Conjoint Professor Sue Wright

Conjoint Professor Sue Wright

Conjoint Professor

Newcastle Business School

Career Summary

Biography

Sue Wright is an academic leader in the field of financial analysis in Australia and is currently Professor of Accounting and Assistant Dean, Research Training at the University of Newcastle.

Sue is an Associate Editor of Australian Journal of Management and serves on the Editorial Boards of Accounting Research Journal and Meditari. She has also been a peer reviewer for the Australian Research Council’s Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA). 

She is the Australasian representative on the European Accounting Association’s Board from 2015 to 2021, and a previous Australian President of the Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand (AFAANZ) from 2011 - 2013. 

Within the field of financial analysis, Sue's research examines corporate governance, financial regulation and financial reporting issues in Australia. She analyses their impact on firm performance and market performance measures, across all sectors, and with a focus on banking and large proprietary companies. Sue is currently supervising PhD, DBA and masters students in these areas.

She also has an on-going interest in financial literacy, and teaching ethics in accounting. She wrote a set of papers on teaching ethics in the tertiary curriculum in a multicultural setting that was motivated by her membership of the Consultative Advisory Group to the IFAC (International Federation of Accountants) board, IAESB (International Accounting Education Standards Board), from 2009 - 2013. 

Sue has close to 40 refereed papers across both the accounting and finance disciplines. They have been published in prestigious international journals, including Accounting Auditing and Accountability Journal, Journal of Business Ethics, Corporate Governance An International Review, Accounting and Business Research, International Journal of Accounting, Multinational Finance Journal, Abacus, and Accounting and Finance, and in regional journals with both academic and practitioner readerships including Journal of Contemporary Accounting and Economics, Accounting Research Journal, Australian Accounting Review, Australian Economic Review, Managerial Auditing Journal, Pacific Accounting Review, and JASSA. She has also published three research-based book chapters and several articles in professional journals.

She has been the recipient of over $1 million in research grants from organisations including ACCA, ANZ Bank, AFAANZ, CAANZ, CIFR, CPA and Financial Literacy Australia.

Sue is the leading author on the popular Australasian textbook Business Analysis and Valuation [Using Financial Statements], and has also authored textbooks on investments and introductory accounting.

Prior to joining University of Newcastle in 2017, Sue worked at Macquarie University, rising from the position of Tutor in Accounting to Associate Professor in Accounting and Finance. At both universities, she has obtained extensive experience in management positions, including Assistant Dean Research Training, Academic Senate, Acting Head of Department of Applied Finance and Actuarial Studies, Acting Head of Department of Accounting and Finance, and Faculty Board. 

Sue’s contributions to Macquarie University were honoured with a Dean's Award for Service to Academia in 2013, and a Macquarie University Outstanding Service Award in 2007. 

Prior to entering academia, Sue worked for several years with the Reserve Bank of Australia in policy areas related to bank supervision and reporting. Her PhD examined the comparative information content of accounting and share prices for Australian banks 1960-1990.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Macquarie University
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), Macquarie University

Keywords

  • corporate governance
  • financial analysis
  • financial literacy
  • financial regulation
  • financial reporting

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/1/2007 - 30/6/2017 Associate Professor in Accounting and Finance

Prior to joining University of Newcastle in 2017, Sue worked at Macquarie University, rising from the position of Tutor in Accounting to Associate Professor in Accounting and Finance. At both universities, she has obtained extensive experience in management positions, including Assistant Dean Research Training, Academic Senate, Acting Head of Department of Applied Finance and Actuarial Studies, Acting Head of Department of Accounting and Finance, and Faculty Board.

Sue’s contributions to Macquarie University were honoured with a Dean's Award for Service to Academia in 2013, and a Macquarie University Outstanding Service Award in 2007. 

