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Conjoint Professor Teri Stone

Conjoint Professor

School of Nursing and Midwifery (Nursing)

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Teresa (Teri) Stone RN, RMN, BA, MHM, PhD FACMHN is Professor of International Nursing at Yamaguchi University, Japan. She is Conjoint Professor at the University of Newcastle and visiting professor at Wuhan University, China. Previously she was programme convenor for the Bachelor of Nursing at the University of Newcastle.

Teri is Editor in Chief of Nursing and Health Sciences a premier international journal focusing on the exchange of knowledge in nursing and health sciences, particularly between the East and West.

She was awarded the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Annual Research Award in 2008 and is involved in research in Japan, China, Korea and Australia. She has published widely in her field of mental health nursing and teaches into the undergraduate and post graduate mental health programmes. In 2009 she was awarded a NSW Quality Teaching Award.

Research Expertise
Teri's research interests include verbal aggression, education, clinical supervision, and mental health.

Teaching Expertise
I have extensive teaching experience over a period of 20 years in the health context and at University level. ! have been responsible for coordinating and teaching the management development suite of courses for Hunter Health and won a Baxter award for excellence for this programme. I have taught in several areas of mental health including child and adolescent nursing; I have taught University of Newcastle medical students counseling and sexuality skills and have taught into and written several post graduate courses. I have the Certificate IV workplace Training and Assessment qualification.

Administrative Expertise
I have extensive management experience in the mental health field including service manager of the Newcastle Mental Health Service with a responsibility for community and inpatient services. I taught management and coached senior managers and ran organisational development activities as part of my role as Management Development coordinator of Hunter New England Mental Health. Both DOCS and the library services at the University of Newcastle contracted our service to run management programmes.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of New England
  • Master of Health Management, Charles Sturt University
  • Graduate Certificate Practice of Tertiary Teaching, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • International nursing
  • aggression
  • clinical supervision
  • health beliefs
  • health services management
  • mental health
  • nursing
  • suicide prevention
  • swearing
  • teaching and learning
  • therapeutic interaction
  • verbal aggression

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified 85
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 15

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/04/2012 -  Professor of International Nursing Yamaguchi University
Graduate School of Medicine
Japan
1/01/2008 - 1/01/2012 Undergraduate Programme Convenor University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/01/2007 - 1/12/2009 Lecturer B University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/03/2003 -  Editor in Chief Nursing and Health Sciences
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Levett-Jones TL, Stone TE, 'Writing for publication: Turning the conference paper into publishable works', Writing for Publication in Nursing and Healthcare, Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester, West Sussex 145-161 (2012) [B2]
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2012 Stone TE, McMillan MA, 'Warning - This job contains strong language and adult themes: Do nurses require thick skins and broad shoulders to deal with encounters involving swearing?', (Re)thinking violence in health care settings : A critical approach, Ashgate, Farnham, England 259-279 (2012) [B1]
2012 Stone TE, 'Leading, managing and delegating', Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 588-600 (2012) [B2]
2011 Stone TE, Taylor A, 'Nursing care of clients with problems of substance abuse', Medical Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Client Care, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 107-135 (2011) [B2]
2010 Stone TE, 'Leading, managing and delegating', Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 546-559 (2010) [B2]
Show 2 more chapters

Journal article (47 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Treloar A, McMillan M, Stone T, 'Nursing in an imperfect world: Storytelling as preparation for mental health nursing practice', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 26 293-300 (2017)

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Storytelling is a valuable adjunctive method of preparing undergraduate mental health nursing students for practice. To exp... [more]

© 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. Storytelling is a valuable adjunctive method of preparing undergraduate mental health nursing students for practice. To explore the possibilities of this method of teaching, 100 stories were collected from experienced nurses working in mental health and analysed using a case study methodology. The aim was to explore the purpose of clinical anecdotes told by experienced nurses working in mental health settings to undergraduates and new recruits, with an ancillary purpose of looking at the implications of these anecdotes for the exploration of contemporary mental health practice and education. A framework for student discussion of stories is provided. The insights gained illuminate not only the history of mental health nursing and the daily activities of nurses working in mental health, but also some of the deep-level skills developed and used by these nurses as they work in the complexity and ambiguity of an imperfect world where the job requires managing the unexpected every shift, and where there might not always be a textbook-perfect solution to clinical situations.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12235
2017 Yang BX, Stone TE, Petrini MA, Morris DL, 'Incidence, Type, Related Factors, and Effect of Workplace Violence on Mental Health Nurses: A Cross-sectional Survey', Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. OBJECTIVE: Workplace violence and its impact on mental health nurses have yet to be thoroughly explored in China. This study aims to investigate the incidenc... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. OBJECTIVE: Workplace violence and its impact on mental health nurses have yet to be thoroughly explored in China. This study aims to investigate the incidence, type, related factors, and effects of workplace violence on mental health nurses as well as identifying coping strategies. METHODS: A researcher - designed workplace violence questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey were distributed to nurses at a mental health hospital in Wuhan, China. RESULTS: Most nurses reported a high incidence of workplace violence (94.6%) in the past year ranging from verbal aggression, sexual harassment, to physical attack. The forms of violence significantly correlated with each other (r > . 0.5, p = 0.000). Working on the psychiatric intensive care unit for adult males and being a male nurse placed nurses at significantly higher risk for workplace violence. Providing routine treatment, caring for male patients, and working the night shift increased the risk of sexual harassment. Nurses who believed that workplace violence was preventable experienced a significantly lower incidence of violence. Burnout levels of the mental health nurses were relatively mild, but increased with age, professional title, years of employment and frequency of workplace violence. CONCLUSION: The incidence of workplace violence among mental health nurses is common, and its frequency is correlated with nurses' level of burnout. Management and clinical nurses should work together on an organization-wide strategy targeting the major identified risk areas to reduce the incidence of workplace violence and minimize its impact on nurses.

DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2017.09.013
2017 Stone TE, Maguire J, Kang SJ, Cha C, 'Practical issues of conducting a Q methodology study: Lessons learned from a cross-cultural study', Advances in Nursing Science, 40 291-299 (2017)

© 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. This article advances nursing research by presenting the methodological challenges experienced in conducting a multination Q-methodology study.... [more]

© 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. This article advances nursing research by presenting the methodological challenges experienced in conducting a multination Q-methodology study. This article critically analyzes the relevance of the methodology for cross-cultural and nursing research and the challenges that led to specific responses by the investigators. The use of focus groups with key stakeholders supplemented the Q-analysis results. The authors discuss practical issues and shared innovative approaches and provide best-practice suggestions on the use of this flexible methodology. Q methodology has the versatility to explore complexities of contemporary nursing practice and cross-cultural health research.

DOI 10.1097/ANS.0000000000000164
2017 Zhang L, Stone TE, Zhang J, 'Understanding the rise of Yinao in China: A commentary on the little known phenomenon of healthcare violence', Nursing & Health Sciences, 19 183-187 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12311
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Omura M, Maguire J, Levett-Jones T, Stone TE, 'The effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs for healthcare professionals and students: A systematic review.', Int J Nurs Stud, 76 120-128 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2017.09.001
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2017 Cao R, Stone TE, Petrini MA, Turale S, 'Nurses' perceptions of health beliefs and impact on teaching and practice: A Q-sort study', International Nursing Review, (2017)

© 2017 International Council of Nurses. Aim: To understand Chinese nurses' perceptions of health beliefs, their content, origin and the influence of sociocultural factors, a... [more]

© 2017 International Council of Nurses. Aim: To understand Chinese nurses' perceptions of health beliefs, their content, origin and the influence of sociocultural factors, as a basis of their evidence-based practice. This study contributes to a larger study to establish the health beliefs of Japanese, Australian, Chinese, South Korean and Thai nurses. Background: Registered nurses teach patients and students about maintaining or attaining health are subject to the same range of influences and their health beliefs may be antithetical to current health evidence. Methods: Q-method design using q-sort and interview was used to explore the perspectives on a range of health beliefs of 60 nurses in four cities in China. Findings: Three factors arose from the perceptions of the participants about health and accounted for 50.2% of the total variance: (1) social impact, (2) 'the importance of evidence', and (3) beliefs rooted in culture. Discussion: Influence on nurses' health beliefs was explored in terms of the internalized and frequently unconscious beliefs, values and norms tying them to their communities, reflecting the need for nurses to be aware of their health beliefs and behaviours. Conclusions: Education for nurses in practice needs to acknowledge that individual practitioners' beliefs strongly influence health teaching for patients and families. In order to implement evidenced-based practice and teach in line with current evidence nurses need to critically examine and reflect on the impact of culture, society and the media on their own health beliefs. Implications for nursing policy and health policy: Education policy needs to consider that culture and societal pressures affect nurses' health beliefs and practice. Critical thinking, reflective and evidence-based practice need to be emphasized in clinical training and nurse education. China also needs to develop policies to allow nurses to be able to assess the reliability of health information on the Internet and to make quality health research more available.

