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Dr Robert Lockie

Conjoint Senior Lecturer

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Applied Sciences)

Career Summary

Biography

Robert completed his undergraduate degree in Human Movement at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). Due to his passion for exercise and sport science, Robert then completed his Honours and PhD at UTS. His research involved the analysis of the biomechanics of sprint acceleration in field sport athletes, and the effects of different speed, strength and power training methodologies. Including the University of Newcastle, Robert has taught at UTS and the University of Sydney, and regularly lectures for the NSW Department of Sport and Recreation. Robert's current research interests include analysing the effects of supplementation for muscle strength and hypetrophy, as well as investigating the training practices of field sport athletes. Research Expertise
My research has a strong interdisciplinary focus, as has focused on areas such as strength and conditioning, biomechanics, and exercise physiology. Predminantly, I have analysed speed and acceleration performance in field sport athletes. This research has focused on the biomechanics of sprint technique, and the processes involved in developing strength and power in these athletes.

Teaching Expertise
I have lectured and tutored at UTS, the University of Sydney, the Sydney Academy of Sport, the Australian Fitness Network, and the Department of Sport and Recreation. The disciplinary areas in which I have taught include biomechanics, physical activity, human growth and development, research methods and statistics, and strength and onditioning.

Administrative Expertise
Subject coordinator at the University of Newcastle, UTS and the University of Sydney. Member of the UTS Human Performance Centre Research and Ethics Committee.



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Technology Sydney
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Technology Sydney
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Technology Sydney

Keywords

  • Acceleration
  • Biomechanics
  • Human development
  • Strength and conditioning

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
110699Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2014 - 25/07/2014LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia
12/05/2009 - 26/06/2009Casual AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
21/08/2006 - 1/12/2006Casual AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/02/2004 - 1/07/2004Casual AcademicThe University of Sydney
School of Education
Australia
1/08/2001 - 1/11/2006Casual AcademicUniversity of Technology Sydney
School of Leisure, Sport and Tourism
Australia

Invitations

Participant

YearTitle / Rationale
20072007 NSW Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport
Organisation: Sports Medicine Australia Description: I was an invited speaker at the 2007 NSW Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, which is interdisciplinary conference aimed to promote knowledge and practice in sports science and sports medicine. My presentation, "Strength and speed in athletes", concluded both the sports science session, and the conference itself.
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (34 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Lockie RG, Schultz AB, Callaghan SJ, Jordan CA, Luczo TM, Jeffriess MD, 'A preliminary investigation into the relationship between functional movement screen scores and athletic physical performance in female team sport athletes', Biology of Sport, 32 41-51 (2015)

There is little research investigating relationships between the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and athletic performance in female athletes. This study analyzed the relationship... [more]

There is little research investigating relationships between the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and athletic performance in female athletes. This study analyzed the relationships between FMS (deep squat; hurdle step [HS]; in-line lunge [ILL]; shoulder mobility; active straight-leg raise [ASLR]; trunk stability push-up; rotary stability) scores, and performance tests (bilateral and unilateral sit-and-reach [flexibility]; 20-m sprint [linear speed]; 505 with turns from each leg; modified T-test with movement to left and right [change-of-direction speed]; bilateral and unilateral vertical and standing broad jumps; lateral jumps [leg power]). Nine healthy female recreational team sport athletes (age = 22.67 ± 5.12 years; height = 1.66 ± 0.05 m; body mass = 64.22 ± 4.44 kilograms) were screened in the FMS and completed the afore-mentioned tests. Percentage between-leg differences in unilateral sit-and-reach, 505 turns and the jumps, and difference between the T-test conditions, were also calculated. Spearman's correlations (p = 0.05) examined relationships between the FMS and performance tests. Stepwise multiple regressions (p = 0.05) were conducted for the performance tests to determine FMS predictors. Unilateral sit-and-reach positive correlated with the left-leg ASLR (r = 0.704-0.725). However, higher-scoring HS, ILL, and ASLR related to poorer 505 and T-test performance (r = 0.722-0.829). A higher-scored left-leg ASLR related to a poorer unilateral vertical and standing broad jump, which were the only significant relationships for jump performance. Predictive data tended to confirm the correlations. The results suggest limitations in using the FMS to identify movement deficiencies that could negatively impact athletic performance in female team sport athletes.

