Dr Rod Ling

Dr Rod Ling

Conjoint Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Rod Ling completed his Bachelor of Commerce (Economics) at the University of Newcastle.  After completion, he worked as a research officer both in the South Australian Public Service and for Monash University administration. After completing his PhD (Sociology) at Monash, he continued at that university, first as an administrator for the human research ethics committee, and then as a tutor, lecturer and research assistant.

In 2009 and 2010 Rod worked as research assistant at the University of Manchester in the Institute of Social Change.  He returned to Newcastle for one year at the Hunter Valley Research Foundation before starting at HMRI in 2012. His current health economics research on mental health in the construction and mining industries has bought together his knowledge of workplace organization, job design, economics and health costing.


Qualifications

  • PhD, Monash University
  • Bachelor of Commerce, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Arts, Monash University

Keywords

  • Micro-Cost Modelling
  • Aged Care
  • Emotional Distress
  • Suicide
  • Cost Effectiveness Analysis
  • Fracture Liaison Clinic
  • Indigenous Health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
140208 Health Economics 100

Professional Experience

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
2/04/2012 -  Health Research Economist Hunter Medical Research Institute
Australia
1/02/2011 - 31/03/2012 Research Fellow Hunter Research Foundation
Australia
1/12/2008 - 31/12/2010 Research Associate University of Manchester
Institute for Social Change
United Kingdom
1/03/2007 - 30/09/2008 Research Assistant Monash University
School of Political and Social Inquiry
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Ling R, Rush A, Carter C, Carpenter J, Watson PH, Byrne JA, Searles A, 'An Australian Biobank Certification Scheme: A Study of Economic Costs to Participating Biobanks', Biopreservation and Biobanking, 16 53-58 (2018) [C1]

Copyright © 2018, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Biobanks face increasing demands for research materials of consistent quality, which can be used in collaborative studies. Several countri... [more]

Copyright © 2018, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Biobanks face increasing demands for research materials of consistent quality, which can be used in collaborative studies. Several countries and some international agencies have made formal efforts to standardize biobank operations and outputs. These include the establishment of best practice guidelines for collection management, and certification programs. Such guidelines and programs increase biobanks' opportunities for participation in high impact research and funding. However, they also impose economic and time costs, which may burden biobanks. This study aimed to estimate the costs of gaining certification and maintaining certification (i.e., committing extra resources to continue standards) for three cancer biobanks participating in a biobank certification program in New South Wales, Australia. To gather cost data for a range of cancer biobanks, we recruited three with different full time equivalent (FTE) staff levels (1.0-3.0), recognizing FTE staff level as an indicator of resources and operating scale. In extended interviews with staff, we gathered biobanks' expected costs in obtaining and annually maintaining certification. The biobank with the highest staff level reported the lowest expected costs in gaining certification, due to the strong prealignment of its present operations with certification requirements. The other biobanks expected higher costs as their operations required greater adjustments. Overall, relative costs of gaining certification were between 2% and 6% of current total annual wage costs. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first such costing study of a biobank certification program. Supplementary Data include the interview schedule that other biobanks may use to estimate their own economic certification costs.

DOI 10.1089/bio.2017.0095
Co-authors Andrew Searles
2018 Ling R, Searles A, Hewitt J, Considine R, Turner C, Thomas S, et al., 'Cost analysis of an integrated aged care program for residential aged care facilities.', Aust Health Rev, (2018)
DOI 10.1071/AH16297
Co-authors Andrew Searles, Isabel Higgins
2017 Rush A, Ling R, Carpenter JE, Carter C, Searles A, Byrne JA, 'Research governance review of a negligible-risk research project: Too much of a good thing?', Research Ethics, (2017)

© 2017, The Author(s) 2017. There are increasing concerns that research regulatory requirements exceed those required to manage risks, particularly for low- and negligible-risk re... [more]

© 2017, The Author(s) 2017. There are increasing concerns that research regulatory requirements exceed those required to manage risks, particularly for low- and negligible-risk research projects. In particular, inconsistent documentation requirements across research sites can delay the conduct of multi-site projects. For a one-year, negligible-risk project examining biobank operations conducted at three separate Australian institutions, we found that the researcher time required to meet regulatory requirements was eight times greater than that required for the approved research activity (60 hours versus 7.5 hours respectively). In total, 76 business days (almost four months) were required to obtain the necessary approvals, and site-specific processes required twice as long (52 business days/approximately 10 weeks) as primary Human Research Ethics Committee and Research Governance Office processes (24 business days/ approximately five weeks). We describe the impact of this administrative load on the conduct of a one-year, externally-funded research project, and identify a shared set of application requirements that could be used to streamline and harmonise research governance review of low- and negligible-risk research projects.

