Ms Natalie Dodd

Associate Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Natalie has a clinical background as an Intensive Care Paramedic and has an active role in Medical Education. She is an associate lecturer and teaches into the Joint Medical Program at the University of Newcastle, with a focus on problem-based learning, communication skills and population and community health. Natalie is an early career researcher and is nearing completion of her PhD (behavioural science in relation to medicine) focussing on strategies to increase colorectal cancer screening. She has been awarded over $200,000 in research grants and awards, and has had eight publications accepted in the past two years. Natalie's interests include public health, cancer prevention and detection, medical education and research methodology.

Qualifications

  • Master of Public Health, University of Newcastle
  • Advanced Diploma of Paramedical Sciences, Ambulance Service of NSW
  • Bachelor of Clinical Practice (Paramedic), Charles Sturt University

Keywords

  • public health
  • health behaviour
  • cancer screening
  • medical education
  • paramedicine

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Associate Lecturer Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Associate Lecturer Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
15/01/2018 -  Tutorial Facilitator

Sessional marker (semester 2) Master of Public Health
PUBH6301 - Chronic disease and injury control PUBH6320 – Social and ecosystem health University of Newcastle
Tutorial facilitator (semester 2) Joint Medical Program
MEDI1011B - Problem-based learning University of Newcastle
Tutorial facilitator and sessional marker (semester 1) Joint Medical Program
MEDI1011A - Population and Community Health. University of Newcastle

Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
15/01/2018 - 15/05/2018 Project manager

The Valley to Coast Charitable Trust 

‘The development and implementation of a GP-specific Certificate in Clinical Teaching 

and Supervision’


Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/04/2014 - 13/07/2018 PhD Candidate

Strategies to increase colorectal cancer screening

Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
10/10/2013 - 1/06/2014 Research Assistant Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
25/04/1996 - 10/10/2012 Intensive Care Paramedic Ambulance Service of New South Wales
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 Hunter Cancer Research Alliance Implementation Science Research Higher Degree Student Award 2017.
Hunter Cancer Research Alliance

Prize

Year Award
2017 HCRA Symposium Award for Best Translational Science Oral Presentation.
Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Dodd N, Mansfield E, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, 'Prevalence of appropriate colorectal cancer screening and preferences for receiving screening advice among people attending outpatient clinics', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 334-339 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Authors Objective: To examine among people attending outpatient clinics aged 50¿74 at average risk of colorectal cancer (CRC): 1) The proportion who report: a) faecal o... [more]

© 2018 The Authors Objective: To examine among people attending outpatient clinics aged 50¿74 at average risk of colorectal cancer (CRC): 1) The proportion who report: a) faecal occult blood test (FOBT) within the past two years; and b) colonoscopy within the past five years, including the reasons for undergoing colonoscopy; 2) characteristics associated with under-screening; 3) For those who are under-screened, the proportion who are: a) willing to receive help and the acceptability of different methods of receiving help, and; b) unwilling to receive help and reasons for this. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 197 participants attending a major regional hospital in New South Wales, Australia. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine correlates of under-screening. Results: A total of 59% reported either FOBT in the past two years or colonoscopy in the past five years. Of those reporting colonoscopy in the past five years, 21% were potentially over-screened. Males were more likely than females to be under-screened. Of those under-screened (41%), fewer than half were willing to receive screening advice. Conclusions and implications for public health: A significant proportion of people attending outpatient clinics are under-screened for CRC, with some people also over-screened. There is a need to explore strategies to overcome both under- and over-screening.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12776
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield
2018 Dodd N, Mansfield E, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Have we increased our efforts to identify strategies which encourage colorectal cancer screening in primary care patients? A review of research outputs over time', Preventive Medicine Reports, 11 100-104 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Globally, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates remain suboptimal. Primary care practitioners are supported by clinical practice guidelines which recommend they provide r... [more]

