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Dr Steven Threadgold

Senior Lecturer

School of Humanities and Social Science (Sociology and Anthropology)

The kids are alright

Steven Threadgold is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology, in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at University of Newcastle.

Worried that the youth of today are taking us all to hell in a hand basket? You can relax, says Dr Steven Threadgold, a youth sociologist with a focus on class, inequality, and culture.

Spoiled by overly busy parents and allergic to saving money or hard work, young people are apparently more interested in scoffing overpriced brunches in bespoke eateries than future planning.

At least that’s what the media tells us.

Unlike many who espouse vehement opinions on young people, Steven is interested in challenging these moral panics with research about their actual lives.

He does so by working directly with young people to learn how class affects their opportunities, attitudes and cultural activities.

Since completing his PhD in 2009, Steven has attracted global attention for his work in youth sociology.

Along with fellow Newcastle researcher and renowned youth sociologist, Professor Pam Nilan, Dr Threadgold co-convenes the Newcastle Youth Studies Group.

Previously Academic Editor of Youth Studies Australia, and Head of Sociology and Anthropology at UON, he is now on the executive board of the Journal of Youth Studies.

Youth, class and everyday struggles

His research monograph Youth, Class, And Everyday Struggles (Routledge, 2017) draws on ideas of affective economies, reflexivity and the work of Pierre Bourdieu.

Despite media and even some youth researcher’s efforts to describe young people as passive dupes, Steven’s work argues young people are actually in a constant reflexive struggle to respond to circumstances not always of their own making.

“My approach recognises that young people's lives can be shaped by economic forces and by classed symbolic and moral boundaries,” Steven says.

In the book, Steven uses the work of Bourdieu to critically examine specific transitions and cultural phenomena in two case studies.

One case study dissects the proclivity of the media and comedy to invoke the labels ‘hipster’ and ‘bogan’ to implicitly delineate class, without ever mentioning class.

The other draws on Steven’s study of young DIY punks and creatives across Australia.

Quite often opting out of the ‘normal’ trajectory of leaving school, doing more study and embarking on a ‘career’, these young people choose a life of voluntary poverty for the sake of artistic passions and ethical concerns, all the while navigating the insecurity this situation creates.

Recently collaborating with UON colleagues Professor Lisa Adkins and Dr Caragh Brosnan, Steven co-edited a collection of works that consider the ongoing relevance of Bourdieu's social theory for contemporary social science.

Bourdieusian Prospects (Routledge, 2017) brings established and emergent scholars together to debate the futures of a specifically Bourdieusian sociology.

Affective labour

With UON colleagues Professor Lisa Adkins, Dr Julia Coffey and Dr David Farrugia, Steven is also working on a project that looks at young people, precarity, and affective labour.

Through a study of 'front of house' service labour in Melbourne and Newcastle, the team aim to illuminate the challenges young people face in an ever increasingly transient and exploitative labour market.

“A huge amount of young people work in the service industry and so we are interviewing young people who work in bars, to understand the demands on them,” Steven says.

“We are looking at the concepts of affective and immaterial labour, which are theories about how capitalism isn't just about extracting the value out of your work, it is actually extracting the value out of your very subjectivity, extracting value from who you are.”

Steven notes they will also be investigating adaptive mechanisms chosen by young people to retain autonomy in this area of their lives.

“They feel very at home in that bar and that creates a vibe which attracts the actual customers that are like that person,” he says.

“And that's a key part of how that bar scene works. There is a whole lot of pleasure involved in this work as well, along with the basic exploitation.”

Struggles and strategies

Steven is collaborating with Professor Penny Jane Burke, Director of UON’s Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education and Global Innovation Chair of Equity, on the Struggle and Strategy project.

This project focusses on transitions from higher education to the labour market as a site of struggle, using qualitative interviews to better understand strategies young people take up to navigate from education to work.

Online distinction

Steven is also working on a project centered around class, consumerism and the internet.

He admits to being fascinated by niche areas on the internet where “laughing down is a thing.”

“There are various websites that attract certain like-minded people, and I am interested in looking at the way these things work as affective economies.”

“People critique the consumption of others, most often people who are not like them. It’s a kind of organised disgust based on morals and values, but is always done through a class lens,” he explains.

“I want to look at why people are attracted to that, and why they do it? How does it make them feel and what do they get out of it?”

Moving forward

Steven has had a fair amount of lived experience when it comes to the casualisation of the workforce and exploitation of young people within the labour market.

