Dr Timothy Regan

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

School of Psychology (Public Health)

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (21 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Williams CM, Gilligan C, Regan T, Daly J, et al., 'Real-time video counselling for smoking cessation', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2017 (2017)

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The objectiv... [more]

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The objectives of this review are to assess the following, across community, healthcare or other settings. The effectiveness of real-time video counselling delivered individually or to a group for increasing smoking cessation. The effectiveness of real-time video counselling on increasing the number of quit attempts. The effect of real-time video counselling on intervention adherence and duration of consultations. The effect of real-time video counselling on satisfaction, including ease of use. The effect of real-time video counselling on therapeutic alliance. To provide a brief economic commentary of real-time video counselling.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012659
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Conor Gilligan, Christopher M Williams
2017 Tzelepis F, Hanna JH, Paul CL, Boyes AW, Carey ML, Regan T, 'Quality of patient-centred care: Medical oncology patients' perceptions and characteristics associated with quality of care.', Psychooncology, (2017)
DOI 10.1002/pon.4380
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Allison Boyes, Mariko Carey
2016 Mansfield E, Bryant J, Regan T, Waller A, Boyes A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Burden and Unmet Needs of Caregivers of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: A Systematic Review of the Volume and Focus of Research Output', COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 13 662-667 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Caregivers of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience significant burden. To develop effective interven... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Caregivers of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience significant burden. To develop effective interventions to support this vulnerable group, it is necessary to understand how this burden varies as a function of patient well-being and across the illness trajectory. This systematic review aimed to identify the number and type of data-based publications exploring the burden and unmet needs of caregivers of individuals with COPD. Medline, Embase, PsycINFO and Cochrane databases were searched for studies published between January 2000 and February 2014. Studies were eligible if they were quantitative studies examining unmet needs of, or burden on, adult caregivers of individuals with COPD. Eligible papers were categorised according to (i) type (i.e. descriptive, measurement and intervention studies); (ii) whether they measured associations between patient and caregiver burden and (iii) whether they measured caregiver burden longitudinally. Twenty-seven data-based papers met criteria for inclusion. There was a significant increase in the total number of publications over time. The majority of publications were descriptive studies (n¿=¿25), with one measurement and one intervention study identified. Fourteen descriptive studies measured the relationship between patient or caregiver factors and caregiver burden. Only two studies measured caregiver burden over time. There are a number of gaps in the body of research examining burden and unmet needs of caregivers of individuals with COPD that preclude the development of effective interventions for this population. Greater research effort should be directed towards identifying rigorous measurement tools which more accurately characterise caregiver burden, so that evidence-based interventions can be d eveloped.

DOI 10.3109/15412555.2016.1151488
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amy Waller, Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elise Mansfield
2016 Clinton-McHarg T, Yoong SL, Tzelepis F, Regan T, Fielding A, Skelton E, et al., 'Psychometric properties of implementation measures for public health and community settings and mapping of constructs against the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research: a systematic review', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0512-5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Lambert SD, McElduff P, Girgis A, Levesque JV, Regan TW, Turner J, et al., 'A pilot, multisite, randomized controlled trial of a self-directed coping skills training intervention for couples facing prostate cancer: accrual, retention, and data collection issues', Supportive Care in Cancer, 24 711-722 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: To examine the acceptability of the methods used to evaluate Coping-Together, one of the first self-directed coping skill inte... [more]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: To examine the acceptability of the methods used to evaluate Coping-Together, one of the first self-directed coping skill intervention for couples facing cancer, and to collect preliminary efficacy data. Methods: Forty-two couples, randomized to a minimal ethical care (MEC) condition or to Coping-Together, completed a survey at baseline and 2¿months after, a cost diary, and a process evaluation phone interview. Results: One hundred seventy patients were referred to the study. However, 57 couples did not meet all eligibility criteria, and 51 refused study participation. On average, two to three couples were randomized per month, and on average it took 26 days to enrol a couple in the study. Two couples withdrew from MEC, none from Coping-Together. Only 44¿% of the cost diaries were completed, and 55¿% of patients and 60¿% of partners found the surveys too long, and this despite the follow-up survey being five pages shorter than the baseline one. Trends in favor of Coping-Together were noted for both patients and their partners. Conclusions: This study identified the challenges of conducting dyadic research, and a number of suggestions were put forward for future studies, including to question whether distress screening was necessary and what kind of control group might be more appropriate in future studies.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-015-2833-3
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2016 Wolfenden L, Regan T, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Kingsland M, Milat A, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of workplace-based policies or practices targeting tobacco, alcohol, diet, physical activity and obesity', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2016 (2016)