Macquarie University
Australia
31/1/2017 - 25/1/2018 Professor of Accounting Faculty of Business and Law University of Newcastle
Newcastle School of Business
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Handley KL, Ross-Smith A, Wright S, 'The Same or Different: How women have become included in corporate leadership in Australia', Inclusive Leadership - Negotiating Gendered Spaces, Palgrave Macmillan, Sydney 93-124 (2017)
Co-authors Karen Handley

Journal article (38 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Magee S, Ng CM, Wright S, 'How executive remuneration responds to guidance: evidence from the Australian banking industry', ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE, (2021)
DOI 10.1111/acfi.12758
2020 Adrian C, Wright S, 'Perceptions of shareholders and directors on corporate governance: what we learn about director primacy', Accounting and Finance, 60 1209-1236 (2020) [C1]

© 2018 Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand This paper compares shareholder and director perceptions since the financial crisis on what constitutes effe... [more]

© 2018 Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand This paper compares shareholder and director perceptions since the financial crisis on what constitutes effective corporate governance. We find three issues on which they have differing perceptions of good corporate governance: multiple directorships, provision of non-audit services and CEO duality, and one issue on which shareholders express concern: directors' tenure. Our results highlight the need for regulations and recommendations to more subtly define good corporate governance practices in these areas. Our results also support the theory of director primacy, providing empirical evidence that this description of corporate power is accurate even for issues on which shareholders and directors differ.

DOI 10.1111/acfi.12418
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2020 Lu M, Shan Y, Wright S, Yu Y, 'Operating cash flow asymmetric timeliness in Australia', Accounting and Finance, 60 587-627 (2020) [C1]

© 2018 AFAANZ Operating cash flow (CFO) asymmetric timeliness occurs when CFO reflects bad news more quickly than good news. We examine the presence and determinants of CFO asymme... [more]

© 2018 AFAANZ Operating cash flow (CFO) asymmetric timeliness occurs when CFO reflects bad news more quickly than good news. We examine the presence and determinants of CFO asymmetric timeliness in Australia, where substantial differences in reporting requirements of cash flow components, in characteristics of listed companies and in the degree of conservative financial reporting produce contrasting findings to those in the United States. We find supportive evidence for the novel ¿sticky cost behaviour¿ explanation and also the product-pricing strategy, but not the life cycle hypothesis. These findings are useful for investors and analysts concerned with forecasting the future values of companies.

DOI 10.1111/acfi.12349
Citations Web of Science - 1
2020 He L, Wright S, Evans E, 'The impact of managerial discretion on fair value information in the Australian agricultural sector', ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE, (2020)
DOI 10.1111/acfi.12647
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2020 Wu H, Thomas A-M, Wright S, 'Using the R&D capitalisation choice to explain the scale benefits of R&D investment', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, 45 579-606 (2020)
DOI 10.1177/0312896219897749
2020 Handley K, Evans E, Wright S, 'Understanding participation in accounting standard-setting: the case of AASB ED 192 Revised Differential Reporting Framework', Accounting & Finance, 60 3621-3645 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/acfi.12490
Co-authors Karen Handley
2019 Potter B, Pinnuck M, Tanewski G, Wright S, 'Keeping it private: financial reporting by large proprietary companies in Australia', Accounting and Finance, 59 87-113 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/acfi.12436
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2019 Bhattacharyya A, Wright S, Rahman ML, 'Is better banking performance associated with financial inclusion and mandated CSR expenditure in a developing country?', ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE, (2019)
DOI 10.1111/acfi.12560
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mdlutfur Rahman, Asit Bhatta
2019 Aman H, Beekes W, Berkman H, Bohmann M, Bradbury M, Chapple L, et al., 'Responsible science: Celebrating the 50-year legacy of Ball and Brown (1968) using a registration-based framework', PACIFIC-BASIN FINANCE JOURNAL, 56 129-150 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.pacfin.2019.05.002
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2018 He LY, Wright S, Evans E, 'Is fair value information relevant to investment decision-making: Evidence from the Australian agricultural sector?', Australian Journal of Management, 43 555-574 (2018) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2018. Despite major accounting standards boards worldwide continuing to use fair value extensively, academic evidence on the relevance of fair value accounting has... [more]