DOI 10.1177/1747016117739937
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Andrew Searles
2016 Stewart Williams J, Ling R, Searles AM, Doran CM, Byles J, 'Identification of higher hospital costs and more frequent admissions among mid-aged Australian women who self-report diabetes mellitus', Maturitas, 90 58-63 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Objective To ascertain whether the hospital costs for mid-aged Australian women who self-reported diabetes mellitus (DM) and who ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Objective To ascertain whether the hospital costs for mid-aged Australian women who self-reported diabetes mellitus (DM) and who had one or more hospital admission during an eight and a half year period were higher than the hospital costs for other similarly aged non-DM women. Methods The sample comprised 2,392 mid-aged women, resident in New South Wales (NSW) Australia and participating in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), who had any NSW hospital admissions during the eight and a half year period 1 July 2000 to 31 December 2008. Analyses were conducted on linked data from ALSWH surveys and the NSW Admitted Patient Data Collection (APDC). Hospital costs were compared for the DM and non-DM cohorts of women. A generalized linear model measured the association between hospital costs and self-reported DM. Results Eight and a half year hospital costs were 41% higher for women who self-reported DM in the ALSWH surveys (p < 0.0001). On average, women who self-reported DM had significantly (p < 0.0001) more hospital admissions (5.3) than women with no reported DM (3.4). The average hospital stay per admission was not significantly different between the two groups of women. Conclusions Self-reported DM status in mid-aged Australian women is a predictor of higher hospital costs. This simple measure can be a useful indicator for public policy makers planning early-stage interventions that target people in the population at risk of DM.

DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.04.008
Co-authors Jenny Stewartwilliams, Julie Byles, Andrew Searles
2016 Doran CM, Ling R, Searles A, Hill P, 'Does evidence influence policy? Resource allocation and the Indigenous Burden of Disease study', Australian Health Review, 40 705-715 (2016) [C1]

Objective The Indigenous Burden of Disease (IBoD) report is the most comprehensive assessment of Indigenous disease burden in Australia. The aim of the present study was to invest... [more]

Objective The Indigenous Burden of Disease (IBoD) report is the most comprehensive assessment of Indigenous disease burden in Australia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential effect of the IBoD report on Australian Indigenous health policy, service expenditure and research funding. Findings have significance for understanding factors that may influence Indigenous health policy. Methods The potential effect of the IBoD report was considered by: (1) conducting a text search of pertinent documents published by the federal government, Council of Australian Governments and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) and observing the quantity and quality of references to IBoD; (2) examining data on government Indigenous healthcare expenditure for trends consistent with the findings and policy implications of the IBoD report; and (3) examining NHMRC Indigenous grant allocation trends consistent with the findings and policy implications of the IBoD report. Results Of 110 government and NHMRC documents found, IBoD was cited in 27. Immediately after publication of the IBoD report, federal and state governments increased Indigenous health spending (relative to non-Indigenous), notably for community health and public health at the state level. Expenditure on Indigenous hospital separations for chronic diseases also increased. These changes are broadly consistent with the findings of the IBoD report on the significance of chronic disease and the need to address certain risk factors. However, there is no evidence that such changes had a causal connection with the IBoD study. After publication of the IBoD report, changes in NHMRC Indigenous research funding showed little consistency with the findings of the IBoD report. Conclusions The present study found only indirect and inconsistent correlational evidence of the potential influence of the IBoD report on Indigenous health expenditure and research funding. Further assessment of the potential influence of the IBoD report on Indigenous health policy will require more targeted research, including interviews with key informants involved in developing health policy. What is known about the topic? There are currently no publications that consider the potential effed of the IBoD study on Indigenous health expenditure and research funding. What does this paper add? This paper offers the first consideration of the potential effect of the IBoD report. It contains analyses of data from readily available sources, examining national expenditures on Indigenous health and NHMRC Indigenous research, before and after the publication of the IBoD report. What are the implications for practitioners? The paper is relevant to analysts interested in drivers of Indigenous health policy. Although it finds correlations between the release of the IBoD report and some subsequent health spending decisions, other factors should be investigated to better understand the complexity of processes that drive government efforts to improve Indigenous health.

