Dr Stina Oftedal

Dr Stina Oftedal

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Stina Oftedal is a dietitian and an early career researcher with the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Stina completed her PhD at the University of Queensland in 2016, investigating the influence of diet and physical activity on the growth and body composition of children with cerebral palsy.

Since joining the University of Newcastle in 2017, Stina's research has focused on the joint effects of physical activity, sleep and diet on physical and mental health.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Health Science (Nutrition & Dietetics), Queensland Institute of Technology

Keywords

  • Diet quality
  • Physical activity
  • Sleep

Languages

  • Norwegian (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
420201 Behavioural epidemiology 30
420603 Health promotion 40
420605 Preventative health care 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (23 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Hutchesson MJ, Duncan MJ, Oftedal S, Ashton LM, Oldmeadow C, Kay-Lambkin F, Whatnall MC, 'Latent Class Analysis of Multiple Health Risk Behaviors among Australian University Students and Associations with Psychological Distress', NUTRIENTS, 13 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu13020425
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Mitch Duncan, Megan Whatnall, Christopher Oldmeadow, Lee Ashton, Frances Kaylambkin
2021 Oftedal S, Rayward AT, Fenton S, Duncan MJ, 'Sleep, diet, activity, and incident poor self-rated health: A population-based cohort study.', Health Psychol, 40 252-262 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1037/hea0001066
Co-authors Anna Rayward, Mitch Duncan
2021 DUNCAN MJ, HOLLIDAY EG, OFTEDAL S, BUMAN M, BROWN WJ, 'Joint association of physical activity and sleep difficulties with the incidence of hypertension in mid-age Australian women', Maturitas, 149 1-7 (2021) [C1]

Introduction: Little is known about the joint effects of physical activity and sleep difficulties on hypertension. The aim of this study was to examine the joint associations of p... [more]

Introduction: Little is known about the joint effects of physical activity and sleep difficulties on hypertension. The aim of this study was to examine the joint associations of physical activity and sleep difficulties with the incidence of hypertension in mid-aged women. Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Main Outcome Measures: Mid-aged participants (n = 5,300) in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health completed four triennial surveys starting in 2004, when they had a mean age of 55 years. The presence of hypertension, physical activity and the number of sleep difficulties (range 0-4) were reported at each survey. Total MET.min/week of physical activity was assessed, and dichotomised as inactive (<500 MET.min/wk) or active (=500 MET.min/wk). Joint categories of physical activity and sleep difficulties were created using six mutually exclusive groups. Associations of joint physical activity and sleep difficulty groups with incident hypertension were examined via discrete-time survival analysis using logit-hazard models. Results: There were 1,175 cases of incident hypertension (22.2%). Compared with the Active and No Difficulties group, women in the Inactive and 1 Difficulty (Odds Ratio (95% confidence interval) (1.31 (1.06, 1.62)) and Inactive and 2-4 Difficulties (1.44 (1.16, 1.78)) groups were more likely to develop hypertension. Sleep difficulties were not associated with hypertension among active women. Conclusions: Mid-aged inactive women with sleep difficulties were more likely to develop hypertension. Physical activity appeared to protect against the increased risk of hypertension in women with sleeping difficulties.

DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2021.04.006
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Mitch Duncan
2021 Oftedal S, Aguiar EJ, Duncan MJ, 'Associations between multiple positive health behaviors and cardiometabolic risk using 3 alternative measures of physical activity: NHANES 2005-2006.', Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme, 46 617-625 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1139/apnm-2020-0588
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2020 Oftedal S, Glozier N, Holliday EG, Duncan MJ, 'Diet quality and depressive symptoms. Assessing the direction of the association in a population-based cohort study', Journal of Affective Disorders, 274 347-353 (2020) [C1]

Background: Emerging evidence links a poor diet with mental ill-health although the direction of this association is unclear. The aim was to examine the bidirectional prospective ... [more]