© The Author(s) 2018. Despite major accounting standards boards worldwide continuing to use fair value extensively, academic evidence on the relevance of fair value accounting has focused on financial assets. This study breaks new ground to provide the first empirical evidence for the agricultural sector on the relevance of fair value accounting. It examines the forecasting power of the fair value of biological assets for future operating cash flows. Using all agribusinesses listed in Australia, where fair value accounting was first implemented in the agricultural sector, we find that fair value of biological assets does not provide incremental forecasting power for future operating cash flows, whether market-determined prices or managerially estimated value is used. The findings of this study provide empirical support for the call by Elad and Herbohn in 2011 for the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) to revisit the implementation of fair value accounting in the agricultural sector. JEL Classification: G14, G38, M41, Q18

DOI 10.1177/0312896218765236
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2018 Benson K, Chang M, Gray P, Wright S, 'The enduring and evolving influence of Ball and Brown (1968)', Australian Journal of Management, 44 153-159 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0312896218813288
2018 Chen X, Wright S, Wu H, 'Exploration intensity, analysts' private information development and their forecast performance', ACCOUNTING AND BUSINESS RESEARCH, 48 77-107 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/00014788.2016.1204216
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2018 Wright S, Sheedy E, Magee S, 'International compliance with new Basel Accord principles for risk governance', ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE, 58 279-311 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/acfi.12213
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2017 Handley KL, Wright S, Evans E, 'SME reporting in Australia: Where to now for decision-­-usefulness?', Australian Accounting Review, (2017)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Karen Handley
2017 Adrian C, Wright S, Kilgore A, 'Adaptive conjoint analysis: A new approach to defining corporate governance', CORPORATE GOVERNANCE-AN INTERNATIONAL REVIEW, 25 428-439 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/corg.12169
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2016 Beaumont S, Ratiu R, Reeb D, Boyle G, Brown P, Szimayer A, et al., 'Comments on Shan and Walter: "Towards a Set of Design Principles for Executive Compensation Contracts'', ABACUS-A JOURNAL OF ACCOUNTING FINANCE AND BUSINESS STUDIES, 52 685-771 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/abac.12091
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2016 Cummings JR, Wright S, 'Effect of Higher Capital Requirements on the Funding Costs of Australian Banks', AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC REVIEW, 49 44-53 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1467-8462.12138
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2015 Dyball MC, Wang AF, Wright S, '(Dis)engaging with sustainability: evidence from an Australian business faculty', ACCOUNTING AUDITING & ACCOUNTABILITY JOURNAL, 28 69-101 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1108/AAAJ-05-2014-1692
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2014 Choi KW, Chen X, Wright S, Wu H, 'Analysts' Forecasts Following Forced CEO Changes', ABACUS-A JOURNAL OF ACCOUNTING FINANCE AND BUSINESS STUDIES, 50 146-173 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/abac.12026
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Chugh S, Fargher N, Wright S, 'Cross-listing as a Global Depository Receipt: The influence of emerging markets, regulation, and accounting regime', Journal of Contemporary Accounting and Economics, 10 262-276 (2014)

© 2014. This paper examines factors influencing international firms' decisions to cross-list as Global Depository Receipts (GDRs). We focus on differences in regulatory and a... [more]

© 2014. This paper examines factors influencing international firms' decisions to cross-list as Global Depository Receipts (GDRs). We focus on differences in regulatory and accounting requirements between exchanges and the economic clustering that has arisen with increasing globalization. An important economic influence on this decision is the home country, reflecting trade ties. Higher US regulation and governance requirements influence firms from emerging markets to issue GDRs rather than ADRs on a US exchange. Using local GAAP or IFRS also tends to deter firms from listing as an ADR, suggesting that the cost of US GAAP reconciliation is an important consideration in the decision to list as a GDR or an ADR.