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The primary ... [more]

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The primary aim of this review is to determine the effectiveness of implementation strategies for policies, practices or programmes that aim to improve health behaviours or reduce unhealthy behaviours commonly associated with risk factors for chronic disease in the workplace. Specifically, this review will target interventions that address diet, physical inactivity, obesity, risky alcohol use and tobacco use. In addition, this review will determine: the effectiveness of implement ation strategies on health behaviour outcomes (nutrition, physical activity, obesity, alcohol use and smoking); the cost-effectiveness of these strategies; the existence of adverse outcomes resulting from the implementation of these strategies.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012439
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2016 Gilligan C, James EL, Snow P, Outram S, Ward BM, Powell M, et al., 'Interventions for improving medical students' interpersonal communication in medical consultations', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2016 (2016)

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of interventions for medical stud... [more]

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of interventions for medical students that aim to improve interpersonal communication in medical consultations.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012418
Co-authors Erica James, Marita Lynagh, Sue Outram, Conor Gilligan
2016 Bryant J, Mansfield E, Boyes AW, Waller A, Sanson-Fisher R, Regan T, 'Involvement of informal caregivers in supporting patients with COPD: A review of intervention studies', International Journal of COPD, 11 1587-1596 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Bryant et al. Caregivers of individuals with COPD have a key role in maintaining patient adherence and optimizing patient function. However, no systematic review has exami... [more]

© 2016 Bryant et al. Caregivers of individuals with COPD have a key role in maintaining patient adherence and optimizing patient function. However, no systematic review has examined how the caregiver role has been operationalized in interventions to improve outcomes of individuals with COPD or the quality or effectiveness of these interventions. The aims of this review were to 1) determine whether caregivers have been involved as part of interventions to improve outcome s of individuals with COPD; 2) determine the risk of bias within included intervention studies; and 3) examine the effectiveness of interventions that have involved caregivers in improving outcomes of individuals with COPD. The electronic databases of Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library were searched from January 2000 to November 2015. Experimental studies testing interventions that involved a caregiver to improve COPD patient outcomes were eligible. Nine studies involving caregivers met inclusion criteria. No studies reported any intervention components targeted solely at caregivers, with most instead including caregivers in dyadic or group education sessions about COPD delivered by health care professionals. The risk of bias identified in included studies was mixed. Seven of the nine studies were effective in improving a broad range of outcomes. These findings highlight that there is an urgent need for methodologically rigorous interventions to examine the effectiveness of strategies to assist caregivers to provide direct care, encourage adherence to health care provider recommendations, act as a health care advocate, and provide emotional and psychosocial support to individuals with COPD.

DOI 10.2147/COPD.S107571
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Amy Waller, Elise Mansfield, Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, Fradgley E, Regan T, 'Medical Oncology Patients: Are They Offered Help and Does It Provide Relief?', Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 50 436-444 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Context Identifying modifiable gaps in the symptom management pathway, as perceived by patients, is the first step to ... [more]

