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Dr Morrow Dong

Research Fellow

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Zhaomin Dong is a research associate of UoN. The focus of his research is on human health risk assessment. During the last eight years,  Dr Dong has accumulated experiences on most segments of the risk assessment, including exposure assessment, toxicology assessment, risk evaluation and management, as well as researching both the methodology and case study of the health risk assessment. In addition Dr Dong is focusing on how to minimize uncertainties in risk assessment, and is familiar with math modelling, statistical analysis and programming.

Research Expertise
Dr Zhaomin Dong is a research associate of UoN. The focus of his research is on human health risk assessment. 


Qualifications

  • PhD, Peking University - Beijing - China

Keywords

  • Mathematical modelling
  • Risk assessment
  • Statistical analysis

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050205 Environmental Management 60
050206 Environmental Monitoring 20
050304 Soil Chemistry (excl. Carbon Sequestration Science) 20
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (33 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Fang C, Zhang X, Dong Z, Wang L, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Smartphone app-based/portable sensor for the detection of fluoro-surfactant PFOA.', Chemosphere, 191 381-388 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.10.057
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Cheng Fang, Megh Mallavarapu, Liang Wang
2017 Qi F, Dong Z, Lamb D, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Ok YS, et al., 'Effects of acidic and neutral biochars on properties and cadmium retention of soils', CHEMOSPHERE, 180 564-573 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.04.014
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Dane Lamb, Ravi Naidu
2017 Yan K, Dong Z, Wijayawardena MAA, Liu Y, Naidu R, Semple K, 'Measurement of soil lead bioavailability and influence of soil types and properties: A review', CHEMOSPHERE, 184 27-42 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.05.143
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ayanka Wijayawardena, Ravi Naidu, Yanju Liu
2017 Qi F, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Dong Z, Yan Y, Lamb D, et al., 'Pyrogenic carbon in Australian soils', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 586 849-857 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.064
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Luchun Duan, Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan, Dane Lamb
2017 Dong Z, Bahar MM, Jit J, Kennedy B, Priestly B, Ng J, et al., 'Issues raised by the reference doses for perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 105 86-94 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2017.05.006
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu, Mezbaul Bahar, Luchun Duan, Dane Lamb
2017 Ben Y, Li T, Wan Y, Dong Z, Hu J, 'Exposure assessment of PCDD/Fs for the population living in the vicinity of municipal waste incinerator: Additional exposure via local vegetable consumption', Environmental Pollution, 224 532-540 (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd While the exposure assessment of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/Fs) for people living in the vicinity of municipal sol... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd While the exposure assessment of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/Fs) for people living in the vicinity of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) has been investigated, indirect exposure to MSWI-emitted PCDD/Fs via consumption of local foods has not been well assessed. In this study, the PCDD/F concentration in the local vegetables grown near a MSWI located in Shenzhen, South China, was determined to be 0.92¿±¿0.59¿pg/g wet weight (ww), significantly higher than that (0.25¿±¿0.35¿pg/g ww) in commercial vegetables (p¿ < ¿0.05). The PCDD/F concentrations in Banyan leaf (Ficus microcarpa) samples collected from 5 sampling sites at 1¿km intervals from the MSWI were found to be significantly decreased with increasing distance, suggesting that the local plants would be impacted by emissions from the MSWI. The exposure assessment of PCDD/Fs for the population living in the vicinity of MSWI was carried out by simultaneously analyzing PCDD/Fs in other food groups that were commonly consumed by the residents. If only the local vegetables were consumed and other foods were acquired commercially, the total dietary intake for a general adult was 0.94¿±¿0.41¿pg TEQ/kg bw/day, of which consumption of local vegetables accounted for 52.3%. If all foods consumed including vegetables were from a commercial source, the total dietary intake was 0.56¿±¿0.30¿pg TEQ/kg bw/day, of which consumption of commercial vegetables accounted for 20.1%. The present study for the first time reported the additional human exposure to PCDD/Fs via consumption of local vegetables impacted by emissions from MSWI.

DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.02.036
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Liu C, Li Y, Zhu C, Dong Z, Zhang K, Zhao Y, Xu Y, 'Response to the letter to editor "Cadmium exposure and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase: a meta-analysis"', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 24 11862-11863 (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-8787-x
2017 Liu Y, Bello O, Rahman MM, Dong Z, Islam S, Naidu R, 'Investigating the relationship between lead speciation and bioaccessibility of mining impacted soils and dusts', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 24 17056-17067 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-9250-8
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu, Mahmud Rahman
2017 Deng AQ, Dong ZM, Gao Q, Hu JY, 'Health risk assessment of arsenic in groundwater across China', Zhongguo Huanjing Kexue/China Environmental Science, 37 3556-3565 (2017)

© 2017, Editorial Board of China Environmental Science. All right reserved. The health human risk of inorganic arsenic (As) in groundwater was assessed usingthe skin cancer, bladd... [more]

© 2017, Editorial Board of China Environmental Science. All right reserved. The health human risk of inorganic arsenic (As) in groundwater was assessed usingthe skin cancer, bladder cancer, lung cancer and the union of bladder cancer and lung cancer were selected as the endpoints. The geometric mean (GM) of arsenic concentrations in groundwater across China was estimated to be in the range of 1.597~6.216µg/L. After adjusting area of each province, the GM of As was 2.773µg/L. The average daily dose (ADDs) for maleand female of As via intake of underground water were estimated to be 0.088µg/(kg bw·d) and 0.093µg/(kg bw·d), respectively. Thus, the expected risk for male raised by As via groundwater exposure was calculated to be 1.32×10 -4 for skin cancer, 9.83×10 -4 for bladdercancer, 5.88×10 -4 for lung cancer, and 1.48× 10 -3 for joint cancer risk (bladder cancer and lung cancer). The cancer risk for female was 1.35×10 -4 , 9.42×10 -4 , 1.49×10 -3 , and 2.31×10 -3 for skin, bladder, lung and the joint cancer risk, respectively, higher than those for male. In most provinces, the risk is higher than the acceptable risk level of 10 -4 for As set by US EPA.