DOI 10.1016/j.jcae.2014.10.004
2013 Tweedie D, Dyball MC, Hazelton J, Wright S, 'Teaching Global Ethical Standards: A Case and Strategy for Broadening the Accounting Ethics Curriculum', JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS, 115 1-15 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10551-012-1364-9
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 20
2013 Adrian C, Wright S, Kilgore A, 'Good corporate governance: What matters most to directors?', JASSA, 2013 17-21 (2013)

Over the past decade, corporate governance codes have been strengthened in many countries in response to large and high-profile corporate collapses. This paper examines directors&... [more]

Over the past decade, corporate governance codes have been strengthened in many countries in response to large and high-profile corporate collapses. This paper examines directors' views on the relative importance of corporate governance mechanisms or attributes. The results of this study provide feedback to regulators which may help to inform any potential future amendments of corporate governance codes in Australia.

Citations Scopus - 2
2013 Potter B, Ravlic T, Wright S, 'Developing Accounting Regulations that Reflect Public Viewpoints: The Australian Solution to Differential Reporting', AUSTRALIAN ACCOUNTING REVIEW, 23 18-28 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/auar.12000
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2012 Wright S, Dyball MC, Byers P, Radich R, 'Preparing students for an international career: The case for contextualizing and integrating ethics education', Asian Social Science, 8 97-108 (2012)

A key aim of IFAC (International Federation of Accountants)'s International Education Standard 4 (IES4) is to raise the ethical awareness of candidates preparing for careers ... [more]

A key aim of IFAC (International Federation of Accountants)'s International Education Standard 4 (IES4) is to raise the ethical awareness of candidates preparing for careers as accounting professionals. This paper reports the results of a survey of undergraduate accounting students at an Australian university, and develops an approach for the implementation of IES4 in business schools with culturally diverse student populations. The survey asks students at different stages of their programs about the contribution of tertiary education to their ethical ideas, drawing conclusions based on their culture, year of study, career intentions, age and gender. It then suggests ways of teaching ethics that value and integrate students' diverse experiences and cultural backgrounds, as well as their existing knowledge. Such initiatives could expand the horizons of students from all cultural backgrounds by increasing their cultural sensitivity and awareness of ethics as an issue of relevance to their professional careers.

DOI 10.5539/ass.v8n14p97
Citations Scopus - 2
2011 Kang WS, Kilgore A, Wright S, 'The effectiveness of audit committees for low- and mid-cap firms', Managerial Auditing Journal, 26 623-650 (2011)

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of recommendations made by the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) relating to audit committees in Australia, an... [more]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of recommendations made by the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) relating to audit committees in Australia, and whether they have improved financial reporting quality for low- and mid-cap listed firms. Design/methodology/approach: The authors examine the relation between characteristics of the audit committee and financial reporting quality for listed companies not mandated to comply with these requirements, i.e. low- and mid-cap firms. For a sample of 288 firms, the authors regress measures of audit committee independence, expertise and activity and size on alternative measures of earnings management. Findings: A significant association is found between all three characteristics and lower earnings management. The significant measure for independence is the proportion of independent directors on the audit committee; for expertise, it is that at least one member of the audit committee has an accounting qualification; and for activity and size, it is the frequency of audit committee meetings. Practical implications: The results provide support for the mandatory establishment of audit committees for the top 500 (high- and mid-cap) firms introduced by the ASX and suggest those audit committee characteristics which could improve financial reporting quality for low- and mid-cap firms. Originality/value: The paper examines low- and mid-cap firms in order to complement previous similar studies done for high-cap firms. It identifies the effects on financial reporting quality of voluntarily choosing to have an audit committee and of the choice of audit committee characteristics, in the period after substantial corporate governance reform. It includes a new measure among audit committee characteristics, industry expertise, which is required in Australia and is new to the literature. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/02686901111151341
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 1
2011 Wright S, Byers P, Dyball M, Hazelton J, Radich R, 'Engaging staff in curriculum change: Reflections from an accounting ethics initiative', Asian Social Science, 7 93-99 (2011)