DOI 10.1111/inr.12399
2017 Stone TE, Conway J, 'Editorial: Self-plagiarism prevention and management at Nursing & Health Sciences', Nursing and Health Sciences, 19 1-4 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12337
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Sun Y, Stone TE, Petrini MA, 'Swearing and verbal aggression in China: A call to action', Nursing and Health Sciences, 19 139-141 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12317
2017 Tsutsumi M, Nogaki H, Shimizu Y, Stone TE, Kobayashi T, 'Individual reactions to viewing preferred video representations of the natural environment: A comparison of mental and physical reactions', Japan Journal of Nursing Science, 14 3-12 (2017)

© 2016 Japan Academy of Nursing Science Aim: Globally, awareness of the vital link between health and the natural environment is growing. This pilot study, based on the idea of Â... [more]

© 2016 Japan Academy of Nursing Science Aim: Globally, awareness of the vital link between health and the natural environment is growing. This pilot study, based on the idea of ¿forest bathing,¿ or shinrin-yoku, the mindful use of all five senses to engage with nature in a natural environment, was initiated in order to determine whether stimulation by viewing an individual's preferred video of sea or forest had an effect on relaxation. Methods: The participants were 12 healthy men in their twenties and they were divided into two groups based on their preference for sea or forest scenery by using the Visual Analogue Scale. The participants watched 90 min DVDs of sea with natural sounds and forest with natural sounds while their heart rate variability and Bispectral Index System value were measured by using MemCalc/Tawara and a Bispectral Index System monitor. Results: The participants were divided into two groups of six based on their preference for sea or forest scenery and each indicator was compared between them. Significant differences in a decrease in heart rate, increase in high frequency, and sustained arousal level were observed while viewing the preferred video. These results indicated that the viewing individual's preferred video of sea or forest had a relaxation effect. Conclusion: This study suggests that individual preferences should be taken into consideration for video relaxation therapy.

DOI 10.1111/jjns.12131
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Cai D, Stone TE, Petrini MA, Mcmillan M, ''An exploration of the health beliefs of Chinese nurses' and nurse academics' health beliefs: A Q-methodology study'', Nursing and Health Sciences, 18 97-104 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. Q-methodology was used to investigate the health beliefs of Chinese clinical nurses and nurse academics. Twenty-eight participants ... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. Q-methodology was used to investigate the health beliefs of Chinese clinical nurses and nurse academics. Twenty-eight participants from one hospital and nursing school in China were involved. The four stages of this study included: (i) concourse development from literature review, Internet searches, and key informant interviews; (ii) A pilot study to develop the Q-sample from the concourse; (iii) participants sorted the Q-sample statements along a continuum of preference (Q-sorting); and (iv) PQ data analysis using principal component analysis and varimax rotation. Five viewpoints were revealed: (i) factor 1 - health management and the importance of evidence; (ii) factor 2 - challenging local cultural belief, and Eastern and Western influences; (iii) factor 3 - commonsense; (iv) factor 4 - health and clinical practice; and (v) factor 5 - health and nursing education. This study presents a need for nurses and nurse academics to think critically, examine their long-held health beliefs, and promote the use of evidence-based practice.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12251
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Stone T, Hua S, Turale S, 'Evaluation of an international and interprofessional collaboration forum', Nurse Education Today, 46 10-16 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Background International and interprofessional collaborations are increasingly becoming a core requirement for health professionals in our globalized world. A... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Background International and interprofessional collaborations are increasingly becoming a core requirement for health professionals in our globalized world. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Asia Pacific Alliance of Health Leaders (APAHL) Forum to enhance the development of international perspectives and leadership among students and faculty in the discipline of health. Methods This pilot study used a student-designed questionnaire to evaluate the views of students and faculty members about the effectiveness of APAHL in meeting its goals. Quantitative data from the scaled items on the questionnaire were analyzed by aggregating the data. Qualitative data were analyzed using a qualitative descriptive approach. Results Study participants comprised of 22 health science (nursing and laboratory science) students and 15 faculty members. Both faculty and students agreed that APAHL was effective in leadership development of students, as well as in advancing internationalization, interprofessional collaboration, and cultural awareness among students. A clear theme among the students was acknowledgement of the importance of communication, in particular being proficient in English. Difficulties in communication were an issue for both students and faculty members. Conclusion This pilot study has shown the benefits of a student-focused international forum in developing cross-cultural awareness, and will provide the groundwork for evaluating the effectiveness of cross-cultural and interprofessional leadership forums aimed particularly at students of health.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2016.06.023
Co-authors Susan Hua
2016 Stone TE, Kang SJU, Cha C, Turale S, Murakami K, Shimizu A, 'Health beliefs and their sources in Korean and Japanese nurses: A Q-methodology pilot study', Nurse education today, 36 214-220 (2016)

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. BACKGROUND: Many health beliefs do not have supporting scientific evidence, and are influenced by culture, gender, religion, s... [more]