“I did an electrical apprenticeship then had about 27 jobs. Then I played cricket here and overseas, before I came to university to try to become a music journalist,” Steven recalls.

“I soon realized that I liked sociology, did Honours, got offered a PhD scholarship, and never left.”

Asked about his future direction, Steven says he is committed to his path as a youth sociologist.

“What I would ultimately like to do is to introduce to youth studies the idea of struggle as a way of thinking about young people's everyday lives in ways that renders them as aware and autonomous in their own situations, while recognizing the role class plays in those struggles and strategies,” Steven says.

“Class is always going to be important, particularly as inequality is getting worse.”

Steven Threadgold

The kids are alright

Steven Threadgold is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology, in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at University of Newcastle.

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Career Summary

Biography

Steven Threadgold is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology, in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at University of Newcastle.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Sociology/Anthropology), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Bourdieu
  • Class
  • DIY Culture
  • Inequality
  • Popular Culture
  • Social Theory
  • Sociology
  • Youth
  • Youth Culture
  • Youth Sociology
  • Youth Transitions
  • sociology of comedy
  • sociology of taste

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
160806 Social Theory 50
160805 Social Change 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2010 -  Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Awards

Recognition

Year Award
2012 Well Regarded Lecturer Award
University of Newcastle
2011 Well Regarded Lecturer Award
University of Newcastle
2009 Research Higher Degree Publications Award
University of Newcastle
2009 Excellence Award for Teaching
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
2008 Student Forum Nomination for 'Lecturers of High Regard'
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
2003 Australian Postgraduate Award (APA)
University of Newcastle
2003 University Medal
University of Newcastle
2001 Summer Vacation Undergraduate Honours Scholarship
University of Newcastle
2001 Pro-Vice Chancellor's Award
University of Newcastle
2001 John Docker Prize for Cultural Studies
University of Newcastle
2000 Dean's Award
University of Newcastle
1999 Dean's Commendation List
University of Newcastle

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2009 Stumbling towards Collapse: Health Implications
Organisation: TASA Conference Health Day Description: Leahy, T. Threadgold, S. and Bowden, V. (2009) 'Stumbling towards Collapse: Health Implications'. Presented on TASA Conference Health Day, December 2009, Australian National University, Canberra.
2009 Should I pitch my tent in the middle ground?" A Reflexive Response to Woodman's Middling Tendency in Youth Sociology
Organisation: he Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Description: Threadgold, S. (2009) '"Should I pitch my tent in the middle ground?" A Reflexive Response to Woodman's Middling Tendency in Youth Sociology'. The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) December 2009, Australian National University, Canberra.
2008 Youth, Habitus and Perceptions of Risk
Organisation: The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Description: Threadgold, S. (2008) 'Youth, Habitus and Perceptions of Risk'. The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference December 2008, University of Melbourne, Melbourne.

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2016 Beyond the gig economy
Gave a presentation called 'DIY Creativity and Struggles in the Precarity'
2016 Public Lecture: Young people, work and the new economy: Surviving and thriving under precarious conditions
Respondent to Andy Furlong's public lecture.
2015 University of Copenhagen Sociology Seminar Series
Presented a paper in their seminar series called: The Overlooked Bourdieu: Struggles, Strategies and Gravity of Social Life
2015 Young People and the Politics of Outrage and Hope Conference
Gave a paper called 'Creativity, Precarity and Maintaining a Hopeful Future: DIY Cultures and Strategic Poverty'
2015 Thinking Globally about Crime and Justice Seminar Series
Gave a paper in their seminar series: Social Gravity and the Illusio of a Scene: A DIY Career in a DIY Music Scene?
2015 University of Auckland Sociology Seminar Series
Gave a paper in their seminar series: Making Class: Affective Figures and New Class Anxieties
2012 Youth Cultures, Belongings, Transitions: Bridging the Gap in Youth Research Conference

Invited Plenary speaker in a session called: Subcultural careers, transitions and do-it-yourself pathways to work and employment: Towards Bridging the Cultures/Transitions Gap.

My paper was called: Independent Music Scenes, DIY Careers and Forms of Capital in Newcastle.

2012 Youth Cultures, Belongings, Transitions: Bridging the Gap in Youth Research Conference

Invited Plenary participant session called: ‘Tackling the gap? What contribution can the work of Pierre Bourdieu make?.

