Mrs Tash Hawkins

Mrs Tash Hawkins

Clinical Nurse Educator

University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health

Career Summary

Biography

I have worked as a Nurse Academic for the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health since 2009. In this position my goal is to gain, train and retain undergraduate nursing students into the positions of registered nurses within the rural health sector.  I have the privilege of working closely with undergraduate nursing students and i provide support to them while on clinical placement. I am also there to support their smooth transition into the workforce following graduation.


Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Nursing, Griffith University

Keywords

  • Clinical Nursing
  • Graduate Nurses Transition
  • Horizontal Violence
  • Nursing Culture
  • Undergraduate Nursing Clinical Education

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified 100

Awards

Award

Year Award
2019 DVC(A) Educator Innovation and Impact Award
The University of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
NURS1103 Preparation for Clinical Practice
Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/2/2017 - 1/7/2017
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Hawkins N, Jeong S, Smith T, 'Coming ready or not! An integrative review examining new graduate nurses' transition in acute care', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, 25 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijn.12714
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Sarah Jeong, Tony Smith
2019 Hawkins N, Jeong S, Smith T, 'New graduate registered nurses exposure to negative workplace behaviour in the acute care setting: An integrative review', International Journal of Nursing Studies, 93 41-54 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Background: Negative workplace behaviour among nurses is a globally recognised problem and new graduate nurses are at high risk for exposure. Negative behaviou... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Background: Negative workplace behaviour among nurses is a globally recognised problem and new graduate nurses are at high risk for exposure. Negative behaviour has detrimental effects on new graduate nurses, the nursing profession and patients. Objectives: To synthesise evidence on negative workplace behaviour experienced by new graduate nurses in acute care setting and discuss implications for the nursing profession. Design: An integrative review guided by Whittemore and Knafl's (2005) framework. Data sources and review methods: A search of evidence-based research from five electronic databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, ProQuest, JBI and Scopus) was conducted for the period of 2007-2017. Eligible articles were critically appraised using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Results: Eight qualitative and eight quantitative studies were identified and reviewed. There was a variety of terms and definitions used to describe the disrespectful, unprofessional and uncivil targeted behaviour towards new graduate nurses. The incidence of negative workplace behaviour varied from 0.3% as a daily occurrence to 57.1% experiencing sporadic exposure. The precipitating factors included the new graduates¿ perceived lack of capability, magnifying power and hierarchy, leadership style and influence of management. The negative behaviour was identified as either a personal or professional attack, which left new graduates feeling emotional distress, anxiety or depression, which in turn impacted upon job satisfaction, cynicism, burnout, and intention to leave. The lack of a definitional consensus and the range of negative workplace behaviour make identification, seeking assistance and intervention difficult. Specific or ongoing organisational support to address negative behaviours towards new gradute nurses was not identified. Instead, the way they used to deal with these behaviours were personal. Conclusion: Negative workplace behaviour towards new graduate nurses continues to be an international problem. Available studies are descriptive and exploratory in nature and there have been few effective strategies implemented in acute care setting to address towards new graduate nurses. Multi-level organisational interventions are warranted to influence the ¿civility norms¿ of the nursing profession. With a new understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of negative workplace behaviours towards new graduate nurses and the identification of limited intervention studies being undertaken, the nursing profession is provided with new directions in their future endeavours.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2018.09.020
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Tony Smith, Sarah Jeong
2018 Hawkins NL, 'A successful transition from the city to a quiet life on the farm', Australian Nursing & Midwifery Journal, Volume 26 26-26 (2018)
2017 Little F, Stokes-Parish JB, Hawkins NL, Collier J, 'Rurally located academics for undergraduate nursing placements for students who 'go rural'', Australian Nursing Midwifery Journal, Volume 25 45-45 (2017)
Co-authors Jessica Stokes
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Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Hawkins N, Edgar A, Weiley S, 'Trailblazing - making tracks in the bush - our mission to gain, train and retain nurses in regional and rural areas', Hobart, TAS (2019)
2015 Hawkins N, Marley R, Dutton R, Boyce L, 'Learning together to work together - Using interprofessional education to increase student awareness of teamwork and communication', Newcastle (2015) [E3]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $10,962

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


Highlighted grants and funding

Escaping the lecture theatre: a team effort$3,406

Funding body: the Educator Network (tEN)

Funding body the Educator Network (tEN)
Project Team

Mrs Jane Ferns, Mrs Natasha Hawkins, Mrs Kerrie Wisely, Ms Jenny Norris, Mrs Alexandra Little, Ms Lani De Silva, Ms Lauren Cone

Scheme Teaching and Innovation Investment Scheme (TI2)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20201 grants / $2,556

Publications - PRCHB Small Grants$2,556

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Beharviour (PRCHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Beharviour (PRCHB)
Project Team

Tash Hawkins

Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20192 grants / $8,406

Statistics - PRCHB Small Grants$5,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Beharviour (PRCHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Beharviour (PRCHB)
Project Team

Natasha Hawkins

Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Escaping the lecture theatre: a team effort$3,406

Funding body: the Educator Network (tEN)

Funding body the Educator Network (tEN)
Project Team

Mrs Jane Ferns, Mrs Natasha Hawkins, Mrs Kerrie Wisely, Ms Jenny Norris, Mrs Alexandra Little, Ms Lani De Silva, Ms Lauren Cone

Scheme Teaching and Innovation Investment Scheme (TI2)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Mrs Tash Hawkins

Position

Clinical Nurse Educator
UDRH
University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email tash.hawkins@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40551903

Office

Building Manning Education Centre
Location Taree

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