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Dr Prasath Annamalai

Research Associate

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

Prasath's research is focused on analytical techniques to measure and remediate environmental chemical contaminants. Prasath completed his PhD in 2014 and his thesis was on ecotoxicity and soil persistence of 2,4-Dinitroanisole – an ingredient in insensitive munitions explosive fills. His current research is on method development to analyze various environmental chemicals such as PFCs. 



Qualifications

  • PhD, University of South Australia

Keywords

  • Analytical Techniques
  • Environmental Contamination

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
030199 Analytical Chemistry not elsewhere classified 60
050206 Environmental Monitoring 20
050207 Environmental Rehabilitation (excl. Bioremediation) 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Prasath A, Panneerselvan L, Provatas A, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Genotoxicity assessment of acute exposure of 2, 4-dinitroanisole, its metabolites and 2, 4, 6-trinitrotoluene to Daphnia carinata', ECOTOXICOLOGY, 25 1873-1879 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10646-016-1709-8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu, Logeshwaran Panneerselvan
2014 Islam S, Meshesha D, Shinjo R, 'Mantle source characterization of sylhet traps, northeastern India: A petrological and geochemical study', Journal of Earth System Science, 123 1839-1855 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s12040-014-0512-2
2014 Norton GJ, Douglas A, Lahner B, Yakubova E, Guerinot ML, Pinson SRM, et al., 'Genome wide association mapping of grain arsenic, copper, molybdenum and zinc in rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown at four international field sites', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0089685
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 39
2012 Norton GJ, Pinson SRM, Alexander J, McKay S, Hansen H, Duan GL, et al., 'Variation in grain arsenic assessed in a diverse panel of rice (Oryza sativa) grown in multiple sites', New Phytologist, 193 650-664 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2011.03983.x
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 43
2010 Norton GJ, Islam MR, Duan G, Lei M, Zhu Y, Deacon CM, et al., 'Arsenic Shoot-Grain Relationships in Field Grown Rice Cultivars', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 44 1471-1477 (2010)
DOI 10.1021/es902992d
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 33
2010 Norton GJ, Dasgupta T, Islam MR, Islam S, Deacon CM, Zhao F-J, et al., 'Arsenic Influence on Genetic Variation in Grain Trace-Element Nutrient Content in Bengal Delta Grown Rice', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 44 8284-8288 (2010)
DOI 10.1021/es101487x
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
2009 Norton GJ, Islam MR, Deacon CM, Zhao F-J, Stroud JL, McGrath SP, et al., 'Identification of Low Inorganic and Total Grain Arsenic Rice Cultivars from Bangladesh', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 43 6070-6075 (2009)
DOI 10.1021/es901121j
Citations Scopus - 91Web of Science - 82
2009 Norton GJ, Duan G, Dasgupta T, Islam MR, Lei M, Zhu Y, et al., 'Environmental and Genetic Control of Arsenic Accumulation and Speciation in Rice Grain: Comparing a Range of Common Cultivars Grown in Contaminated Sites Across Bangladesh, China, and India', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 43 8381-8386 (2009)
DOI 10.1021/es901844q
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 79
2009 Williams PN, Islam S, Islam R, Jahiruddin M, Adomako E, Soliaman ARM, et al., 'Arsenic limits Trace Mineral Nutrition (Selenium, Zinc, and Nickel) in Bangladesh Rice Grain', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 43 8430-8436 (2009)
DOI 10.1021/es901825t
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 45
2008 Hossain M, Islam MR, Jahiruddin M, Abedin A, Islam S, Meharg AA, 'Effects of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water on growth, yield, and nutrient concentration in rice', Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, 39 302-313 (2008)

A study was undertaken to determine the effects of different concentrations of arsenic (As) in irrigation water on Boro (dry-season) rice (Oryza sativa) and their residual effects... [more]