© 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Context Identifying modifiable gaps in the symptom management pathway, as perceived by patients, is the first step to relieving patient suffering. Objectives The objective is to describe the proportion of patients experiencing treatable cancer-related symptoms who reported 1) a health care provider at the treatment center offered assistance for their symptom, 2) they accepted the assistance offered, and 3) the assistance relieved suffering. Variation in symptom management among treatment centers also was examined. Methods A survey was done with 528 medical oncology outpatients recruited from six treatment centers. Eight items explored management of prevalent, burdensome, and treatable cancer-related symptoms: pain, fatigue, other physical side effects, and emotional distress. Participants were asked about symptom management provided at the clinic from where they were recruited. Questions referred to the last occasion the patient experienced the symptom. Results Fewer patients were offered help to relieve fatigue (44%) and emotional distress (57%), than pain (90%) and other physical side effects (84%). In most cases, help was not offered as clinic staff were not aware of the patient's symptom. Although the vast majority of patients accepted the help that was offered, more patients accepted help for physical symptoms (pain, 97%; fatigue, 95%; and other side effects, 98%) than emotional symptoms (87%). When care was provided, most patients experienced at least a little relief from pain (99%), fatigue (94%), and emotional distress (96%). Symptom management did not vary significantly by treatment center (P = 0.073). Conclusion Quality improvement initiatives must focus primarily on improving providers' awareness of their patients' symptoms and ensuring that patients are subsequently offered help.

DOI 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.04.018
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Elizabeth Fradgley, Mariko Carey, Amy Waller, Alison Zucca, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Regan T, Carey M, Bryant J, Waller A, Mansfield E, Sitas F, Tracey E, 'Prevalence and correlates of current smoking among medical oncology outpatients', Psycho-Oncology, 24 1258-1264 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Background Continued smoking following a cancer diagnosis has adverse impacts on ca... [more]

Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Background Continued smoking following a cancer diagnosis has adverse impacts on cancer treatment and puts individuals at risk of secondary cancers. Data on the prevalence and correlates of smoking among cancer patients are critical for successfully targeting smoking cessation interventions. Aims To explore among a sample of medical oncology outpatients (a) the prevalence of self-reported current smoking and (b) the demographic and psychosocial factors associated with self-reported smoking. Methods A heterogeneous sample of cancer patients aged 18 years or over was recruited from 1 of 11 medical oncology treatment centres across Australia. Patients completed a survey assessing the following: smoking status; socio-demographic, disease and treatment characteristics; time since diagnosis; anxiety; and depression. Factors associated with self-reported smoking were examined using a univariate and multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression. Results A total of 1379 patients returned surveys and 1338 were included in the analysis. The prevalence of current smoking was 10.9% (n=146). After adjusting for treatment centre, patients aged 65 years and older and those without health concession cards were significantly less likely to smoke. Patients diagnosed with lung cancer and those without private health insurance were more likely to smoke. Discussion A minority of cancer patients reported continued smoking at an average time of 13 months post-diagnosis. Patients, who are younger, have been diagnosed with lung cancer and have lower socioeconomic status are at-risk groups and represent important targets for smoking cessation advice and intervention.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3893
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amy Waller, Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield
2015 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Regan T, Hobden B, Ackland SP, 'Oncology patients overwhelmingly support tissue banking.', BMC Cancer, 15 413 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1416-5
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Elizabeth Fradgley, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Stephen Ackland
2015 Bryant J, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Mansfield E, Regan T, Bisquera A, 'Missed opportunities: General practitioner identification of their patients' smoking status', BMC Family Practice, 16 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: In order to provide smoking cessation support to their patients in line with clinical practice guidelines, general prac... [more]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: In order to provide smoking cessation support to their patients in line with clinical practice guidelines, general practitioners must first ascertain whether their patients' use tobacco. This study examined (i) the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of general practitioner detection of smoking, and (ii) the general practitioner and patient characteristics associated with detection of tobacco use. Methods: Eligible patients completed a touchscreen computer survey while waiting for an appointment with their general practitioner. Patients self-reported demographic characteristics, medical history, and current smoking status. Following the patient's consultation, their general practitioner was asked to indicate whether the patient was a current smoker (yes/no/unsure/not applicable). Smoking prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values (with 95% confidence intervals) were calculated using patient self-report of smoking status as the gold standard. Generalised estimating equations were used to examine the general practitioner and patient characteristics associated with detection of tobacco use. Results: Fifty-one general practitioners and 1,573 patients in twelve general practices participated. Patient self-report of smoking was 11.3% compared to general practitioner estimated prevalence of 9.5%. Sensitivity of general practitioner assessment was 66% [95% CI 59-73] while specificity was 98% [95% CI 97-98] . Positive predictive value was 78% [95% CI 71-85] and negative predictive value was 96% [95% CI 95-97] . No general practitioner factors were associated with detection of smoking. Patients with a higher level of education or who responded 'Other ' were less likely to be detected as smokers than patients who had completed a high school or below level of education. Conclusion: Despite the important role general practitioners play in providing smoking cessation advice and support, a substantial proportion of general practitioners do not know their patient's smoking status. This represents a significant missed opportunity in the provision of preventive healthcare. Electronic waiting room assessments may assist general practitioners in improving the identification of smokers.

