Dr Wei Xie

Research Associate

School of Engineering (Chemical Engineering)

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Wei Xie has been working as a Research Associate in Chemical Engineering at the University of Newcastle since 2013. The focus of his research is on coal pyrolysis, including coal maceral separation, thermodynamics of coal maceral concentrates, and extraction and characterisation coal tar. In addition, Xie had focused on sulphur removal from coal gas before his PhD, which provides him with a broad research area in the cleaning utilization of fossil fuels.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Chemical Engineering), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Coal ash utilization
  • Coal coking
  • Coal maceral separation
  • Gas cleaning
  • Thermoplasticity

Languages

  • Chinese, nec (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
091407 Pyrometallurgy 50
091404 Mineral Processing/Beneficiation 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Engineering
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (21 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Han L, Li Q, Chen S, Xie W, Bao W, Chang L, Wang J, 'A Magnetically Recoverable Fe3O4-NH2-Pd Sorbent for Capture of Mercury from Coal Derived Fuel Gas.', Sci Rep, 7 7448 (2017)
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-07802-8
2016 Stanger R, Tran QA, Xie W, Smith N, Lucas J, Yu J, et al., 'The use of LDI-TOF imaging mass spectroscopy to study heated coal with a temperature gradient incorporating the plastic layer and semi-coke', Fuel, 165 33-40 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. This work has used high range imaging mass spectrometry to study a coal sample that has undergone heating with a temperature gradient. A custom made hotplate... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. This work has used high range imaging mass spectrometry to study a coal sample that has undergone heating with a temperature gradient. A custom made hotplate was heated to 1000°C and the coal was allowed to heat naturally through conduction to produce a large thermal gradient typical of conditions in a coke oven. The sample was quenched, sectioned and analysed using laser desorption time of flight imaging mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF-IMS) to study the molecular changes that occur within the plastic layer and in the semi-coke. The raw coal was observed to have a molecular weight range between 500 and 20,000 Da with a peak occurring at 2000 Da. The plastic layer was observed to have a prevalence for increasing 500-1000 Da structures though this formed part of the larger molecular weight range. Resolidification of the plastic layer coincided with a rise in 4000 Da structures. The semi-coke spectrum had a series of repeating peaks separated by 24 Da extending from 1000 Da to 3000 Da. This was considered evidence of broad molecular ordering. A second phenomenon was observed in the semi-coke associated with low range molecular weights (50-300 Da). This appeared as high intensity signals in a molecular range typically considered as ion fragments (being too low in size to remain in the high vacuum environment). It was speculated that these low range structures may be associated with the coking of volatile tars exiting the hot-side of the plastic layer through high temperature semi-coke. Overall, this preliminary work provides a novel methodology to study t he heating impacts during coking on a molecular level.

DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2015.10.028
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Jianglong Yu, Eric Kennedy, Michael Stockenhuber, John Lucas, Terry Wall, Rohan Stanger
2016 Quang AT, Stanger R, Xie W, Smith N, Lucas J, Wall T, 'Impacts of Mild Pyrolysis and Solvent Extraction on Coking Coal Thermoplasticity', ENERGY & FUELS, 30 9293-9302 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.6b02018
Co-authors Terry Wall, Rohan Stanger, John Lucas
2016 Xing B, Huang G, Chen L, Guo H, Zhang C, Xie W, Chen Z, 'Microwave synthesis of hierarchically porous activated carbon from lignite for high performance supercapacitors', Journal of Porous Materials, 23 67-73 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. A hierarchically porous activated carbon (HPAC) with high surface area (3064¿m 2 /g) and large pore volume (2.319¿cm 3 /g) was... [more]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. A hierarchically porous activated carbon (HPAC) with high surface area (3064¿m 2 /g) and large pore volume (2.319¿cm 3 /g) was prepared from lignite using KOH as activation agent by microwave heating. Nitrogen adsorption¿desorption at -196¿°C, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the HPAC. Because of its high surface area, macro¿meso¿micro hierarchically porous structure and oxygen-enriched surface, the HPAC exhibits excellent electrochemical performance in terms of specific capacitance, energy density and cycling stability as electrode material for supercapacitors. The HPAC showed a high specific capacitance of 390¿F/g in aqueous electrolyte at a current density of 50¿mA/g and 94.1¿% of the initial specific capacitance was retained after 2000 cycles. Furthermore, this HPAC displayed a high specific capacitance of 198¿F/g in an organic electrolyte.

