid-Searl K, Levett-Jones TL, 'The creative use of masks to promote quality teaching and learning of safe medication practices for nurses', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Helen Bellchambers
2010Bembridge ER, Levett-Jones TL, Jeong Y-S, 'University vs reality: Are the information and communication (ICT) skills of new graduate nurses working in regional/ semi metropolitan areas transferable to the workplace?', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sarah Jeong
2010Dempsey J, Jeong Y-S, Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, 'Reasoning without reflecting', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsSarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Van Der Riet PJ, Francis LM, Levett-Jones TL, 'Complementary therapies: Design, implementation and evaluation of an elective course for undergraduate nursing students', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsPamela Vanderriet, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Dempsey J, Bourgeois S, Hunter S, Jeong Y-S, 'Enhancing nursing students' clinical reasoning skills through their engagement with interactive computerised case studies', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsSharyn Hunter, Sarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010McCoy MA, Pitt VL, Levett-Jones TL, 'Testing the psychometric properties of the ascent to competence scale: A study of nursing students' clinical placement experiences', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Pitt VL, Powis DA, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, 'Altering selection strategies: The future of undergraduate nursing education', ANZAME 2010: Overcoming Barriers, Re(E)Forming Professional Practice, Townsville, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsSharyn Hunter, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Levett-Jones TL, Bellchambers HL, Gilligan C, 'Enhancing medication safety through the use of innovative multimedia, interprofessional communication and clinical reasoning', Healthcare Communication Symposium 2010, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsConor Gilligan, Tracy Levett-Jones, Helen Bellchambers
2010Levett-Jones TL, 'Educating undergraduates: Have we overlooked an opportunity for improving patient safety?', Recognising and Responding to Clinical Deterioration: Solutions for Safe Care Conference 2010, Adelaide, SA (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Arthur C, Roche JM, Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Kable AK, Hunter S, 'The simulation 'pot of gold': How should we spend it?', SimTech Health 2010: Education and Innovation in Healthcare. Conference Handbook with Program and Abstracts, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsSharyn Hunter, Ashley Kable, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Roche JM, Hoffman KA, Levett-Jones TL, 'Interpersonal communication and the effect on nursing students clinical reasoning', SimTech Health 2010: Education and Innovation in Healthcare. Conference Handbook with Program and Abstracts, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Arthur C, Levett-Jones TL, Kable AK, 'Identifying quality indicators for the use of human patient simulation manikins and ICT - A Delphi study', Symposium: Simulation and Beyond. Creative Teaching Approaches for Improving Patient Safety. Program, Pokolbin, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsAshley Kable, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Pitt VL, Van Der Riet PJ, Levett-Jones TL, 'Integrating palliative care into undergraduate nursing curriculum. The University of Newcastle's experience', Third National Palliative Care Education Conference, Brisbane, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsPamela Vanderriet, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Williams AP, Levett-Jones TL, Sher WD, Simmons CA, Gu N, Bowen LJ, 'Can ePortfolios assist university students' work integrated learning? Exploring professional competencies in nursing and construction management', ePortfolios Australia Conference 2010: Book of Abstracts and Papers, Melbourne, VIC (2010) [E1]
Co-authorsNing Gu, Tracy Levett-Jones, Willy Sher, Tony Williams, Lynette Bowen
2010Simmons CA, Williams AP, Levett-Jones TL, Sher WD, Bowen LJ, Gu N, 'Can e-Portfolios assist students' learning in the work place? Exploring students' demonstration of their professional work experience through e-Portfolios in the Construction Management and Nursing disciplines', Learning Forum London 2010. Internet of Subjects Forum Proceedings, London (2010) [E1]
Co-authorsNing Gu, Lynette Bowen, Tony Williams, Tracy Levett-Jones, Willy Sher
2010Simmons CA, Williams AP, Levett-Jones TL, Sher WD, Bowen LJ, Gu N, 'Worlds apart? Developing a professional competency assessment framework that links university education with 'real world' practices in the Construction Management and Nursing disciplines', Learning Forum London 2010. Internet of Subjects Forum, London (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTony Williams, Lynette Bowen, Ning Gu, Willy Sher, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Palmer L, Levett-Jones TL, Mintoff JG, McMillan MA, 'Teaching moral reasoning: Challenges for undergraduate nursing education', Rethinking Learning in Your Discipline. Proceedings of the University Learning and Teaching Futures Colloquium, 2010, Armidale, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Joseph Mintoff
2010Rossiter RC, Stone TE, Levett-Jones TL, 'One oar or two? Enhancing mental health undergraduate education', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, Hobart, Tas (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTeresa Stone, Rachel Rossiter, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Hoffman KA, Dempsey J, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, Hickey N, Roche JM, et al., 'Enhancing nursing students' clinical reasoning skills through their engagement with computerised decision support frameworks', Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2009: Concurrent Sessions, Christchurch, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsSharyn Hunter, Sarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Noble DI, Hoffman KA, Levett-Jones TL, 'How can clinical skills improve patient safety? The 5 R's of clinical reasoning', Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2009: Concurrent Sessions, Christchurch, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2009Pitt VL, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, Powis DA, 'Personal