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. BACKGROUND: Many health beliefs do not have supporting scientific evidence, and are influenced by culture, gender, religion, social circumstance and popular media. Nurses may also hold non-evidenced-based beliefs that affect their own health behaviours and their practices. OBJECTIVES: Using Q-methodology, pilot Q-cards representing a concourse of health beliefs for Japanese and South Korean nurses and explain the content and sources of health beliefs. DESIGN: Qualitative. SETTINGS: Two university campuses, one each in Japan and Korea. PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of 30 was obtained, 14 clinical nurses and 16 academic nurses. METHODS: Literature reviews and expert informants were used to develop two sets of 65 Q-cards which listed culturally appropriate health beliefs in both Japan and Korea. These beliefs were examined in four structured groups and five individual interviews in Japan, and five groups and two individual interviews in Korea. RESULTS: Our unique study revealed six categories regarding sources of health beliefs that provide rich insights about how participants accessed, processed and transmitted health information. They were more certain about knowledge from their specialty area such as that from medical or nursing resources, but derived and distributed many general health beliefs from personal experience, family and mass media. They did not always pass on accurate information to students or those in their care, and often beliefs were not based on scientific evidence. CONCLUSION: Findings highlight the dangers of clinical and academic nurses relying on health belief advice of others and passing this on to patients, students or others, without mindfully examining the basis of their beliefs through scientific evidence.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2015.10.017
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Honda K, Levett-Jones T, Stone T, Maguire J, 'Japanese nursing students' sense of belonging: A story of Uchi (insider) and Soto (outsider)', Nurse Education in Practice, 20 85-92 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Clinical placement experiences are the cornerstone of nursing education and a body of literature indicates that belongingness is fundamental to students'... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Clinical placement experiences are the cornerstone of nursing education and a body of literature indicates that belongingness is fundamental to students' learning when undertaking placements. However, little is known about Japanese nursing students¿ sense of belonging and how it is influenced by their cultural values. The aim of this paper is to profile a study that: measured the extent to which Japanese nursing students¿ experience a sense of belonging in clinical placements, and explored the factors that impact on and are consequences of that experience. A mixed methods design was used with quantitative data collected using the Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience and qualitative data collected using semi-structured interviews. Ninety-two third and fourth year students from a large regional university in Japan completed the questionnaire; of these six also participated in interviews. The results identified similarities and differences between this and other studies of belongingness. Supportive and welcoming clinical environments facilitated participants' belongingness and motivation to learn. However, the belongingness scores of this sample were lower than those in all other studies. This may be explained, in part, by the Japanese cultural values of ¿Uchi (insider) and Soto¿ (outsider), which pervaded the participants¿ placement experiences and led to feelings of exclusion and alienation.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2016.07.004
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2016 Tokuda N, Walsh J, Stone TE, 'Focus on Japan: Challenges for women in health science academic positions', Nursing and Health Sciences, 18 139-142 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12265
2016 Xiong M, Stone TE, Turale S, Petrini MA, 'Women's experiences of making healthcare decisions about their breast cancer: A phenomenological study', Nursing and Health Sciences, 18 314-320 (2016)

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd There are few studies about how healthcare decisions are made for women with breast cancer in China and this knowledge is vital, bot... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd There are few studies about how healthcare decisions are made for women with breast cancer in China and this knowledge is vital, both to further develop person-centered health care and to ensure that women have a voice in their healthcare decisions. This phenomenological study explored the meaning of women's lived experiences of making healthcare decisions about their breast cancer in China. Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of eight women with breast cancer. Data were analyzed using Colaizzi's phenomenological analytic method. The results of this study identified four themes: authority and expertise, lack of knowledge, family support, and Chinese cultural and social influences. Women were deferential to medical authority and perceived expertise, but they wanted to be involved to a greater degree in healthcare decisions. It is important for health professionals to optimize women's participation in decision-making by removing barriers and advocating on their behalf.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12270
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Rossiter RC, Stone TE, '¿Buyer Beware!¿ predatory conferences: Avoiding an expensive mistake', Nursing and Health Sciences, 18 414-415 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12318
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rachel Rossiter
2015 Stone TE, McMillan M, Hazelton M, 'Back to swear one: A review of English language literature on swearing and cursing in Western health settings', Aggression and Violent Behavior, 25 65-74 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on swearing in English with particular emphasis on healthcare contexts, a previously neglected area of ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on swearing in English with particular emphasis on healthcare contexts, a previously neglected area of research. The review commences with a discussion of the nature of swearing, definitional considerations, and its prevalence. This is followed by an outline of the uses and functions of swearwords, and discussion of those aspects of swearing linked to illness, aggression, gender, and mental health problems. The final section focuses on the importance of appropriate responses to swearing to the practice of health professionals, in particular, those within the nursing profession.