DOI 10.1071/AH15105
Co-authors Andrew Searles
2016 Searles A, Doran C, Attia J, Knight D, Wiggers J, Deeming S, et al., 'An approach to measuring and encouraging research translation and research impact', HEALTH RESEARCH POLICY AND SYSTEMS, 14 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12961-016-0131-2
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Joerg Mattes, John Wiggers, Michael Nilsson, John Attia, Darryl Knight, Andrew Searles
2016 Doran CM, Ling R, Gullestrup J, Swannell S, Milner A, 'The impact of a suicide prevention strategy on reducing the economic cost of suicide in the new south wales construction industry', Crisis, 37 121-129 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Hogrefe Publishing. Background: Little research has been conducted into the cost and prevention of self-harm in the workplace. Aims: To quantify the economic cost of self-h... [more]

© 2015 Hogrefe Publishing. Background: Little research has been conducted into the cost and prevention of self-harm in the workplace. Aims: To quantify the economic cost of self-harm and suicide among New South Wales (NSW) construction industry (CI) workers and to examine the potential economic impact of implementing Mates in Construction (MIC). Method: Direct and indirect costs were estimated. Effectiveness was measured using the relative risk ratio (RRR). In Queensland (QLD), relative suicide risks were estimated for 5-year periods before and after the commencement of MIC. For NSW, the difference between the expected (i.e., using NSW pre-MIC [2008-2012] suicide risk) and counterfactual suicide cases (i.e., applying QLD RRR) provided an estimate of potential suicide cases averted in the post-MIC period (2013-2017). Results were adjusted using the average uptake (i.e., 9.4%) of MIC activities in QLD. Economic savings from averted cases were compared with the cost of implementing MIC. Results: The cost of self-harm and suicide in the NSW CI was AU $527 million in 2010. MIC could potentially avert 0.4 suicides, 1.01 full incapacity cases, and 4.92 short absences, generating annual savings of AU $3.66 million. For every AU $1 invested, the economic return is approximately AU $4.6. Conclusion: MIC represents a positive economic investment in workplace safety.

DOI 10.1027/0227-5910/a000362
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
2016 Edmunds K, Searles A, Neville J, Ling R, McCalman J, Mein J, 'Apunipima baby basket program: a retrospective cost study', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1133-3
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Andrew Searles
2016 Doran CM, Ling R, Byrnes J, Crane M, Shakeshaft AP, Searles A, Perez D, 'Benefit Cost Analysis of Three Skin Cancer Public Education Mass-Media Campaigns Implemented in New South Wales, Australia', PLOS ONE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0147665
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Andrew Searles
2016 Ling R, Kelly B, Considine R, Tynan R, Searles A, Doran CM, 'The economic impact of psychological distress in the Australian coal mining industry', Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 58 e171-e176 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the economic impact of psychological distress among employees ... [more]

© 2016 American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the economic impact of psychological distress among employees of the Australian Coal Mining Industry. Methods: Sample data were gathered from 1456 coal mining staff across eight sites in two Australian states. Two measures were taken of work time lost over four weeks due to psychological distress: (1) full-day absences; (2) presenteeism. Lost work time was valued using hourly wages. Sample data was modeled to estimate annual monetary losses for the Australian Coal Mining Industry. Results: For the sample, estimated annual value of time lost due to psychological distress was $4.9 million ($AUS2015) ($0.61 million per mine), and for the Australian Coal Mining Industry, $153.8 million ($AUS2015). Conclusion: Psychological distress is a significant cost for the Australian Coal Mining Industry. Relevant intervention programs are potentially cost-effective.

DOI 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000714
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Andrew Searles, Brian Kelly
2015 Doran CM, Ling R, Byrnes J, Crane M, Searles A, Perez D, Shakeshaft A, 'Estimating the economic costs of skin cancer in New South Wales, Australia', BMC Public Health, 15 1-10 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2267-3
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Andrew Searles
2014 Nair BKR, Searles AM, Ling RI, Wein J, Ingham K, 'Workplace-based assessment for international medical graduates: At what cost?', Medical Journal of Australia, 200 41-44 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To estimate the cost of resources required to deliver a program to assess international medical graduates (IMGs) in Newcastle, Australia, known as the Workplace Based A... [more]

Objective: To estimate the cost of resources required to deliver a program to assess international medical graduates (IMGs) in Newcastle, Australia, known as the Workplace Based Assessment (WBA) Program. Design and setting: A costing study to identify and evaluate the resources required and the overheads of delivering the program for a cohort of 15 IMGs, based on costs in 2012. Main outcome measures: Labour-related costs. Results: The total cost in 2012 for delivering the program to a typical cohort of 15 candidates was $243 384. This equated to an average of $16226 per IMG. After allowing for the fees paid by IMGs, the WBA Program had a deficit of $153384, or $10226 per candidate, which represents the contribution made by the health system. Conclusion: The cost per candidate to the health system of this intensive WBA program for IMGs is small.

DOI 10.5694/mja13.10849
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Kichu Nair, Andrew Searles
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Health economics analysis of cancer biobank investments and activity in NSW Public Health Not Elswr Classi, The University of Sydney Co-Supervisor
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Dr Rod Ling

Position

Conjoint Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email rod.ling@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 40420493
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