DOI 10.1007/s10934-015-0056-0
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2016 Tran QA, Stanger R, Xie W, Lucas J, Yu J, Stockenhuber M, et al., 'Maceral separation from coal by the Reflux Classifier', FUEL PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY, 143 43-50 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.fuproc.2015.11.009
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Terry Wall, Rohan Stanger, Eric Kennedy, Michael Stockenhuber, Jianglong Yu, John Lucas
2016 Xie W, Wall T, Lucas J, Mahoney M, Stanger R, 'Thermo-swelling Behavior of Australian Coking Coals from Different Basins: Relating to Rank and Maceral Compositions', ENERGY & FUELS, 30 10126-10135 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.6b01683
Co-authors John Lucas, Terry Wall, Rohan Stanger
2016 Xie W, Wall T, Lucas J, Mahoney M, Stanger R, 'Chemical Changes of Australian Coking Coals from Different Basins with Various Ranks and Maceral Compositions: Linking to Both Physical and Thermal Changes', ENERGY & FUELS, 30 10136-10147 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.6b01684
Co-authors John Lucas, Terry Wall, Rohan Stanger
2016 Tran QA, Stanger R, Xie W, Smith N, Lucas J, Wall T, 'Linking Thermoplastic Development and Swelling with Molecular Weight Changes of a Coking Coal and Its Pyrolysis Products', Energy and Fuels, 30 3906-3916 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 American Chemical Society. The thermoplastic development of an Australian coking coal was investigated by linking thermal swelling with changes in molecular weight of its ... [more]

© 2016 American Chemical Society. The thermoplastic development of an Australian coking coal was investigated by linking thermal swelling with changes in molecular weight of its pyrolysis products. Coal thermal swelling was investigated together with volatiles evolution and characterization of generated volatiles (including volatile tar and light gases). The molecular weight distributions of coal and its solvent extracts were measured by using laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectroscopy (LDI-TOF-MS). Solvent extraction (by acetone and tetrahydrofuran (THF)) was initially used on the raw coal to aid interpretation of thermoswelling by volumetric expansion measurements. The removal of ~2% solvent-soluble matter from the raw coal (the mobile phase) reduced its swelling extent during heating by up to 22% (from 86% down to 68% and 64% for acetone- and THF-residues, respectively). Volatile release after solvent treatment remained unaffected. This suggested that the majority of the coals swelling behavior could be attributed to the formation of heat-generated liquid matter (the Metaplast) during pyrolysis. Broad molecular weight changes were found in the solvent extractable component (metaplastic material extracted by acetone and THF) of the semicoke. Prior to softening (350 °C), the extractable components were composed of molecules mainly < 500 Da. The upper limit in molecular weight distribution of solvent extracts increased significantly to 1800 Da at the onset of swelling (400-450 °C) and decreased back to ~500 Da at the end of swelling (500 °C). The spectra showed that the volatile tar and acetone extract (the light solvent extract) consisted of similar repeating structures separated 12-14 Da apart. As the treatment temperature increased, the molecular weight distribution of volatile tar increased in molecular mass, approaching that of the acetone extract distribution (~600 Da). The THF extract molecular weight distribution was a mixture of 12-14 and 24 Da repeating units which only became apparent at molecular weight above 600 Da. The LDI-TOF-MS analysis of the solid coal showed that it contained a distribution of molecular structures centered at 2000 Da and spanning between 500 and 7000 Da. This raw coal spectrum also contained multiple repeating mass lines every 24 Da apart. Overall, these results suggested that the coal consisted of complicated structures which subsequently degraded into smaller fragments capable of forming a complex intermediate liquid phase and a distribution of lighter volatile tar species.

