Conjoint Associate Professor Pooshan Navathe

Conjoint Associate Professor Pooshan Navathe

Conjoint Associate Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Associate Professor Pooshan Navathe is and has been a practising clinician specialising in occupational and aviation medicine for many years, and is internationally respected as a thought leader in evidence based aeromedical decision making.  He continues to maintain his clinical currency, even as he works as the Director Medical Services for the Maitland and Lower Hunter Hospitals . He describes his role as that of a Senior Staff Specialist in safety, quality, and system integrity.  Pooshan’s  special interests are safety and governance, the education and mentoring of health professionals, implementing change, and enabling colleagues to attain professional excellence in their practice.

Over a clinical career lasting over three decades, Pooshan has worked on several internally and externally (Grant) funded research projects. While the grants total up to about a million dollars, much of the work was done as task directives within the organisations that Pooshan has worked for. His strong international reputation is supported by publications in pre-eminent journals in aviation medicine and his Fellowships and Memberships of premier international bodies such as the Aerospace Medical Association, The Royal Aeronautical Society, and the International Academy of Aviation and Space Medicine.  He has contributed to or led nearly 50 departmental projects of varying magnitude and significance. He has also written book chapters and contributed to several papers and conference presentations and sessions including as Chair. His definition of spatial disorientation, and his approach to evidence based clinical aeromedical decision making are among those academic achievements that have led the world in those areas.  He brings to his research a difficult balance – a combination of academic purity, scientific rigour, and real world pragmatism.

 Pooshan has a strong educational emphasis in his practice, and his degree in education has been supplemented by over two decades as a teacher in Universities and Professional colleges. He has demonstrated  leadership in education by participating and chairing the education committees of most professional colleges that he has worked with – an interest that he continues to maintain in spite of his busy schedule.  He has supervised, and continues to supervise  students for the grant of MD degrees, for a Masters in Health Science (by research) degree, and for  trainees in occupational medicine, aviation medicine and medical leadership.

Research Expertise

 After completing a PhD in the effects of acclimatization on psychomotor performance at altitude, Pooshan has worked on spatial disorientation, and on the aeromedical decision making of diverse subjects ranging from cardiology, neurology, to urology, and diabetes. He has worked on risk assessment and risk management, and is currently pursuing a PhD in the management of risk and uncertainty in clinical aeromedical decision making. His current research Interests are Clinical reasoning, evidence based clinical decision making, impact of quality projects on medical practice, assessment of medical education & professional competence, medical ethics,  and health services research.

Teaching expertise

Pooshan has been a post- graduate teacher for over two decades, with appointments across India, New Zealand and Australia. More recently, he has been involved in the teaching and mentoring of undergraduate medical students.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Medicine, Bangalore University - India
  • Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery, University of Pune - India
  • Bachelor of Education, Annamalai University - India
  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Delhi - India
  • Diploma in Occupational Medicine, University of Auckland - NZ
  • Diploma of Aviation Safety Regulation, Swinburne University of Technology
  • Master of Business Administration, Australian National University

Keywords

  • Aviation Medicine
  • Governance
  • Medical Education
  • Occupational Medicine

Languages

  • Hindi (Mother)
  • English (Mother)
  • Maori (New Zealand) (Working)
  • Punjabi (Fluent)
  • Bengali (Working)
  • Nepali (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
27/07/2010 - 12/01/2015 Associate Professor Australian National University
Australia
1/01/2010 - 1/01/2015 Clinical Senior Lecturer Wellington School of Medicine (Otago UNiversity)
New Zealand
27/06/2006 - 12/01/2010 Clinical Senior Lecturer (and Course Director) Wellington School of Medicine (Otago UNiversity)
New Zealand
11/11/2003 - 11/11/2007 Senior Lecturer The University of Auckland
New Zealand

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
12/01/2015 -  Director Medical Services Hunter New England Health
Australia
27/02/2008 - 12/01/2015 Principal Medical Officer Civil Aviation Safety Authority
Australia
20/06/2001 - 27/02/2008 Senior Medical Officer Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand
New Zealand