This paper identifies the challenges associated with engaging staff in curriculum change, using the context of systematic inclusion of ethics in the accounting curriculum of a maj... [more]

This paper identifies the challenges associated with engaging staff in curriculum change, using the context of systematic inclusion of ethics in the accounting curriculum of a major Australian metropolitan university, and offers some suggestions as to how these challenges might be overcome. We characterize the inclusion of ethics in the accounting curriculum as 'pluri-disciplinary' following the typology of Davies and Devlin (2007) and draw on 22 interviews with accounting academics to examine curriculum change in a pluri-disciplinary context. We find that key staff concerns are the impact on broader accounting discourse, assignment of teaching responsibilities, curriculum content, and identification of who is ultimately responsible for the curriculum change. The responses indicate that staff would like to be equipped to confidently deliver ethics content and to have material relevant to a technically-focused student cohort. One means of achieving this might be to involve ethics experts in developing and delivering foundational material early in the curriculum and having accounting staff teach applications of this material in the latter stages. Our observations might also be of interest to those seeking to embed other 'soft' skills (such as communication, critical thinking and sustainability) within a technical curriculum.

DOI 10.5539/ass.v7n11p93
Citations Scopus - 2
2010 Cheung E, Evans E, Wright S, 'An historical review of quality in financial reporting in Australia', PACIFIC ACCOUNTING REVIEW, 22 147-+ (2010)
DOI 10.1108/01140581011074520
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 4
2010 Wu H, Fargher N, Wright S, 'Accounting for investments and the relevance of losses to firm value', International Journal of Accounting, 45 104-127 (2010)

Recent research has documented investment in research and development as a key driver of the market value of currently unprofitable firms (hereafter loss firms) in a knowledge-bas... [more]

Recent research has documented investment in research and development as a key driver of the market value of currently unprofitable firms (hereafter loss firms) in a knowledge-based economy. We broaden this argument to consider the influence of accounting for investments in general on the relation between current profitability and firm value for loss firms. Specifically, in the context of a resource-based economy, we find that exploration costs, cash flow measures of investment, and research and development costs help to explain the value of loss firms and reduce the negative relation between current profitability and firm value. © 2010.

DOI 10.1016/j.intacc.2010.01.005
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 2
2009 Lau J, Sinnadurai P, Wright S, 'Corporate governance and chief executive officer dismissal following poor performance: Australian evidence', ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE, 49 161-182 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-629X.2008.00278.x
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
2009 Chen R, Dyball MC, Wright S, 'The Link Between Board Composition and Corporate Diversification in Australian Corporations', CORPORATE GOVERNANCE-AN INTERNATIONAL REVIEW, 17 208-223 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8683.2009.00734.x
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 40
2009 He L, Wright S, Evans E, Crowe S, 'What makes a board independent? Australian evidence', Accounting Research Journal, 22 144-166 (2009)

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to determine what aspects of board independence, in terms of board structure and characteristics of non-executive directors (NEDs), are asso... [more]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to determine what aspects of board independence, in terms of board structure and characteristics of non-executive directors (NEDs), are associated with effective monitoring of management, as evidenced through lower levels of earnings management. Design/methodology/ approach - This paper examines the effectiveness of board independence requirements under the 2003 Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) Principles of Good Corporate Governance and Best Practice Recommendations (POGCG) for a sample of 231 firms listed on the ASX in the financial year 2005. The associations of board composition, share ownership and compensation of NEDs with the level of earnings management are estimated. To explore the characteristics of NEDs that are important for effective monitoring, NEDs are separated into "grey" (affiliated) directors and independent directors and compensation is separated into variable and fixed components. Findings - The results of the paper indicate a positive relation between earnings management and share ownership of NEDs, particularly that of grey directors. There is a negative relation between NED compensation and the level of earnings management, particularly the fixed compensation component for independent directors. Practical implications - This paper is important to shareholders, academics and policy makers because it shows the type of remuneration and ownership levels for NEDs that are consistent with good corporate governance. NEDs are more effective monitors when independent directors are compensated more as a fixed amount that is not related to the firm's performance. The compensation of grey directors is not associated with the level of earnings management. On the other hand, NEDs are less effective monitors as share ownership by grey directors increases. The share ownership of independent directors is not associated with the level of earnings management. To ensure the independence of the board and enhance its ability and incentives to effectively monitor management, the paper recommends that remuneration of NEDs should be a fixed amount, and the share ownership of NEDs should be limited. Originality/value - The findings provide guidance as to the meaning of board independence, in terms of the payments and returns that NEDs receive from a company. The results provide support for recommendation 2.1 in the ASX's POGCG that requires the majority of the board to be independent directors. The paper highlights the need for boards to be careful when choosing and rewarding NEDs. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/10309610910987493
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 2
2008 Lau B, Proimos A, Wright S, 'Accounting measures of operating performance outcomes for Australian mergers', Journal of Applied Accounting Research, 9 168-180 (2008)