DOI 10.1186/s12875-015-0228-7
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elise Mansfield, Mariko Carey
2015 Regan TW, Lambert SD, Kelly B, Falconier M, Kissane D, Levesque JV, 'Couples coping with cancer: exploration of theoretical frameworks from dyadic studies.', Psychooncology, 24 1605-1617 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.3854
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2015 De Los Reyes A, Augenstein TM, Aldao A, Thomas SA, Daruwala S, Kline K, Regan T, 'Implementing Psychophysiology in Clinical Assessments of Adolescent Social Anxiety: Use of Rater Judgments Based on Graphical Representations of Psychophysiology', Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 44 264-279 (2015)

© 2015, Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Social stressor tasks induce adolescents' social distress as indexed by low-cost psychophysiological methods. Unknown is... [more]

© 2015, Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Social stressor tasks induce adolescents' social distress as indexed by low-cost psychophysiological methods. Unknown is how to incorporate these methods within clinical assessments. Having assessors judge graphical depictions of psychophysiological data may facilitate detections of data patterns that may be difficult to identify using judgments about numerical depictions of psychophysiological data. Specifically, the Chernoff Face method involves graphically representing data using features on the human face (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape). This method capitalizes on humans' abilities to discern subtle variations in facial features. Using adolescent heart rate norms and Chernoff Faces, we illustrated a method for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety. Twenty-two clinic-referred adolescents completed a social anxiety self-report and provided psychophysiological data using wireless heart rate monitors during a social stressor task. We graphically represented participants' psychophysiological data and normative adolescent heart rates. For each participant, two undergraduate coders made comparative judgments between the dimensions (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape) of two Chernoff Faces. One Chernoff Face represented a participant's heart rate within a context (baseline, speech preparation, or speech-giving). The second Chernoff Face represented normative heart rate data matched to the participant's age. Using Chernoff Faces, coders reliably and accurately identified contextual variation in participants' heart rate responses to social stress. Further, adolescents' self-reported social anxiety symptoms predicted Chernoff Face judgments, and judgments could be differentiated by social stress context. Our findings have important implications for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety.

DOI 10.1080/15374416.2013.859080
Citations Scopus - 15
2015 Regan T, Levesque JV, Lambert SD, Kelly B, 'A Qualitative Investigation of Health Care Professionals', Patients' and Partners' Views on Psychosocial Issues and Related Interventions for Couples Coping with Cancer', PLOS ONE, 10 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0133837
Citations Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2014 Regan TW, Lambert SD, Kelly B, McElduff P, Girgis A, Kayser K, Turner J, 'Cross-sectional relationships between dyadic coping and anxiety, depression, and relationship satisfaction for patients with prostate cancer and their spouses.', Patient Educ Couns, 96 120-127 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2014.04.010
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Bonevski B, Paul C, Jones A, Bisquera A, Regan T, 'Smoky homes: Gender, socioeconomic and housing disparities in second hand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure in a large population-based Australian cohort', Preventive Medicine, 60 95-101 (2014) [C1]

Objective: Although research suggests that socioeconomic status (SES) will be related to housing type with regard to second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure, there has been no comprehens... [more]