My paper was called: Using Bourdieu in Reflexive Modernity

2012 Youth Cultures & Subcultures: Australian Perspectives Symposium
Invited speaker, co-written paper with Pam Nilan called: The Moral Economy of the Mosh Pit: Straight Edge, Reflexivity and Classification Struggles
2012 Youth Cultures & Subcultures: Australian Perspectives Symposium
Invited speaker, paper called: (Sub)Cultural Capital, DIY Careers and Transferability: Towards Maintaining ‘Reproduction’ in the Use of Bourdieu.

Thesis Examinations

Year Level Discipline Thesis
2016 Masters Social Sciences The discourse of choice and the 'missing generation'
2016 PHD Social Sciences Catastrophe and precaution outside the risk society: A study of the experience of risk in Afghanistan in 2011
2013 Honours Social Sciences Queer Punx: Young Women in the Newcastle Hardcore Music Scene
2012 Honours Social Sciences Youth and Australia Day: Constructions and Experiences of National Identity
2012 Honours Social Sciences The Formation of Classed Selves: Bogans and New Professionals
2011 Honours Social Sciences Pathways to Cosmopolitanism?’ Living Overseas and the Cosmopolitan Capital of Singaporean Students in Canberra
2010 Honours Social Sciences Epic Hunters: Adventure Climbing in Reflexive Modernity
2004 Honours Social Sciences The Foreign Policy of George W Bush’

Prestigious works

Year Commenced Year Finished Prestigious Work Role
2016 2019 Executive Board, Journal of Youth Studies Journal of Youth Studies Editor
2015 2019 International Editorial Board, Journal of Applied Youth Studies. Journal of Applied Youth Studies. Member
2013 2017 Editorial Board, Journal of Youth Studies Journal of Youth Studies Member
2012 2013 Academic Editor Youth Studies Australia Editor
2011 2013 Editorial Board, Youth Studies Australia Youth Studies Australia Member

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
CULT3240 Popular Culture and Society
University of Newcastle

This course will engage with the major theories of popular culture, media and society, as well as introduce various artistic  and theoretical practices that form the landscape of contemporary culture. We look at aspects and ideologies of popular culture that include topics such as postmodernism, feminism; identity and sexuality; net activism and new technologies; media,television and film analysis. We explore theories that examine the basic issues of popular culture; some examples include power and surveillance, gender and ethnicity, private/public spheres and censorship.

Course Coordinator, Lecturer and Tutor 5/07/2010 - 22/11/2010
CULT3210 Music and Culture
University of Newcastle

Popular music remains at the heart of everyday life in many different ways. Its ability to organise, reassure, provoke, contain or anaesthetise attests to its influence within social life. This course examines some of the key debates in popular music studies, including the significant changes in popular music consumption, with, for example, the emergence of the mobile phone and TV talent show franchises as key links between contemporary youth audiences and performers. Equally, in the age of the 'mash-up', innovation in digital technologies continues to challenge prior modes of production and viability for producers in an era of industry/company integration. While these are important issues for debate, this course also emphasises effect and affectivity: the astonishing ways in which popular music moves us to different forms of expression and feeling.

CULT 3120 assumes that popular music provides not only entertainment, but a common space for the personal, social and political experiences of youth. It will consider the cultural roles of music and musicians, and the ways in which music is interpreted and used by listeners in a variety of contexts.

Guest Lecturer 10/07/2007 - 30/11/2007
CMNS2350 Contemporary Popular Music: Cultural Production and Use
University of Newcastle

BRIEF COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course maps the social, cultural, communication and media theories applicable to the study of popular music. It also examines the debates surrounding these theoretical positions and the issues that arise from the relationship of popular music to the media such as its relationship to radio, film, television and other social and cultural institutions.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

The course is constructed to:
1. encourage students to appreciate the complexity of popular music as one of society's most ubiquitous creators and conveyors of values, beliefs and attitudes and a multi-billion dollar a year industry;
2. equip students to apply the insights of communication theories to popular music in particular, and popular cultural forms of artistic expression in general, which impact profoundly on how they construct and carry on their social and cultural lives as individuals and groups;
3. understand the functions and uses of popular music as media content, as a site of mediation for power relations and regimes of truth;
4. enhance the understanding of a particular form of media content and its relationship to the macro framework of culture and society as well as examine and analyse the issues that arise from the use of popular music.

