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Dr Janet Bristow

Conjoint Senior Lecturer

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Human Physiology)

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Holt completed her PhD at the University of Newcastle 2002-2006 investigating gene expression in the developing mammalian ovary. Post-doctoral research areas have included nuclear signalling in the developing mammalian testis and currently, control of meiosis and molecular mechanisms underlying aneuploidy in the mammalian female gamete.

Research Expertise
- Egg quality and the ageing ovary - Meiosis regulation in the male and female gamete - Molecular mechanisms leading to aneuploidy in the egg








Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Biotechnology)(Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • meiosis
  • oocytes

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified 50
111499 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/02/2012 - 1/04/2015 Fellow - ARC University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
1/01/2011 - 1/12/2013 Fellow - UON University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Holt JE, Stanger SJ, Nixon B, McLaughlin EA, 'Non-coding RNA in Spermatogenesis and Epididymal Maturation', , SPRINGER 95-120 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-94-017-7417-8_6
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, Brett Nixon
2013 Jones KT, Lane SIR, Holt JE, 'Start and Stop Signals of Oocyte Meiotic Maturation', Oogenesis, Springer, London 183-193 (2013) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-0-85729-826-3_13
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Keith Jones
2013 Holt JE, Lane SIR, Jones KT, 'The Control of Meiotic Maturation in Mammalian Oocytes', Gametogenesis, Academic Press, San diego 207-226 (2013) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-416024-8.00007-6
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Keith Jones

Journal article (25 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Reilly JN, McLaughlin EA, Stanger SJ, Anderson AL, Hutcheon K, Church K, et al., 'Characterisation of mouse epididymosomes reveals a complex profile of microRNAs and a potential mechanism for modification of the sperm epigenome.', Sci Rep, 6 31794 (2016)
DOI 10.1038/srep31794
Co-authors Brett Nixon, Andy Eamens, Eileen Mclaughlin
2016 Kumar M, Camlin NJ, Holt JE, Teixeira JM, McLaughlin EA, Tanwar PS, 'Germ cell specific overactivation of WNT/ßcatenin signalling has no effect on folliculogenesis but causes fertility defects due to abnormal foetal development.', Sci Rep, 6 27273 (2016)
DOI 10.1038/srep27273
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar, Eileen Mclaughlin
2016 Camlin NJ, Sobinoff AP, Sutherland JM, Beckett EL, Jarnicki AG, Vanders RL, et al., 'Maternal smoke exposure impairs the long-term fertility of female offspring in a murine model', Biology of Reproduction, 94 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.The theory of fetal origins of adult disease was first proposed in 1989, and in the decades since, a wide range of other ... [more]

© 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.The theory of fetal origins of adult disease was first proposed in 1989, and in the decades since, a wide range of other diseases from obesity to asthma have been found to originate in early development. Because mammalian oocyte development begins in fetal life it has been suggested that environmental and lifestyle factors of the mother could directly impact the fertility of subsequent generations. Cigarette smoke is a known ovotoxicant in active smokers, yet disturbingly 13% of Australian and 12% of US women continue to smoke throughout pregnancy. The focus of our investigation was to characterize the adverse effects of smoking on ovary and oocyte quality in female offspring exposed in utero. Pregnant mice were nasally exposed to cigarette smoke for 12 wk throughout pregnancy/lactation, and ovary and oocyte quality of the F1 (maternal smoke exposed) generation was examined. Neonatal ovaries displayed abnormal somatic cell proliferation and increased apoptosis, leading to a reduction in follicle numbers. Further investigation found that altered somatic cell proliferation and reduced follicle number continued into adulthood; however, apoptosis did not. This reduction in follicles resulted in decreased oocyte numbers, with these oocytes found to have elevated levels of oxidative stress, altered metaphase II spindle, and reduced sperm-egg interaction. These ovarian and oocyte changes ultimately lead to subfertility, with maternal smoke-exposed animals having smaller litters and also taking longer to conceive. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that in utero and lactational exposure to cigarette smoke can have long-lasting effects on the fertility of the next generation of females.