qualities and nursing students clinical & academic performance', Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2009: Concurrent Sessions, Christchurch, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsSharyn Hunter, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Roche JM, Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, 'Is cue acquisition and clinical reasoning influenced by the use of high fidelity human simulation?', Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2009: Concurrent Sessions, Christchurch, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2009Arthur C, Kable AK, Levett-Jones TL, Bourgeois S, 'Human patient simulation manikin and information communication technology use in Australian nurse education', Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2009: Concurrent Sessions, Christchurch, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsAshley Kable, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Lapkin S, Levett-Jones TL, Bellchambers HL, 'The effectiveness of using human patient simulation manikins in the teaching of clinical reasoning skills to undergraduate nursing students: A systematic review', Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2009: Poster Presentations, Christchurch, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsHelen Bellchambers, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Pitt VL, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, Powis DA, 'Selection or support: The best direction for improving undergraduate nursing?', RCNA Annual Conference 09: Program and Book of Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sharyn Hunter
2009Kenny RP, Levett-Jones TL, Kable AK, 'The information communication technology profile of commencing bachelor of nursing students enrolled in three Australian universities', RCNA Annual Conference 09: Program and Book of Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsAshley Kable, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Levett-Jones TL, Roche JM, Arthur C, Dempsey J, 'Structured observation and assessment of practice (SOAP): A comprehensive clinical competence assessment that motivates student learning, promotes critical reflection and confirms nursing graduates' readiness for professional practice', Third International Clinical Skills Conference. Abstracts, Papers, Workshops and Posters, Prato, Italy (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2009Reid-Searl K, Bellchambers HL, Levett-Jones TL, 'Using innovative simulation to teach medication safety to nurses', Third International Clinical Skills Conference. Abstracts, Papers, Workshops and Posters, Prato, Italy (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Helen Bellchambers
2009Roche JM, Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Hazelton MJ, 'How can clinical skills education improve patient safety? - Is cue acquistion and clinical reasoning influences by the use of high fidelity human patient simulation?', Third International Clinical Skills Conference. Abstracts, Papers, Workshops and Posters, Prato, Italy (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsMichael Hazelton, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Dempsey J, Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Hunter S, Hickey N, Noble DI, et al., 'The 5 r's of clinical reasoning', Third International Clinical Skills Conference. Abstracts, papers, workshops and posters, Prato, Italy (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsSharyn Hunter, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Harris MA, Stone TE, Levett-Jones TL, Sinclair PM, 'The genesis of 'the neophytes': A writing support group for clinical nurses', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
DOI10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00648.x
Co-authorsTeresa Stone, Tracy Levett-Jones
2008Levett-Jones TL, 'Belongingness: Essential for optimising the learning of nursing students in the clinical environment', 13th National Nurse Education Conference. Program, Sydney, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2008Bowen LJ, Kenny K, Levett-Jones TL, 'When a flexible delivery learning model becomes flexible!', 13th National Nurse Education Conference. Program, Sydney, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsLynette Bowen, Tracy Levett-Jones
2008Kable AK, Levett-Jones TL, Maynard JM, 'Enhancing academic staff understanding of the learning needs of Indigenous Australian students in a tertiary education setting', 13th National Nurse Education Conference. Program, Sydney, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsAshley Kable, John Maynard, Tracy Levett-Jones
2008Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, 'Belongingness: Its contribution to student nurse learning', 13th Ottawa International Conference on Clinical Competence. Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2008Levett-Jones TL, Bourgeois S, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Exploring the information and communication technology skills of nursing students and graduates', NETNEP 2008: 2nd International Nurse Education Conference: Abstract Book, Dublin, Ireland (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsPamela Vanderriet, Tracy Levett-Jones
2008Levett-Jones TL, Lathlean J, 'Don't 'rock the boat': Nursing students' stories of conformity and compliance', NETNEP 2008: 2nd International Nurse Education Conference: Abstract Book, Dublin, Ireland (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2008Levett-Jones TL, 'Innovations in clinical teaching in nursing', The Clinical Teaching Forum in Nursing Education Program, Seoul, Korea (2008) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2007Bourgeois S, Levett-Jones TL, 'From practice to research to practice', The 18th International Nursing Research Congress Focusing on Evidence-Based Practice. Abstracts, Vienna, Austria (2007) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2007Levett-Jones TL, 'Belongingness: A pivotal precursor to optimising the learning of nursing students in the clinical environment', The 18th International Nursing Research Congress Focusing on Evidence-Based Practice. Abstracts, Vienna, Austria (2007) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
Show 65 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2011Levett-Jones TL, 'Examining the impact of simulated patients and information and communication technology on nursing students' clinical reasoning', Australian Learning and Teaching Council, 81 (2011) [R1]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants17
Total funding$658,487