Tutor 4/07/2005 - 25/11/2005
POLI1020 Introduction to Politics
University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/01/2006 - 22/11/2006
POLI2020/3020 FOUNDATIONS OF MODERN POLITICS
University of Newcastle
This course examines some of the most important political theories which have influenced the practice of politics in modern society. Political theorists that may be studied include Machiavelli, Locke, Marx, Mill, Bakunin, Baudrillard and Foucault. Political theories that may be studied include liberalism, social democracy, feminism, anarchism, conservatism and postmodernism. This course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the major intellectual theories and ideas which provide the foundations for contemporary politics.
Course coordinator, Lecturer and Tutor 1/01/2004 - 22/11/2004
POLI2040/3040 Democracy and the Politics of Equality
University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/01/2004 - 22/11/2004
POLI2070/3070 International Relations
University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/01/2003 - 22/11/2003
POLI2140/3140 Politics of Globalization
University of Newcastle
Guest Lecturer and Tutor 1/01/2006 - 22/11/2006
POLI2160/3160 Global Power and World Order
University of Newcastle
This course examines the institutions and processes shaping the international order and relations between states. It focuses on the development of this order, beginning with the dropping of the atomic bomb and the onset of the Cold War, and traces it through to the post-September 11 period. It discusses the role and significance of international bodies such as the United Nations, the International Criminal Court and the War Crimes Tribunals in the context of a newly emerging world order. The course also examines issues such as human rights, international justice, and the problem of terrorism in the wake of the events of September 11. It asks to what extent September 11, and its aftermath, has reshaped global power and the world order.

 

Tutor 1/01/2007 - 22/11/2007
POLI 2180/3180 POLITICS, POLICY AND GOVERNMENT
University of Newcastle
This course looks at the Australian state in a wider political context by examining the major changes it has undergone in the last twenty years. The course explores the major reforms to the public service and other government agencies by examining their changing relationship to government. A central question will be whether the public service has become overly politicised such that it is unable to offer the government independent advice. Case studies of specific policy issues in areas such as immigration, education, and defence (or any other topical policy area) will be used to trace the development of major government policy decisions and to explore problems of politicisation and accountability. Attention is also given to the emergence of new policy frameworks, especially economic rationalism, and their impact on these processes.
Tutor 1/01/2007 - 22/11/2007
SOCA3220 Youth Cultural and Risk
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Newcastle

Provides an understanding of contemporary youth cultures in relation to sociological theories of risk. It moves between examination of theoretical and empirical accounts of contemporary youth cultures, and concepts of risk which can be used to understand youth culture phenomena. A primary focus will be on urban youth cultures, and class and gender in Australia and other countries.

The course begins by defining key terms in the study of youth culture and risk.

This is followed by a coverage of significant areas of contemporary research on youth: for example,  youth transitions, class, gender and race issues, media tastes and consumption, youth subcultures and peer interactions.

As new studies and theoretical innovations in the field of youth studies come into the public domain they will be integrated into course content.

On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Have developed a critical understanding of the way modernity, youth culture and risk have been dealt in sociology.

2. Have demonstrated an understanding of the significance of contemporary youth cultures in the global context.

3. Have gained an improved general sociological understanding through this focused study in youth culture and risk.

4. Have improved general scholarly skills regarding the presentation of well-supported argument and the communication of ideas in written and verbal form.

Course Coordinator and Lecturer 4/07/2017 - 22/11/2017
SOCA1010 Society and Culture: A Sociological Introduction
University of Newcastle

Introduces students to the sociological perspective through an exploration of contemporary social and cultural issues. Topics may include: socialisation and identity, sex and gender, race and ethnicity, class and social inequality, globalisation and work, deviance and social control, and media and popular culture. Key sociological concepts and theories are used to examine social patterns, social action and social change.

Course content will be drawn from a selection of the following topics:

  1.               What is sociology? Developing a 'sociological imagination'.
  2.               An overview of sociological perspectives and social research.
  3.               Socialisation and identity.
  4.               Sex and gender.
  5.               Race, racism, ethnicity and multiculturalism.
  6.               Globalisation.
  7.               Work and unemployment.
  8.               Class and social inequality.
  9.               Deviance and social control.
  10.               Media and popular culture.