DOI 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.6b00324
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Lucas, Terry Wall, Rohan Stanger
2015 Xie W, Stanger R, Lucas J, Mahoney M, Elliott L, Yu J, Wall T, 'Thermo-swelling Properties of Particle Size Cuts of Coal Maceral Concentrates', Energy & Fuels, 29 4893-4901 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.5b01122
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Rohan Stanger, John Lucas, Terry Wall, Jianglong Yu, Liza Elliott
2015 Xie W, Stanger R, Wall TF, Lucas JA, Mahoney MR, 'Associations of physical, chemical with thermal changes during coking as coal heats - Experiments on coal maceral concentrates', Fuel, 147 1-8 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Dynamic measurements of physical, chemical and thermal changes in the transformation of coal maceral concentrates were made during heati... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Dynamic measurements of physical, chemical and thermal changes in the transformation of coal maceral concentrates were made during heating at a rate of 10°C/min to 1000°C. The endothermic and exothermic processes were identified by measurements of apparent specific heat while the fluidity was indicated by the estimated thermal conductivity. Measurements of swelling and bed permeability were made, with continuous quantitative elemental analysis of gases and tars as they evolved. Data for two coal concentrates of high and moderate vitrinite indicate that the same reactions and events are occurring for the two samples, but to a greater extent for the high vitrinite sample. The research has noted the significance of evolved tars in the early events, being the lowest temperature event identified, with rapid tar evolution prior to the onset of swelling associated with permeability change. Further tar release and gas evolution is associated with a rapid swelling event, this event being substantially greater for the high vitrinite sample. The data has also quantified contraction at higher temperatures following swelling which is associated with the release of hydrogen containing gases. Evolved tars from the high vitrinite sample showed elevated H/C ratio indicating that vitrinite tars appear to be more aliphatic than those evolved from inertinite. A comparison of measured swelling with estimated volumetric flow rate of the volatiles has indicated that thermo-expansion of coal utilised up to 21% of the volatiles to drive bubble growth. This utilisation rate varied significantly across the plastic temperature range.

DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2015.01.016
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Rohan Stanger, Terry Wall, John Lucas
2015 Xing BL, Guo H, Chen LJ, Chen ZF, Zhang CX, Huang GX, et al., 'Lignite-derived high surface area mesoporous activated carbons for electrochemical capacitors', Fuel Processing Technology, (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Mesoporous activated carbons (ACs) were successfully prepared from lignite using KOH as activation agent at the temperature above 700°C. The pore structure ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Mesoporous activated carbons (ACs) were successfully prepared from lignite using KOH as activation agent at the temperature above 700°C. The pore structure and surface chemistry of the as-prepared ACs were characterized by means of nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that such prepared mesoporous ACs have a high specific surface area (~3036m2·g-1) with a hierarchical macro-meso-micro-pore structure and oxygen-enriched surface. The electrochemical performances of the ACs as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors (ECs) were assessed by galvanostatic charge-discharge, cyclic voltammetry and cycling durability tests. It was demonstrated that the mesoporous ACs produced in this study possessed a maximum specific capacitance of 355F·g-1 and 196F·g-1 in 3M KOH aqueous and 1M (C2H5)4NBF4/PC organic electrolytes, respectively, at a current density of 50mA·g-1, and exhibited a desirable energy and power density with a superior cycling performance. The excellent capacitive behavior of the prepared mesoporous ACs in aqueous system is attributed to their unique macro-meso-micro-hierarchical pore structure with high surface area and oxygen-containing surface. Their superb electrochemical performance in the organic electrolyte is attributed to their well-developed mesoporous structure.