DOI10.5604/20831862.1127281
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2015Lockie RG, Schultz AB, Jordan CA, Callaghan SJ, Jeffriess MD, Luczo TM, 'Can selected functional movement screen assessments be used to identify movement deficiencies that could affect multidirectional speed and jump performance?', J Strength Cond Res, 29 195-205 (2015)
DOI10.1519/JSC.0000000000000613Author URL
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2015Delaney JA, Scott TJ, Ballard DA, Duthie GM, Hickmans JA, Lockie RG, Dascombe BJ, 'Contributing factors to change-of-direction ability in professional rugby league players.', J Strength Cond Res, (2015)
DOI10.1519/JSC.0000000000000960Author URL
Co-authorsBen Dascombe
2014Lockie RG, Murphy AJ, Callaghan SJ, Jeffriess MD, 'Effects of sprint and plyometrics training on field sport acceleration technique.', J Strength Cond Res, 28 1790-1801 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1519/JSC.0000000000000297Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014Scott BR, Slattery KM, Sculley DV, Lockie RG, Dascombe BJ, 'Reliability of telemetric electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy during high-intensity resistance exercise', Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 24 722-730 (2014)
DOI10.1016/j.jelekin.2014.07.008
Co-authorsBen Dascombe
2014Scott BR, Slattery KM, Sculley DV, Lockie RG, Dascombe BJ, 'Reliability of telemetric electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy during high-intensity resistance exercise', Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 24 722-730 (2014) [C1]

This study quantified the inter- and intra-test reliability of telemetric surface electromyography (EMG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during resistance exercise. Twelve w... [more]

This study quantified the inter- and intra-test reliability of telemetric surface electromyography (EMG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during resistance exercise. Twelve well-trained young men performed high-intensity back squat exercise (12 sets at 70-90% 1-repetition maximum) on two occasions, during which EMG and NIRS continuously monitored muscle activation and oxygenation of the thigh muscles. Intra-test reliability for EMG and NIRS variables was generally higher than inter-test reliability. EMG median frequency variables were generally more reliable than amplitude-based variables. The reliability of EMG measures was not related to the intensity or number of repetitions performed during the set. No notable differences were evident in the reliability of EMG between different agonist muscles. NIRS-derived measures of oxyhaemoglobin, deoxyhaemoglobin and tissue saturation index were generally more reliable during single-repetition sets than multiple-repetition sets at the same intensity. Tissue saturation index was the most reliable NIRS variable. Although the reliability of the EMG and NIRS measures varied across the exercise protocol, the precise causes of this variability are not yet understood. However, it is likely that biological variation during multi-joint isotonic resistance exercise may account for some of the variation in the observed results. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI10.1016/j.jelekin.2014.07.008
Co-authorsBen Dascombe
2014Scott BR, Dascombe BJ, Delaney JA, Elsworthy N, Lockie RG, Sculley DV, Slattery KM, 'The Validity and Reliability of a Customized Rigid Supportive Harness During Smith Machine Back Squat Exercise', JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, 28 636-642 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182a362dfAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsBen Dascombe
2014Lockie RG, Callaghan SJ, Berry SP, Cooke ERA, Jordan CA, Luczo TM, Jeffriess MD, 'RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN UNILATERAL JUMPING ABILITY AND ASYMMETRY ON MULTIDIRECTIONAL SPEED IN TEAM-SPORT ATHLETES', JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, 28 3557-3566 (2014) [C1]
Author URL
2014Lockie RG, Schultz AB, Callaghan SJ, Jeffriess MD, 'The effects of traditional and enforced stopping speed and agility training on multidirectional speed and athletic function', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 28 1538-1551 (2014) [C1]

This study investigated the effects of a traditional speed and agility training program (TSA) and an enforced stopping program emphasizing deceleration (ESSA). Twenty college-aged... [more]