Awards

Award

Year Award
2014 John A Tamisea Award
Civil Aviation Medical Association (USA)
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Navathe P, 'The role and scope of psychological testing in risk reduction', Pilot Mental Health Assessment and Support: A Practitioner's Guide, Routledge, Oxon & New York., Routledge, Oxon, NY (2016)
2014 Gomez G, Griffiths R, Navathe P, 'Concept maps as replacements of written essays in efficient assessment of complex medical knowledge', Cases on Teaching Critical Thinking through Visual Representation Strategies 223-271 (2014)

© 2014, IGI Global. Marking efficiency and timely student feedback are two aspects of assessment that may be greatly improved with concept maps (cmaps), if student learning style... [more]

© 2014, IGI Global. Marking efficiency and timely student feedback are two aspects of assessment that may be greatly improved with concept maps (cmaps), if student learning style preference for more traditional approaches can be overcome. A semester-long exploratory case study was designed and performed in a distance aviation medicine course. This involved participant observations, interviews, and task analysis to investigate cmaps' claimed advantages for meaningful learning. The results showed that cmaps could be suitable replacements of written essays in the assessment of complex medical conceptual knowledge. Both present similar strengths and weaknesses; however, cmaps are faster to mark, and quickly reveal student understanding of a particular topic. The discussion of results is informed by relevant literature on concept mapping (cmapping) in medical education, assessment for deep understanding, and learning styles. This research can benefit online postgraduate education programmes searching for alternatives to improve the assessment process.

DOI 10.4018/978-1-4666-5816-5.ch010
Citations Scopus - 1

Journal article (16 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Vuorio A, Laukkala T, Navathe P, Budowle B, Bor R, Sajantila A, 'Bipolar Disorder in Aviation Medicine', AEROSPACE MEDICINE AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE, 88 42-47 (2017)
DOI 10.3357/AMHP.4620.2017
2017 Laukkala T, Bor R, Budowle B, Sajantila A, Navathe P, Sainio M, Vuorio A, 'Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Fatal Accidents in Aviation Medicine', AEROSPACE MEDICINE AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE, 88 871-875 (2017)
DOI 10.3357/AMHP.4919.2017
2016 Clem PA, Navathe PD, Drane MA, 'Identifying pilots with parkinson's disease', Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, 87 545-549 (2016)

© by the Aerospace Medical Association, Alexandria, VA. BACKGROUND: In 2012 the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare produced a report titled 'Dementia in Australia.&a... [more]

© by the Aerospace Medical Association, Alexandria, VA. BACKGROUND: In 2012 the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare produced a report titled 'Dementia in Australia.'2 The report noted that the number of people with dementia in Australia would reach almost 400,000 by 2020. Australia is a jurisdiction which does not impose a mandatory retirement age for pilots. With an aging population it was hypothesized that conditions such as Parkinson's disease (PD) were likely to be seen more commonly by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA). It was decided that this was an appropriate time to retrospectively study the data held by CASA. METHODS: An interrogation of CASA databases was undertaken. Data was produced comparing percentage of Class 1 certificate holders over 60 yr of age against time. A cohort of pilots and controllers with PD was identified. The history of the cases was reviewed. RESULTS: The study confirms that the pilot population is aging in line with population trends. Over a period from 1992 to 2012, 22 cases of pilots and controllers with PD were identified. DISCUSSION: The study confirmed that PD will be of increased relevance over the next decade. Gaps between policy and practice managing past cases were identified. Updated guidelines have been published aiming to address the deficiencies identified in the study. Historically pilots and controllers have been able to maintain certification for an average of 3.75 yr. This information should be of benefit to clinicians, pilots, and controllers when considering occupation and treatment options.