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $2,000

6th International Clinical Skills Conference, Prato Italy, 17-20 May 2015$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500202
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20142 grants / $5,078

Developing a course handover tool to support new course coordinators$3,078

Funding body: Office for Learning and Teaching

Funding bodyOffice for Learning and Teaching
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones, Dr David Birbeck, Assoicate Professor Andrea Chester
SchemeCommissioned Strategic Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400919
Type Of FundingExternal
CategoryEXTE
UONY

Fifith International Nurse Education Conference, Noordwijkerhout Netherlands, 22-25 June 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400371
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20132 grants / $20,000

Reshaping curricula: integrating culturally diverse/mental health online content to prepare work ready health professionals$10,000

Funding body: Office for Learning and Teaching

Funding bodyOffice for Learning and Teaching
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones, Professor Elnear Muir-Cochrane
SchemeInnovation and Development Program
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1400358
Type Of FundingExternal
CategoryEXTE
UONY

Reshaping curricula: integrating culturally diverse/mental health online content to prepare work ready health professionals$10,000

Funding body: Office for Learning and Teaching

Funding bodyOffice for Learning and Teaching
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones, Professor Elnear Muir-Cochrane
SchemeInnovation and Development Program
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1400358
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

20121 grants / $2,000

NETNEP 2012 - The 4th International Nurse Education Conference - Changing the landscape for nursing and healthcare education: evidence-based innovation, policy and practice, Baltimore, USA, 16 - 20 Ju$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200422
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20112 grants / $219,000

Enhancing the teaching of medication safety to nursing, pharmacy and medical students through interprofessional education (IPE)$217,000

Funding body: Australian Learning and Teaching Council

Funding bodyAustralian Learning and Teaching Council
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones, Doctor Helen Bellchambers, Doctor Conor Gilligan
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000934
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

International Forum on Quality and Safety in Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 5 - 8 April 2011$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100288
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20092 grants / $132,500

Facilitating WIL Through Skills-Enabled e-Portfolios in the Disciplines of Construction and Nursing$130,000

Funding body: Australian Learning and Teaching Council

Funding bodyAustralian Learning and Teaching Council
Project TeamProfessor Anthony Williams, Professor Tracy Levett-Jones, Associate Professor Willy Sher
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0900116
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

3rd International Clinical Skills Conference, Prato Italy, 29 June - 7 July 2009$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190128
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20082 grants / $231,500

Examining the impact of simulated patients and information communication technology on nursing students' clinical reasoning$229,000

Funding body: Australian Learning and Teaching Council

Funding bodyAustralian Learning and Teaching Council
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones, Ms Kerry Hoffman, Doctor Jennifer Dempsey
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0189623
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

The Second International Nursing Education Conference, Dublin Ireland, 8/6/2008 - 11/6/2008$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188975
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20071 grants / $1,700

/18th International Nursing Research Congress Foucusing on Evidence-Based Practise, Vienna, Austria, 11/7/2007 - 14/$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0187674
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20062 grants / $35,039

Equity Research Fellowship Semester 1, 2006$33,539

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones
SchemeEquity Research Fellowship
RoleLead
Funding Start2006
Funding Finish2006
GNoG0185969
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

1st Nurse Education International Conference, 14-16 May 2006$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2006
Funding Finish2006
GNoG0186224
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20052 grants / $9,670

Belongingness: Implications for third year nursing students in Australia and the United Kingdom$8,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones
SchemeEarly Career Researcher Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2005
GNoG0185880
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

First International Clinical Skills Conference, 9-11 May 2005$1,670

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Tracy Levett-Jones
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2005
GNoG0185212
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
Edit

Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015Development of an Educational Module or Make a Recommendation and Evaluation of Culturally Appropriate Assertiveness Communication Training Module for Health Professional Students with the Background where Cultural Barriers may Hinder Assertiveness
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2013Investigating Behavioural Intention in E-Learning
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2011Are Contemporary Practice Environments Conducive to the Learning Needs and Preferences of 'Generation Y' Occupational Therapy Students?
Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2010A Mixed Methods Study of Academic Literacies Development within a Cohort of Undergraduate Nursing Students
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2007A critical ethnography of the transition of registered nurses to nurse practiitioners in Australia
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014Enhancing Safe Medication Practices: An Interprofessional Education Approach
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2014Human Patient Stimulation Manikins and Information and Communication Technology: Use and Quality Indicators in Australian Schools of Nursing
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2014Factors Impacting on Bachelor of Nursing Students' Clinical and Academic Performance and Progression
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
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Professor Tracy Levett-Jones

Position

Professor
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Nursing

Contact Details

Emailtracy.levett-jones@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 492 16599
Fax(02) 492 16301

Office

RoomRW1-40
BuildingRichardson Wing
LocationCallaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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