This study investigated the effects of a traditional speed and agility training program (TSA) and an enforced stopping program emphasizing deceleration (ESSA). Twenty college-aged team sport athletes (16 males, 4 females) were allocated into the training groups. Pretesting and posttesting included: 0-10, 0-20, 0-40 m sprint intervals, change-of-direction, and acceleration test (CODAT), T-test (multidirectional speed); vertical, standing broad, lateral, and drop jumps, medicine ball throw (power); Star Excursion Balance Test (posteromedial, medial, anteromedial reaches; dynamic stability); and concentric (240°·s-1) and eccentric (30°·s-1) knee extensor and flexor isokinetic testing (unilateral strength). Both groups completed a 6-week speed and agility program. The ESSA subjects decelerated to a stop within a specified distance in each drill. A repeated measures analysis of variance determined significant (p = 0.05) with in and between-group changes. Effect sizes (Cohen's d) were calculated. The TSA group improved all speed tests (d = 0.29-0.96), and most power tests (d = 0.57-1.10). The ESSA group improved the 40-m sprint, CODAT, T-test, and most power tests (d = 0.46-1.31) but did not significantly decrease 0-10 and 0-20 m times. The TSA group increased posteromedial and medial excursions (d = 0.97-1.89); the ESSA group increased medial excursions (d = 0.99-1.09). The ESSA group increased concentric knee extensor and flexor strength, but also increased between-leg knee flexor strength differences (d = 0.50-1.39). The loading associated with stopping can increase unilateral strength. Coaches should ensure deceleration drills allow for appropriate sprint distances before stopping, and athletes do not favor 1 leg for stopping after deceleration. © 2014 National Strength and Conditioning Association.

CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2014Hart NH, Spiteri T, Lockie RG, Nimphius S, Newton RU, 'Detecting deficits in change of direction performance using the preplanned multidirectional Australian football league agility test.', Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association, 28 3552-3556 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1519/jsc.0000000000000587
2014Lockie RG, Callaghan SJ, Jeffriess MD, 'Acceleration Kinematics in Cricketers: Implications for Performance in the Field', JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCE AND MEDICINE, 13 128-136 (2014) [C1]
Author URL
2014Lockie RG, Jeffriess MD, McGann TS, Callaghan SJ, Schultz AB, 'Planned and reactive agility performance in semiprofessional and amateur basketball players', International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 9 766-771 (2014) [C1]

Context: Research indicates that planned and reactive agility are different athletic skills. These skills have not been adequately assessed in male basketball players. Purpose: To... [more]

Context: Research indicates that planned and reactive agility are different athletic skills. These skills have not been adequately assessed in male basketball players. Purpose: To define whether 10-m-sprint performance and planned and reactive agility measured by the Y-shaped agility test can discriminate between semiprofessional and amateur basketball players. Methods: Ten semiprofessional and 10 amateur basketball players completed 10-m sprints and planned- and reactive-agility tests. The Y-shaped agility test involved subjects sprinting 5 m through a trigger timing gate, followed by a 45° cut and 5-m sprint to the left or right through a target gate. In the planned condition, subjects knew the cut direction. For reactive trials, subjects visually scanned to find the illuminated gate. A 1-way analysis of variance (P < .05) determined between-groups differences. Data were pooled (N = 20) for a correlation analysis (P < .05). Results: The reactive tests differentiated between the groups; semiprofessional players were 6% faster for the reactive left (P = .036) and right (P = .029) cuts. The strongest correlations were between the 10-m sprints and planned-agility tests (r = .590-.860). The reactive left cut did not correlate with the planned tests. The reactive right cut moderately correlated with the 10-m sprint and planned right cut (r = .487-.485). Conclusions: The results reemphasized that planned and reactive agility are separate physical qualities. Reactive agility discriminated between the semiprofessional and amateur basketball players; planned agility did not. To distinguish between male basketball players of different ability levels, agility tests should include a perceptual and decision-making component. © 2014 Human Kinetics, Inc.