DOI 10.3357/AMHP.4428.2016
2015 Vuorio A, Laukkala T, Navathe P, Budowle B, Eyre A, Sajantila A, 'On doctors' accountability and flight deck safety', CROATIAN MEDICAL JOURNAL, 56 385-386 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.3325/cmj.2015.56.385
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Navathe P, Drane M, Preitner C, 'Aeromedical Decision Making: From Principles to Practice', AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, 85 576-580 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.3357/ASEM.3561.2014
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2014 Vuorio A, Laukkala T, Navathe P, Budowle B, Eyre A, Sajantila A, 'Aircraft-Assisted Pilot Suicides: Lessons to be Learned', AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, 85 841-846 (2014)
DOI 10.3357/ASEM.4000.2014
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2013 Michael A, Drane C, Navathe P, Clem P, 'Aeromedical Certification of Aircrew and Controllers with Renal Calculi', AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, 84 1074-1081 (2013)
DOI 10.3357/ASEM.3604.2013
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2012 Vuorio A, Laukkala T, Navathe P, 'Major Depression and Fitness to Fly by Different Aviation Authorities', AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, 83 909-911 (2012)
DOI 10.3357/ASEM.3363.2012
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2011 Fitzgerald DJP, Navathe PD, Drane AM, 'Aeromedical decision making in attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder', Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, 82 550-554 (2011)

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is a problematic diagnosis in the context of aeromedical certification. Certain characteristics of the disorder such as impaired attention... [more]

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is a problematic diagnosis in the context of aeromedical certification. Certain characteristics of the disorder such as impaired attention potentially affect the safe conduct of flying. Pharmacological treatment with stimulants also has issues surrounding short half-lives and effects on the recognition of fatigue. This article gives a broad overview of the issues involved and provides certification guidelines as adopted in the Australian Civil Aviation Safety Authority which may be helpful if adopted by other certification bodies. © by the Aerospace Medical Association, Alexandria, VA.

DOI 10.3357/ASEM.2889.2011
Citations Scopus - 2
2010 Fitzgerald DJP, Navathe PD, Drane AM, 'Insulin-dependent diabetes and aeromedical certification - The Australian perspective', Medical Journal of Australia, 193 469-471 (2010)

¿ Whether pilots with insulin-dependent diabetes should be allowed to fly has long been a controversial issue. ¿ Hypoglycaemia remains a significant threat to flight safety, and... [more]

¿ Whether pilots with insulin-dependent diabetes should be allowed to fly has long been a controversial issue. ¿ Hypoglycaemia remains a significant threat to flight safety, and a barrier for pilots with insulin-dependent diabetes to overcome. ¿ Some countries allow recreational pilots to fly while treated with insulin under strict conditions. ¿ Recent changes in aeromedical certification in Australia will give pilots with diabetes more freedom to exercise the privileges of their licence, while adopting mechanisms to ensure the safety of air navigation.

2004 Angelici A, Baker S, Cimrmancic MA, DeJohn C, Evans A, Hoffman H, et al., 'The age 60 rule', AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, 75 708-715 (2004)
Citations Scopus - 7
2002 Navathe PD, Gomez G, Krishnamurthy A, 'Relaxed acceleration tolerance in female pilot trainees', Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, 73 1106-1108 (2002)

Background: Female pilots now fly many types of aircraft including military fighters capable of maneuvers that produce high, sustained acceleration in the +Gz axis. Although women... [more]

Background: Female pilots now fly many types of aircraft including military fighters capable of maneuvers that produce high, sustained acceleration in the +Gz axis. Although women have participated as subjects in various centrifuge studies, little is known about the acceleration tolerance of female pilots. Methods: Between April 1995 and December 1997, 17 female pilot trainees were studied at the Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Bangalore, India. The subjects were 23.2 ± 1.4 yr old and led physically active lives. Their relaxed +Gz tolerance limits (defined as peripheral light loss) were tested using the High G and Disorientation Demonstrator. The protocol included a series of rapid onset runs (RORs) to tolerance followed by a single gradual onset run (GOR) to tolerance. Results: The mean ROR tolerance was 4.2 ± 0.4 G. The mean GOR tolerance was 5.2 ± 0.6 G. Three of the subjects were unable to complete the GOR due to severe nausea. Two women reported breast discomfort at levels of 3.5 G and beyond. No other problems were reported. Conclusions: The acceleration tolerances for the female pilot trainees were comparable to those for male pilots previously studied in our laboratory.