2016 Dong Z, Yan K, Liu Y, Naidu R, Duan L, Wijayawardena A, et al., 'A meta-analysis to correlate lead bioavailability and bioaccessibility and predict lead bioavailability', Environment International, 92-93 139-145 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2016.04.009
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Yanju Liu, Mahmud Rahman, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Luchun Duan
2016 Dong Z, Liu CX, Liu Y, Yan K, Semple KT, Naidu R, 'Using publicly available data, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model and Bayesian simulation to improve arsenic non-cancer dose-response', Environment International, 92-93 239-246 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Publicly available data can potentially examine the relationship between environmental exposure and public health, however, it has not yet been widely applied... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Publicly available data can potentially examine the relationship between environmental exposure and public health, however, it has not yet been widely applied. Arsenic is of environmental concern, and previous studies mathematically parameterized exposure duration to create a link between duration of exposure and increase in risk. However, since the dose metric emerging from exposure duration is not a linear or explicit variable, it is difficult to address the effects of exposure duration simply by using mathematical functions. To relate cumulative dose metric to public health requires a lifetime physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, yet this model is not available at a population level. In this study, the data from the U.S. total diet study (TDS, 2006-2011) was employed to assess exposure: daily dietary intakes for total arsenic (tAs) and inorganic arsenic (iAs) were estimated to be 0.15 and 0.028 µg/kg/day, respectively. Meanwhile, using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 2011-2012) data, the fraction of urinary As(III) levels (geometric mean: 0.31 µg/L) in tAs (geometric mean: 7.75 µg/L) was firstly reported to be approximately 4%. Together with Bayesian technique, the assessed exposure and urinary As(III) concentration were input to successfully optimize a lifetime population PBPK model. Finally, this optimized PBPK model was used to derive an oral reference dose (Rfd) of 0.8 µg/kg/day for iAs exposure. Our study also suggests the previous approach (by using mathematical functions to account for exposure duration) may result in a conservative Rfd estimation.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2016.03.035
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Bolan S, Naidu R, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Ok YS, Palanisami T, et al., 'Speciation and bioavailability of lead in complementary medicines', Science of the Total Environment, 539 304-312 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine th... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine the speciation and bioavailability of lead (Pb) in selected complementary medicines. Six her bal and six ayurvedic medicines were analysed for: (i) total heavy metal(loid) contents including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), Pb and mercury (Hg); (ii) speciation of Pb using sequential fractionation and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques; and (iii) bioavailability of Pb using a physiologically-based in vitro extraction test (PBET). The daily intake of Pb through the uptake of these medicines was compared with the safety guidelines for Pb. The results indicated that generally ayurvedic medicines contained higher levels of heavy metal(loid)s than herbal medicines with the amount of Pb much higher than the other metal(loid)s. Sequential fractionation indicated that while organic-bound Pb species dominated the herbal medicines, inorganic-bound Pb species dominated the ayurvedic medicines. EXAFS data indicated the presence of various Pb species in ayurvedic medicines. This implies that Pb is derived from plant uptake and inorganic mineral input in herbal and ayurvedic medicines, respectively. Bioavailability of Pb was higher in ayurvedic than herbal medicines, indicating that Pb added as a mineral therapeutic input is more bioavailable than that derived from plant uptake. There was a positive relationship between soluble Pb fraction and bioavailability indicating that solubility is an important factor controlling bioavailability. The daily intake values for Pb as estimated by total and bioavailable metal(loid) contents are likely to exceed the safe threshold level in certain ayurvedic medicines. This research demonstrated that Pb toxicity is likely to result from the regular intake of these medicines which requires further investigation.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.08.124
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Thava Palanisami, Balaji Seshadri
2016 Bello O, Naidu R, Rahman MM, Liu Y, Dong Z, 'Lead concentration in the blood of the general population living near a lead-zinc mine site, Nigeria: Exposure pathways', Science of the Total Environment, 542 908-914 (2016) [C1]

© 2015. Lead (Pb) poisoning in children is a major public health catastrophe worldwide. This report summarises both exposure pathways and blood Pb levels in children below 7. year... [more]