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyse success at the corporate level for 72 Australian mergers between publicly listed firms during the period 1999-2004, and to reassess... [more]

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyse success at the corporate level for 72 Australian mergers between publicly listed firms during the period 1999-2004, and to reassess evidence in earlier Australian studies that contrasts findings from other countries which report a decline in post-merger operating performance. Design/methodology/approach A number of accounting operating performance measures for profitability, cash flow, efficiency, leverage and growth are used to proxy for the success of the merger, which is defined in terms of an improvement in each merged firm's industry-adjusted operating performance between the pre and post-merger period. Both non-parametric and parametric comparisons of these measures are presented. Findings Some evidence that mergers improve the operating performance of the post-merger firm is found. Industry adjusted profitability, cash flows, efficiency and leverage measures were higher in the post-merger period. Research limitations/implications The findings of this study are limited by the small sample size, the focus on listed firms, and the use of only operating financial measures of merger success. Future research could examine more mergers over a longer time period, use alternative methods of performance benchmarking, and use alternative measures of merger success, such as share price performance. Originality/value Australian mergers led to improved corporate performance during the period 1999-2004. This result is consistent with findings in other countries but has not been found in prior Australian research. © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

DOI 10.1108/09675420810919720
Citations Scopus - 8
2008 Cheung E, Evans E, Wright S, 'The adoption of IFRS in Australia: The case of AASB 138 (IAS 38) intangible assets', AUSTRALIAN ACCOUNTING REVIEW, 18 248-256 (2008)
DOI 10.1111/j.1835-2561.2008.0029.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2005 Proimos A, Wright S, 'A pilot study of venture capital investment appraisal in Australia', JOURNAL OF FINANCIAL SERVICES MARKETING, 9 272-286 (2005)
DOI 10.1057/palgrave.fsm.4770159
Citations Web of Science - 4
2004 Wright S, Hobbes G, 'The non-linearity of the returns/earnings association', Accounting Research Journal, 17 156-163 (2004)
1998 Magennis D, Watts E, Wright S, 'Convertible notes: The debt versus equity classification problem', Journal of Multinational Financial Management, 8 303-315 (1998)

This paper tests the Kim (Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, 25 (2) (1990) 229-243) 'Informative Conversion Ratios' hypothesis. The Kim theory predicts that... [more]

This paper tests the Kim (Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, 25 (2) (1990) 229-243) 'Informative Conversion Ratios' hypothesis. The Kim theory predicts that the conversion price of a convertible note issue will determine whether the issue is similar to debt or similar to equity. A convertible note with a low conversion price is similar to equity under the Kim theory whilst a convertible note with a high conversion price is similar to debt. Expected time to at-the-money was used throughout this paper as an adjusted conversion price. Observation of a strong positive relation between announcement period abnormal returns and expected time to at-the-money for a sample of Australian convertible note issue announcements supports the Kim theory.

