Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli

Conjoint Associate Professor

School of Health Sciences (Physiotherapy)

  • Phone:(02) 4921 6046

Career Summary

Biography

As Senior Lecturer in the very popular new University Bachelor of Physiotherapy Program, over the first four years of the program I have had to develop all teaching and assessment materials used within courses for which I was the designated co-ordinator. Thus my research and publication outputs have been less than I would have liked.

Research Expertise
Continence Promotion, Epidemiology and prevention of female urinary incontinence in clinical groups, Faecal incontinence, Male Continence Promotion related to Prostate Cancer Management

Teaching Expertise
Following my appointment as Senior lecturer Physiotherapy I undertook the development and co-ordination of the undergraduate Bachelor of Physiotherapy Program -specifically the first and fourth years of the program. My contribution otherwise within the program focuses on gender based health issues across the four years of the program as well as Issues related to health promotion. As testaments to my teaching effectiveness, commencing and continuing students have indicated satisfaction with the course amongst the highest achieved within the Faculty of Health and well above the University Average. Students' evaluations of my teaching have been encouraging over the last five years. For 25 years I have taught continence promotion and pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation to graduate Physiotherapists with international invitations to teach in Canada, USA, UK, Hong Kong, New Zealand and in Australia. I have supervised three successful Research Masters Students and have two current PhD students.

Administrative Expertise
Co-ordination of Courses with the Bachelor of Physiotherapy program including the initial development and ongoing co-ordination of all first and second year clinical placements. Annual required alterations to Curriculum tracking system in line with required alterations to first and fourth year courses with the program. 

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Diploma in Health Soc Sc (Hlth Prom), University of Newcastle
  • Diploma in Physiotherapy, University of Sydney
  • Master of Medical Science, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Continence Promotion
  • Pelvic Floor Muscle Dysfunction Female
  • Pelvic Floor Muscle Dysfunction Male
  • Physiotherapy

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 40
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified 30
111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified 30

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/04/2007 -  Invited member representing Australian Physiotherapy Association Continence Foundation of Australia, Continence Awareness and Support Project (CASP)
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Invited Member - Australian New Zealand Continence Journal Australian New Zealand Continence Journal
Australia
Chairperson Professional Practice Standards Committee Continence and Women's Health Special Group Australian Physiotherapy Association
Media Appraisals Co-ordinator Australian Journal of Physiotherapy
Australia
1/07/2006 - 1/10/2007 Member - Convenor of Scientific Subcommittee Inaugural Australian Physiotherapy Association Combined Groups Conference Australian Physiotherapy Association

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2007 Continence Promotion in Afged Care Facilities
Organisation: Aged CAre Channel Australia Description: Aged Care Channel provides ongoing twice monthly programs aimed at educating enrolled nurses working in 5000 Aged Care faciklities across Australia
2007 Reviewer
Organisation: Australian New Zealand Journal of Public Health
2007 Reviewer
Organisation: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS)
2007 Reviewer
Organisation: International Urogynecology Journal
2006 Life- with Physiotherapy
Organisation: New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Description: International recogntion of my research
2006 'Australian incontinence data analysis and development' AIHW cat. no DIS 44
Organisation: Federal Government Description: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report 'Australian incontinence data analysis and development' Acknowlegement of contribution made within the report
2005 Physiotherapy Assessment and Management of Lower Bowel Dysfunction
Organisation: Faculty of Medicine, Dept of continuing medical education and professional development Description: In view of my research related to lower bowel dysfunction (Faecal incontinence and constipation) I was invited to prepare and present a four day workshop with Dr HJo laycock who is a recognised world expert
2004 Review of National Physiotherapy Competency Standards
Organisation: Nova Consultancy and Australian Physiotherapy Association Description: In recognition of my participation within and across the Physiotherapy profession and its governing bodies, coupled with my experience in developing a new University based physiotherapy undergraduate course I was invited by NOVA consultancy to join their team as consultant physiotherapist to review and redevelop the National Physiotherapy Competency Standards.
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Chiarelli P, 'Female pelvic floor dysfunctions and evidence-based physical therapy: Lifestyle interventions', Evidence-Based Physical Therapy for the Pelvic Floor: Bridging Science and Clinical Practice: Second Edition, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh 136-153 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-7020-4443-4.00007-8
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2008 Chiarelli PE, 'Postpartum management of the pelvic floor', Pelvic Floor Re-education: Principles and Practice, Springer London, London 235-241 (2008) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-1-84628-505-9_27
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2008 Chiarelli PE, Moore KH, 'Exercise, feedback, and biofeedback', Pelvic Floor Re-education: Principles and Practice, Springer London, London 184-189 (2008) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-1-84628-505-9_19
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2007 Chiarelli PE, 'Lifestyle interventions for pelvic floor dysfunction', Evidence-Based Physical Therapy for the Pelvic Floor, Elsevier, Amsterdam 147-159 (2007) [B1]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2006 Chiarelli PE, 'Anal Dysfunction after Delivery', The Pelvic Floor, Georg Thieme Verlag, Stuttgart, Germany 440-448 (2006) [B1]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2002 Chiarelli PE, 'Constipation', Therapeutic management of incontinence and pelvic pain, Springer, Wiltshire- UK 143-148 (2002) [B2]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2002 Chiarelli PE, 'Improving Patient's Adherence', Therapeutic Management of Incontinence and Pelvic Pain, Springer, Wiltshire- UK 73-74 (2002) [B2]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
Show 4 more chapters

Journal article (89 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Drew MK, Lovell G, Palsson TS, Chiarelli PE, Osmotherly PG, 'Australian football players experiencing groin pain exhibit reduced subscale scores of Activities of Daily Living and Sport and Recreation on the HAGOS questionnaire: A case-control study', Physical Therapy in Sport, 26 7-12 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Objectives To report normative responses to the HAGOS questionnaire for Australian football players and to determine whether any of the HAGOS questionnaire sub scales can ... [more]

© 2017 Objectives To report normative responses to the HAGOS questionnaire for Australian football players and to determine whether any of the HAGOS questionnaire sub scales can differentiate players with and without groin pain. Design Case-control. Setting Clinical setting. Participants Professional (n = 66) and semi-professional (n = 9) Australian football (AF) players with current groin pain (n = 16) and controls (n = 57) without current groin pain. Main outcome measure The HAGOS subscales were compared between players with and without groin pain using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test with effect sizes (ES) calculated. Floor and ceiling effects were examined. A post-hoc factor analysis was undertaken. Results Participants with current groin pain showed lower Physical Function of Daily Living (PFDL) and Physical Function in Sport and Recreation (PFSR) subscale scores (p < 0.05, ES: 0.77 and 0.90 respectively). Any groin pain (current and/or historical) lowered the Pain and Quality of Life (QOL) subscale scores (p < 0.05, ES: 0.38 and 0.72 respectively). Factor analysis showed 8 significant factors with one main factor identified representing items describing forceful activities (Eigenvalue = 18.02, Proportion = 0.49). Conclusions The HAGOS can distinguish AF players with current groin pain in the PFDL and PFSR subscales but not in the other four subscales. Any current or historical groin pain lowers scores on the QOL and Pain sub scales. Level of evidence Aetiology, Individual Case-Control Study, Level 3b

DOI 10.1016/j.ptsp.2017.04.004
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2017 Pierce H, Perry L, Gallagher R, Chiarelli P, 'Urinary incontinence, work, and intention to leave current job: A cross sectional survey of the Australian nursing and midwifery workforce', Neurourology and Urodynamics, 36 1876-1883 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/nau.23202
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Lin Perry
2017 Drew MK, Palsson TS, Hirata RP, Izumi M, Lovell G, Welvaert M, et al., 'Experimental pain in the groin may refer into the lower abdomen: Implications to clinical assessments.', J Sci Med Sport, 20 904-909 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.04.007
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2016 Pierce H, Perry L, Chiarelli P, Gallagher R, 'A systematic review of prevalence and impact of symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction in identified workforce groups', Journal of Advanced Nursing, 72 1718-1734 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd Aim: To investigate the prevalence and impact of symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction in identified workforce groups. Background: Productivity ... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aim: To investigate the prevalence and impact of symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction in identified workforce groups. Background: Productivity of workforce groups is a concern for ageing societies. Symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction are associated with ageing and negatively influence psychosocial health. In the general population, lower urinary tract symptoms negatively influence work productivity. Design: A systematic review of observational studies. Data sources: Electronic searches of four academic databases. Reference lists were scanned for relevant articles. The search was limited to English language publications 1990¿2014. Review methods: The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination procedure guided the review method. Data extraction and synthesis was conducted on studies where the workforce group was identified and the type of pelvic floor dysfunction defined according to accepted terminology. Quality appraisal of studies was performed using a Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tool. Results: Twelve studies were identified of variable quality, all on female workers. Nurses were the most frequently investigated workforce group and urinary incontinence was the most common subtype of pelvic floor dysfunction examined. Lower urinary tract symptoms were more prevalent in the studied nurses than related general populations. No included study investigated pelvic organ prolapse, anorectal or male symptoms or the influence of symptoms on work productivity. Conclusion: Lower urinary tract symptoms are a significant issue among the female nursing workforce. Knowledge of the influence of symptoms on work productivity remains unknown. Further studies are warranted on the impact of pelvic floor dysfunction subtypes in workforce groups.