Objective: Although research suggests that socioeconomic status (SES) will be related to housing type with regard to second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure, there has been no comprehensive examination of these relationships. This study aimed to explore associations between SHS exposure a) at home and b) at other places, and a number of SES, housing, and health factors. Method: Data were drawn from the 45 and Up Study, a large cohort study with 266,848 adults in New South Wales, Australia, of which 160,824 participants aged 45-65. years were included in this study. Associations between socio-demographic characteristics, smoking status, housing-type, SES, and exposure to SHS were explored initially using Chi-square tests. Ordinal logistic models were created with increasing exposure to SHS at home and at other places. Results: When measuring SHS exposure at home, being female (odds ratio (OR) = 1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2, 1.3); being of lower age (45-49. years vs 60-64. years, OR = 1.4, 95%CI = 1.3, 1.5), being a current smoker of over 20 cigarettes per day (vs never smoked, OR = 10.2, 95%CI = 9.4,11); living in other types of dwelling compared to living at home (OR = 1.3, 95%CI = 1.1, 1.4), living with a partner (vs being single OR = 2.3, 95%CI = 2.1, 2.5), and low SES measures were associated with increased exposure. Increasing SHS exposure at other places was also related to low SES measures, however unlike SHS exposure at home, SHS exposure at other places was associated with being male (OR = 1.5, 95%CI = 1.5, 1.6); and greater paid hours of work (OR = 1.3, 95%CI = 1.2, 1.3). Conclusion: Improved monitoring of SHS exposure in high risk environments is required. Tailoring SHS messages to environments may also be required, for example to women living in units, apartments and mobile homes and males in lower income workplaces. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.12.024
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2014 Bonevski B, Regan T, Paul C, Baker AL, Bisquera A, 'Associations between alcohol, smoking, socioeconomic status and comorbidities: Evidence from the 45 and Up Study', Drug and Alcohol Review, 33 169-176 (2014) [C1]

Introduction and Aims.: Understanding how tobacco, alcohol and mental health are related is important for developing population-level policies and individual-level treatments that... [more]

Introduction and Aims.: Understanding how tobacco, alcohol and mental health are related is important for developing population-level policies and individual-level treatments that target comorbidities. The current study aimed to examine sociodemographic characteristics and mental health comorbidities associated with the odds of using tobacco and harmful levels of alcohol concurrently. Design and Methods.: Data were drawn from the 45 and Up Study, a large cohort study with 267153 adults aged 45 years and over in New South Wales, Australia. Participants completed a survey assessing alcohol, smoking, psychological distress, treatment for depression and anxiety, and a range of socioeconomic status indicators. Univariate analyses and three multiple-logistic regression models were used to determine associations with (i) tobacco but not alcohol use; (ii) alcohol but not tobacco use; and (iii) concurrent tobacco and risky levels of alcohol use. Results.: Being female, younger, lower individual and area-level socioeconomic status (SES) and depression and psychological distress were associated with tobacco use alone. Factors associated with alcohol use alone were older age, male gender, higher SES, and lower psychological distress and no recent depression treatment. Factors associated with concurrent risky alcohol consumption and tobacco use included being 45-64, being male, less education, earning < $30000, being employed, and living in lower-SES areas, treatment for depression, and high distress on the Kessler-10. Discussion and Conclusions.: Results suggest strong links between SES, treatment for depression, psychological distress, and concurrent tobacco and alcohol use. This has implications for public health policies and clinical treatment for tobacco and alcohol use, suggesting greater emphasis on addressing multiple health and social concerns. © 2013 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12104
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Amanda Baker, Chris Paul
2013 Lambert SD, Girgis A, Turner J, Regan T, Candler H, Britton B, et al., '"You need something like this to give you guidelines on what to do": patients' and partners' use and perceptions of a self-directed coping skills training resource', SUPPORTIVE CARE IN CANCER, 21 3451-3460 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-013-1914-4
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
2013 Regan T, Lambert SD, Kelly B, 'Uptake and attrition in couple-based interventions for cancer: Perspectives from the literature', Psycho-Oncology, 22 2639-2647 (2013) [C1]

Objective Recognition that patients and partners are both affected by a cancer diagnosis has led to increased interest in couple-based interventions. Although these interventions ... [more]