DOI 10.1016/s1042-444x(98)00033-4
Citations Scopus - 9
1994 Wright S, 'Minority Ethnic Groups and Higher Education in Britain: Questions of Access and Equity', Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research, 7 413-421 (1994)

The role of higher education in Britain is in transition as the system expands to educate an ever-growing proportion of the nation's eighteen-year-olds. In the past it could ... [more]

The role of higher education in Britain is in transition as the system expands to educate an ever-growing proportion of the nation's eighteen-year-olds. In the past it could have been argued that one of its mainfunctions was to reproduce the class which would direct the country in the political, Judicial, industrial ¿, commercial and educational spheres. Now, succesful completion of a first degree will be unlikely in itself to guarantee access to the ruling elites. This paper considers questions of access and equity within British higher education, andfocuses, inparticular, on howyoungpeoplefrom the minority groups constituted by recent immigration to Britain fare within the system. © 1994, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1080/13511610.1994.9968421
1989 WRIGHT SJ, 'THE FUTURE OF THE MARKET FOR MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES IN AUSTRALIA', Economic Papers: A journal of applied economics and policy, 8 12-25 (1989)
DOI 10.1111/j.1759-3441.1989.tb01054.x
Show 35 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Handley K, Wright S, Ross-Smith A, 'A comparison of the profiles of new male and female directors: An Australian case study', A comparison of the profiles of new male and female directors: An Australian case study, Melbourne, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Karen Handley
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 8
Total funding $188,239

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $5,000

“The impacts of mandated CSR expenditure and financial inclusion on banking performance” $5,000

Funding body: AFAANZ

Funding body AFAANZ
Project Team

A. Bhattacharyya and S. Wright

Scheme AFAANZ
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20153 grants / $63,142

“University Level Financial Literacy Education Interventions: Downstream Effects and a Comparison of Face-to-Face and Online Delivery Outcomes”$38,000

Funding body: Financial Literacy Australia

Funding body Financial Literacy Australia
Project Team

Wright S., Gerrans P. and Ooi E.

Scheme Financial Literacy Australia
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

“Determining viable thresholds for SME reporting in Australia”$20,592

Funding body: Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand (CAANZ)

Funding body Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand (CAANZ)
Project Team

Wright, S., Handley, K. and Evans, E.

Scheme Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand (CAANZ)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

“Asymmetric Timeliness in Operating Cash Flows in Australia” $4,550

Funding body: AFAANZ

Funding body AFAANZ
Project Team

Sue Wright, Meiting Lu and Yaowen Shan

Scheme AFAANZ
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20142 grants / $74,965

“Bank Regulatory Requirements Project” $55,000

Funding body: ANZ Bank

Funding body ANZ Bank
Project Team

Wright S., Jameson K. and Cummings J.

Scheme ANZ Bank
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

“The Viability of North Ryde Community Bank”$19,965

Funding body: North Ryde Community Bank

Funding body North Ryde Community Bank
Project Team

Wright S.

Scheme Macquarie-Ryde Futures Partnership Local Research Grant 2014
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20132 grants / $45,132

“The Effects of the Basel Accord capital requirements on the loan-loss provisioning practices of Australian banks”$26,132

Funding body: CIFR

Funding body CIFR
Project Team

Cummings J and Wright S.

Scheme CIFR
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

2013 Learning and Teaching Grant $19,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team

Wright S.

Scheme AFIN252 – Applied Financial Analysis and Management
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD The Effect of Executive Pay Incentives on Firm Outcomes PhD (Accounting & Finance), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Remuneration Committee Characteristics and CEO compensation in Australia PhD (Accounting & Finance), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD How to detect frauds and accounting irregularities, and how to improve the accuracy of detection techniques. Accounting, Australian National University Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 Professional Doctorate TBA Accounting, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2019 Professional Doctorate TBA Accounting, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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Conjoint Professor Sue Wright

Position

Conjoint Professor
Newcastle Business School
College of Human and Social Futures

Contact Details

Email sue.wright@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Building NeW Space
Location City Campus

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