DOI10.1123/IJSPP.2013-0324
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2014Scott BR, Lockie RG, Davies SJG, Clark AC, Lynch DM, Janse De Jonge XAK, 'The physical demands of professional soccer players during in-season field-based training and match-play', Journal of Australian Strength and Conditioning, 22 7-15 (2014) [C1]
Co-authorsX Jansedejonge
2014Lockie RG, Jeffriess MD, McGann TS, Callaghan SJ, 'Ankle muscle function during preferred and non-Preferred 45° directional cutting in semi-professional basketball players', International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, 14 574-593 (2014) [C1]

No research has analysed the influence of ankle muscle activity for joint mobility and stability on preferred directional cutting. Twelve basketballers completed the Y-Shaped agil... [more]

No research has analysed the influence of ankle muscle activity for joint mobility and stability on preferred directional cutting. Twelve basketballers completed the Y-Shaped agility test, requiring 45° cuts to the left or right, to assess planned and reactive cutting. In planned conditions, participants knew the cutting direction. In reactive conditions, participants responded to a randomly illuminated gate. Legs were defined as the outside (furthest from target gate) or inside (closest to target gate) cut legs. The preferred outside cutting leg was determined from the fastest planned cut. Electromyography measured peak normalised (against 10- meter sprint performance) activity of the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus (PL), peroneus brevis (PB), and soleus. Paired t-Tests (p > 0.05) compared preferred and non-preferred cutting legs; effect sizes (d) were calculated. There were no differences in muscle activity between the preferred and non-preferred legs in the planned (p = 0.218-0.828) or reactive (p = 0.092- 0.862) cuts. There were moderate effects for a 28% higher PL (d = 0.51), and 27% lower PB (d = 0.57) activity, for the reactive outside cut leg. Due to the synergistic nature of these muscles, there was likely no effect to agility. Irrespective of preferred cutting direction, ankle muscles respond similarly.

2013Lockie RG, Schultz AB, Callaghan SJ, Jeffriess MD, 'The Relationship between Dynamic Stability and Multidirectional Speed.', J Strength Cond Res, (2013)
DOI10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182a744b6Author URL
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2013Lockie RG, Vickery WM, 'Kinematics that differentiate the beach flags start between elite and non-elite sprinters', Biology of Sport, 30 255-261 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.5604/20831862.1077550Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2013Lockie RG, Schultz AB, Callaghan SJ, Jeffriess MD, 'The effects of isokinetic knee extensor and flexor strength on dynamic stability as measured by functional reaching', Isokinetics and Exercise Science, 21 301-309 (2013) [C1]

BACKGROUND: Team sport athletes require dynamic stability in unilateral activities for their sports, which necessitates some degree of knee flexion and extension strength. OBJECTI... [more]

BACKGROUND: Team sport athletes require dynamic stability in unilateral activities for their sports, which necessitates some degree of knee flexion and extension strength. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the possible association of knee extension and flexion strength with dynamic stability, as measured by the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). METHODS: Sixteen male team sport athletes completed the SEBT, which involves a series of unilateral squats with the subject maximally reaching with the other leg in eight directions. Knee muscle strength was measured isokinetically both concentrically (60°/s, 180°/s, 240°/s) and eccentrically (30°/s). Subjects were divided into better and lesser groups based on mean functional reach distance. A 1-way analysis of variance (p= 0.05) determined between-group differences in reach distances and relative torque. RESULTS: Subjects with better dynamic stability generated greater knee extensor torque concentrically at 180°/s for the right leg, and at all speeds for the left leg. The effects of knee strength were particularly noteworthy for the left leg, as subjects with better dynamic stability reached significantly further across all 8 directions. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that greater knee extensor strength may enhance unilateral dynamic stability in team sport athletes. © 2013 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