© 2015. Lead (Pb) poisoning in children is a major public health catastrophe worldwide. This report summarises both exposure pathways and blood Pb levels in children below 7. years of age and adults (above 18. years) from the Adudu community living near a lead-zinc mine in Nasawara, Nigeria. The average and median blood Pb levels in children and adults were 2.1 and 1.3 µg/dL, 3.1 and 1.8 µg/dL, respectively. However, Pb in 14% of adults' blood exceeded 5. µg/dL, which is the recommended threshold blood Pb concentration in adults as established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Furthermore 68% of adults' blood exceeded blood Pb action level of 2 µg/dL. For children, 11.4% and 31% of the blood samples exceeded 5 µg/dL and 2 µg/dL, respectively, while no safe blood Pb level in children has been recommended. In Nasawara, a significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed between the various age groups in children with 2-4 years old having the highest levels and 6. year old children having the lowest Pb levels. Although this study did not detect elevated levels of Pb in children's blood in regions such as Zamfara, Nigeria and Kabwe, Zambia, a high percentage of samples exceeded 2 µg/dL. Soils, floor dusts, water and crops also reveal that Pb contamination in the study area could potentially be the major cause of blood Pb in the community exposed to mining. This study also observed a significant correlation between water Pb levels of adults and blood Pb levels, suggesting that water is the major exposure pathway. This analysis highlights the need to properly manage mining activities so that the health of communities living in the vicinity of a Pb-Zn mine is not compromised.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.10.143
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Yan K, Dong Z, Liu Y, Naidu R, 'Quantifying statistical relationships between commonly used in vitro models for estimating lead bioaccessibility', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 23 6873-6882 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Bioaccessibility to assess potential risks resulting from exposure to Pb-contaminated soils is commonly estimated using various in vitro... [more]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Bioaccessibility to assess potential risks resulting from exposure to Pb-contaminated soils is commonly estimated using various in vitro methods. However, existing in vitro methods yield different results depending on the composition of the extractant as well as the contaminated soils. For this reason, the relationships between the five commonly used in vitro methods, the Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure (RBALP), the unified BioAccessibility Research Group Europe (BARGE) method (UBM), the Solubility Bioaccessibility Research Consortium assay (SBRC), a Physiologically Based Extraction Test (PBET), and the in vitro Digestion Model (RIVM) were quantified statistically using 10 soils from long-term Pb-contaminated mining and smelter sites located in Western Australia and South Australia. For all 10 soils, the measured Pb bioaccessibility regarding all in vitro methods varied from 1.9 to 106¿% for gastric phase, which is higher than that for intestinal phase: 0.2 ~ 78.6¿%. The variations in Pb bioaccessibility depend on the in vitro models being used, suggesting that the method chosen for bioaccessibility assessment must be validated against in vivo studies prior to use for predicting risk. Regression studies between RBALP and SRBC, RBALP and RIVM (0.06) (0.06¿g of soil in each tube, S:L ratios for gastric phase and intestinal phase are 1:375 and 1:958, respectively) showed that Pb bioaccessibility based on the three methods were comparable. Meanwhile, the slopes between RBALP and UBM, RBALP and RIVM (0.6) (0.6¿g soil in each tube, S:L ratios for gastric phase and intestinal phase are 1:37.5 and 1:96, respectively) were 1.21 and 1.02, respectively. The findings presented in this study could help standardize in vitro bioaccessibility measurements and provide a scientific basis for further relating Pb bioavailability and soil properties.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-015-5947-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Liu C, Li Y, Zhu C, Dong Z, Zhang K, Zhao Y, Xu Y, 'Benchmark dose for cadmium exposure and elevated N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase: a meta-analysis', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 23 20528-20538 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-7214-z
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2016 Dong Z, Yuan G, Hu J, 'Uncertainty analysis in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) cancer dose-response for three occupational cohorts', Environment International, 88 53-59 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2015.12.010
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Duan L, Naidu R, Liu Y, Dong Z, Mallavarapu M, Herde P, et al., 'Comparison of oral bioavailability of benzo[a]pyrene in soils using rat and swine and the implications for human health risk assessment', Environment International, 94 95-102 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Background: There are many uncertainties concerning variations in benzo[a]pyrene (B[a] P) soil guidelines protecting human health based on carcinogenic data o... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Background: There are many uncertainties concerning variations in benzo[a]pyrene (B[a] P) soil guidelines protecting human health based on carcinogenic data obtained in animal studies. Although swine is recognised as being much more representative of the human child in terms of body size, gut physiology and genetic profile the rat/mice model is commonly used in practice. Objectives: We compare B[a]P bioavailability using a rat model to that estimated in a swine model, to investigate the correlation between these two animal models. This may help reduce uncertainty in applying bioavailability to human health risk assessment. Methods: Twelve spiked soil samples and a spiked silica sand (reference material) were dosed to rats in parallel with a swine study. B[a] P bioavailability was estimated by the area under the plasma B[a]P concentration-time curve (AUC) and faecal excretion as well in the rats. Direct comparison between the two animal models was made for: firstly, relative bioavailability (RB) using AUC assay; and secondly, the two assays in the rat model. Results: Both AUC and faecal excretion assays showed linear dose-response for the reference material. However, absolute bioavailability was significantly higher when using faecal excretion assay (p < 0.001). In aged soils faecal excretion estimated based on solvent extraction was not accurate due to the form of non-extractable fraction through ageing. A significant correlation existed between the two models using RB for soil samples (RB rat = 0.26RB swine + 17.3, R 2 = 0.70, p < 0.001), despite the regression slope coefficient revealing that the rat model would underestimate RB by about one quarter compared to using swine. Conclusions: In the comparison employed in this study, an interspecies difference of four in RB using AUC assay was identified between the rat and swine models regarding pharmacokinetic differences, which supported the body weight scaling method recommended by US EPA. Future research should focus on the carcinogenic competency (pharmacodynamics) used in experiment animals and humans.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2016.04.041