DOI 10.1095/biolreprod.115.135848
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Emma Beckett, Eileen Mclaughlin, Jessie Sutherland, Philip Hansbro
2015 Mihalas BP, Western PS, Loveland KL, McLaughlin EA, Holt JE, 'Changing expression and subcellular distribution of karyopherins during murine oogenesis', REPRODUCTION, 150 485-496 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1530/REP-14-0585
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin
2015 Anderson AL, Stanger SJ, Mihalas BP, Tyagi S, Holt JE, McLaughlin EA, Nixon B, 'Assessment of microRNA expression in mouse epididymal epithelial cells and spermatozoa by next generation sequencing', Genomics Data, 6 208-211 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.The mammalian epididymis is a highly specialized region of the male reproductive tract that is lined with a continuous layer of epithelial cells that display ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.The mammalian epididymis is a highly specialized region of the male reproductive tract that is lined with a continuous layer of epithelial cells that display a remarkable level of regionalized secretory and absorptive activity. The luminal environment created by this combined secretory and absorptive activity is directly responsible for promoting the functional maturation of spermatozoa and their maintenance in a quiescent and viable state prior to ejaculation. This study was designed to identify the complement of microRNAs (miRNAs) that are expressed within the mouse epididymal epithelial cells and the maturing populations of spermatozoa. Through the use of Next Generation Sequencing technology we have demonstrated that both epididymal epithelial cells and spermatozoa harbour a complex repertoire of miRNAs that have substantially different expression profiles along the length of the tract. These data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) with the accession numbers GSE70197 and GSE70198, afford valuable insight into the post-transcriptional control of gene expression within the epididymis and provide the first evidence for the dynamic transformation of the miRNA content of maturing sperm cells. Ultimately such information promises to inform our understanding of the aetiology of male infertility. Herein we provide a detailed description of the methodology used to generate these important data.

DOI 10.1016/j.gdata.2015.09.012
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Brett Nixon, Eileen Mclaughlin
2015 Nixon B, Stanger SJ, Mihalas BP, Reilly JN, Anderson AL, Dun MD, et al., 'Next generation sequencing analysis reveals segmental patterns of microRNA expression in mouse epididymal epithelial cells', PLoS ONE, 10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Nixon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and repr... [more]

© 2015 Nixon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.The functional maturation of mammalian spermatozoa is accomplished as the cells descend through the highly specialized microenvironment of the epididymis. This dynamic environment is, in turn, created by the combined secretory and absorptive activity of the surrounding epithelium and displays an extraordinary level of regionalization. Although the regulatory network responsible for spatial coordination of epididymal function remains unclear, recent evidence has highlighted a novel role for the RNA interference pathway. Indeed, as noncanonical regulators of gene expression, small noncoding RNAs have emerged as key elements of the circuitry involved in regulating epididymal function and hence sperm maturation. Herein we have employed next generation sequencing technology to profile the genome-wide miRNA signatures of mouse epididymal cells and characterize segmental patterns of expression. An impressive profile of some 370 miRNAs were detected in the mouse epididymis, with a subset of these specifically identified within the epithelial cells that line the tubule (218). A majority of the latter miRNAs (75%) were detected at equivalent levels along the entire length of the mouse epididymis. We did however identify a small cohort of miRNAs that displayed highly regionalized patterns of expression, including miR-204-5p and miR-196b-5p, which were down- and up-regulated by approximately 39- and 45-fold between the caput/caudal regions, respectively. In addition we identified 79 miRNAs (representing ~ 21% of all miRNAs) as displaying conserved expression within all regions of the mouse, rat and human epididymal tissue. These included 8/14 members of let-7 family of miRNAs that have been widely implicated in the control of androgen signaling and the repression of cell proliferation and oncogenic pathways. Overall these data provide novel insights into the sophistication of the miRNA network that regulates the function of the male reproductive tract.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0135605
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, Brett Nixon, Matt Dun
2015 Nixon B, Stanger SJ, Mihalas BP, Reilly JN, Anderson AL, Tyagi S, et al., 'The MicroRNA Signature of Mouse Spermatozoa Is Substantially Modified During Epididymal Maturation', Biology of Reproduction, 93 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.In recent years considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the epigenetic control of sperm development, leadin... [more]