Objective Recognition that patients and partners are both affected by a cancer diagnosis has led to increased interest in couple-based interventions. Although these interventions show promise for enhancing both patients' and partners' illness adjustment, couples' acceptance of these interventions is not well documented. This review explores these issues as reflected in uptake and attrition rates in published trials. Methods A literature search identified 17 manuscripts reporting the uptake and attrition rates of couple-based interventions for couples facing cancer. The uptake (percentage of eligible couples randomised into a trial) and the attrition (percentage of couples who dropped out of a trial) rates were extracted by cancer type, cancer stage, intervention type, intervention focus and intervention delivery method. Results Uptake and attrition rates ranged from 13.6% to 94.2% and 0% to 49.4%, respectively. Low uptake rates were noted for communication-focused interventions and those requiring both the patient and the partner to participate in the intervention simultaneously. Attrition was also high in the latter group. Uptake rates appeared slightly lower than individual-based interventions (58%-76%), as were attrition rates, although only for late stage cancer (~30% couple-based vs. ~69% individual-based). Common barriers to uptake included accessibility, competing priorities and illness severity. Conclusions The couple-based interventions had slightly lower uptake rates than what has been previously reported for individual-based interventions; however, lower attrition suggests patients and partners may be more inclined to complete an intervention when they participate together. The findings support the need to develop strategies to improve the delivery and acceptability of couple-based interventions in clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3342
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2012 Regan TW, Lambert SD, Girgis A, Kelly BJ, Kayser K, Turner J, 'Do couple-based interventions make a difference for couples affected by cancer?: A systematic review', BMC Cancer, 12 279 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 46
Co-authors Brian Kelly
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Conference (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Regan T, Levesque J, Lambert S, Kelly B, 'A Qualitative Investigation of Health Care Professionals', Patients' and Partners' Views on Psychosocial Issues and Related Interventions for Couples Coping With Cancer', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2014 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley L, Regan T, Hobden B, Ackland S, Turon H, 'ONCOLOGY PATIENTS OVERWHELMINGLY SUPPORT TISSUE BANKING', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elizabeth Fradgley, Stephen Ackland
2012 Regan TW, Lambert S, Kelly BJ, 'Feasibility and uptake challenges of couple-based interventions: Perspectives from the literature and interviews with couples', Supportive Care in Cancer: Abstracts of the 2012 International MASCC/ISOO Symposium (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2012 Regan TW, Lambert S, Kelly BJ, 'Couple-coping within a cancer context: Theoretical perspectives and measurement', Supportive Care in Cancer: Abstracts of the 2012 International MASCC/ISOO Symposium (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2012 Regan TW, Lambert S, Kelly BJ, 'Couples coping with cancer: A qualitative study of the views of health care providers', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2012 Kelly BJ, Regan TW, Lambert S, 'Coping with cancer: Addressing the needs of older couples', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: Special Issue: Abstracts of the Joint Meeting of the COSA 39th Annual Scientific Meeting and IPOS 14th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2012 Lambert SD, Candler H, Girgis A, Turner J, Regan TW, Kayser K, 'Addressing common barriers to using self-directed coping skills training booklets for couples facing cancer', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: Special Issue: Abstracts of the Joint Meeting of the COSA 39th Annual Scientific Meeting and IPOS 14th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology (2012) [E3]
Show 4 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Bonevski B, Bisquera A, Regan T, 'Exploring the relationships between exposure to second hand smoke (SHS), co-morbidities, housing status and socioeconomic status in the 45 and up sample. A Report for Action for Smoking and Health (ASH) Australia', Action for Smoking and Health (ASH) Australia (2012)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $29,271

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $9,271

Process of behavior change outcomes of the NSW Get health Coaching and Information Service among people with mental illness$9,271

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Kate Bartlem, Doctor Timothy Regan
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700266
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20141 grants / $20,000

Prevent 2nd Stroke: The development and pilot testing of an online lifestyle behaviours program for stroke and TIA survivors$20,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Professor Billie Bonevski, Dr Alyna Turner, Professor Amanda Baker, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Conjoint Associate Professor Michael Pollack, Doctor Timothy Regan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301114
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Dr Timothy Regan

Position

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Public Health

Contact Details

Email timothy.regan@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49217123
Mobile 0427469237

Office

Room AVG08
Building Psychology Building
Location Callaghan University Drive Callaghan, NSW 2308 Australia
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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