DOI 10.1111/jan.12909
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Lin Perry
2016 Drew MK, Lovell G, Palsson TS, Chiarelli PE, Osmotherly PG, 'Do Australian Football players have sensitive groins? Players with current groin pain exhibit mechanical hyperalgesia of the adductor tendon', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 19 784-788 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Sports Medicine Australia Objectives This is the first study to evaluate the mechanical sensitivity, clinical classifications and prevalence of groin pain in Australian fo... [more]

© 2016 Sports Medicine Australia Objectives This is the first study to evaluate the mechanical sensitivity, clinical classifications and prevalence of groin pain in Australian football players. Design Case-control. Methods Professional (n = 66) and semi-professional (n = 9) Australian football players with and without current or previous groin injuries were recruited. Diagnoses were mapped to the Doha Agreement taxonomy. Point and career prevalence of groin pain was calculated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed at regional and distant sites using handheld pressure algometry across four sites bilaterally (adductor longus tendon, pubic bone, rectus femoris, tibialis anterior muscle). To assess the relationship between current groin pain and fixed effects of hyperalgesia of each site and a history of groin pain, a mixed-effect logistic regression model was utilised. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curve were determined for the model. Results Point prevalence of groin pain in the preseason was 21.9% with a career prevalence of 44.8%. Adductor-related groin pain was the most prevalent classification in the pre-season period. Hyperalgesia was observed in the adductor longus tendon site in athletes with current groin pain (OR = 16.27, 95% CI 1.86 to 142.02). The ROC area under the curve of the regression model was fair (AUC = 0.76, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.83). Conclusions Prevalence data indicates that groin pain is a larger issue than published incidence rates imply. Adductor-related groin pain is the most common diagnosis in pre-season in this population. This study has shown that hyperalgesia exists in Australian football players experiencing groin pain indicating the value of assessing mechanical pain sensitivity as a component of the clinical assessment.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.12.516
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2016 Drew MK, Palsson TS, Izumi M, Hirata RP, Lovell G, Chiarelli P, et al., 'Resisted adduction in hip neutral is a superior provocation test to assess adductor longus pain: An experimental pain study', Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 26 967-974 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 John Wiley &amp; Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd The criterion of long-standing groin pain diagnoses in athletes usually relies on palpation and clini... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd The criterion of long-standing groin pain diagnoses in athletes usually relies on palpation and clinical tests. An experimental pain model was developed to examine the clinical tests under standardized conditions. Pain was induced by hypertonic saline injected into the proximal adductor longus (AL) tendon or rectus femoris (RF) tendon in 15 healthy male participants. Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as a control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS). Resisted hip adduction at three different angles and trunk flexion were completed before, during, and after injections. Pain provocation in the presence of experimental pain was recorded as a true positive compared with pain provocation in the non-pain conditions. Similar p eak VAS scores were found after hypertonic saline injections into the AL and RF and both induced higher VAS scores than isotonic saline (P < 0.01). Adduction at 0° had the greatest positive likelihood ratio (+LR = 2.8, 95%CI: 1.09¿7.32) with 45° (-LR = 0.0, 95%CI: 0.00¿1.90) and 90° (-LR = 0.0, 95%CI: 0.00¿0.94) having the lowest negative LR. This study indicates that the 0° hip adduction test resisted at the ankles optimizes the diagnostic procedure without compromising diagnostic capacity to identify experimental groin pain. Validation in clinical populations is warranted.

DOI 10.1111/sms.12529
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2015 McGarvey AC, Hoffman GR, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Maximizing shoulder function after accessory nerve injury and neck dissection surgery: A multicenter randomized controlled trial', Head and Neck, 37 1022-1031 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Background Shoulder pain and dysfunction after neck dissection may result from injury to the accessory nerve. The effect of early physical therapy ... [more]

© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Background Shoulder pain and dysfunction after neck dissection may result from injury to the accessory nerve. The effect of early physical therapy in the form of intensive scapular strengthening exercises is unknown. Methods A total of 59 neck dissection participants were prospectively recruited for this study. Participants were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n = 32), consisting of progressive scapular strengthening exercises for 12 weeks, or the control group (n = 29). Blinded assessment occurred at baseline, and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results Three-month data were collected on 52 participants/53 shoulders. Per-protocol analysis demonstrated that the intervention group had statistically significantly higher active shoulder abduction at 3 months compared to the control group (+26.6°; 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.28-45.95; p =.007). Conclusion The intervention is a favorable treatment for maximizing shoulder abduction in the short term. The effect of the intervention compared to usual care is uncertain in the longer term.

DOI 10.1002/hed.23712
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2015 Pierce H, Perry L, Gallagher R, Chiarelli P, 'Pelvic floor health: A concept analysis', Journal of Advanced Nursing, (2015) [C1]

Aim: To report an analysis of the concept &apos;pelvic floor health&apos;. Background: &apos;Pelvic floor health&apos; is a term used by multiple healthcare disciplines, yet as a ... [more]

Aim: To report an analysis of the concept 'pelvic floor health'. Background: 'Pelvic floor health' is a term used by multiple healthcare disciplines, yet as a concept is not well defined. Design: Rodger's evolutionary view was used to guide this analysis. Data sources: Academic literature databases and public domain websites viewed via the Internet search engine Google. Review methods: Literature in English, published 1946-July 2014 was reviewed. Websites were accessed in May 2014, then analysed of presentation for relevance and content until data saturation. Thematic analysis identified attributes, antecedents and consequences of the concept. Results: Based on the defining attributes identified in the analysis, a contemporary definition is offered. 'Pelvic floor health' is the physical and functional integrity of the pelvic floor unit through the life stages of an individual (male or female), permitting an optimal quality of life through its multifunctional role, where the individual possesses or has access to knowledge, which empowers the ability to prevent or manage dysfunction. Conclusion: This analysis provides a definition of 'pelvic floor health' that is based on a current shared meaning and distinguishes the term from medical and lay terms in a complex, multifaceted and often under-reported area of healthcare knowledge. This definition provides a basis for theory development in future research, by focusing on health rather than disorders or dysfunction. Further development of the meaning is required in an individual's social context, to ensure a contemporaneous understanding in a dynamic system of healthcare provision.

DOI 10.1111/jan.12628
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Lin Perry
2015 McKiernan S, Chiarelli P, Warren-Forward H, 'The content of a training package in diagnostic ultrasound for physiotherapists', Sonography, 2 1-7 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/sono.12015
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Sharmaine Mckiernan, Pauline Chiarelli
2015 Dumoulin C, Hay-Smith J, Frawley H, McClurg D, Alewijnse D, Bo K, et al., '2014 consensus statement on improving pelvic floor muscle training adherence: International Continence Society 2011 State-of-the-Science Seminar', Neurourology and Urodynamics, 34 600-605 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Aims To summarize the findings and &quot;expert-panel&quot; consensus of the State-of-the-Science Seminar on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) ad... [more]

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Aims To summarize the findings and "expert-panel" consensus of the State-of-the-Science Seminar on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) adherence held prior to the 41st International Continence Society scientific meeting, Glasgow, 2011. Methods Summaries of research and theory about PFMT adherence (based on a comprehensive literature search) were presented by subject experts at the 2011 Seminar to generate discussion and guidance for clinical practice and future research. Supplemental research, post-seminar, resulted in, three review papers summarizing: (1) relevant behavioral theories, (2) adherence measurement, determinants and effectiveness of PFMT adherence interventions, and (3) patients' PFMT experiences. A fourth, reported findings from an online survey of health professionals and the public. Results Few high-quality studies were found. Paper I summarizes 12 behavioral frameworks relevant to theoretical development of PFMT adherence interventions and strategies. Findings in Paper II suggest both PFMT self-efficacy and intention-to-adhere predict PFMT adherence. Paper III identified six potential adherence modifiers worthy of further investigation. Paper IV found patient-related factors were the biggest adherence barrier to PFMT adherence. Conclusion Given the lack of high-quality studies, the conclusions were informed by expert opinion. Adherence is central to short- and longer-term PFMT effect. More attention and explicit reporting is needed regarding: (1) applying health behavior theory in PFMT program planning; (2) identifying adherence determinants; (3) developing and implementing interventions targeting known adherence determinants; (4) using patient-centred approaches to evaluating adherence barriers and facilitators; (5) measuring adherence, including refining and testing instruments; and (6) testing the association between adherence and PFMT outcome.