Citations Scopus - 4
1994 Navathe PD, Singh B, 'Prevalence of spatial disorientation in Indian Air Force aircrew', Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, 65 1082-1085 (1994)

The 1 Aero Medical Training Centre has surveyed aircrew of the Indian Air Force to determine the prevalence of Spatial Disorientation (SD), as related to aircraft stream, age, fly... [more]

The 1 Aero Medical Training Centre has surveyed aircrew of the Indian Air Force to determine the prevalence of Spatial Disorientation (SD), as related to aircraft stream, age, flying experience, geographical location and other operationally significant variables. The reported prevalence of SD is 75% among fighter aircrew, 64% in transport aircrew, and 55% in helicopter aircrew. Whereas the prevalence of SD does not appear to vary significantly with age and flying experience, it is higher in fully operational pilots and in pilots returning to flight duties after a ground tenure, as compared to ab-initio and type-converting pilots.

Citations Scopus - 4
1994 Singh B, Navathe PD, 'Indian Air Force and world spatial disorientation accidents: A comparison', Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, 65 254-256 (1994)

Human error is known to be a major contributory factor in aviation accidents, with spatial disorientation (SD) a preeminent cause within this group. This paper presents incidence ... [more]

Human error is known to be a major contributory factor in aviation accidents, with spatial disorientation (SD) a preeminent cause within this group. This paper presents incidence of SD-related accidents in some major Air Forces of the West, and compares it with Indian Air Force (IAF) data from 1970 to 1990. Incongruence between the Indian and Western (U.S. and British) data is discussed, and possible reasons for this are highlighted. The authors suggest a review of the existing working definition of spatial disorientation with particular reference to its usage by accident investigators.

Citations Scopus - 2
1994 Navathe PD, Singh B, 'An operational definition for spatial disorientation.', Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, 65 1153-1155 (1994)

Spatial disorientation (SD) is a term which continues to have different meanings for different classes of people involved with aviation. The advent of new terms like "situati... [more]

Spatial disorientation (SD) is a term which continues to have different meanings for different classes of people involved with aviation. The advent of new terms like "situational awareness" (SA), has only added to the plethora of existing definitions, leading to a difference of opinion among researchers worldwide. Lack of agreement regarding the semantics of SD among various aircraft accident investigators leads to different yardsticks in determining whether or not an accident is SD-related. These definitional differences do not allow for inter-Air Force comparisons of SD accident data, and a valuable opportunity to learn from the experience of others is lost. The authors examine the existing definitions, and propose a new practical operational definition of SD, for use in investigation and classification of aircraft accidents.

Citations Scopus - 4
1983 Chakraborti S, Darnal SK, Ray RC, 'Comparative Studies Of The Effect Of Moderate And High Altitude Stress On Human Subjects: Studies On Erythrocyte Ghost Atpases', International Journal of Environmental Studies, 20 317-321 (1983)

Studies have been carried out on erythrocyte membrane-bound ATPases of ten female subjects at a moderate altitude (2200 m) and at a high altitude (5100 m). Mg2+-ATPase activity of... [more]

Studies have been carried out on erythrocyte membrane-bound ATPases of ten female subjects at a moderate altitude (2200 m) and at a high altitude (5100 m). Mg2+-ATPase activity of the subjects was found to be significantly stimulated under conditions at a high altitude in comparison to that at a moderate altitude. The changes in total lipids and cholesterol contents of erythrocyte ghosts and plasma Na+/K+ levels at high altitude in comparison to the moderate altitude indicates an alteration in the membrane permeability under high altitude stress. On acclimatization of the subjects from a high to a moderate altitude, the studied parameters reverted to the values as observed at a moderate altitude. © 1983, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1080/00207238308710051
Citations Scopus - 2
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Conjoint Associate Professor Pooshan Navathe

Position

Conjoint Associate Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email pooshan.navathe@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4939 2252
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