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Luchun Duan, Ravi Naidu, Yanju Liu
2015 Duan L, Naidu R, Liu Y, Palanisami T, Dong Z, Mallavarapu M, Semple KT, 'Effect of ageing on benzo[a]pyrene extractability in contrasting soils', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 296 175-184 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.04.050
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Luchun Duan, Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami, Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Rahman MM, Dong Z, Naidu R, 'Concentrations of arsenic and other elements in groundwater of Bangladesh and West Bengal, India: Potential cancer risk', Chemosphere, 139 54-64 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.05.051
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Mahmud Rahman
2015 Dong Z, Liu Y, Duan L, Bekele D, Naidu R, 'Uncertainties in human health risk assessment of environmental contaminants: A review and perspective', Environment International, 85 120-132 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Addressing uncertainties in human health risk assessment is a critical issue when evaluating the effects of contaminants on public health. A range of uncertai... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Addressing uncertainties in human health risk assessment is a critical issue when evaluating the effects of contaminants on public health. A range of uncertainties exist through the source-to-outcome continuum, including exposure assessment, hazard and risk characterisation. While various strategies have been applied to characterising uncertainty, classical approaches largely rely on how to maximise the available resources. Expert judgement, defaults and tools for characterising quantitative uncertainty attempt to fill the gap between data and regulation requirements. The experiences of researching 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) illustrated uncertainty sources and how to maximise available information to determine uncertainties, and thereby provide an 'adequate' protection to contaminant exposure. As regulatory requirements and recurring issues increase, the assessment of complex scenarios involving a large number of chemicals requires more sophisticated tools. Recent advances in exposure and toxicology science provide a large data set for environmental contaminants and public health. In particular, biomonitoring information, in vitro data streams and computational toxicology are the crucial factors in the NexGen risk assessment, as well as uncertainties minimisation. Although in this review we cannot yet predict how the exposure science and modern toxicology will develop in the long-term, current techniques from emerging science can be integrated to improve decision-making.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2015.09.008
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Luchun Duan, Yanju Liu, Dawit Bekele
2015 Shakoor MB, Niazi NK, Bibi I, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Dong Z, et al., 'Unraveling health risk and speciation of arsenic from groundwater in rural areas of Punjab, Pakistan', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 12 12371-12390 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This study determined the total and speciated arsenic (As) concentrations and other health-related water quality paramete... [more]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This study determined the total and speciated arsenic (As) concentrations and other health-related water quality parameters for unraveling the health risk of As from drinking water to humans. Groundwater samples (n = 62) were collected from three previously unexplored rural areas (Chichawatni, Vehari, Rahim Yar Khan) of Punjab in Pakistan. The mean and median As concentrations in groundwater were 37.9 and 12.7 µg¿L -1 (range = 1.5¿201 µg¿L -1 ). Fifty three percent groundwater samples showed higher As value than WHO safe limit of 10 µg¿L -1 . Speciation of As in groundwater samples (n = 13) showed the presence of inorganic As only; arsenite (As(III)) constituted 13%¿67% of total As and arsenate (As(V)) ranged from 33% to 100%. For As health risk assessment, the hazard quotient and cancer risk values were 11¿18 and 46¿600 times higher than the recommended values of US-EPA (i.e., 1.00 and 10 -6 , respectively). In addition to As, various water quality parameters (e.g., electrical conductivity, Na, Ca, Cl - , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , Fe, Mn, Pb) also enhanced the health risk. The results show that consumption of As-contaminated groundwater poses an emerging health threat to the communities in the study area, and hence needs urgent remedial and management measures.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph121012371
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Mahmud Rahman
2014 Zhang Q, Jia A, Wan Y, Liu H, Wang K, Peng H, et al., 'Occurrences of three classes of antibiotics in a natural river basin: Association with antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli', Environmental Science and Technology, 48 14317-14325 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es503700j
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 33
2014 Duan L, Palanisami T, Liu Y, Dong Z, Mallavarapu M, Kuchel T, et al., 'Effects of ageing and soil properties on the oral bioavailability of benzo[a]pyrene using a swine model', Environment International, 70 192-202 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2014.05.017
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Yanju Liu, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu, Luchun Duan
2013 Wan Y, Zhang K, Dong Z, Hu J, 'Distribution is a major factor affecting bioaccumulation of decabrominated diphenyl ether: Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) as an example', Environmental Science and Technology, 47 2279-2286 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es304926r
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
2012 Meng LP, Dong ZM, Hu JY, 'National survey and risk assessment of haloacetic acids in drinking water in China for reevaluation of the drinking water standards', Zhongguo Huanjing Kexue/China Environmental Science, 32 721-726 (2012)