DOI 10.1002/nau.22796
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2015 McClurg D, Frawley H, Hay-Smith J, Dean S, Chen S-Y, Chiarelli P, et al., 'Scoping review of adherence promotion theories in pelvic floor muscle training-2011 ics state-of-the-science seminar research paper i of iv', NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS, 34 606-614 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/nau.22769
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2015 Ilic D, Jammal W, Chiarelli P, Gardiner RA, Hughes S, Stefanovic D, Chambers SK, 'Assessing the effectiveness of decision AIDS for decision making in prostate cancer testing: A systematic review', Psycho-Oncology, 24 1303-1315 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. Background Prostate cancer is a leading disease affecting men worldwide. Conflicting evidence within the literature provides little guidance ... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Background Prostate cancer is a leading disease affecting men worldwide. Conflicting evidence within the literature provides little guidance to men contemplating whether or not to be screened for prostate cancer. This systematic review aimed to determine whether decision aids about early detection of prostate cancer improve patient knowledge and decision making about whether to undergo prostate-specific antigen testing. Methods Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects and Health Technology Assessment databases up until March 2014 were searched. All included randomised controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality. Clinical selection and assessment heterogeneity among studies prevented the pooling of data for meta-analyses. Descriptive analyses of all included studies and comparison were performed. Results A total of 13 randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. Significant heterogeneity was present for the design and implementation of decision aids including comparative interventions and outcomes. Eight studies were of a low methodological quality, with the remaining five of medium quality. Improvements in patient knowledge following use of a decision aid were demonstrated by 11 of the 13 included studies. Seven of 10 studies demonstrated a reduction in decisional conflict/distress. Three of four studies demonstrated no difference between a decision aid and information only in reducing decisional uncertainty. Three of five studies demonstrated an increase in decisional satisfaction with use of a decision aid. Conclusions Decision aids increase patient knowledge and confidence in decision making about prostate cancer testing. Further research into effective methods of implementation is needed.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3815
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 McKiernan ST, Chiarelli P, Warren-Forward H, 'Diagnostic Ultrasound for Assessment of Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction: Frequently Asked Questions.', Journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Women's Health, Spring 37-43 (2014) [C1]
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Sharmaine Mckiernan, Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Woodward S, Norton C, Chiarelli P, 'Biofeedback for treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation in adults', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2014)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008486.pub2
Citations Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Lopès P, Levy-Toledano R, Chiarelli P, Rimbault F, Marès P, 'Multicentric prospective randomized study evaluating the interest of intravaginal electro-stimulation at home for urinary incontinence after prior perineal reeducation. Interim analysis', Gynecologie Obstetrique Fertilite, (2014)

Objectives: Perineal reeducation of stress urinary incontinence is beneficial in 80% of cases. However, patients have to perform self-retraining exercises of the perineal muscles ... [more]

Objectives: Perineal reeducation of stress urinary incontinence is beneficial in 80% of cases. However, patients have to perform self-retraining exercises of the perineal muscles at home, in order to maintain the benefit of the physiotherapy. The aim of this study is to assess the benefit of GYNEFFIK ® , a perineal electro-stimulator, during this home-care phase. Patients and methods: Women with stress urinary incontinence (UI) or with mixed UI (composed predominantly of stress UI) that responded to physiotherapy were included in this study in two parallel groups. The groups followed a self-reeducation program, with or without GYNEFFIK ® electro-stimulation sessions. The comparison of the two groups was based on the rate of women for whom the benefit of the initial perineal reeducation was maintained (defined as non-worsening ICIQ and Ditrovie scales' score). Results: According to the protocol, an interim analysis was performed on 95 patients (i.e. almost half of the expected sample size) who had had at least one evaluation under treatment, among which 44 patients had finished the study. The therapeutic benefit of the initial perineal reeducation was maintained in 87.8% of the GYNEFFIK ® patient group, while it was maintained in 52.2% (P = 0.0001) in the usual care group (i.e. who did not use electro-stimulation). Discussion and Conclusion: Likewise, patient had a more favorable subjective impression when using GYNEFFIK ® (83.7% versus 60.0% in the usual care group) as they felt that they improved during the study. In the GYNEFFIK ® group, no increase in symptoms was reported, whereas almost one out of five patients in the usual care group felt that their condition had worsened. © 2014.

DOI 10.1016/j.gyobfe.2014.01.002
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 McGarvey AC, Hoffman GR, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Intra-operative monitoring of the spinal accessory nerve: A systematic review', Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 128 746-751 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 JLO (1984) Limited. Objective: To investigate evidence that intra-operative nerve monitoring of the spinal accessory nerve affects the prevalence of post-operative shoulde... [more]

© 2014 JLO (1984) Limited. Objective: To investigate evidence that intra-operative nerve monitoring of the spinal accessory nerve affects the prevalence of post-operative shoulder morbidity and predicts functional outcome. Methods: A search of the Medline, Scopus and Cochrane databases from 1995 to October 2012 was undertaken, using the search terms 'monitoring, intra-operative' and 'accessory nerve'. Articles were included if they pertained to intra-operative accessory nerve monitoring undertaken during neck dissection surgery and included a functional shoulder outcome measure. Further relevant articles were obtained by screening the reference lists of retrieved articles. Results: Only three articles met the inclusion criteria of the review. Two of these included studies suggesting that intra-operative nerve monitoring shows greater specificity than sensitivity in predicting post-operative shoulder dysfunction. Only one study, with a small sample size, assessed intra-operative nerve monitoring in neck dissection patients. Conclusion: It is unclear whether intra-operative nerve monitoring is a useful tool for reducing the prevalence of accessory nerve injury and predicting post-operative functional shoulder outcome in patients undergoing neck dissection. Larger, randomised studies are required to determine whether such monitoring is a valuable surgical adjunct.

DOI 10.1017/S0022215113002934
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2014 Lopès P, Levy-Toledano R, Chiarelli P, Rimbault F, Marès P, 'Multicentric prospective randomized study evaluating the interest of intravaginal electro-stimulation at home for urinary incontinence after prior perineal reeducation. Interim analysis', Gynecologie Obstetrique et Fertilite, 42 155-159 (2014)

Objectives Perineal reeducation of stress urinary incontinence is beneficial in 80% of cases. However, patients have to perform self-retraining exercises of the perineal muscles a... [more]

Objectives Perineal reeducation of stress urinary incontinence is beneficial in 80% of cases. However, patients have to perform self-retraining exercises of the perineal muscles at home, in order to maintain the benefit of the physiotherapy. The aim of this study is to assess the benefit of GYNEFFIK ® , a perineal electro-stimulator, during this home-care phase. Patients and methods Women with stress urinary incontinence (UI) or with mixed UI (composed predominantly of stress UI) that responded to physiotherapy were included in this study in two parallel groups. The groups followed a self-reeducation program, with or without GYNEFFIK ® electro-stimulation sessions. The comparison of the two groups was based on the rate of women for whom the benefit of the initial perineal reeducation was maintained (defined as non-worsening ICIQ and Ditrovie scales' score). Results According to the protocol, an interim analysis was performed on 95 patients (i.e. almost half of the expected sample size) who had had at least one evaluation under treatment, among which 44 patients had finished the study. The therapeutic benefit of the initial perineal reeducation was maintained in 87.8% of the GYNEFFIK ® patient group, while it was maintained in 52.2% (P = 0.0001) in the usual care group (i.e. who did not use electro-stimulation). Discussion and Conclusion Likewise, patient had a more favorable subjective impression when using GYNEFFIK ® (83.7% versus 60.0% in the usual care group) as they felt that they improved during the study. In the GYNEFFIK ® group, no increase in symptoms was reported, whereas almost one out of five patients in the usual care group felt that their condition had worsened. © 2012 Publie par Elsevier Masson SAS.