DOI 10.1016/j.avb.2015.07.012
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Michael Hazelton
2015 Stone TE, Treloar AE, '"How did it get so late so soon?": Tips and tricks for managing time.', Nursing & health sciences, 17 409-411 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12208
Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Rossiter RC, Stone TE, 'Getting the message across: Delivering a quality conference presentation', Nursing and Health Sciences, 17 145-147 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12204
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rachel Rossiter
2015 Stone TE, Rossiter RC, 'Predatory publishing: Take care that you are not caught in the Open Access net', Nursing and Health Sciences, 17 277-279 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12215
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Rachel Rossiter
2015 Omura M, Levett-Jones T, Stone TE, Maguire J, Lapkin S, 'Measuring the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on Japanese nurses and nursing students using the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire', Nursing and Health Sciences, 17 500-506 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12224
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2015 McAllister M, Lasater K, Stone TE, Levett-Jones T, 'The reading room: Exploring the use of literature as a strategy for integrating threshold concepts into nursing curricula', Nurse Education in Practice, 15 549-555 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. In addition to acquiring a solid foundation of clinical knowledge and skills, nursing students making the transition from lay person to health professional m... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. In addition to acquiring a solid foundation of clinical knowledge and skills, nursing students making the transition from lay person to health professional must adopt new conceptual understandings and values, while at the same time reflecting on and relinquishing ill-fitting attitudes and biases. This paper presents creative teaching ideas that utilise published narratives and explores the place of these narratives in teaching threshold concepts to nursing students. Appreciating nuance, symbolism and deeper layers of meaning in a well-drawn story can promote emotional engagement and cause learners to care deeply about an issue. Moreover, aesthetic learning, through the use of novels, memoirs and picture books, invites learners to enter into imagined worlds and can stimulate creative and critical thinking. This approach can also be a vehicle for transformative learning and for enhancing students' understanding and internalisation of threshold concepts that are integral to nursing. Guided engagement with the story by an effective educator can help learners to examine taken-for-granted assumptions, differentiate personal from professional values, remember the link between the story and the threshold concept and re-examine their own perspectives; this can result in transformative learning. In this paper, we show how threshold concepts can be introduced and discussed with nursing students via guided engagement with specific literature, so as to prompt meaningful internalised learning.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2015.07.012
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2015 Yan YE, Turale S, Stone T, Petrini M, 'Disaster nursing skills, knowledge and attitudes required in earthquake relief: Implications for nursing education', International Nursing Review, 62 351-359 (2015)

© 2015 International Council of Nurses. Background: Globally, nurses becoming more aware of getting better prepared for disaster relief, but in China, disaster nursing knowledge,... [more]

© 2015 International Council of Nurses. Background: Globally, nurses becoming more aware of getting better prepared for disaster relief, but in China, disaster nursing knowledge, courses and research are still limited. Introduction: China has long been prone to disasters, but disaster nursing education and training is in its infancy. Aim: This study explored the skills, knowledge and attitudes required by registered nurses from across China who worked in the aftermath of three large earthquakes to try to determine future disaster nursing education requirements. Method: The Questionnaire ofNurses'DisasterNursingSkills atEarthquakeSites, assessing nursing skills, knowledge and attitudes, was distributed to 139 registered nurses in 38 hospitals in 13 provinces across China who had worked in one or more earthquake disaster zones. Descriptive statistics were used for quantitative data, and content analysis for qualitative data. Results: Eighty-nine questionnaires were returned, a response rate of 68.3%. No respondent had ever received specific disaster nursing training prior to their post-earthquake nursing. Skills most often used by respondents were haemostasis bandaging, fixation, manual handling, observation and monitoring, debridement and dressing, and mass casualty transportation. Respondents identified that the most important groups of skills required were cardiopulmonary resuscitation; haemostasis, bandaging, fixation, and manual handling; and emergency management. They emphasized the need for psychological care of victims as well as that of fellow health workers. Conclusion: No respondent had ever received disaster nursing training prior to engagement at the earthquake disaster sites. All believed that there were important gaps in their knowledge and skills, and supported disaster nursing courses in the future. Implications for nursing and health policy: China urgently needs to develop disaster nursing courses, with the support of nurse leaders, educationalists and government, to implement training using an all hazards approach in accordance with international best practice and trainees' background clinical experience and knowledge. International Nursing Review

DOI 10.1111/inr.12175
Citations Scopus - 9
2015 Li Y, Turale S, Stone TE, Petrini M, 'A grounded theory study of 'turning into a strong nurse': Earthquake experiences and perspectives on disaster nursing education', Nurse Education Today, 35 e43-e49 (2015)