Background: Emerging evidence links a poor diet with mental ill-health although the direction of this association is unclear. The aim was to examine the bidirectional prospective relationships between core (and non-core food consumption, and symptoms of depression. Methods: Depressive symptoms (Mental Health Index-5, MHI-5), current/prior depression and consumption of core (recommended food groups) and non-core (discretionary) foods were assessed in the population-based 2013 and 2017 Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia cohort study. Three cross-lagged linear models assessed associations between all three baseline variables in 2013, alternating 2017 variables as outcomes. Results: In the population (n = 10,003; 48.3% women; 48.5[15.7] years), core food score in 2013 was associated with MHI-5 (ß:0.102, 95%CI: 0.010,0.193) in 2017, while the non-core food score was not (ß:-0.030, 95%CI:-0.099,0.160). Depressive symptom score in 2013 was not associated with either food score in 2017. Current/prior diagnosis of depression in 2013 was associated with core (ß:-0.198, 95%CI:-0.329,-0.067) but not non-core (ß:-0.036, 95%CI: -0.151,0.080) food score in 2017. Limitations: Results may not be generalizable to the whole population due to some selection bias, self-report depression diagnosis may have led to misclassification of previous mental illness, and core and non-core food scores are not validated measures of diet quality. Conclusions: There is a prospective association between core food consumption and depressive symptoms. This association is of small magnitude and we cannot discount insufficient core food consumption reflecting an effect of prior mental illness. Our results suggest that, for depression, public health focus should be on improving core food intake.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2020.05.046
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Liz Holliday
2020 Oftedal S, Holliday EG, Attia J, Brown WJ, Collins CE, Ewald B, et al., 'Daily steps and diet, but not sleep, are related to mortality in older Australians', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 23 276-282 (2020) [C1]

Objectives: Supporting healthy ageing is a key priority worldwide. Physical activity, diet quality and sleep are all associated with health outcomes, but few studies have explored... [more]

Objectives: Supporting healthy ageing is a key priority worldwide. Physical activity, diet quality and sleep are all associated with health outcomes, but few studies have explored their independent associations with all-cause mortality in an older population in the same model. The study aim was to examine associations between step-count, self-reported diet quality, restless sleep, and all-cause mortality in adults aged 55¿85 years. Design: A prospective cohort study of adults in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Method: Data were from 1697 participants (49.3% women; baseline mean age 65.4 ± 7.1 years). Daily steps (measured by pedometer), diet quality (from a modified Australian Recommended Food Score), and frequency of restless sleep (by self-report) were assessed in relation to all-cause mortality using Cox proportional hazard regression with adjustment for sex, age, household income and smoking. Baseline data were collected between January 2005 and April 2008, and last follow-up was in March 2017 (median follow-up 9.6 years). Results: Higher step count (HR: 0.93, 95%CI: 0.88¿0.98 per 1000-step increment) and higher diet quality (HR: 0.86, 95%CI: 0.74¿0.99 per 8-point increment in diet quality score) were associated with reduced mortality risk. Restless sleep for =3 nights/week was not associated with mortality risk (HR: 1.03, 95%CI: 0.78¿1.39). Sensitivity analyses, adjusting for chronic disease and excluding deaths <1 year after baseline, did not change these estimates. Conclusions: Increased daily steps and consumption of a greater variety of nutrient-dense foods every week would result in substantial health benefits for older people. Future research should include a greater variety of sleep measures.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.09.018
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Mitch Duncan, Ben Ewald, Ron Plotnikoff, John Attia, Liz Holliday
2020 Duncan MJ, Oftedal S, Rebar AL, Murawski B, Short CE, Rayward AT, Vandelanotte C, 'Patterns of physical activity, sitting time, and sleep in Australian adults: A latent class analysis', Sleep Health, 6 828-834 (2020) [C1]

Objective: To identify the patterns of activity, sitting and sleep that adults engage in, the demographic and biological correlates of activity-sleep patterns and the relationship... [more]