DOI 10.1016/j.gyobfe.2014.01.00
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Mcgarvey AC, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, Chiarelli PE, 'Lymphoedema following treatment for head and neck cancer: Impact on patients, and beliefs of health professionals', European Journal of Cancer Care, 23 317-327 (2014) [C1]

Cervicofacial lymphoedema is a recognised side-effect that may result following treatment for head and neck cancer. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives of affected pa... [more]

Cervicofacial lymphoedema is a recognised side-effect that may result following treatment for head and neck cancer. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives of affected patients and the beliefs that treating health professionals hold about head and neck lymphoedema. Ten patients with head and neck lymphoedema and 10 health professionals experienced in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients agreed to participate in semi-structured face to face interviews. Interviews were recorded, audio files were transcribed and coded and then analysed for themes. Themes of experiences of patients with head and neck lymphoedema and the beliefs of health professionals largely overlapped. Given its visible deformity, the main effect of lymphoedema in head and neck cancer patients was on appearance. In some cases this lead to negative psychosocial sequelae such as reduced self-esteem, and poor socialisation. Clinicians need to be aware of those patients more likely to experience lymphoedema following treatment for head and neck cancer, and how they are affected. Understanding how patients with facial lymphoedema are affected psychologically and physically, and the importance of prompt referral for lymphoedema treatment, might ultimately improve outcomes and ensure optimal management. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/ecc.12134
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Gallagher R, Osmotherly P, Chiarelli P, 'Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, what is the physiotherapist¿s role in assessment for surgery?', Physical Therapy Reviews, 19 245-251 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1179/1743288X13Y.0000000130
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Ryan Gallagher Uon, Peter Osmotherly
2014 Chiarelli PE, Johnston C, Osmotherly PG, 'Introducing palliative care into entry-level physical therapy education', Journal of Palliative Medicine, 17 152-158 (2014) [C1]

Background and Objective: There is a paucity of information related to teaching palliative care to entry-level physical therapy students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the... [more]

Background and Objective: There is a paucity of information related to teaching palliative care to entry-level physical therapy students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of an undergraduate course in palliative care on the preparedness of entry-level physical therapy students to practice within the palliative care setting. Methods: Participants were all entry-level undergraduate students enrolled in the third year of a 4-year undergraduate degree. All students enrolled in the course, "Physiotherapy Through Lifestages" took part in the learning modules relating to the care of patients undergoing palliative care. A survey instrument was used in the study, a modified version of an existing unpublished written questionnaire previously used to evaluate palliative care education in other allied health professions. Results and Conclusions: Participation in the course resulted in an increase in self-rated knowledge and confidence for working in the palliative care setting for entry-level physical therapy students and is considered to provide a useful ongoing resource for the presentation of this topic material. Although the impact of the delivery of this education module may be considered successful in this regard, it would appear that some of the underlying attitudes and emotional responses to this area of physiotherapy practice were less easily influenced. Further research is required to understand the influences on emotional preparedness of students to undertake this area of study and practice and to determine the optimal stage of study for delivery of this content. © Copyright 2014, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

DOI 10.1089/jpm.2013.0158
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Cath Johnston, Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Drew MK, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Imaging and clinical tests for the diagnosis of long-standing groin pain in athletes. A systematic review', Physical Therapy in Sport, 15 124-129 (2014) [C1]

Objectives: To examine the validity of clinical tests available for the diagnosis of longstanding groin pain in athletes. Design: Systematic review. Method: A published search str... [more]

Objectives: To examine the validity of clinical tests available for the diagnosis of longstanding groin pain in athletes. Design: Systematic review. Method: A published search strategy of MeSH terms in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and SportDiscuss. Inclusion criteria: diagnostic studies relating to athletic groin pain, professional or semi-professional athletes, symptoms lasting for more than six weeks, and not limited by age or gender. A priori exclusion criteria were utilised. Outcome measures: QUADAS tool, sensitivity and specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values of the reported tests and investigations. Results: 577 Journal articles were identified. Five studies metall requirements. Sensitivity and specificity of clinical tests ranged between 30 and 100% and 88 and 95% respectively with negative likelihood ratio of 0.15-0.78 and positive likelihood ratios of 1.0-11.0. Sensitivity and specificity of investigations (MRI, herniography, and dynamic ultrasound) ranged between 68% and 100% as well as 33% and 100% respectively with negative likelihood ratios between 0 and 0.32 and positive likelihood ratios between 1.5 and 8.1. Conclusion: There is a lack of validated diagnostic clinical tests available for clinicians and a lack of symptomology being evaluated. It is recommended that a reference standard should be applied and data should be reported in sufficient detail to calculate diagnostic statistics that is useful to the clinician. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.ptsp.2013.11.002
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Downs S, Marquez J, Chiarelli P, 'Normative scores on the Berg Balance Scale decline after age 70 years in healthy community-dwelling people: a systematic review', JOURNAL OF PHYSIOTHERAPY, 60 85-89 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jphys.2014.01.002
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jodie Marquez, Pauline Chiarelli
2013 McGarvey AC, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, Chiarelli PE, 'Impact of Neck Dissection on Scapular Muscle Function: A Case-Controlled Electromyographic Study', ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, 94 113-119 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2012.07.017
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2013 Halland M, Koloski NA, Jones M, Byles J, Chiarelli P, Forder P, Talley NJ, 'Prevalence Correlates and Impact of Fecal Incontinence Among Older Women', DISEASES OF THE COLON & RECTUM, 56 1080-1086 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/DCR.0b013e31829203a9
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Nicholas Talley, Peta Forder, Julie Byles, Pauline Chiarelli
2013 McGarvey AC, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, Chiarelli PE, 'Scapular muscle exercises following neck dissection surgery for head and neck cancer: A comparative electromyographic study', Physical Therapy, 93 786-797 (2013) [C1]

Background Shoulder pain and dysfunction can occur following neck dissection surgery for cancer. These conditions often are due to accessory nerve injury. Such an injury leads to ... [more]

Background Shoulder pain and dysfunction can occur following neck dissection surgery for cancer. These conditions often are due to accessory nerve injury. Such an injury leads to trapezius muscle weakness, which, in turn, alters scapular biomechanics. Objective The aim of this study was to assess which strengthening exercises incur the highest dynamic activity of affected trapezius and accessory scapular muscles in patients with accessory nerve dysfunction compared with their unaffected side. Design A comparative design was utilized for this study. Methods The study was conducted in a physical therapy department. Ten participants who had undergone neck dissection surgery for cancer and whose operated side demonstrated clinical signs of accessory nerve injury were recruited. Surface electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius, middle trapezius, rhomboid major, and serratus anterior muscles on the affected side was compared dynamically with that of the unaffected side during 7 scapular strengthening exercises. Results Electromyographic activity of the upper and middle trapezius muscles of the affected side was lower than that of the unaffected side. The neck dissection side affected by surgery demonstrated higher levels of upper and middle trapezius muscle activity during exercises involving overhead movement. The rhomboid and serratus anterior muscles of the affected side demonstrated higher levels of activity compared with the unaffected side. Limitations Exercises were repeated 3 times on one occasion. Muscle activation under conditions of increased exercise dosage should be inferred with caution. Conclusions Overhead exercises are associated with higher levels of trapezius muscle activity in patients with accessory nerve injury following neck dissection surgery. However, pain and correct scapular form must be carefully monitored in this patient group during exercises. Rhomboid and serratus anterior accessory muscles may have a compensatory role, and this role should be considered during rehabilitation. © 2013 American Physical Therapy Association.

DOI 10.2522/ptj.2012038
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2013 McKiernan S, Chiarelli P, Warren-Forward H, 'Professional issues in the use of diagnostic ultrasound biofeedback in physiotherapy of the female pelvic floor', Radiography, 19 117-124 (2013) [C1]

The usage of diagnostic ultrasound equipment has expanded into physiotherapy. The aim of this paper is to deliver to both the ultrasound and physiotherapy professions an understan... [more]

The usage of diagnostic ultrasound equipment has expanded into physiotherapy. The aim of this paper is to deliver to both the ultrasound and physiotherapy professions an understanding of the use of diagnostic ultrasound for biofeedback in physiotherapy of the female pelvic floor and the issues related to competent and safe practice, including accessing suitable training. This has been evaluated using a qualitative research paradigm with data gathered via focus groups of Australian physiotherapists. The target group were pelvic floor physiotherapists as this is one of the main uses of diagnostic ultrasound within physiotherapy and the main area physiotherapists would like to be trained in. Two focus groups were run with a total of sixteen physiotherapists. Focus group participants reported their training in diagnostic ultrasound to be largely self directed. They also reported they were learning on their patients. Despite very limited training, participants demonstrated some familiarity with images and equipment settings. Participants felt the modality had a role within physiotherapy as an adjunct to their current practices. The main need raised by participants during the focus groups was related to patient expectations and the fact that the physiotherapist may miss evidence of pathology. © 2013 The College of Radiographers.

DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2013.01.006
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Helen Warren-Forward, Sharmaine Mckiernan
2013 Scott OM, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Assessment of pelvic floor muscle contraction ability in healthy males following brief verbal instruction', The Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal, 19 12-17 (2013) [C1]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2013 Downs S, Marquez J, Chiarelli P, 'The Berg Balance Scale has high intra- and inter-rater reliability but absolute reliability varies across the scale: a systematic review', JOURNAL OF PHYSIOTHERAPY, 59 93-99 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Jodie Marquez, Pauline Chiarelli
2012 Chiarelli P, Sibbritt D, 'OSTEOPOROSIS AND PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE IN AUSTRALIAN WOMEN: A LONGITUDINAL ANALYSIS.', INTERNATIONAL UROGYNECOLOGY JOURNAL, 23 S151-S152 (2012)
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2012 Downs S, Marquez JL, Chiarelli PE, 'Balance outcomes from two small rural hospitals', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 20 275-280 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Jodie Marquez
2012 McKiernan ST, Chiarelli PE, Warren-Forward H, 'A comparison between workshop and DVD methods of training for physiotherapists in diagnostic ultrasound', Radiography, 18 287-291 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2012.07.004
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Helen Warren-Forward, Sharmaine Mckiernan
2011 McGarvey A, Chiarelli PE, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, 'Physiotherapy for accessory nerve shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection surgery: A literature review', Head and Neck-Journal for the Sciences and Specialties of the Head and Neck, 33 274-280 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/hed.21366
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2011 McKiernan ST, Chiarelli PE, Warren-Forward H, 'A survey of diagnostic ultrasound within the physiotherapy profession for the design of future training tools', Radiography, 17 121-125 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2010.08.003
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Sharmaine Mckiernan, Helen Warren-Forward, Pauline Chiarelli
2011 Chiarelli PE, 'Continence assessment in residential aged care', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 30 2 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2011.00508.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2011 Burrows TL, Findlay NA, Killen CG, Dempsey SE, Hunter S, Chiarelli PE, Snodgrass SN, 'Using nominal group technique to develop a consensus derived model for peer review of teaching across a multi-school faculty', Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 8 1-9 (2011) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Shane Dempsey, Pauline Chiarelli, Suzanne Snodgrass, Tracy Burrows, Sharyn Hunter
2010 McKiernan ST, Chiarelli PE, Warren-Forward H, 'Diagnostic ultrasound use in physiotherapy, emergency medicine, and anaesthesiology', Radiography, 16 154-159 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2009.12.004
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Sharmaine Mckiernan, Helen Warren-Forward
2010 Chiarelli PE, Weatherall M, 'The link between chronic conditions and urinary incontinence', Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal, 16 7-14 (2010) [C1]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2010 Surjan Y, Chiarelli PE, Dempsey SE, Lyall DG, O'Toole G, Snodgrass SN, Tessier JW, 'The experience of implementing an interprofessional first year course for undergraduate health science students: The value of acting on student feedback', Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, 7 1-17 (2010) [C1]
Co-authors Yolanda Surjan, David Lyall, John Tessier, Pauline Chiarelli, Gjyn Otoole, Suzanne Snodgrass, Shane Dempsey
2009 Byles JE, Millar CJ, Sibbritt DW, Chiarelli PE, 'Living with urinary incontinence: A longitudinal study of older women', Age and Ageing, 38 333-338 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ageing/afp013
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Julie Byles, Pauline Chiarelli
2009 Chiarelli PE, Mackenzie LA, Osmotherly PG, 'Urinary incontinence is associated with an increase in falls: A systematic review', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 55 89-95 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0004-9514(09)70038-8
Citations Scopus - 60Web of Science - 51
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2008 Tomas L, Chiarelli P, Baines SK, 'Urinary incontinence', Journal of Complementary Medicine, 7 14-22 (2008)

¿ Stress, urge (overactive bladder; OAB) and mixed incontinence is more prevalent in women than men, with prevalence of the stress type peaking in females in their 50s and OAB an... [more]

¿ Stress, urge (overactive bladder; OAB) and mixed incontinence is more prevalent in women than men, with prevalence of the stress type peaking in females in their 50s and OAB and of stress incontinence increasing with age ¿ Age, Caucasian ethnicity, high BMI, smoking, alcohol intake, higher education, hormone status, comorbidities and medications are all associated with urinary incontinence ¿ Association with caffeine is less strong than previously thought, however reduced fluid intake does reduce incontinence episodes in those consuming > 1L/day ¿ Weight loss is an important non-surgical treatment in moderately obese women ¿ Supplemental magnesium may be beneficial OAB in women, while potassium may relieve symptoms of urinary incontinence and frequency ¿ Hormone replacement may affect incontinence, with synthetic hormones worsening symptoms ¿ There is considerable high-level evidence for mind-body interventions, such as relaxation, CBT, mediation, imagery, biofeedback and imagery ¿ Moderate evidence supports bladder training ¿ Magnetic stimulation is a new therapy for incontinence and evidence to date suggests it may be effective in the short term ¿ Electrostimulation trials have had some inconsistently positive results ¿ Pelvic-floor muscle training, the most effective and commonly recommended physical therapy for women, can be easily initiated but current guidelines recommend specialised training ¿ Acupuncture has been trialled with some success for urinary incontinence.

Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2008 Chiarelli PE, 'The two faces of Janus: Looking backwards, looking forward', Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal, 14 35-36 (2008) [C3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2008 Chiarelli PE, 'Systematic review: The management of constipation using physical therapies Including biofeedback', Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal, 14 6-13 (2008) [C1]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2008 Drew MK, Sibbritt DW, Chiarelli PE, 'No association between previous Caesarean-section delivery and back pain in mid-aged Australian women: An observational study', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 54 269-272 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0004-9514(08)70006-0
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2007 Chiarelli PE, 'Urinary stress incontinence and overactive bladder symptoms in older women', Contemporary Nurse: A Journal for the Australian Nursing Profession, 26 198-207 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.5172/conu.2007.26.2.198
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2007 Parkinson L, Chiarelli PE, Byrne JM, Gibson RE, McNeill S, Lloyd G, et al., 'Continence promotion for older hospital patients following surgery for fractured neck of femur: Pilot of a randomized controlled trial', Clinical Interventions in Aging, 2 705-714 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.2147/CIA.S1302
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Julie Byles, L Parkinson, Pauline Chiarelli
2007 Chiarelli PE, 'Hysterectomy, Vaginal Repair and Surgery for Stress Incontinence [Book Review]', Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal, 13 96 (2007) [C3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2007 Chiarelli PE, 'Constipation 213-222 (2007)
DOI 10.1007/978-1-84628-756-5_33
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2007 Maskell FJ, Chiarelli PE, Isles R, 'Dizziness after traumatic brain injury: Results from an interview study', Brain Injury, 21 741-752 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02699050701472109
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2006 Maskell FJ, Chiarelli PE, Isles RC, 'Dizziness after traumatic brain injury: Overview and measurement in the clinical setting', Brain Injury, 20 293-305 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02699050500488041
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2006 Chiarelli PE, 'Commentary', Evidence - Based Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 8 113 (2006) [C3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2006 Chiarelli PE, Byles JE, Parkinson L, Gibson RE, 'Changes in lower urinary tract symptoms following surgery for fractured neck of femur', Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal, 12 90-92 (2006) [C1]
Co-authors Julie Byles, L Parkinson, Pauline Chiarelli
2006 Byles JE, Chiarelli PE, Hacker AH, 'The Evaluation of Print Material used within Three Models of Continence Care', Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal, 12 75-76 (2006) [C1]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Julie Byles
2005 Byles JE, Chiarelli PE, Hacker AH, Bruin CT, Cockburn JD, Parkinson L, 'An evaluation of three community-based projects to improve care for incontinence', International Urogynecology Journal, 16 29-38 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00192-004-1208-y
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, L Parkinson, Julie Byles
2005 Chiarelli PE, Bower W, Wilson AJ, Attia JR, Sibbritt DW, 'Estimating the prevalence of urinary and faecal incontinence in Australia: systematic review', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 24 19-27 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2005.00063.x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Amanda Wilson, John Attia, Pauline Chiarelli
2005 Lee C, Johnson CE, Chiarelli PE, 'Women's Waterworks: Evaluating and Early Intervention for Incontinence Among Adult Women', Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal, 11 11-16 (2005) [C1]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2005 Chiarelli PE, 'Conservative treatment for postpartum incontinence did not result in decreased rates of incontinence in the long term: Commentary', Evidence-based Obstetrics and Gynecology, 7 199-200 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ebobgyn.2005.09.004
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2004 Chiarelli PE, Murphy BM, Cockburn JD, 'Promoting urinary continence in postpartum women: 12-month follow-up data from a randomised controlled trial', International Urogynecology Journal, 15 99-105 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00192-004-1119-y
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2004 Chiarelli PE, 'Urinary incontinence: the last taboo?', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 12 277-278 (2004) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2004 Chiarelli PE, 'Pelvic floor electrical stimulation did not improve the efficacy of behavioural training for stress incontinence - commentary', Evidence-based Obstetrics and Gynecology, 6 38 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ebobgyn.2004.01.005
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2004 Capra S, Collins C, Chiarelli P, 'Best practice dietary management of chronic constipation', JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 2 (2004)