Course Coordinator, Lecturer, Tutor 27/02/2017 - 2/06/2017
SOCA3666 Consumption and Everyday Life
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Newcastle

This course will engage with key ideas and theories of consumption and consumer culture. Drawing on contemporary theories of culture and everyday life the course will cover the diverse ways in which consumerism is analysed in contemporary social sciences. Aspects that may be covered include; theories of the consumer; identity and manufacturing choice; anthropological analysis of material culture; Globalization, McDonaldization and Disneyization; commodification of the body; commodification of nature; the politics and ethics of consumerism; the spaces and sites of consumption; the environmental and waste aspects of consumer culture; and symbolic aspects of consumer culture. The course will help students develop a better understanding of the how recent social change from a 'production' to a 'consumption' society has implications for social relations and their own reflexive identity.

Upon successful completion students will be able to demonstrate:

1. An understanding of sociological approaches to consumption and consumer culture.

2. An understanding of the interplay between cultural discourses of consumption, power and the construction and maintenance of identity.

3. An understanding of the political and environmental implications of consumer culture.

4. Skills in critical analysis and evaluation of a range of sociological theories, perspectives and research.

5. A reflexive understand of how the students' own identity, opinions and tastes are created by and reflected in consumer culture.

Course Coordinator 30/06/2018 - 30/11/2018
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 9
Total funding $136,159

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $13,500

Young People, Insecurity and Affective Labour: a Study of 'Front of House' Service Labour$13,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team

Dr Steven Threadgold; Prof Lisa Adkins; Dr Julia Coffey: Dr David Farrugia

Scheme FEDUA Strategic Networks and Pilot Projects Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20152 grants / $64,923

Attitudes to Changing Land Use - the Narrabri Shire$49,923

Funding body: NSW Department of Primary Industries

Funding body NSW Department of Primary Industries
Project Team Doctor Hedda Askland, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Meg Sherval, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor Steven Threadgold, Doctor Michael Askew
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401491
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Newcastle Youth Studies Group - Theoretical Innovations and Challenges in Youth Sociology: One day symposium$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Steven Threadgold, Professor Pamela Nilan, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Hedda Askland
Scheme Strategic Networks Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500904
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20143 grants / $32,500

FEDUA ECR Fellowships $16,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team

Steven Threadgold

Scheme Early Career Researcher Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Network for Youth Research Outside the Northern Metropole$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Pamela Nilan, Doctor Steven Threadgold, Conjoint Professor Andy Furlong, Doctor David Farrugia, Doctor Julia Coffey, Doctor Hedda Askland, Doctor Lena Rodriguez
Scheme Strategic Networks Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400957
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The Australian Sociological Association (TASA), University of South Australia, Adelaide, 24 - 27 November 2014$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Steven Threadgold
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401251
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20131 grants / $8,827

From Subculture to Career? DIY Economies and Network Capital$8,827

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Steven Threadgold
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301142
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20121 grants / $12,598

Where are they now/Youth Connections (funded by Enterprise Connect)$12,598

Funding body: Newcastle Innovation

Funding body Newcastle Innovation
Project Team Doctor Steven Threadgold
Scheme Administered Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1300624
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20111 grants / $3,811

Expectations and reality of Young People's Ambitions: A longitudinal Study Based in Newcastle$3,811

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Steven Threadgold
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000972
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed4
Current7

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD2.95

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Commercialisation, Digital Media and Edgework in Backcountry Touring PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Table Top Gaming using Social Existential Theory PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD The Kids Are Alright - A Study of Attitudes of Youth Participating in a Workplace Environmental Program PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Women in Punk Creating Queer Identity Spaces: Strategies of Resistance Revisited PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Post-release becomings of youth who have participated in crime PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Moral Panics and Intergenerational Conflict PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Living on Welfare: An Experiential Exploration of Families Who Live on Welfare PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Risking it for Coal: Business Leaders' Attitudes to Climate Change PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Young Indonesian Musicians: Making the Transition to Adulthood through Entrepreneurial Activities and Mobility PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD In the Echoes of Mountains: Embodying Climbing Practice PhD (Sociology & Anthropology), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Governing the Facebook Self: Social Network Sites and Neoliberal Subjects PhD (Politics), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

Symposium highlights key concerns for youth

Symposium to highlight concerns for youth

July 7, 2014

The Youth Outside the Northern Metropole symposium will bring together international researchers in the area of youth studies to articulate the key concerns for urban, regional and rural young people in Australia and the Pacific region.

Dr Steven Threadgold

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Focus area

Sociology and Anthropology

Contact Details

Email steven.threadgold@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5919

Office

Room W317
Building Behavioural Science
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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