Publications and Resources

Family Action Centre

Resources

The Dad Factor

The Dad Factor

Author: Dr Richard Fletcher

Explains why a father's involvement with his child right from birth is vitally important  to the development of a child's brain and emotional stability.  How father-baby bonding helps a child for life.


Volume 10 Number 3

2007 - Volume 10, Number 3


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Volume 10 Number 2

2007 - Volume 10, Number 2


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Volume 10 Number 1

2007 - Volume 10, Number 1


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Volume 9 Number 3

2006 - Volume 9, Number 3


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Volume 9 Number 2

2006 - Volume 9, Number 2


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Volume 9 Number 1

2006 - Volume 9, Number 1


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Volume 8 Number 3

2005 - Volume 8, Number 3


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Volume 8 Number 2

2005 - Volume 8, Number 2


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Volume 8 Number 1

2005 - Volume 8, Number 1


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Volume 7 Number 3

2004 - Volume 7, Number 3


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Volume 7 Number 2

2004 - Volume 7, Number 2


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Volume 7 Number 1

2004 - Volume 7, Number 1


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Volume 6 Number 3

2003 - Volume 6, Number 3


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Volume 6 Number 2

2003 - Volume 6, Number 2


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Volume 6 Number 1

2003 - Volume 6, Number 1


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Volume 5 Number 2

2002 - Volume 5, Number 2


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Volume 5 Number 1

2002 - Volume 5, Number 1

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Volume 4 Number 3

2001 - Volume 4, Number 3


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Volume 4 Number 2

2001 - Volume 4, Number 2


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Volume 4 Number 1

2001 - Volume 4, Number 1


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  • Engaging Aboriginal fathers in Developing Practice

The parenting partnership is the relationship that adults share in the raising of children. This is most often between a child’s biological mother and father but parenting partnerships come in many forms and can span generations.

When a parenting partnership is working well the parents are likely to be less stressed and enjoy parenting more while their children are likely to experience better social relationships with their families, teachers and peers.

We now know that the quality of parenting partnerships can be enhanced through intervention, however these interventions are often labour intensive and expensive. Connecting the Dots is aiming to find cost effective ways to promote parenting partnership quality in the everyday interactions that occur between services and families.

This resource supports parents in the development of shared expectations for their child with a disability but the resource is being developed for other applications. The aim of this resource is to get parents talking about specific expectations that they have for their child. The kit contains 3 sets of identical cards that parents can sort individually and/or on their own. The aim is for parents to identify their highest areas of need and then compare these to those of their partner. The acceptability and efficiency of this resource is currently being assessed.

View publications by:

Distinguished Professor Alan Hayes

Associate Professor Richard Fletcher

Dr Jennifer StGeorge

Dr Deborah Hartmann

Dr Graeme Stuart

Dr Leanne Schubert

Dr Emily Freeman