Objectives The objective of this review is to identify and present the best available evidence on dietetic treatment and management of constipation in children and adults. This wi... [more]

Objectives The objective of this review is to identify and present the best available evidence on dietetic treatment and management of constipation in children and adults. This will be achieved by reviewing the literature relevant to the management of constipation. Question To investigate effectiveness of dietary interventions in chronic constipation in achieving laxation. Criteria for Inclusion Types of Participants Participants will include children or adults, who are defined as constipated by the following definition: Having at least one of:- ¿ < 3 bowel movements each week ¿ hard or lumpy stools ¿ anal blockage Patients with a constipation for a minimum of two weeks, whose constipation is treated for a minimum of one week. Patients from special populations, such as peripartum and tube-fed patients, will be excluded. Types of Interventions Interventions of interest will be those used for the purpose of treatment of constipation. Examples of specific interventions to be included in the review, but not be limited to, include: bulk, stimulant, osmotic and softening (surfactant) laxatives. Specific treatments previously identified include: psyllium, ispaghula, bran, prucara, lactulose, lactitol, propylethylene glycol, docusate sodium, docusate calcium, cisapride, senna, agiolax, lunelax, calcium polycarbophil, methylcellulose, magnesium hydroxide, laxamucil, sorbitol, dorbanex and sodium picosulphate. Results will be reported under the categories of: 1. Interventions provided by a dietary strategy solely. 2. Interventions provided by a dietary and laxative medication strategy. Types of Outcome measures Measures of outcome will include but not be limited to: ¿ Frequency and/or consistency of bowel actions per week ¿ Symptom improvement (including anal blockage). ¿ Reduction in abdominal pain ¿ Need for breakthrough laxatives ¿ Cost.

Co-authors Clare Collins, Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Chiarelli PE, 'Pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy prevented urinary incontinence in late pregnancy and after delivery', Evidence-Based Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 5 131 (2003) [C3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Chiarelli PE, Byles JE, Hacker AH, Bruin C, 'Help Seeking for Faecal Incontinence', Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal, 9 16-19 (2003) [C2]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Julie Byles
2003 Byles JE, Chiarelli PE, Hacker AH, Bruin C, 'Help Seeking for Urinary Incontinence', Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal, 9 8-13 (2003) [C2]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Julie Byles
2003 Chiarelli PE, Bower W, Wilson AJ, Sibbritt DW, Attia JR, 'The prevalence of urinary incontinence in the community: a systematic review', Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, (2003) [C3]
Co-authors John Attia, Pauline Chiarelli, Amanda Wilson
2003 Chiarelli PE, Bower W, Wilson AJ, Sibbritt DW, Attia JR, 'The prevalence of faecal incontinence: a systematic review', Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, (2003) [C3]
Co-authors Amanda Wilson, Pauline Chiarelli, John Attia
2003 Chiarelli P, Cockburn J, Sampselle CM, 'A physiotherapist-led programme of postpartum pelvic floor exercises reduced urinary incontinence at 3 months', Evidence-based Obstetrics and Gynecology, 5 38-39 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S1361-259X(03)00029-1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Chiarelli PE, Murphy BM, Cockburn JD, 'Acceptability of a urinary continence promotion programme to women in postpartum', BJOG: an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 110 188-196 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1046/j.1471-0528.2003.02205.x
Citations Scopus - 14
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Chiarelli PE, Bates A, Rowe LJ, 'Factors related to thumb pain in physiotherapists', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 49 243-250 (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Darren Rivett, Suzanne Snodgrass
2003 Chiarelli PE, Murphy BM, Cockburn JD, 'Fecal Incontinence After High-Risk Delivery', Obstetrics and Gynecology, 102 1299-1305 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.obstetgynecol.2003.08.021
Citations Scopus - 21
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Chiarelli PE, Murphy B, Cockburn JD, 'Women's Knowledge, Practices, and Intentions Regarding Correct Pelvic Floor Exercises', Neurourology and Urodynamics, 22 246-249 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/nau.10119
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Miller YD, Brown WJ, Russell A, Chiarelli PE, 'Urinary Incontinence Across the Lifespan', Neurourology and Urodynamics, 22 550-557 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/nau.10023
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Miller YD, Brown WJ, Smith N, Chiarelli PE, 'Managing Urinary Incontinence Across the Lifespan', International Journal of Behavioural Medicine, 10 143-161 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1207/S15327558IJBM1002_04
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Chiarelli P, Murphy B, Cockburn J, 'Fecal incontinence after high-risk delivery', OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY, 102 1299-1305 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/j.obstetgynccol.2003.08.021
Citations Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Mørkved S, Bø K, Schei B, Salvesen KA, Chiarelli P, 'Pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy prevented urinary incontinence in late pregnancy and after delivery', Evidence-based Obstetrics and Gynecology, 5 130-131 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S1361-259X(03)00095-3
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Chiarelli P, Murphy B, Cockburn J, 'Acceptability of a urinary continence promotion programme to women in postpartum', BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, 110 188-196 (2003)
DOI 10.1046/j.1471-0528.2003.02205.x
Citations Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2002 Chiarelli PE, Cockburn J, 'Promoting urinary incontinence in women after delivery:randomised controlled trial', British Medical Journal, 7348 1241-1244 (2002) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmj.324.7348.1241
Citations Scopus - 79Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2001 Doran C, Chiarelli PE, Cockburn JD, 'Economic costs of urinary incontinence in community-dwelling Australian women', Medical Journal of Australia, 174 456-458 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2000 Chiarelli PE, Brown W, McElduff P, 'Constipation in Australian women: prevalence and associated factors', International Urogynecology Journal, 11 71-78 (2000) [C1]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2000 Chiarelli P, Brown W, McElduff P, 'Constipation in Australian women: prevalence and associated factors', International Urogynecology Journal & Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, 11 71-78 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 58Web of Science - 45
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Pauline Chiarelli
2000 Chiarelli P, 'The efficacy of exercises, electrical stimulation and cones in the treatment of genuine stress incontinence in women', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOTHERAPY, 46 317-317 (2000)
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
1999 Chiarelli PE, Brown W, 'Leaking urine in Australian women: Prevalence and associated conditions', Women and Health, 29(1) 1-13 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
1999 Chiarelli PE, Cockburn JD, 'The development of a physiotherapy continence promotion program using a customer focus', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 45 111-119 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
1999 Chiarelli P, Brown WJ, McElduff P, 'Leaking Urine: Prevalence And Associated Factors In Australian Women', NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS, 18 567-577 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 116Web of Science - 93
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Pauline Chiarelli
1999 Chiarelli PE, Brown W, McEldruff P, 'Leaking urine-Prevalence and associated factors in Australian women', Neurology and Urodynamics, 18 567-577 (1999) [C1]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
1999 Chiarelli PE, Cockburn JD, 'Postpartum perineal management and best practice', Australian College of Midwives Incorporated, 12(1) 14-18 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
1997 Chiarelli P, Campbell E, 'Incontinence during pregnancy. Prevalence and opportunities for continence promotion', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 37 66-73 (1997)

A cross-sectional study using a structured interview was conducted with 304 women in the postnatal ward of a large NSW teaching hospital. Women were asked about any incontinence e... [more]

A cross-sectional study using a structured interview was conducted with 304 women in the postnatal ward of a large NSW teaching hospital. Women were asked about any incontinence experienced in the last month of pregnancy, and about advice and interventions for bladder control or incontinence they had received during pregnancy. Sixty four per cent of women reported incontinence during pregnancy. Compared to women with no prior deliveries, those with a previous forceps delivery were 10 times more likely to experience incontinence, and with prior vaginal deliveries 4 times more likely to experience incontinence. Women who reported experiencing bouts Of coughing on a regular basis during pregnancy were 4 times more likely to experience incontinence than those who did not. While 68% of the women reported being examined vaginally at least once during pregnancy, only 6% of the sample reported having their pelvic floor muscles tested during routine vaginal examination. Twenty three per cent of women reported having spoken with a healthcare professional regarding loss of bladder control. The results indicate, that opportunities for continence promotion are not being utilized.