© 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.In recent years considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the epigenetic control of sperm development, leading to an increased appreciation of the importance of RNA interference pathways, and in particular miRNAs, as key regulators of spermatogenesis and epididymal maturation. It has also been shown that sperm are endowed with an impressive array of miRNA that have been implicated in various aspects of fertilization and embryo development. However, to date there have been no reports on whether the sperm miRNA signature is static or whether it is influenced by their prolonged maturation within the male reproductive tract. To investigate this phenomenon, we employed next-generation sequencing to systematically profile the miRNA signature of maturing mouse spermatozoa. In so doing we have provided the first evidence for the posttesticular modification of the sperm miRNA profile under normal physiological conditions. Such modifications include the apparent loss and acquisition of an impressive cohort of some 113 and 115 miRNAs, respectively, between the proximal and distal epididymal segments. Interestingly, the majority of these changes occur late in maturation and include the uptake of novel miRNA species in addition to a significant increase in many miRNAs natively expressed in immature sperm. Because sperm are not capable of de novo transcription, these findings identify the epididymis as an important site in establishing the sperm epigenome with the potential to influence the peri-conceptual environment of the female reproductive tract, contribute to the inheritance of acquired characteristics, and/or alter the developmental trajectory of the resulting offspring.

DOI 10.1095/biolreprod.115.132209
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Brett Nixon, Eileen Mclaughlin
2015 Sutherland JM, Sobinoff AP, Gunter KM, Fraser BA, Pye V, Bernstein IR, et al., 'Knockout of RNA Binding Protein MSI2 Impairs Follicle Development in the Mouse Ovary: Characterization of MSI1 and MSI2 during Folliculogenesis.', Biomolecules, 5 1228-1244 (2015) [C1]
Co-authors Jessie Sutherland, Eileen Mclaughlin
2014 Sadeqzadeh E, De Bock CE, Wojtalewicz N, Holt JE, Smith ND, Dun MD, et al., 'Furin processing dictates ectodomain shedding of human FAT1 cadherin', Experimental Cell Research, 323 41-55 (2014) [C1]

Fat1 is a single pass transmembrane protein and the largest member of the cadherin superfamily. Mouse knockout models and in vitro studies have suggested that Fat1 influences cell... [more]

Fat1 is a single pass transmembrane protein and the largest member of the cadherin superfamily. Mouse knockout models and in vitro studies have suggested that Fat1 influences cell polarity and motility. Fat1 is also an upstream regulator of the Hippo pathway, at least in lower vertebrates, and hence may play a role in growth control. In previous work we have established that FAT1 cadherin is initially cleaved by proprotein convertases to form a noncovalently linked heterodimer prior to expression on the cell surface. Such processing was not a requirement for cell surface expression, since melanoma cells expressed both unprocessed FAT1 and the heterodimer on the cell surface. Here we further establish that the site 1 (S1) cleavage step to promote FAT1 heterodimerisation is catalysed by furin and we identify the cleavage site utilised. For a number of other transmembrane receptors that undergo heterodimerisation the S1 processing step is thought to occur constitutively but the functional significance of heterodimerisation has been controversial. It has also been generally unclear as to the significance of receptor heterodimerisation with respect to subsequent post-translational proteolysis that often occurs in transmembrane proteins. Exploiting the partial deficiency of FAT1 processing in melanoma cells together with furin-deficient LoVo cells, we manipulated furin expression to demonstrate that only the heterodimer form of FAT1 is subject to cleavage and subsequent release of the extracellular domain. This work establishes S1-processing as a clear functional prerequisite for ectodomain shedding of FAT1 with general implications for the shedding of other transmembrane receptors. © 2014.

DOI 10.1016/j.yexcr.2014.02.012
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Matt Dun, Rick Thorne
2014 Camlin NJ, McLaughlin EA, Holt JE, 'Through the smoke: Use of in vivo and in vitro cigarette smoking models to elucidate its effect on female fertility', Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 281 266-275 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc.A finite number of oocytes are established within the mammalian ovary prior to birth to form a precious ovarian reserve. Damage to this limited pool of gamete... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc.A finite number of oocytes are established within the mammalian ovary prior to birth to form a precious ovarian reserve. Damage to this limited pool of gametes by environmental factors such as cigarette smoke and its constituents therefore represents a significant risk to a woman's reproductive capacity. Although evidence from human studies to date implicates a detrimental effect of cigarette smoking on female fertility, these retrospective studies are limited and present conflicting results. In an effort to more clearly understand the effect of cigarette smoke, and its chemical constituents, on female fertility, a variety of in vivo and in vitro animal models have been developed. This article represents a systematic review of the literature regarding four of experimental model types: 1) direct exposure of ovarian cells and follicles to smoking constituents' in vitro, 2) direct exposure of whole ovarian tissue with smoking constituents in vitro, 3) whole body exposure of animals to smoking constituents and 4) whole body exposure of animals to cigarette smoke. We summarise key findings and highlight the strengths and weaknesses of each model system, and link these to the molecular mechanisms identified in smoke-induced fertility changes.