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Background: While Asia has the dubious distinction of being the world's most natural disaster-prone area, disaster nursing education and training are sp... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Background: While Asia has the dubious distinction of being the world's most natural disaster-prone area, disaster nursing education and training are sparse in many Asian countries, especially China where this study took place. Objective: To explore the earthquake disaster experiences of Chinese nurses and develop a substantive theory of earthquake disaster nursing that will help inform future development of disaster nursing education. Design: A qualitative study employing grounded theory, informed by symbolic interactionism. Participants and Setting: Fifteen Chinese registered nurses from five hospitals in Jiangxi Province who undertook relief efforts after the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake. Methods: Data were collected in 2012-2013 in digitally-recorded, semi-structured, in-depth interviews and reflective field notes, and analyzed using Glaser's grounded theory method. Results: Participants were unprepared educationally and psychologically for their disaster work. Supporting the emergent theory of "working in that terrible environment", was the core category of "turning into a strong nurse", a process of three stages: "going to the disaster" "immersing in the disaster" and "trying to let disaster experiences fade away". The participants found themselves thrust in "terrible" scenes of destruction, experienced personal dangers and ethical dilemmas, and tried the best they could to help survivors, communities and themselves, with limited resources and confronting professional work. Conclusions: Our rich findings confirm those of other studies in China and elsewhere, that attention must be paid to disaster education and training for nurses, as well as the mental health of nurses who work in disaster areas. Emergent theory helps to inform nurse educators, researchers, leaders and policy makers in China, and elsewhere in developing strategies to better prepare nurses for future disasters, and assist communities to prepare for and recover after earthquake disasters.

DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2015.05.020
Citations Scopus - 5
2015 Wenji Z, Turale S, Stone TE, Petrini MA, 'Chinese nurses' relief experiences following two earthquakes: Implications for disaster education and policy development', Nurse Education in Practice, 15 75-81 (2015)

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Disasters require well trained nurses but disaster nursing education is very limited in China and evidence is urgently required for future planning and imple... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Disasters require well trained nurses but disaster nursing education is very limited in China and evidence is urgently required for future planning and implementation of specialized disaster education. This describes the themes arising from narratives of Chinese registered nurses who worked in disaster relief after two major earthquakes. In-depth interviews were held with 12 registered nurses from Hubei Province. Riessman's narrative inquiry method was used to develop individual stories and themes, and socio-cultural theory informed this study. Five themes emerged: unbeatable challenges; qualities of a disaster nurse; mental health and trauma; poor disaster planning and co-ordination; and urgently needed disaster education. Participants were challenged by rudimentary living conditions, a lack of medical equipment, earthquake aftershocks, and cultural differences in the people they cared for. Participants placed importance on the development of teamwork abilities, critical thinking skills, management abilities of nurses in disasters, and the urgency to build a better disaster response system in China in which professional nurses could more actively contribute their skills and knowledge. Our findings concur with previous research and emphasize the urgency for health leaders across China to develop and implement disaster nursing education policies and programs.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2014.06.011
Citations Scopus - 11
2014 Treloar A, Stone TE, Mcmillan M, Flakus K, 'A Narrative in Search of a Methodology', Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, (2014)

Purpose: Research papers present us with the summaries of scholars' work; what we readers do not see are the struggles behind the decision to choose one methodology over anot... [more]

Purpose: Research papers present us with the summaries of scholars' work; what we readers do not see are the struggles behind the decision to choose one methodology over another. Design and Methods: A student's mental health portfolio contained a narrative that led to an exploration of the most appropriate methodology for a projected study of clinical anecdotes told by nurses who work in mental health settings to undergraduates and new recruits about mental health nursing. This paper describes the process of struggle, beginning with the student's account, before posing a number of questions needing answers before the choice of the most appropriate methodology. Findings: We argue, after discussing the case for the use of literary analysis, discourse analysis, symbolic interactionism, hermeneutics, and narrative research, that case study research is the methodology of choice. Practice Implications: Case study is frequently used in educational research and is sufficiently flexible to allow for an exploration of the phenomenon. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI 10.1111/ppc.12081
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Stone TE, Levett-Jones T, 'A comparison of three types of stimulus material in undergraduate mental health nursing education', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 34 586-591 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2013.07.014
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2014 Stone TE, Francis L, van der Riet P, Dedkhard S, Junlapeeya P, Orwat E, 'Awakening to the other: Reflections on developing intercultural competence through an undergraduate study tour', Nursing and Health Sciences, 16 521-527 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. For the past 4 years, undergraduate students from the Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia, have undertaken a tw... [more]

© 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. For the past 4 years, undergraduate students from the Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia, have undertaken a two week cultural study tour in Thailand, being exposed to a broad range of cultural interactions, health settings in rural and remote areas, and health-treatment approaches, including traditional and complementary therapies. Student evaluations and reflections were collected after the 2010 and 2011 study tours. This paper reports on findings following thematic analysis of the data, which identified central themes, including connectivity to others, "awakenings", "embodiment", and looking to the future. Findings included a recognition by students of a growth in awareness and change in perspective, which they felt would impact on their future approach in caring for patients from culturally- and linguistically-diverse backgrounds. We conclude that the study tour provided an effective way of sensitizing students to cultural differences and promoting cross-cultural awareness.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12139
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet
2014 Stone TE, Rossiter R, 'Making the most of conference attendance', Nursing and Health Sciences, 16 275-276 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12171
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rachel Rossiter
2014 Tone M, Stone T, 'What we can learn about recovery: Lessons from the Fukushima survivors', Nursing and Health Sciences, 16 52-55 (2014)