DOI 10.1016/j.fuproc.2015.07.017
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Jianglong Yu
2015 Stanger R, Borrowdale J, Smith N, Xei W, Tran QA, Lucas J, Wall T, 'Changes in Solvent-Extracted Matter for Heated Coal during Metaplast Formation Using High-Range Mass Spectrometry', Energy and Fuels, 29 7101-7113 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. A fundamental study was undertaken to characterize the changes in solvent-extracted matter formed during the thermoplastic phase of coking. Coal... [more]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. A fundamental study was undertaken to characterize the changes in solvent-extracted matter formed during the thermoplastic phase of coking. Coal samples were heated to fixed temperatures within the pyrolytic plastic range of 400-500 °C, and the volatile material was extracted in a two-stage extraction with acetone (light extract) and then tetrahydrofuran (THF heavy extract). The extracted material was analyzed using laser desorption ionization (time-of flight) mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF-MS). The LDI-TOF-MS results showed that three extracted fractions could be broadly classified here as overlapping molecular weight ranges as volatile tars (200-450 Da), light acetone-soluble extract (250-500 Da), and heavy THF-soluble extract (300-1200 Da). A further class of compounds was identified from THF extraction of the raw coal in the range of 600-2500 Da that required higher laser powers to ionize and was not observed in the thermally generated samples. Negligible changes were observed in the composition of the acetone-soluble extracts with temperature, while the THF-soluble extract showed smaller proportions of larger molecules with higher treatment temperatures. It was observed that each molecular weight spectrum showed repeating structural units forming peaks every 12-14 Da (homologous series), with distributions of species around each peak. The volatile tar and acetone-soluble material shared common repeating structures also evident in the raw coal extract. This suggested that the material in this fraction was thermally stable over the analyzed temperature range. The repeating features of the THF-soluble extract species appeared to be structurally different. Overall, this work has indicated that development of extractable matter expected to be associated with fluidity during coking and subsequent resolidification relies on < 1000 Da compounds. The results showed that > 600 Da compounds are thermally sensitive. Compounds with molecular weights of < 450 Da may be removed during coking, possibly as a vapor, resulting in a reduction in fluidity. There has been speculation that the thermally stable (acetone-soluble) material identified in both raw coal extract and those from thermally treated samples may be capable of undergoing a phase change to initiate plastic deformation.

DOI 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.5b01850
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 7
Co-authors John Lucas, Rohan Stanger, Terry Wall
2014 Stanger R, Xie W, Wall T, Lucas J, Mahoney M, 'Dynamic measurement of coal thermal properties and elemental composition of volatile matter during coal pyrolysis', Journal of Materials Research and Technology, 3 2-8 (2014)

A new technique that allows dynamic measurement of thermal properties, expansion and the elemental chemistry of the volatile matter being evolved as coal is pyrolysed is described... [more]

A new technique that allows dynamic measurement of thermal properties, expansion and the elemental chemistry of the volatile matter being evolved as coal is pyrolysed is described. The thermal and other properties are measured dynamically as a function of temperature of the coal without the need for equilibration at temperature. In particular, the technique allows for continuous elemental characterisation of tars as they are evolved during pyrolysis and afterwards as a function of boiling point. The technique is demonstrated by measuring the properties of maceral concentrates from a coal. The variation in heats of reaction, thermal conductivity and expansion as a function of maceral composition is described. Combined with the elemental analysis, the results aid in the interpretation of the chemical processes contributing to the physical and thermal behaviour of the coal during pyrolysis. Potential applications in cokemaking studies are discussed. © 2013 Brazilian Metallurgical, Materials and Mining Association. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.jmrt.2013.10.012
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Rohan Stanger, Terry Wall, John Lucas
2014 Stanger R, Xie W, Wall T, Lucas J, Mahoney M, 'Dynamic measurement of coal thermal properties and elemental composition of volatile matter during coal pyrolysis', Journal of Materials Research and Technology, 3 2-8 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jmrt.2013.10.012
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Terry Wall, John Lucas, Rohan Stanger
2013 Xie W, Stanger R, Lucas J, Wall T, Mahoney M, 'Coal macerals separation by reflux classification and thermo-swelling analysis based on the Computer Aided Thermal Analysis', FUEL, 103 1023-1031 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2012.07.061
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Rohan Stanger, Terry Wall, John Lucas
2013 Stanger R, Xie W, Wall T, Lucas J, Mahoney M, 'Dynamic Elemental Thermal Analysis: A technique for continuous measurement of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen chemistry of tar species evolved during coal pyrolysis', Fuel, 103 764-772 (2013) [C1]

