Dr Netsanet Negewo

Dr Netsanet Negewo

Postdoctoral Research Assistant

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy

Career Summary

Biography

Netsanet Negewo is a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Faculty of Health and Medicine. Her research focus is on respiratory medicine. Netsanet is a pharmacist by profession and was awarded her PhD (Medicine) in 2017 at the University of Newcastle. Her doctoral work broadly aimed to advance the understanding of the role of comorbidities and inflammation in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Pharmacy, Addis Ababa University - Ethiopia
  • Master of Pharmacy, Addis Ababa University - Ethiopia

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Inflammation
  • Respiratory Medicine

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110203 Respiratory Diseases 100
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Negewo NA, Gibson PG, Wark PAB, Simpson JL, McDonald VM, 'Treatment burden, clinical outcomes, and comorbidities in COPD: An examination of the utility of medication regimen complexity index in COPD', International Journal of COPD, 12 2929-2942 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Negewo et al. Background: COPD patients are often prescribed multiple medications for their respiratory disease and comorbidities. This can lead to complex medication regim... [more]

© 2017 Negewo et al. Background: COPD patients are often prescribed multiple medications for their respiratory disease and comorbidities. This can lead to complex medication regimens resulting in poor adherence, medication errors, and drug-drug interactions. The relationship between clinical outcomes and medication burden beyond medication count in COPD is largely unknown. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the relationships of medication burden in COPD with clinical outcomes, comorbidities, and multidimensional indices. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, COPD patients (n=222) were assessed for demographic information, comorbidities, medication use, and clinical outcomes. Complexity of medication regimens was quantified using the validated medication regimen complexity index (MRCI). Results: Participants (58.6% males) had a mean (SD) age of 69.1 (8.3) years with a postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second % predicted of 56.5 (20.4) and a median of five comorbidities. The median (q1, q3) total MRCI score was 24 (18.5, 31). COPD-specific medication regimens were more complex than those of non-COPD medications (median MRCI: 14.5 versus 9, respectively; P < 0.0001). Complex dosage formulations contributed the most to higher MRCI scores of COPD-specific medications while dosing frequency primarily drove the complexity associated with non-COPD medications. Participants in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease quadrant D had the highest median MRCI score for COPD medications (15.5) compared to those in quadrants A (13.5; P=0.0001) and B (12.5; P < 0.0001). Increased complexity of COPD-specific treatments showed significant but weak correlations with lower lung function and 6-minute walk distance, higher St George¿s Respiratory Questionnaire and COPD assessment test scores, and higher number of prior year COPD exacerbations and hospitalizations. Comorbid cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or metabolic diseases individually contributed to higher total MRCI scores and/or medication counts for all medications. Charlson Comorbidity Index and COPD-specific comorbidity test showed the highest degree of correlation with total MRCI score (¿=0.289 and ¿=0.326; P < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion: In COPD patients, complex medication regimens are associated with disease severity and specific class of comorbidities.

DOI 10.2147/COPD.S136256
Co-authors Jodie Simpson, Peter Wark, Vanessa Mcdonald, Peter Gibson
2016 Negewo NA, McDonald VM, Baines KJ, Wark PAB, Simpson JL, Jones PW, Gibson PG, 'Peripheral blood eosinophils: A surrogate marker for airway eosinophilia in stable COPD', International Journal of COPD, 11 1495-1504 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Negewo et al. Introduction: Sputum eosinophilia occurs in approximately one-third of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and can predict exacerbati... [more]