© 2018 Globally, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates remain suboptimal. Primary care practitioners are supported by clinical practice guidelines which recommend they provide routine CRC screening advice. Published research can provide evidence to improve CRC screening in primary care, however this is dependent on the type and quality of evidence being produced. This review aimed to provide a snapshot of trends in the type and design quality of research reporting CRC screening among primary care patients across three time points: 1993¿1995, 2003¿2005 and 2013¿2015. Four databases were searched using MeSH headings and keywords. Publications in peer-reviewed journals which reported primary data on CRC screening uptake among primary care patients were eligible for inclusion. Studies meeting eligibility criteria were coded as observational or intervention. Intervention studies were further coded to indicate whether or not they met Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) study design criteria. A total of 102 publications were included. Of these, 65 reported intervention studies and 37 reported observational studies. The proportion of each study type did not change significantly over time. The majority of intervention studies met EPOC design criteria at each time point. The majority of research in this field has focused on testing strategies to increase CRC screening in primary care patients, as compared to research describing rates of CRC screening in this population. Further research is needed to determine which effective interventions are most likely to be adopted into primary care.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.05.015
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Oldmeadow, Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield
2018 Sanson-Fisher R, Hobden B, Waller A, Dodd N, Boyd L, 'Methodological quality of teaching communication skills to undergraduate medical students: a mapping review', BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12909-018-1265-4
Co-authors Amy Waller, Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2017 Waller A, Dodd N, Tattersall MHN, Nair B, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Improving hospital-based end of life care processes and outcomes: a systematic review of research output, quality and effectiveness', BMC PALLIATIVE CARE, 16 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12904-017-0204-1
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Kichu Nair, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2017 Dodd N, Carey M, Mansfield E, 'Knowledge of colorectal cancer risk factors and screening recommendations: A crosssectional study of regional Australian general practice patients', Public Health Research and Practice, 27 (2017)
DOI 10.17061/phrp2751748
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield
2017 Dodd N, Mansfield E, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, 'Are Australian general practice patients appropriately screened for colorectal cancer? A cross-sectional study', Australasian Medical Journal, 10 610-619 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, Australasian Medical Journal Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Background Australia has one of the highest rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the world. Data from the Nationa... [more]

© 2017, Australasian Medical Journal Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Background Australia has one of the highest rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the world. Data from the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) suggests that only one third of Australians eligible for CRC screening are up-to-date with CRC screening; however screening occurring outside the program is not captured. Aims This study examines the self-reported CRC screening practices of general practice patients, and the factors associated with being under-screened for CRC. Methods A cross-sectional study conducted in five general practice clinics in NSW from 2015-2017. Participants were aged 50-75 and at average risk of CRC. Participants reported whether they had a faecal occult blood test (FOBT) in the past two years, including the source of FOBT; and whether they had a colonoscopy in the past five years and the reason for colonoscopy. Results Forty-nine per cent of participants completed a FOBT in the past two years. Of these, 62 per cent sourced their FOBT from the NBCSP and 25 per cent from their general practitioner. Thirty-seven per cent of participants reported colonoscopy in the past five years. Of these, 29 per cent received potentially inappropriate colonoscopy. Thirty-two per cent of the samples were classified as under-screened. Older adults were less likely to be under-screened. Conclusion CRC screening rates were higher than those reported by the NBCSP, however a significant proportion of participants remain under-screened. Over one-quarter of participants reporting colonoscopy in the past five years may have undergone unnecessary colonoscopy. These findings indicate that more needs to be done at a general practice level to facilitate risk-appropriate CRC screening.