A novel technique is described which provides quantitative and continuous analysis of light gas and condensable tar components as they are evolved in terms of carbon, hydrogen and... [more]

A novel technique is described which provides quantitative and continuous analysis of light gas and condensable tar components as they are evolved in terms of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. The technique has also been used to directly characterise the total tar sample in terms of carbon distribution and boiling point. It has been found that changes to the dynamic tar-H/C ratio correspond well with particular temperatures measured by Geiseler Plastometer for softening, maximum fluidity and re-solidification. This technique can enhance the chemical understanding of mechanisms occurring during de-polymerisation and cross-linking of coal (i.e. metaplast development and the transfer of hydrogen) while also monitoring tar evolution. A tar collection and re-vaporisation method provides a means of identifying tar groups that contribute towards the metaplast phase and temperatures at which they evolve. Both methods are unique in studying chemical aspects of coal and tar behaviour with heating, in a field based on thermo-physical techniques (e.g. H 1 NMR, high temperature rheology, Geiseler plastometry, dilatation). Overall, the Dynamic Elemental Thermal Analysis (DETA) technique can give new insight into the fundamental mechanisms prevalent in coal pyrolysis and provides quantitative chemical assessment of tar nature (i) during the heating of coal and (ii) as a final (total) condensed product. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2012.06.071
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Rohan Stanger, John Lucas, Terry Wall
2013 Stanger R, Xie W, Wall T, Lucas J, Mahoney M, 'Dynamic behaviour of coal macerals during pyrolysis-Associations between physical, thermal and chemical changes', Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, 34 2393-2400 (2013) [C1]

A fundamental study on the behaviour of heating coal macerals has been undertaken using two novel thermal analysis techniques. The apparent specific heat was determined during hea... [more]

A fundamental study on the behaviour of heating coal macerals has been undertaken using two novel thermal analysis techniques. The apparent specific heat was determined during heating using an inverse calorimetric method (computer aided thermal analysis, CATA) and combined with pressure and displacement measurements to correlate endothermic and exothermic behaviour with measurement of swelling. The second technique used a post-oxidation stage to combust the tars and gases into products which were analysed. This method was used to study the elemental character of volatiles release from coal maceral concentrates in terms of carbon and hydrogen. Extents of swelling and exothermicity during primary devolatilisation were found to be correlated with vitrinite content and were associated with tar evolution. For the highest vitrinite fraction (of 86.4% vitrinite) swelling was initiated at the same temperature range for exothermic reactions, and maximum swelling coincided with the peak release of light gases. Tar evolution was found to change in chemical character (as defined by H/C ratio) during progressive heating, initially rising in the early stages of tar formation ( < 430°C) to a maximum of 1.24, then gradually decreasing to a minimum of 0.64 at 550°C. © 2012 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.proci.2012.07.003
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors John Lucas, Rohan Stanger, Terry Wall
2011 Yu J, Chang L, Xie W, Wang D, 'Correlation of H2S and COS in the hot coal gas stream and its importance for high temperature desulfurization', Korean Journal of Chemical Engineering, 28 1054-1057 (2011) [C1]

Thermodynamic analysis of the correlation of H 2 S and COS has been carried out at the temperature range of 400-650°C at which high temperature desulfurization of coal gas is usu... [more]

Thermodynamic analysis of the correlation of H 2 S and COS has been carried out at the temperature range of 400-650°C at which high temperature desulfurization of coal gas is usually performed. The correlation of the two sulfur species is mainly through the reaction H 2 S+CO¿COS+H 2 . Simulated coal gas with the following composition CO 32.69%, H 2 39.58%, CO 2 18.27%, N 2 8.92% and H 2 S 0.47% was used in this study, and the equilibrium concentrations of the two species at different temperatures were calculated. The results of Fe-based sorbents during sulfidation were compared with calculations. It is concluded that the above reaction may reach equilibrium concentration in the presence of the Fe-based sorbents, which means the Fe-based sorbents may effectively catalyze the reaction between H 2 S and CO. Because of the correlation of the two sulfur species, both can be effectively removed at high temperatures simultaneously, offering high temperature desulfurization some advantages over low temperature desulfurization processes. © 2011 Korean Institute of Chemical Engineers, Seoul, Korea.