DOI10.3233/IES-130501
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2013Lockie RG, Murphy AJ, Schultz AB, Jeffriess MD, Callaghan SJ, 'Influence of Sprint Acceleration Stance Kinetics on Velocity and Step Kinematics in Field Sport Athletes', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 27 2494-2503 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1519/JSC.0b013e31827f5103Author URL
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2013Lockie RG, Callaghan SJ, Jeffriess MD, 'Analysis of specific speed testing for cricketers', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 27 2981-2988 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1519/JSC.0b013e31828a2c56
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2013Lockie RG, Schultz AB, Callaghan SJ, Jeffriess MD, Berry SP, 'Reliability and Validity of a New Test of Change-of-Direction Speed for Field-Based Sports: the Change-of-Direction and Acceleration Test (CODAT)', JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCE AND MEDICINE, 12 88-96 (2013) [C1]
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2013Scott BR, Lockie RG, Knight TJ, Clark AC, de Jonge XAKJ, 'A Comparison of Methods to Quantify the In-Season Training Load of Professional Soccer Players', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS PHYSIOLOGY AND PERFORMANCE, 8 195-202 (2013) [C1]
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authorsX Jansedejonge
2012Lockie RG, Schultz A, Jeffriess MD, Callaghan SJ, 'The relationship between bilateral differences of knee flexor and extensor isokinetic strength and multi-directional speed', Isokinetics and Exercise Science, 20 211-219 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2012Lockie RG, Murphy AJ, Schultz A, Knight TJ, Janse De Jonge XA, 'The effects of different speed training protocols on sprint acceleration kinematics and muscle strength and power in field sport athletes', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 26 1539-1550 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 17Web of Science - 18
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz, X Jansedejonge
2012Lockie RG, Vickery WM, Janse De Jonge XA, 'Kinematics of the typical beach flags start for young adult sprinters', Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 11 444-451 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsX Jansedejonge
2012Lockie RG, Murphy AJ, Scott BR, Janse De Jonge XA, 'Quantifying session ratings of perceived exertion for field-based speed training methods in team sport athletes', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 26 2721-2728 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsX Jansedejonge
2012Lockie RG, Jeffriess MD, Callaghan SJ, 'Running velocity during the run-a-three in experienced cricketers', Serbian Journal of Sports Sciences, 6 103-110 (2012) [C1]
2012Lockie RG, Schultz A, Callaghan SJ, Jeffriess MD, 'Physiological profile of national-level junior American football players in Australia', Serbian Journal of Sports Sciences, 6 127-136 (2012) [C2]
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2012Lockie RG, Jeffriess MD, Schultz A, Callaghan SJ, 'Relationship between absolute and relative power with linear and change-of-direction speed in junior American football players from Australia', Journal of Australian Strength and Conditioning, 20 4-12 (2012) [C1]
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2011Lockie RG, Murphy AJ, Knight TJ, Janse De Jonge XA, 'Factors that differentiate acceleration ability in field sport athletes', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 25 2704-2714 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 35Web of Science - 36
Co-authorsX Jansedejonge
2007Spinks CD, Murphy AJ, Spinks WL, Lockie RG, 'The effects of resisted sprint training on acceleration performance and kinematics in soccer, rugby union, and Australian football players', JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, 21 77-85 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1519/00124278-200702000-00015Author URL
CitationsScopus - 62Web of Science - 56
2003Lockie RG, Murphy AJ, Spinks CD, 'Effects of resisted sled towing on sprint kinematics in field-sport athletes', JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, 17 760-767 (2003) [C1]
Author URL
CitationsScopus - 68Web of Science - 59
2003Murphy AJ, Lockie RG, Coutts AJ, 'Kinematic determinants of early acceleration in field sport athletes', Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 2 144-150 (2003) [C1]

Acceleration performance is important for field sport athletes that require a high level of repeat sprint ability. Although acceleration is widely trained for, there is little evi... [more]

Acceleration performance is important for field sport athletes that require a high level of repeat sprint ability. Although acceleration is widely trained for, there is little evidence outlining which kinematic factors delineate between good and poor acceleration. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinematic differences between individuals with fast and slow acceleration. Twenty field sport athletes were tested for sprint ability over the first three steps of a 15m sprint. Subjects were filmed at high speed to determine a range of lower body kinematic measures. For data analysis, subjects were then divided into relatively fast (n = 10) and slow (n = 10) groups based on their horizontal velocity. Groups were then compared across kinematic measures, including stride length and frequency, to determine whether they accounted for observed differences in sprint velocity. The results showed the fast group had significantly lower (~11-13%) left and right foot contact times (p < .05), and an increased stride frequency (~9%), as compared to the slow group. Knee extension was also significantly different between groups (p < .05). There was no difference found in stride length. It was concluded that those subjects who are relatively fast in early acceleration achieve this through reduced ground contact times resulting in an improved stride frequency. Training for improved acceleration should be directed towards using coaching instructions and drills that specifically train such movement adaptations. ©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2003).