Recovery from disaster can take a lifetime, and people looking in from outside might not appreciate the stages of recovery. Little talked about is the stigma, which might attach t... [more]

Recovery from disaster can take a lifetime, and people looking in from outside might not appreciate the stages of recovery. Little talked about is the stigma, which might attach to the survivors of a disaster, especially if it is a man-made disaster. This paper documents the account of a Japanese nursing student who visited the area 18 months after the Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami, talked to the people there, and shared her reflections. The experiences of the Fukushima survivors are linked to those of victims of other disasters, whose recovery was impeded by being discriminated against and stigmatized. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12117
Citations Scopus - 6
2014 Stone TE, Francis L, van der Riet P, Dedkhard S, Junlapeeya P, Orwat E, 'Awakening to the other: Reflections on developing intercultural competence through an undergraduate study tour', Nursing and Health Sciences, 16 521-527 (2014)

© 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.For the past 4 years, undergraduate students from the Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia, have undertaken a two... [more]

© 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.For the past 4 years, undergraduate students from the Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia, have undertaken a two week cultural study tour in Thailand, being exposed to a broad range of cultural interactions, health settings in rural and remote areas, and health-treatment approaches, including traditional and complementary therapies. Student evaluations and reflections were collected after the 2010 and 2011 study tours. This paper reports on findings following thematic analysis of the data, which identified central themes, including connectivity to others, "awakenings", "embodiment", and looking to the future. Findings included a recognition by students of a growth in awareness and change in perspective, which they felt would impact on their future approach in caring for patients from culturally- and linguistically-diverse backgrounds. We conclude that the study tour provided an effective way of sensitizing students to cultural differences and promoting cross-cultural awareness.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12139
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet
2013 Stone TE, Ajayi C, '"There comes a time when silence is betrayal": Racism and nursing', Nursing and Health Sciences, 15 407-409 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12100
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Stone TE, 'Blowing away the myths of time: Evidence-based health promotion', Nursing and Health Sciences, 15 1-2 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12044
2013 Stone TE, 'Malnutrition in hospitals: What is the next course?', Nursing and Health Sciences, 15 135-136 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12074
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Joyce T, Higgins IJ, Magin PJ, Goode SM, Pond CD, Stone TE, et al., 'The experiences of nurses with mental health problems: Colleagues' perspectives', Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, 26 324-332 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Isabel Higgins, Parker Magin, Dimity Pond
2012 Stone T, McMinn B, 'What's in a word? Ageism: "the bias against older people by the (temporarily) young?"', Nursing and Health Sciences, 14 433-434 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12019
Citations Scopus - 3
2012 Stone T, 'Social media and health professionals: making the "net" work for you.', Nursing & health sciences, 14 137-139 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1442-2018.2012.00712.x
2011 Stone TE, McMillan MA, Hazelton MJ, Clayton EH, 'Wounding words: Swearing and verbal aggression in an inpatient setting', Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 47 194-203 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1744-6163.2010.00295.x
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Michael Hazelton
2011 Joyce TA, Higgins IJ, Magin PJ, Goode SM, Pond CD, Stone TE, et al., 'Nurses' perceptions of a mental health education programme for Australian nurses', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 20 247-252 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00737.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Isabel Higgins, Parker Magin, Dimity Pond
2010 Kepreotes EA, Keatinge DR, Stone TE, 'The experience of parenting children with chronic health conditions: A new reality', Journal of Nursing and Healthcare of Chronic Illness, 2 51-62 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1752-9824.2010.01047.x
2010 Spencer S, Stone TE, McMillan MA, 'Violence and aggression in mental health inpatient units: An evaluation of aggression minimisation programs', HNE Handover. For Nurses and Midwives, 3 42-48 (2010) [C2]
2010 Stone TE, Levett-Jones TL, Harris MA, Sinclair PM, 'The genesis of 'the Neophytes': A writing support group for clinical nurses', Nurse Education Today, 30 657-661 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2009.12.020
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Margaret Harris, Peter Sinclair
2010 Stone TE, Francis LM, 'What's the bloody law on this? Nurses, swearing, and the law in New South Wales, Australia', Contemporary Nurse, 34 248-257 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.5172/conu.2010.34.2.248
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2010 Stone TE, McMillan MA, Hazelton MJ, 'Swearing: Its prevalence in healthcare settings and impact on nursing practice', Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 17 528-534 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2850.2010.01554.x
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Michael Hazelton
2009 Stone TE, Francis LM, Levett-Jones TL, 'Profanity, expletives, swearing and offensive language: All in a day's work?', HNE Handover for Nurses and Midwives, 2 12-15 (2009) [C2]
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2009 Stone TE, Levett-Jones TL, Harris MA, 'The genesis of 'The neophytes': A writing support group for clinical nurses', HNE Handover for Nurses and Midwives, 2 32-36 (2009) [C2]
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2009.12.020
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Margaret Harris
2008 Stone TE, Hazelton MJ, 'An overview of swearing and its impact on mental health nursing practice', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 17 208-214 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2008.00532.x
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Michael Hazelton
Show 44 more journal articles