DOI 10.21767/AMJ.2017.3041
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield, Christopher Oldmeadow
2017 Dodd N, Carey ML, Mansfield E, Oldmeadow C, 'Testing the Effectiveness of a Primary Care Intervention to Improve Uptake of Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol', JMIR RESEARCH PROTOCOLS, 6 (2017)
DOI 10.2196/resprot.7432
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Christopher Oldmeadow, Mariko Carey
2016 Bryant J, Mansfield E, Hall A, Waller A, Boyes A, Jayakody A, et al., 'The psychosocial outcomes of individuals with hematological cancers: Are we doing enough high quality research, and what is it telling us?', Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, 101 21-31 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This systematic review assessed the quantity and quality of research examining the psychosocial outcomes among hematological cancer patients. Studies ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This systematic review assessed the quantity and quality of research examining the psychosocial outcomes among hematological cancer patients. Studies were categorised as either measurement, descriptive or intervention. Intervention studies were further assessed according to Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) methodological criteria. A total of 261 eligible papers were identified. The number of publications increased by 8.8% each year (95% CI = 7.5-10.2%; p < 0.0001). The majority of studies were descriptive (n = 232; 89%), with few measurement (n = 8; 3%) and intervention (n = 21; 8%) studies identified. Ten intervention studies met EPOC design criteria, however only two interventions, one targeted at individuals with Hodgkin's or Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and one targeted at individuals with leukaemia, lymphoma or myelomatosis were successful in improving patients' psychosocial outcomes. Despite an increasing volume of research examining psychosocial outcomes of hematological cancer patients, there is a need for robust measurement and methodologically rigorous intervention research in this area.

DOI 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2016.02.016
Co-authors Amy Waller, Elise Mansfield, Allison Boyes, Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Jayakody A, Bryant J, Carey M, Hobden B, Dodd N, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Effectiveness of interventions utilising telephone follow up in reducing hospital readmission within 30 days for individuals with chronic disease: a systematic review', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1650-9
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Mariko Carey, Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher
Show 6 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Dodd N, Carey M, Mansfield E, Oldmeadow C, 'Testing the Effectiveness of a General Practice Intervention to Improve Uptake of Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Randomized Controlled Trial', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Mariko Carey
2016 Dodd N, Carey M, Mansfield E, Oldmeadow C, 'THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A POINT OF CARE INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE UPTAKE OF COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENING AMONG PRIMARY CARE PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Christopher Oldmeadow, Mariko Carey
2016 Dodd N, Mansfield E, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, 'PARTICIPATION IN FOBT AND COLONOSCOPY AMONG AUSTRALIAN PRIMARY CARE PATIENTS: RESULTS OF A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield, Christopher Oldmeadow
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $266,447

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $114,185

The development and implementation of a GP-specific Certificate in Clinical Teaching and Supervision$114,185

Funding body: Valley to Coast Charitable Trust

Funding body Valley to Coast Charitable Trust
Project Team Mrs Kerry Peek, Professor Brian Jolly, Doctor Cathy Regan, Professor Dimity Pond, Professor Jennifer May, Doctor Miriam Grotowski, Ms Natalie Dodd
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701233
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20171 grants / $5,000

Hunter Cancer Research Alliance Implementation Science Research Higher Degree Student Award 2017$5,000

Funding body: HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance

Funding body HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20161 grants / $5,000

Improving uptake of colorectal cancer screening among primary care attendees.$5,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour
Scheme Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20143 grants / $142,262

PhD Scholarship. Australian Rotary Health/ Rotary District 9650 Bowelscan and University of Newcastle. $87,000

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team

A/Prof Mariko Carey, Dr Elise Mansfield, Dr Christopher Oldmeadow, Ms Natalie Dodd

Scheme Bowel Cancer Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON N

PhD Scholarship. MM Sawyer Trust through the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI). $37,500

Improving uptake of colorectal cancer screening among primary care attendees.Improving uptake of colorectal cancer screening among primary care attendees.

Funding body: MM Sawyer Trust through the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI).

Funding body MM Sawyer Trust through the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI).
Project Team

Ms Natalie Dodd, A/Prof Mariko Carey, Dr Elise Mansfield, Dr Christopher Oldmeadow

Scheme MM Sawyer Trust through the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI).
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Testing the impact of tailored feedback on primary care patients’ understanding of colorectal cancer risk, attitudes towards Faecal Occult Blood Tests (FOBT) and intentions to undertake FOBT screening.$17,762

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
Project Team

A/Prof Mariko Carey, Dr Elise Mansfield, L/Prof Rob Sanson-Fisher, Dr Christopher Oldmeadow, DR Lyndal Trevena, Ms Natalie Dodd

Scheme Pilot
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Ms Natalie Dodd

Positions

Associate Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Associate Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email natalie.dodd@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 40420425

Office

Room Various
Building HMRI
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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