CitationsScopus - 42
2002Sprinks C, Murphy A, Spinks W, Lockie R, 'The effects of acceleration training on acceleration performance and sprint kinematics in football players', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 5 (2002) [C1]
2001Pine MJ, Murphy AJ, Watsford ML, Spurrs RW, Lockie RS, 'Validity and reliability of a new test of lower leg musculotendinous stiffness', Sports Medicine Australia, (2001) [C1]
Show 31 more journal articles

Conference (10 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Schultz A, Schultz A, Blackburn M, Logan P, White D, Taaffe D, Lockie R, 'Musculoskeletal screening as a predictor of seasonal low back pain in Olympic class sailors', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Canberra, Australia (2014) [E3]
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2014Lockie R, Jeffriess M, McGann T, Callghan S, Schultz A, 'The Effects of Preventative Ankle Taping on Planned and Reactive Agility and Peak Ankle Muscle Activity in Basketballers.', Supplement 2 National Strength and Conditioning Association 2014 Conference Abstracts, Las Vegas, USA (2014) [E3]
DOI10.1519/JSC.0000000000000655
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2012Lockie RG, Callaghan SJ, Berry SP, Jeffriess MD, Schultz A, 'Relationship between dynamic stability as measured by lower-limb functional reach and multidirectional speed in team sport athletes', NSCA National Conference & Exhibition Abstracts, Providence, RI (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2011Lockie RG, Schultz A, Callaghan SJ, Jeffriess MD, 'Vertical and propulsive ground reaction force during sprint acceleration in team sport athletes', 34th National Strength and Conditioning Association National Conference and Exhibition, Las Vegas, Nevada (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsAdrian Schultz
2011Janse De Jonge XA, De Ruiter CJ, Lockie RG, 'Pilot study into the use of a repeated jump test for in-field athlete monitoring', 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science Book of Abstracts, Liverpool (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsX Jansedejonge
2010Lockie RG, Murphy A, Janse De Jonge XA, 'Quantifying training load for free sprint, resisted sprint, plyometrics and weights training with session-RPE in field sport athletes', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Orlando, Florida (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsX Jansedejonge
2009Lockie RG, Murphy A, 'The effects of sprint, resistance and plyometrics training on sprint acceleration kinematics and muscular function', 14th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science: Final Programme, Oslo, Norway (2009) [E3]
2007Lockie RG, Murphy A, McLachlan K, 'Correlation of acceleration performance in field sport athletes', Program and Abstracts: 2007 Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport (Supplement to: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport), Adelaide, S.A. (2007) [E3]
2007Lockie RG, Murphy A, McLachlan K, Rees S, 'Change in ground contact kinetics as a result of acceleration training in field sport athletes', 12th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science. Book of Abstracts, Jyvaskyla, Finland (2007) [E3]
2007Rees S, Murphy A, Watsford M, Lockie RG, 'Effects of vibration exercise on lower limb strength and functional performance in an older population', 12th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science. Book of Abstracts, Jyvaskyla, Finland (2007) [E3]
Show 7 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants4
Total funding$12,608

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20131 grants / $2,000

Faculty PVC Conference Assistance Grant 2013$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamDoctor Robert Lockie
SchemePVC Conference Assistance Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1401165
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20121 grants / $3,806

The effects of ankle taping on muscle activation and performance during planned and reactive agility tests in basketball players$3,806

Funding body: NSW Sporting Injuries Committee

Funding bodyNSW Sporting Injuries Committee
Project TeamDoctor Robert Lockie, Mr Matt Jeffriess, Mr Adrian Schultz, Mr Sam Callaghan
SchemeResearch & Injury Prevention Scheme
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200945
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

20081 grants / $5,102

Factors that determine faster performance in the start and acceleration phases of the beach flags race$5,102

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Robert Lockie
SchemeNew Staff Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188609
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20071 grants / $1,700

12th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Finland, 11/7/2007 - 14/7/2007$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Robert Lockie
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0188005
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2011Low Back Pain in Laser Class Sailors
Human Movement, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
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Dr Robert Lockie

Position

Conjoint Senior Lecturer
Exercise and Sport Science
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Focus area

Applied Sciences

Contact Details

Emailrobert.lockie@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 4349 4428
Fax(02) 4348 4145

Office

RoomSO:E1.43
BuildingScience Offices
LocationOurimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
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