Conference (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Spencer S, Stone TE, McMillan M, Hanstock T, 'When life unravels: Adolescent mental health therapeutic interventions', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tanya Hanstock
2012 Stone TE, Turale S, 'Changing our social and cultural fabric: Experiences of two ex-pat mental health professors in Japan', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2012) [E3]
2011 Stone TE, McMillan MA, 'When patients use bad language: The therapeutic implications for nurses', 8th International Nursing Conference: INC2011 Abstracts (2011) [E3]
2011 Stone TE, Kirby DM, Dluzewska T, 'Turning the tide: Promoting nursing student mental health and wellbeing for academic success', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2011) [E3]
2011 Hartog CY, O'Brien LM, Stone TE, 'That's not my job! Well...whose job is it to place the flags in caring for mentally disordered offenders?', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing: Australian College of Mental Health Nursing 37th International Conference Abstracts (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Louise Obrien
2010 Joyce TA, Higgins IJ, Magin PJ, Goode SM, Stone TE, Pond CD, et al., 'Up the creek without a paddle', 36th International Conference 2010: Australian College of Mental Health Nurses. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Isabel Higgins, Parker Magin, Dimity Pond
2010 McCauley-Elsom K, Goodwin V, Stone TE, Cross W, 'Mothers or mad women: Media portrayal of maternal filicide', 36th International Conference 2010: Australian College of Mental Health Nurses. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
2010 Stone TE, 'Warning: This job contains coarse language: Dilemmas preparing nurses for real world practice', Healthcare Communication Symposium 2010 (2010) [E3]
2010 Rossiter RC, Stone TE, Levett-Jones TL, 'One oar or two? Enhancing mental health undergraduate education', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Rachel Rossiter, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009 Hazelton MJ, Stone TE, 'Leadership skills across cultures and communities', Asia-Pacific Alliance for Health Leaders (APAHL): Developing Health Leaders for the Future (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Hazelton
2009 Stone TE, 'The impact of bad language on the therapeutic relationship', Asia-Pacific Alliance for Health Leaders (APAHL): Developing Health Leaders for the Future (2009) [E3]
2009 Stone TE, Sharples J, 'The filth and the fury: Caring on the margins of care', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00648.x
2009 Stone TE, ''Mind' the gap: The impact of swearing and its effects on the therapeutic relationship between nurse and patient', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00648.x
2009 Harris MA, Stone TE, Levett-Jones TL, Sinclair PM, 'The genesis of 'the neophytes': A writing support group for clinical nurses', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00648.x
Co-authors Peter Sinclair, Margaret Harris, Tracy Levett-Jones
2008 Stone TE, Hazelton MJ, ''Delete as appropriate': Language and conduct in mental health nursing practice', 34th Annual International Conference of the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses: Presenters Abstracts (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Hazelton
Show 12 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $52,630

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20111 grants / $1,500

Nursing Education: New Paradigm for Global Environment, Sheraton Grande Walkerhill Hotel, Soeul Korea, 27-28th October 2011$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Conjoint Professor Teri Stone
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100965
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20101 grants / $1,500

HORATIO Congress Prague 2010, Hotel Pyramida - Prague Czech Republic, 15 - 17 April 2010$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Conjoint Professor Teri Stone
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000097
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20091 grants / $840

International Conference College of Australian Mental Health Nurses, Sydney, 29 September - 2 October 2009$840

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Conjoint Professor Teri Stone
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190475
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20081 grants / $47,443

Healing the healer - a peer based mentorship intervention$47,443

Funding body: Beyond Blue Ltd

Funding body Beyond Blue Ltd
Project Team Professor Dimity Pond, Doctor Teresa Joyce, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Professor Isabel Higgins, Conjoint Professor Teri Stone, Mrs Susan Goode
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0188948
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20071 grants / $1,347

Mental Health Nursing - Making Waves 33 International Conference, Cairns, 8/10/2007 - 12/10/2007$1,347

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Professor Teri Stone
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0188060
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current2

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.55

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Examining the effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs for registered nurses and nursing students in Japan PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Nursing Responses and Interventions for Episodes of Adolescent Distress in an Acute Child and Adolescent Mental Health Inpatient Unit: An Ethnographic Study PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Storytelling in Mental Health Nursing: Clinical and Educational Purpose PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD A Critical Ethnography: The Parental Impact of Diagnosed Rare Diseases of Childhood PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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Conjoint Professor Teri Stone

Position

Conjoint Professor
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Nursing

Contact Details

Email teresa.stone@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7043
Fax (02) 4921 6301

Office

Room RW1-19
Building Richardson Wing
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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