DOI 10.1016/j.taap.2014.10.010
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin
2014 Yun Y, Holt JE, Lane SIR, McLaughlin EA, Merriman JA, Jones KT, 'Reduced ability to recover from spindle disruption and loss of kinetochore spindle assembly checkpoint proteins in oocytes from aged mice', Cell Cycle, 13 1938-1947 (2014) [C1]

Currently, maternal aging in women, based on mouse models, is thought to raise oocyte aneuploidy rates, because chromosome cohesion deteriorates during prophase arrest, and Sgo2, ... [more]

Currently, maternal aging in women, based on mouse models, is thought to raise oocyte aneuploidy rates, because chromosome cohesion deteriorates during prophase arrest, and Sgo2, a protector of centromeric cohesion, is lost. Here we show that the most common mouse strain, C57Bl6/J, is resistant to maternal aging, showing little increase in aneuploidy or Sgo2 loss. Instead it demonstrates significant kinetochore-associated loss in the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2 and phosphorylated Aurora C, which is involved in microtubule-kinetochore error correction. Their loss affects the fidelity of bivalent segregation but only when spindle organization is impaired during oocyte maturation. These findings have an impact clinically regarding the handling of human oocytes ex vivo during assisted reproductive techniques and suggest there is a genetic basis to aneuploidy susceptibility. © 2014 Landes Bioscience.

DOI 10.4161/cc.28897
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, Keith Jones
2014 Holt JE, Pye V, Boon E, Stewart JL, Garcia-Higuera I, Moreno S, et al., 'The APC/C activator FZR1 is essential for meiotic prophase I in mice', DEVELOPMENT, 141 1354-U327 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/dev.104828
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, Keith Jones
2013 Merriman JA, Lane SIR, Holt JE, Jennings PC, Garcia-Higuera I, Moreno S, et al., 'Reduced Chromosome Cohesion Measured by Interkinetochore Distance Is Associated with Aneuploidy Even in Oocytes from Young Mice', Biology of Reproduction, 88 31-31 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1095/biolreprod.112.104786
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Keith Jones, Eileen Mclaughlin
2013 Holt JE, Lane SIR, Jones KT, 'Time-lapse epifluorescence imaging of expressed cRNA to cyclin B1 for studying meiosis i in mouse oocytes', Methods in Molecular Biology, 957 91-106 (2013) [C2]

The first meiotic division of mammalian oocytes physiologically occurs in the ovary in the hours preceding ovulation. Fortunately, oocytes removed from their follicular environmen... [more]

The first meiotic division of mammalian oocytes physiologically occurs in the ovary in the hours preceding ovulation. Fortunately, oocytes removed from their follicular environment will readily undergo this process in culture. Their large size, optical transparency, and efficiency in translating exogenous cRNA make mouse oocytes very amenable to study this process in detail using fluorescence imaging-based techniques. Here we describe the process of microinjecting cRNA to proteins of interest that have been coupled to a fluorescent protein using cyclin B1 as an example. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