© 2016 Negewo et al. Introduction: Sputum eosinophilia occurs in approximately one-third of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and can predict exacerbation risk and response to corticosteroid treatments. Sputum induction, however, requires expertise, may not always be successful, and does not provide point-of-care results. Easily applicable diagnostic markers that can predict sputum eosinophilia in stable COPD patients have the potential to progress COPD management. This study investigated the correlation and predictive relationship between peripheral blood and sputum eosinophils. It also examined the repeatability of blood eosinophil counts. Methods: Stable COPD patients (n=141) were classified as eosinophilic or noneosinophilic based on their sputum cell counts (=3%), and a cross-sectional analysis was conducted comparing their demographics, clinical characteristics, and blood cell counts. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess the predictive ability of blood eosinophils for sputum eosinophilia. Intraclass correlation coefficient was used to examine the repeatability of blood eosinophil counts. Results: Blood eosinophil counts were significantly higher in patients with sputum eosinophilia (n=45) compared to those without (0.3×10 9 /L vs 0.15×10 9 /L; P < 0.0001). Blood eosinophils correlated with both the percentage (¿=0.535; P < 0.0001) and number of sputum eosinophils (¿=0.473; P < 0.0001). Absolute blood eosinophil count was predictive of sputum eosinophilia (area under the curve =0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.67¿0.84; P < 0.0001). At a threshold of =0.3×10 9 /L (specificity =76%, sensitivity =60%, and positive likelihood ratio =2.5), peripheral blood eosinophil counts enabled identification of the presence or absence of sputum eosinophilia in 71% of the cases. A threshold of =0.4×10 9 /L had similar classifying ability but better specificity (91.7%) and higher positive likelihood ratio (3.7). In contrast, =0.2×10 9 /L offered a better sensitivity (91.1%) for ruling out sputum eosinophilia. There was a good agreement between two measurements of blood eosinophil count over a median of 28 days (intraclass correlation coefficient =0.8; 95% CI =0.66¿0.88; P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Peripheral blood eosinophil counts can help identify the presence or absence of sputum eosinophilia in stable COPD patients with a reasonable degree of accuracy.

DOI 10.2147/COPD.S100338
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Peter Wark, Katherine Baines, Peter Gibson, Vanessa Mcdonald, Jodie Simpson
2015 Negewo NA, Gibson PG, McDonald VM, 'COPD and its comorbidities: Impact, measurement and mechanisms', RESPIROLOGY, 20 1160-1171 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/resp.12642
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Vanessa Mcdonald
2014 Negewo NA, McDonald VM, Gibson PG, 'Comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease', Respiratory Investigation, (2014) [C1]

© 2015 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) often experience comorbid conditions. The most common comorbidities that have ... [more]

© 2015 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) often experience comorbid conditions. The most common comorbidities that have been associated with COPD include cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, metabolic disorder, osteoporosis, anxiety and depression, skeletal muscle dysfunction, cachexia, gastrointestinal diseases, and other respiratory conditions. Not only are comorbidities common but they also considerably influence disease prognosis and patients' health status, and are associated with poor clinical outcomes. However, perusal of literature indicates that little has been done so far to effectively assess, manage, and treat comorbidities in patients with COPD. The aim of this review is to comprehensively narrate the comorbid conditions that often coexist with COPD, along with their reported prevalence and their significant impacts in the disease management of COPD. A perspective on integrated disease management approaches for COPD is also discussed.

DOI 10.1016/j.resinv.2015.02.004
Citations Scopus - 14
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald, Peter Gibson
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Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Negewo N, Mcdonald V, Baines K, Wark P, Simpson J, Jones P, Gibson P, 'BLOOD EOSINOPHILS AS A SURROGATE MARKER FOR SPUTUM EOSINOPHILIA IN STABLE COPD', RESPIROLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Jodie Simpson, Peter Wark, Peter Gibson, Vanessa Mcdonald
2016 Negewo N, Gibson P, Wood L, Baines K, McDonald V, 'DOES WEIGHT LOSS COUPLED WITH RESISTANCE TRAINING IN OBESE COPD PATIENTS IMPROVE OTHER INTERRELATED COMORBIDITIES?', RESPIROLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald, Peter Gibson
2015 Negewo N, McDonald V, Baines K, Wark P, Simpson J, Jones P, Gibson P, 'Can blood eosinophils predict sputum eosinophils in stable COPD?', Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2015)
DOI 10.1183/13993003.congress-2015.PA3967
Co-authors Vanessa Mcdonald, Katherine Baines, Peter Wark, Jodie Simpson, Peter Gibson
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $57,512

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20152 grants / $30,000

The role of comorbidities and inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team

Professor Peter Gibson, Professor Vanessa McDonald, Dr Katie Baines

Scheme Emlyn and Jennie Thomas Postgraduate Medical Research Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON N

(PROJECT)$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Vanessa McDonald, Doctor Netsanet Negewo, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson, Doctor Katie Baines
Scheme Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501430
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20141 grants / $27,512

Investigating the Phenotypes of Bronchiectasis$27,512

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Professor Vanessa McDonald, Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson, Doctor Netsanet Negewo
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400084
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Dr Netsanet Negewo

Positions

Postdoctoral Research Assistant
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Research Assistant
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email netsanet.negewo@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40420762
Fax (02) 40420046

Office

Room Level 2, West Wing, HMRI building
Building Hunter Medical Research Institute
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