Objective: To identify the patterns of activity, sitting and sleep that adults engage in, the demographic and biological correlates of activity-sleep patterns and the relationship between identified patterns and self-rated health. Design and Setting: Online panel of randomly selected Australian adults (n = 2034) completing a cross-sectional survey in October-November 2013. Participants: Panel members who provided complete data on all variables were included (n = 1532). Measurements: Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, height, weight, self-rated health, duration of physical activity, frequency of resistance training, sitting time, sleep duration, sleep quality, and variability in bed and wake times. Activity-sleep patterns were determined using latent class analysis. Latent class regression was used to examine the relationships between identified patterns, demographic and biological characteristics, and self-rated health. Results: A 4-class model fit the data best, characterized by very active good sleepers, inactive good sleepers, inactive poor sleepers, moderately active good sleepers, representing 38.2%, 22.2%, 21.2%, and 18.4% of the sample, respectively. Relative to the very active good sleepers, the inactive poor sleepers, and inactive good sleepers were more likely to report being female, lower education, higher body mass index, and lower self-rated health, the moderately active good sleepers were more likely to be older, report lower education, higher body mass index and lower self-rated health. Associations between activity-sleep pattern and self-rated health were the largest in the inactive poor sleepers. Conclusions: The 4 activity-sleep patterns identified had distinct behavioral profiles, sociodemographic correlates, and relationships with self-rated health. Many adults could benefit from behavioral interventions targeting improvements in physical activity and sleep.

DOI 10.1016/j.sleh.2020.04.006
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Anna Rayward
2019 Oftedal S, Kolt GS, Holliday EG, Stamatakis E, Vandelanotte C, Brown WJ, Duncan MJ, 'Associations of health-behavior patterns, mental health and self-rated health', Preventive Medicine, 118 295-303 (2019) [C1]

Diet quality, physical activity, alcohol use, smoking, sleep and sitting-time are behaviors known to influence health. The aims of this study were to identify how these behaviors ... [more]