A study was undertaken to determine the effects of different concentrations of arsenic (As) in irrigation water on Boro (dry-season) rice (Oryza sativa) and their residual effects on the following Aman (wet-season) rice. There were six treatments, with 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mg As L-1 applied as disodium hydrogen arsenate. All the growth and yield parameters of Boro rice responded positively at lower concentrations of up to 0.25 mg As L-1 in irrigation water but decreased sharply at concentrations more than 0.5 mg As L-1. Arsenic concentrations in grain and straw of Boro rice increased significantly with increasing concentration of As in irrigation water. The grain As concentration was in the range of 0.25 to 0.97 µg g-1 and its concentration in rice straw varied from 2.4 to 9.6 µg g-1 over the treatments. Residual As from previous Boro rice showed a very similar pattern in the following Aman rice, although As concentration in Aman rice grain and straw over the treatments was almost half of the As levels in Boro rice grain. Arsenic concentrations in both grain and straw of Boro and Aman rice were found to correlate with iron and be antagonistic with phosphorus. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/00103620701759335
Citations Scopus - 12
2007 Islam MT, Islam SA, Latif SA, 'Detection of arsenic in water, herbal and soil samples by neutron activation analysis technique', Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 79 327-330 (2007)

Arsenic contamination of ground water is well understood while other environmental systems are rarely considered to be contaminated by arsenic. A vital issue is whether or not app... [more]

Arsenic contamination of ground water is well understood while other environmental systems are rarely considered to be contaminated by arsenic. A vital issue is whether or not appreciable arsenic transmits through the food chain. Reportedly, ayurvedic herbal medicine products (AHMPs) manufactured in Asia were found to be contaminated by harmful level of Arsenic. This study was aimed to quantify the arsenic levels in water, herbal and soil samples collected from the same origin using highly accurate neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique. Harmful level of arsenic was detected in most of the water and soil samples. Moreover, a considerably harmful level of Arsenic was detected in herbal samples collected from the same origin. As a result, AHMPs manufactured in Asia might be contaminated by arsenic through arsenic contaminated herb plants. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

DOI 10.1007/s00128-007-9209-4
Citations Scopus - 9
2007 Islam MR, Jahiruddin M, Islam S, 'Arsenic linkage in the irrigation water-soil-rice plant systems', Pakistan Journal of Scientific and Industrial Research, 50 85-90 (2007)

This investigation reports the levels of arsenic (As) in irrigation waters, soils and Boro (dry season) rice grain from 100 shallow tube well (STW) areas over the sadar upazila of... [more]

This investigation reports the levels of arsenic (As) in irrigation waters, soils and Boro (dry season) rice grain from 100 shallow tube well (STW) areas over the sadar upazila of Chapai Nawabganj. The As concentrations for all samples (soil, water and rice grain) varied widely between locations. The shallow tube well (STW) water As concentration ranged from 0.015-0.352 µg/ml with a mean of 0.075 µg/ml, the concentration being lower in shallow well depth, reaching to a maximum about at 25 m depth and then decreased with increasing depths. The levels of total As in soils over the locations ranged from 5.8-17.7 µg/g with a mean of 11.2 µg/g. Total As content in soils was positively correlated with irrigation water-As indicating a possibility of As build up in soil with time. The rice grain-As concentration was in the range of 0.24-1.30 µ/g g having a mean of 0.76 µg/g. 22% of the grain samples had As level < 0.5 µg/g, 39% in the range of 0.50-0.75 µg/g, 36% in the range of 0.75-1.0 µg/g and the rest 12% more than 1.0 µg/g. The grain-As was poorly correlated with soil-As as well as irrigation water-As. 94% of the rice grain grown in Chapai Nawabganj irrigated with As contaminated water may lead to an intake of more than 100% maximum tolerable daily intake (MTDI) for an adult of 60 kg body weight.

Citations Scopus - 6
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Dr Prasath Annamalai

Position

Research Associate
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER)
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email prasath.annamalai@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room ATC
Building Advanced Technology Centre.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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