DOI 10.1007/s11814-010-0482-2
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Jianglong Yu
2010 Xie W, Chang L, Wang D, Xie K, Wall TF, Yu J, 'Removal of sulfur at high temperatures using iron-based sorbents supported on fine coal ash', Fuel, 89 868-873 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2009.01.006
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 47
Co-authors Jianglong Yu, Terry Wall
2008 Hu S, Xie W, Chang L, Song H, Yu J, 'Characteristics of Fe-Ce sorbents and its ash-support for desulphurization of hot coal gas', Liaoning Gongcheng Jishu Daxue Xuebao (Ziran Kexue Ban)/Journal of Liaoning Technical University (Natural Science Edition), 27 620-622 (2008)

Using different size range of flying ash samples from gangue thermal power plant of Liaoning Fuxin as carrier, Fe-Ce oxide as active component, Kaolin as binder, through mechanica... [more]

Using different size range of flying ash samples from gangue thermal power plant of Liaoning Fuxin as carrier, Fe-Ce oxide as active component, Kaolin as binder, through mechanical mixing, forming, drying and high temperature calcination, columnar samples are prepared. In the condition of 120°C, drying for 4h,then calcining in 700°C for 8h, the iron-cerium-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulphurization were prepared using coal ash as the support and the sorbents and coal ash are characterized by means of numerous analytical methods such as composition analysis, XRD and SEM. The results clearly indicate that the sorbents prepared using coal ash as the support demonstrate high reactivity and high resistance to attrition during sulfidation during the temperature range of 400 °C to 600°C.

Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Jianglong Yu
2007 Xie W, Chang L, Song H, Liu X, Xie K, Wall T, Yu J, 'Two-step hot coal gas desulphurization process integrated with direct production of elemental sulfur using iron-based sorbents: A preliminary study', 24th Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference 2007, PCC 2007, 1 544-553 (2007)

The paper proposed a two-step desulphurization process using iron-based high temperature sorbents for removal of hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gases after coal gasification. The ... [more]

The paper proposed a two-step desulphurization process using iron-based high temperature sorbents for removal of hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gases after coal gasification. The authors use the mixture of iron oxide with other metal oxides (e.g. Ce) supported by ash from a coalgangue- fired power plant to prepare high temperature desulphurization sorbents. The two-step desulphurization process is comprised of a first-stage desulphurization of removing majority of sulfur followed by a second-stage desulphurization to remove the remaining sulfur species. The process is integrated with effective sulfur recovery through direct elemental sulfur production during the regeneration of Fe/Ce based sorbents. Preliminary studies on sulfidation using a quartz fixed-bed reactor demonstrated that the Fe/Ce-based sorbents prepared in this study was able to remove > 97% sulfur in the temperature range of 400-600°C. Simultaneous removal of organic and inorganic sulfur species was achieved.

Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Terry Wall
Show 18 more journal articles

Conference (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Mahoney MR, Xie W, Stanger R, Wall T, Lucas J, 'Physical, chemical and thermal behaviours during cokemaking using CATA and DETA techniques', 10th Australian Coal Science Conference Proceedings (2013) [E2]
Co-authors Rohan Stanger, John Lucas, Terry Wall
2012 Stanger RJ, Xie W, Wall TF, Lucas JA, Mahoney MR, 'Dynamic measurement of coal thermal properties and elemental composition of volatile matter during coal pyrolysis', Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on the Science and Technology of Ironmaking (2012) [E2]
Co-authors Rohan Stanger, John Lucas, Terry Wall
2011 Xie W, Stanger RJ, Lucas JA, Wall TF, Mahoney MR, 'Influence of heating rate and particle size on thermo-swelling properties of heating coal', Proceedings of the Australian Combustion Symposium 2011 (2011) [E1]
Co-authors Terry Wall, Rohan Stanger, John Lucas
2006 Yu J, Song H, Chang L, Xie W, Xie K, 'A study on the ash from coal gangue fired power plant-characteristics and application', 23rd Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference, PCC - Coal-Energy, Environment and Sustainable Development (2006)