DOI 10.1007/978-1-62703-191-2-6
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Keith Jones
2012 Holt JE, Lane SI, Jennings PC, Garcia-Higuera I, Moreno S, Jones KT, 'APC FZR1 prevents nondisjunction in mouse oocytes by controlling meiotic spindle assembly timing', Molecular Biology of the Cell, 23 3970-3981 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Keith Jones
2012 Seah KYM, Holt JE, Garcia-Higuera I, Moreno S, Jones KT, 'The APC activator fizzy-related-1 (FZR1) is needed for preimplantation mouse embryo development', Journal of Cell Science, 125 6030-6037 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Keith Jones
2011 Holt JE, Tran SM-T, Stewart JL, Minahan KL, Garcia-Higuera I, Moreno S, Jones KT, 'The APC/C activator FZR1 coordinates the timing of meiotic resumption during prophase I arrest in mammalian oocytes', Development, 138 905-913 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/dev.059022
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Keith Jones
2010 Jones KT, Holt JE, 'BubR1 highlights essential function of Cdh1 in mammalian oocytes', Cell Cycle, 9 1029-1030 (2010) [C3]
Co-authors Keith Jones
2010 Holt JE, Stewart JL, Jones KT, 'Spatial regulation of APC(Cdh1)-induced cyclin B1 degradation maintains G2 arrest in mouse oocytes', Development, 137 1297-1304 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/dev.047555
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Keith Jones
2009 Holt JE, Jones KT, 'Control of homologous chromosome division in the mammalian oocyte', Molecular Human Reproduction, 15 139-147 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/molehr/gap007
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Keith Jones
2007 Holt JE, Jans DA, Ly-Huynh JD, Efthymiadis A, Hime GR, Loveland KL, Jans DA, 'Regulation of Nuclear Import During Differentiation: The IMP alpha gene family and spermatogenesis', Current Genomics, 8 323-334 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.2174/138920207782446151
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2006 Holt JE, Roman SD, Aitken RJ, McLaughlin EA, 'Identification and characterization of a novel Mt-retrotransposon highly represented in the female mouse germline', Genomics, 87 490-499 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ygeno.2005.08.015
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, Shaun Roman, John Aitken
2006 Curry BJ, Holt JE, McLaughlin EA, Aitken RJ, 'Characterization of structure and expression of the Dzip1 gene in the rat and mouse', Genomics, 87 275-285 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ygeno.2005.10.007
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ben Curry, Eileen Mclaughlin, John Aitken
2006 Holt JE, Jackson A, Roman SD, Aitken RJ, Koopman PA, McLaughlin EA, 'CXCR4/SDF1 interaction inhibits the primordial to primary follicle transition in the neonatal mouse ovary', Developmental Biology, 293 449-460 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2006.02.012
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 48
Co-authors John Aitken, Eileen Mclaughlin, Shaun Roman
2004 Blackmore DG, Baillie LR, Holt JE, Dierkx LM, Aitken RJ, McLaughlin EA, 'Biosynthesis of the Canine Zona Pellucida Requires the Integrated Participation of Both Oocytes and Granulosa Cells', Biology of Reproduction, 71 661-668 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1095/biolreprod.104.028779
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 28
Co-authors John Aitken, Eileen Mclaughlin
Show 22 more journal articles

Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Hopkins LA, Pye VJ, Fraser BA, Holt JE, Jones KT, McLaughlin EA, 'The Role of Fizzy Related 1 in Male Meiosis', Reproduction, Fertility and Development (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, Keith Jones
2009 Jones KT, Weaver J, Holt JE, 'The mechanism by which fizzy-related (Fzr1) controls pro-phase 1 arrest in mouse oocytes', Biology of Reproduction (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Keith Jones
2007 Gunter KM, Fraser BA, Holt JE, Stanger SJ, Aitken RJ, Roman SD, McLaughlin EA, 'CXCR4/SDF1 interaction in the neonatal mouse testes', 7th Hunter Cellular Biology Meeting. Program (2007) [E3]
Co-authors John Aitken, Eileen Mclaughlin, Shaun Roman
2006 Fraser BA, Holt JE, Andrew J, Roman SD, Stanger SJ, Aitken RJ, et al., 'CXCR4/SDF1 Interactionin the Embryonic and Neonatal Mpise Testes', Abstracts (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Shaun Roman, Eileen Mclaughlin, John Aitken
2006 Holt JE, Andrew J, Roman SD, Stanger SJ, Aitken RJ, Peter K, McLaughlin EA, 'CXCR4/SDF-1 interaction in the embryonic and neonatal mouse tests', Book of Abstracts (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Shaun Roman, Eileen Mclaughlin, John Aitken
2005 Holt JE, Aitken RJ, Roman SD, McLaughlin E, 'Use of RNA interference for the functional analysis of genes involved in ovarian development', MECHANISMS OF DEVELOPMENT (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Shaun Roman, John Aitken, Eileen Mclaughlin
2004 Holt JE, Aitken RJ, Roman SD, McLaughlin EA, 'Expression of the Chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 in the activating Mammalian Ovarian follicle', Reproduction, Fertility and Development (2004) [E3]
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, John Aitken, Shaun Roman
2003 Holt JE, Aitken RJ, Roman SD, McLaughlin EA, 'Gene expression in the activating mammalian ovarian follicle', ComBio Combined Conference Abstracts (2003) [E3]
Co-authors Shaun Roman, John Aitken, Eileen Mclaughlin
Show 5 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 14
Total funding $1,458,102