Diet quality, physical activity, alcohol use, smoking, sleep and sitting-time are behaviors known to influence health. The aims of this study were to identify how these behaviors co-occur to form distinct health-behavior patterns, and to investigate the relationship between these patterns, and mental and self-rated health. Members of the Australian 10,000 Steps project were invited to participate in an online survey in November¿December 2011. The participants self-reported demographic and behavioral characteristics (fruit and vegetable intake, fast food, soft drink and alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, sitting-time and sleep), frequency of mental distress and self-rated health. Latent Class Analysis was used to identify health-behavior patterns. Latent class regression was used to examine relationships between behavior patterns, mental and self-rated health, and socio-demographic and economic factors. Data were analyzed in October 2017. Complete datasets were obtained from 10,638 participants. Four latent classes were identified, characterized by ¿Low-Risk Behavior¿, ¿Poor Sleep, Low-Risk Daytime Behavior¿, 'sound Sleep, High-Risk Daytime Behavior¿ and ¿High-Risk Behavior¿. The latter two classes, both characterized by high-risk daytime behaviors, were associated with poor self-rated health. Participants in classes with high-risk daytime behaviors were more likely to be younger, non-partnered, non-university educated, from lower income households and work longer hours. Classes characterized by poor sleep quality were associated with higher frequency of mental distress. Findings suggest that experiencing poor sleep is partly independent of daytime behaviors, demographic and socioeconomic factors, but has a strong association with mental health.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.11.017
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Mitch Duncan
2019 Oftedal S, Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, 'Patterns of Diet, Physical Activity, Sitting and Sleep Are Associated with Socio-Demographic, Behavioural, and Health-Risk Indicators in Adults', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16132375
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2019 Oftedal S, Burrows T, Fenton S, Murawski B, Rayward AB, Duncan MJ, 'Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of an m-Health Intervention Targeting Physical Activity, Diet, and Sleep Quality in Shift-Workers', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16203810
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Mitch Duncan, Anna Rayward
2019 Oftedal S, Smith J, Vandelanotte C, Burton NW, Duncan MJ, 'Resistance training in addition to aerobic activity is associated with lower likelihood of depression and comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms: A cross sectional analysis of Australian women', Preventive Medicine, 126 1-8 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105773
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jordan Smith, Mitch Duncan
2018 Keawutan P, Bell KL, Oftedal S, Davies PSW, Ware RS, Boyd RN, 'Relationship between habitual physical activity, motor capacity, and capability in children with cerebral palsy aged 4-5 years across all functional abilities', DISABILITY AND HEALTH JOURNAL, 11 632-636 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.dhjo.2018.03.006
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2018 Keawutan P, Bell KL, Oftedal S, Davies PSW, Ware RS, Boyd RN, 'Quality of life and habitual physical activity in children with cerebral palsy aged 5 years: A cross-sectional study', RESEARCH IN DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, 74 139-145 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.ridd.2018.01.008
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2017 Oftedal S, Davies PSW, Boyd RN, Stevenson RD, Ware RS, Keawutan P, et al., 'Body composition, diet, and physical activity: a longitudinal cohort study in preschoolers with cerebral palsy', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, 105 369-378 (2017)
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.116.137810
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
2017 Keawutan P, Bell KL, Oftedal S, Ware RS, Stevenson RD, Davies PSW, Boyd RN, 'Longitudinal physical activity and sedentary behaviour in preschool-aged children with cerebral palsy across all functional levels', DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE AND CHILD NEUROLOGY, 59 852-857 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dmcn.13439
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
2017 Keawutan P, Bell KL, Oftedal S, Davies PSW, Ware RS, Boyd RN, 'Habitual Physical Activity in Children With Cerebral Palsy Aged 4 to 5 Years Across All Functional Abilities', PEDIATRIC PHYSICAL THERAPY, 29 8-14 (2017)
DOI 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000327
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2016 Oftedal S, Davies PSW, Boyd RN, Stevenson RD, Ware RS, Keawutan P, et al., 'Longitudinal Growth, Diet, and Physical Activity in Young Children With Cerebral Palsy', PEDIATRICS, 138 (2016)
DOI 10.1542/peds.2016-1321
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
2016 Keawutan P, Bell KL, Oftedal S, Davies PSW, Boyd RN, 'Validation of Accelerometer Cut-Points in Children With Cerebral Palsy Aged 4 to 5 Years', PEDIATRIC PHYSICAL THERAPY, 28 427-434 (2016)
DOI 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000291
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
2015 Oftedal S, Bell KL, Davies PSW, Ware RS, Boyd RN, 'Sedentary and Active Time in Toddlers with and without Cerebral Palsy', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, 47 2076-2083 (2015)
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000653
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
2014 Oftedal S, Bell KL, Davies PSW, Ware RS, Boyd RN, 'Validation of Accelerometer Cut Points in Toddlers with and without Cerebral Palsy', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, 46 1808-1815 (2014)
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000299
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 22
2013 Mitchell LE, Ziviani J, Oftedal S, Boyd RN, 'A systematic review of the clinimetric properties of measures of habitual physical activity in primary school aged children with cerebral palsy', RESEARCH IN DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, 34 2419-2432 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.ridd.2013.04.013
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
2012 Oftedal S, Bell KL, Mitchell LE, Davies PSW, Ware RS, Boyd RN, 'A systematic review of the clinimetric properties of habitual physical activity measures in young children with a motor disability.', International journal of pediatrics, 2012 976425 (2012)
DOI 10.1155/2012/976425
2012 Mitchell L, Ziviani J, Oftedal S, Boyd R, 'The effect of virtual reality interventions on physical activity in children and adolescents with early brain injuries including cerebral palsy', DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE AND CHILD NEUROLOGY, 54 667-671 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2011.04199.x
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 40
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Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Oftedal S, Duncan M, Holliday E, Brown W, Collins C, Ewald B, et al., 'Daily steps and diet quality, but not sleep, are related to mortality in older Australians', Daily steps and diet quality, but not sleep, are related to mortality in older Australians, Novotel Twin Waters (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.08.244
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Mitch Duncan, Liz Holliday
2019 Oftedal S, Duncan M, Smith J, Vandelanotte C, Burton N, 'Resistance training plus aerobic activity associated with lower likelihood of depression and comorbid depression and anxiety in Australian women', Resistance training plus aerobic activity associated with lower likelihood of depression and comorbid depression and anxiety in Australian women, Novotel Twin Waters (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.08.215
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Jordan Smith
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Understanding and Enhancing Activity, Diet and Sleep Behaviours in Shift-Workers PhD (Medicine), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Stina Oftedal

Position

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email stina.oftedal@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room ATC 316
Building ATC
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