Coal will continue to dominate China s energy supply in the future. The mining of coal creates large amount of gangue which not only occupies a large area of land but also generat... [more]

Coal will continue to dominate China s energy supply in the future. The mining of coal creates large amount of gangue which not only occupies a large area of land but also generate environmental problems. On the other hand, coal gangue is a low calorific fuel which should be utilized properly. A few small power plants are current running or under construction in China. However, due to its high ash content, coal gangue generates a large amount of ash when it is combusted in power plants. The ash from power stations not only contributes to emissions of fine particulates in the air but also results in the contamination of soil. The utilization of coal gangue ash is therefore important to reduce China s environmental pollution. In this paper, current status of the research and development of gangue ash utilization in China is reviewed. The gangue ash has found its application in a wide range of areas, such as road construction, chemicals, agriculture fertilizers, etc. Some ash samples were collected by the authors from a coal gangue fired power plant in Fuxin, northeast China. Characteristics of the ash were analyzed by using XRD, SEM, Laser sizer and other techniques. Because of its physical structure (e.g., large surface area and porosity) and its composition (i.e., containing mainly SiO2, Al2O3 and CaO) the gangue ash has a potential in the application of iron-based sorbents for high temperature removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas. A desulphurization sorbent was prepared by using the mixture of iron oxide and the gangue ash collected from the power plant. The structure and property of the surbent were examined using XRD, SEM and other techniques.

Show 1 more conference

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Mahoney MR, Stanger R, Xie W, Lucas J, Wall T, 'Fundamental reasons for different coking behaviour of coals from different basins - behaviour of semi-inerts', Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP), 77 (2014) [R1]
Co-authors Terry Wall, John Lucas, Rohan Stanger
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $537,540

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20172 grants / $124,250

Relevance of maceral concentrates to whole coal coking predicts$69,500

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Doctor Wei Xie, Doctor Rohan Stanger, Doctor Merrick Mahoney, Emeritus Professor Terry Wall, Associate Professor John Lucas, Doctor Jianglong Yu
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700654
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Physical and chemical interactions occurring between macerals during cokemaking and their influence on coke strength$54,750

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Doctor Wei Xie, Doctor Merrick Mahoney, Doctor Rohan Stanger, Associate Professor John Lucas, Emeritus Professor Terry Wall, Doctor Jianglong Yu, Dr Karen Steel
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700655
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20164 grants / $351,490

Optimising the performance of solid bowl centrifuge for tailing dewatering$125,560

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Doctor Rohan Stanger, Associate Professor John Lucas, Emeritus Professor Terry Wall, Doctor Jianglong Yu, Doctor Wei Xie
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600043
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Using high range mass spectrometry to study the link between coal structure, coke strength and thermoplastic chemistry in blends$104,240

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Doctor Rohan Stanger, Emeritus Professor Terry Wall, Associate Professor John Lucas, Doctor Jianglong Yu, Doctor Wei Xie, Doctor Merrick Mahoney
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600044
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Concentrating coke oven sized inertinite particles to study their behaviour in targeted coking blends$91,690

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Doctor Wei Xie, Doctor Rohan Stanger, Doctor Merrick Mahoney, Emeritus Professor Terry Wall, Associate Professor John Lucas, Doctor Jianglong Yu
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600048
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Scoping study on Matmor feed material using novel thermal analysis$30,000

Funding body: Environmental Clean Technologies Limited

Funding body Environmental Clean Technologies Limited
Project Team Doctor Rohan Stanger, Emeritus Professor Terry Wall, Associate Professor John Lucas, Doctor Wei Xie, Professor Eric Kennedy, Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600680
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20151 grants / $61,800

Physical and chemical interactions occurring during cokemaking and their influence on coke strength$61,800

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Doctor Wei Xie, Doctor Merrick Mahoney, Dr Karen Steel
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500601
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 20
China 8
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Dr Wei Xie

Position

Research Associate
School of Engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Focus area

Chemical Engineering

Contact Details

Email wei.xie@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6457

Office

Room EB 126
Building EB Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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