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $54,698

Nose only inhalation smoke exposure system for mice$54,698

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Phil Hansbro, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Doctor Jay Horvat, Doctor Janet Bristow, Doctor Malcolm Starkey, Doctor Rebecca Vanders
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501551
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20143 grants / $497,831

miRNA regulation of sperm maturation $396,157

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Brett Nixon, Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Doctor Janet Bristow
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1300125
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

JuLI Stage $71,674

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

The Role of the GTPase Dynamin in the Female Germline$30,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Ms Kate Redgrove, Doctor Janet Bristow, Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Professor Brett Nixon
Scheme Bridging Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301333
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20132 grants / $35,595

The Annual Scientific Meeting of the Endocrine Society of Australia and Society of Reproductive Biology, Sydney 25-28 August 2013.$595

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Janet Bristow
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300895
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20122 grants / $705,000

Regulation of germ cell number and quality by Fizzy-Related protein$375,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Janet Bristow
Scheme Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100556
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The control of chromosome division during female meiosis$330,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Janet Bristow
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100078
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20115 grants / $163,478

2010 Research Fellowship - PRCRS (DECRA 1/3/2012)$121,978

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Janet Bristow
Scheme Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1100163
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Eppendorf mastercycler pro with thermomixer comfort and 5430R centrifuge$15,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Professor Peter Lewis, Professor Adam McCluskey, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Brett Nixon, Doctor Shaun Roman, Doctor Jennette Sakoff, Doctor Ian Grainge, Doctor Janet Bristow, Doctor Xiao Yang
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100028
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Mechanisms underlying the incidence of aneuploidy in mammalian eggs$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Janet Bristow
Scheme Fellowship Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100395
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

IMPLEN NanoPhotometer pearl$10,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Professor Alan Brichta, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Emeritus Professor Patricia Michie, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Ulli Schall, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Doctor Frederick Walker, Doctor Rick Thorne, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Doctor Janet Bristow, Doctor Severine Roselli, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Associate Professor Liz Milward, Doctor Charles De Bock, Doctor Julie Merriman-Jones, Doctor Jing Qin Wu, Doctor Bing Liu, Dr DAN Johnstone, Ms BELINDA Goldie, Doctor Natalie Beveridge
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100030
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

EMBO Meiosis Meeting, Hotel Ariston and Congress Centre, Cappacio, Italy, 17 - 21 September 2011$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Janet Bristow
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100939
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20101 grants / $1,500

Cold Springs Harbor Germ Cell Conference, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, NT, USA, 5 - 9 October 2010$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Janet Bristow
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000768
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed4
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.8

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Levels of Steroids and Endometrial Proteins as an Infertility Indicators Markers in Women with Reproductive Pathologies of Immune Origin.
PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Role of microenvironment in endometrial cancer progression, metastasis and drug resistance
PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD The Impact of Maternal Ageing and Chemotoxicants on Female Fertility
PhD (Biological Sciences), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Endometrial Stem/Progenitor Cells in Endometrial Regeneration, Carcinogenesis and Aging
PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Susceptibility of Mammalian Oocytes to Chromosome Segregation Errors with Maternal Aging
PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Role of Fzr1 in Embryogenesis
PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Control of Chromosome Segregation in Mouse Oocytes
PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 Masters Characterisation of an Oocyte Specific Knockout Model of Cdh1
M Philosophy (Human Physiolog), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Dr Janet Bristow

Position

Conjoint Senior Lecturer
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Human Physiology

Contact Details

Email janet.holt@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Building Life Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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