Citations Scopus - 35
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
1989 Chiarelli PE, 'Incontinence. The pelvic floor function.', Australian family physician, 18 (1989)

The most commonly found contributing factor in incontinence is weakness of the pelvic floor muscles. This is true for patients with stress incontinence and for patients in need of... [more]

The most commonly found contributing factor in incontinence is weakness of the pelvic floor muscles. This is true for patients with stress incontinence and for patients in need of a bladder retraining programme. Simple assessment and strengthening procedures for these muscles give the general practitioner a powerful tool for treating and preventing weakness.

Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
1981 Chiarelli PE, O'Keefe DR, 'PHYSIOTHERAPY FOR THE PELVIC FLOOR', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 27 103-108 (1981)

The inefficiencies of the physiotherapy profession in its attitude to the treatment of pelvic floor insufficiency and urinary stress incontinence are discussed, together with a de... [more]

The inefficiencies of the physiotherapy profession in its attitude to the treatment of pelvic floor insufficiency and urinary stress incontinence are discussed, together with a description of the different types of urinary stress incontinence, their causes and a brief outline of the anatomy of the pelvic floor. The total concept of the authors' treatment regime is described in detail¿exercises done per vaginam by the physiotherapists as well as the patient, and the reasons for the choice and application of interferential therapy as an adjunct to these exercises. The authors consider that only physiotherapists possess the necessary combined skills in kinesiology and electrotherapy, and a knowledge of anatomy, and, therefore, physiotherapy is the most appropriate profession to undertake the task of retraining thousands of women who are, at the moment, literally told to ¿grin and bear it¿ until their condition is bad enough to warrant surgery, which is often not very effective. © 1981, Australian Physiotherapy Association. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/S0004-9514(14)60750-9
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
Show 86 more journal articles

Conference (40 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Pierce H, Perry L, Gallagher R, Chiarelli P, 'LIMITED FLUID INTAKE AND RESTRICTED TOILETING ARE BEHAVIOURS ASSOCIATED WITH REDUCED WORK PRODUCTIVITY FOR WOMEN WITH STORAGE LOWER URINARY TRACT SYMPTOMS AT WORK.', NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS, Florence, ITALY (2017)
Co-authors Lin Perry, Pauline Chiarelli
2015 Gallagher R, Chiarelli PE, Marquez J, Osmotherly PG, 'iNPH QUEST Study: Quantifying a battery of gait, cognitive and radiological examinations to improve shunt response from the lumbar puncture tap test ¿ Interim results', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Jodie Marquez, Peter Osmotherly
2015 Chiarelli PE, Osmotherly PG, Vaughan BL, 'Early stage prostate cancer radiotherapy with or without neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. Treatment outcomes on pelvic floor muscle function', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2015 Drew M, Palsson TS, Hirata RP, Izumi M, Lovell G, Chiarelli P, et al., 'THE INFLUENCE OF EXPERIMENTAL THIGH AND GROIN PAIN ON THE MECHANICAL SENSITIVITY, PAIN DISTRIBUTION AND CLINICAL TESTS OF THE ADDUCTOR LONGUS', Vienna, Austria (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2015 Drew MK, Palsson TS, Lovell G, Chiarelli P, Osmotherly PG, 'Australian football players exhibit primary hyperalgesia of the adductor tendon when experiencing groin pain', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2014 Frawley H, Chiarelli P, Gunn J, 'UPTAKE OF ANTEPARTUM CONTINENCE SCREENING AND PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE EXERCISE INSTRUCTION BY MATERNITY CARE PROVIDERS: AN IMPLEMENTATION PROJECT.', NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS, Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL (2014)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Drew M, Palsson TS, Hirata RP, Izumi M, Lovell G, Chiarelli P, et al., 'An experimental pain model to evaluate the diagnostic tests for adductor-related pain', Aspetar, Doha, Qatar (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2014 Drew M, Palsson TS, Hirata RP, Izumi M, Lovell G, Chiarelli P, et al., 'Pain distribution, quality and intensity in experimentally-induced adductor longus pain: Considerations for athletes with long-standing groin pain', Aspetar, Doha, Qatar (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2013 Johnston CL, Newstead CJ, Walmsley S, MacDonald-Wicks L, Chiarelli P, 'Physiotherapy student clinical placements in the aged care setting: practitioner attitudes and support needs.', Journal of Physiotherapy, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Lesley Wicks, Cath Johnston, Sarah Walmsley
2013 Gallagher R, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus. Is there a role for physiotherapists in management?', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2013 McKiernan S, Chiarelli P, Warren-Forward H, 'Using Diagnostic Ultrasound to Investigate the Pelvic Floor', Sydney (2013)
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Sharmaine Mckiernan, Pauline Chiarelli
2012 Chiarelli P, Sibbritt D, 'OSTEOPOROSIS AND URINARY INCONTINENCE IN AUSTRALIAN WOMEN: A LONGITUDINAL ANALYSIS.', NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS, Beijing, PEOPLES R CHINA (2012)
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2012 McKiernan ST, Chiarelli PE, Warren-Forward H, 'Results of a survey to investigate diagnostic ultrasound within physiotherapy', Annual National Conference of the Australian Sonographers Association, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Sharmaine Mckiernan, Pauline Chiarelli
2012 McKiernan ST, Chiarelli PE, Warren-Forward H, 'Training in diagnostic ultrasound for physiotherapists via workshop or DVD. Which provides the better educational outcome?', Annual Scientific Meeting of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy . Abstracts, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Sharmaine Mckiernan, Pauline Chiarelli
2012 McGarvey A, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman G, Chiarelli PE, 'Facial lymphoedema following treatment for head and neck cancer: Impact on patients and beliefs of health professionals', Final Program. Australian and New Zealand Head and Neck Cancer Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Brisbane, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2012 McGarvey A, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman G, Chiarelli PE, 'Impact of neck dissection on scapular muscle function: A case-controlled electromyographic study', Final Program. Australian and New Zealand Head and Neck Cancer Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Brisbane, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2012 Chiarelli PE, Sibbritt DW, 'Osteoporosis and urinary incontinence in Australian women: A longitudinal analysis', 42nd Annual Meeting of the International Continence Society (ICS). Abstracts, Beijing, China (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2011 Baratiny G, Chiarelli PE, 'Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms and sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: COSA 38th Annual Scientific Meeting Poster Abstracts, Perth, WA (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2011.01472.x
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2011 Drew MK, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'The diagnosis of persistent pain arising from the attachments of the pubic arc in athletes', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations, Brisbane (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2011 McGarvey A, Chiarelli PE, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman G, 'Physiotherapy for accessory nerve shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection surgery', Abstracts for the Tri-Society Head and Neck Oncology Meeting 2011, Singapore (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1002/hed.21366
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2011 McKiernan ST, Chiarelli PE, Warren-Forward H, 'Diagnostic ultrasound in physiotherapy, what they are using it for and how we can help', Proceedings of the UK Radiological Congress 2011, Manchester, UK (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Pauline Chiarelli, Sharmaine Mckiernan
2011 Koloski NA, Jones M, Halland M, Byles JE, Chiarelli PE, Talley NJ, 'Fecal incontinence in community dwelling older women - Its impact on quality of life and associated factors', Gastroenterology: DDW 2011 Abstracts, Chicago, IL (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Julie Byles, Pauline Chiarelli, Nicholas Talley
2011 Baratiny G, Chiarelli PE, 'Symptoms of lower urinary tract symptoms after prostate cancer treatment', Neurourology and Urodynamics, Glasgow, Scotland (2011) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2011 Halland M, Koloski NA, Jones M, Byles JE, Chiarelli PE, Forder PM, Talley NJ, 'Modifiable risk factors associated with faecal incontinence in older community dwelling women', Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Brisbane, Australia (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1746.2011.06826.x
Co-authors Peta Forder, Nicholas Talley, Julie Byles, Pauline Chiarelli
2010 Johnston CL, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Physiotherapy student preparedness for working with patients with life limiting illnesses undergoing palliative care: The impact of the palliative care curriculum for undergraduates (PCC4U) resources', ANZAME 2010: Overcoming Barriers, Re(E)Forming Professional Practice, Townsville, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Cath Johnston, Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2010 Chiarelli PE, Johnston CL, Osmotherly PG, 'An evaluation of the palliative care curriculum for undergraduates (PCC4U) resources by undergraduate physiotherapy students', ANZAME 2010: Overcoming Barriers, Re(E)Forming Professional Practice, Townsville, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Cath Johnston, Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2010 Scott O, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Assessment of pelvic floor muscle contraction ability in healthy males follwoing brief verbal instruction', Handbook. 19th National Conference on Incontinence, Alice Springs, Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2010 McGarvey A, Chiarelli PE, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman G, 'Physiotherapy for accessory nerve shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection surgery: A multicentre randomised controlled trial', Head & Neck 2010 Final Program, Manly, N.S.W. (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2010 McGarvey A, Chiarelli PE, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman G, 'Physiotherapy for accessory nerve shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection surgery: A literature review', Head & Neck 2010 Final Program, Manly, N.S.W. (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1002/hed.21366
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2009 Clinton P, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Pelvic floor muscle function in men following radiation therapy for prostate cancer: A preliminary exploration using real time ultrasound imaging', Handbook: 18th National Conference on Incontinence, Adelaide, SA (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2009 Ng Hung Shin PB, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Pre-activation of transversus abdominis protects the rectus abdominis diastasis of post-partum women doing a head lift', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy: eSupplements, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2008 Chiarelli PE, Mackenzie L, Osmotherly PG, 'The association between falls and urinary incontinence: A systematic review of the evidence', 3rd Australian and New Zealand Falls Prevention (ANZFP) Conference: Program and Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2008 Byles JE, Sibbritt DW, Miller C, Chiarelli PE, 'Living with urinary incontinence: A longitudinal study of older women', Health Outcomes 2008: Facilitating Knowledge Exchange and Transfer for a Dynamic Future: 13th National Health Outcomes Conference Proceedings, Canberra, ACT (2008) [E2]
Co-authors Julie Byles, Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Silcock PJ, Rivett DA, Chiarelli PE, 'Electromyographical Muscle Activation Patterns in Lateral Epicondylalgia', Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Australia 13 Biennial Conference, Sydney, Australia (2003) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett, Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Chiarelli P, Bates AM, Rowe LJ, 'Factors related to thumb pain in physiotherapists', Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Australia 13th Biennial Conference, Sydney, NSW (2003)
Co-authors Darren Rivett, Suzanne Snodgrass, Pauline Chiarelli
2003 Rivett DA, Sanson-Fisher RW, Chiarelli PE, Murphy BM, 'Musculoskeletal Skills Required by New Physiotherapy Graduates: Pruning the Dead Wood in Undergraduate Curricula', New Zealand Manipulative Physiotherapists Association, Auckland, New Zealand (2003) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett, Pauline Chiarelli, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2003 Rivett DA, Sanson-Fisher RW, Chiarelli PE, Murphy BM, 'Distinguishing Essential and Non-Essential Generic Skills in Clinical Practice: Perceptions Of Recent Physiotherapy Graduates', ANZAME Inaugural NSW State Conference, Newcastle (2003) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Darren Rivett, Pauline Chiarelli
2001 Chiarelli PE, Cockburn J, 'Preventing Urinary Incontinence in Postpartum Women', Neurourology and Urodynamics, Seoul, Korea (2001) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2001 Chiarelli PE, 'Anal Incontinence in Postpartum Women', International Urogynecology Journal, Melbourne Australia (2001) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
1995 Chiarelli PE, 'Assessment and rehabilitation of the muscles of the pelvic floor in the elderly', HONG KONG JOURNAL OF GERONTOLOGY, VOL 10, SUPPLEMENT 1996, HONG KONG, HONG KONG (1995)
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
Show 37 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 McKiernan ST, Chiarelli P, Warren-Forward H, 'Using Diagnostic Ultrasound to Investigate the Pelvic Floor', ( pp.30): Australian Sonographers Association (2013)
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Helen Warren-Forward
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 13
Total funding $953,686

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20131 grants / $28,386

Maximising Allied Health professional placements in aged care: exploring opportunities for future partnerships within the Newcastle and Coast region$28,386

Funding body: HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)

Funding body HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)
Project Team Doctor Catherine Johnston, Mr CLINT Newstead, Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli, Doctor Lesley MacDonald-Wicks
Scheme NSW ICTN Local Project Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201146
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20122 grants / $56,750

Maximising pelvic floor muscle function and continence status in men receiving radiation therapy with or without neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy for early-stage prostate cancer: a pilot conti$54,750

Funding body: AbbVie Pty Ltd

Funding body AbbVie Pty Ltd
Project Team Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200905
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

42nd Annual Meeting of the International Continence Society - China, 15-19 Oct 2012$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200706
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20101 grants / $62,727

Clinical and quality of life outcomes after pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence - A randomised controlled trial of a DVD-guided training tool versus standard$62,727

Funding body: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia

Funding body Clinical Oncological Society of Australia
Project Team Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000653
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20091 grants / $1,500

41st International Continence Society, Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre, 29/08/11 - 02/09/11$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G1100413
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20071 grants / $0

Priority Research centre Funding$0

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team

Prof Julie Byles

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20063 grants / $661,252

PRC - Priority Research Centre for Gender health & Ageing$543,772

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Sandra Capra, Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli, Conjoint Professor David Henry, Professor Tina Koch, Ms Chris Landorf, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Professor Deb Loxton, Associate Professor Liz Milward, Conjoint Associate Professor Lynne Parkinson, Professor Dimity Pond, Conjoint Professor David Sibbritt, Associate Professor Anne Young
Scheme Priority Research Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G0186949
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Review of current printed information products available under the National Continence Management Strategy$93,500

Funding body: Continence Foundation of Australia

Funding body Continence Foundation of Australia
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Lynne Parkinson, Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli, Professor Julie Byles
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0186932
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Continence Promotion Following Stroke: a Pilot randomised controlled trial$23,980

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Pauline Chiarelli

Scheme Unknown
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20041 grants / $122,571

Continence promotion following surgical repair of fractured neck of femur in older hospital patients$122,571

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care
Project Team Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli, Professor Julie Byles, Conjoint Associate Professor Lynne Parkinson, Professor Kichu Nair
Scheme National Continence Management Strategy
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0183872
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20031 grants / $7,500

Continence status following surgical repair of fractured neck of femur in hospital patients.$7,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli, Professor Julie Byles, Ms Rhonda Walker, Conjoint Associate Professor Lynne Parkinson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0182467
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20011 grants / $7,000

Audit of the needs of physiotherapists to promote best practice in the management of women undergoing treatment for breast cancer$7,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0181663
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19981 grants / $6,000

Primary prevention of incontinence amongst at-risk post partum women.$6,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Jill Cockburn, Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli, Dr Maxwell Brinsmead
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1998
GNo G0177212
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed9
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2007 PhD Use of Ultrasound imaging by health professional: What they know andhow this knowledge might be expanded Radiography, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2007 Masters Lymphoedema management Physiotherapy, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2004 PhD Patient contribution to clinical reasoning clinical setting Physiotherapy, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Beyond the Pathoanatomical Explanation of Long-standing Groin Pain in Athletes PhD (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Physiotherapy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer PhD (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 Masters The Berg Balance Scale - Determining its Usefulness in the Elderly M Philosophy (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD The Use of Imaging Ultrasound by Physiotherapists: Assessing and Meeting their Educational Needs PhD (Medical Radiation Sc), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Clinical Education: An Investigation of Educational Processes - The Application of Student-Centred Education and Client-Centred Care During Undergraduate Physiotherapy Clinical Practice PhD (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2007 Masters Dizziness After Traumatic Brain Injury - Towards a Measurement Tool M MedSc (Physiotherapy) [R], Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2004 Masters Factors Related to Thumb Pain in Physiotherapists M MedSc (Physiotherapy) [R], Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2004 Masters Surface Electromyographic Muscle Activation Patterns in Lateral Epicondylalgia M MedSc (Physiotherapy) [R], Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2003 Masters Factors related to thumb pain in Physiotherapists Physiotherapy, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli

Position

Conjoint Associate Professor
Bachelor of Physiotherapy
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Physiotherapy

Contact Details

Phone (02) 4921 6046
Fax (02) 4921 7902

Office

Room HE13
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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