Nine haloacetic acids were determined in finished water samples from 117 drinking water supply plants, using a specific and sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method. Of nine haloacetic acids, ... [more]

Nine haloacetic acids were determined in finished water samples from 117 drinking water supply plants, using a specific and sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method. Of nine haloacetic acids, dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid showed high detection frequencies with 78.6% and 81.2%, and concentrations with 3.47µg/L and 3.31µg/L, respectively. The expected lifetime cancer risk of dichloroacetic acid associated with uptake of drinking water in China was 5.72×10 -6 , showing a relatively low risk. The concentration of trichloroacetic acid in finished water which exceeded the health guideline value of 20µg/L was estimated to be 1.7%. Based on the results of risk assessment and the national survey of haloacetic acids, the criteria of dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic were suggested to be 16µg/L and 20µg/L, respectively.

Citations Scopus - 4
2012 Sun J, Hu J, Peng H, Shi J, Dong Z, 'Molecular and physiological characterization of fluoroquinolone resistance in relation to uropathogenicity among Escherichia coli isolates isolated from Wenyu River, China', Chemosphere, 87 37-42 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2011.11.050
Citations Scopus - 10
2012 Ma F, Wan Y, Yuan G, Meng L, Dong Z, Hu J, 'Occurrence and source of nitrosamines and secondary amines in groundwater and its adjacent Jialu River Basin, China', Environmental Science and Technology, 46 3236-3243 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es204520b
Citations Scopus - 34
2012 Dong Z, Hu J, 'Development of lead source-specific exposure standards based on aggregate exposure assessment: Bayesian inversion from biomonitoring information to multipathway exposure', Environmental Science and Technology, 46 1144-1152 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es202800z
Citations Scopus - 15
2011 Jia A, Hu J, Wu X, Peng H, Wu S, Dong Z, 'Occurrence and source apportionment of sulfonamides and their metabolites in Liaodong Bay and the adjacent Liao River basin, North China', Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 30 1252-1260 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/etc.508
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 45
2011 Dong ZM, Wu SM, Hu JY, 'Health risk assessment for children due to lead exposure in some region of China', Zhongguo Huanjing Kexue/China Environmental Science, 31 1910-1916 (2011)

In the present study, mild mental retardation (MMR) rates for Chinese children in some regions were assessed based on the distribution of blood lead levels in Chinese children and... [more]

In the present study, mild mental retardation (MMR) rates for Chinese children in some regions were assessed based on the distribution of blood lead levels in Chinese children and a non-thresholdren dose-response curve. And then the corresponding disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were calculated using the MMR rate and the life timetable. Based on the data collected, the geometric mean (GM) and the geometric standard deviation (GSD) of blood lead levels in Chinese children were 5.94 µg/dL and 1.58 µg/dL, respectively. The rate higher than safety value of exposure for children in China was 12.74% and the corresponding MMR rate and DALYs were 0.78% and 0.1a, respectively. These results showed that the risk in Chinese children was lower than Africa, South America and partial Mideast, and similar with other Asian countries, expect for Japan, but much higher than North America and Europe.

2011 Wu SM, Jia A, Peng H, Wu XQ, Dong ZM, Hu JY, 'Determination and risk assessment of steroidal estrogens in Liaodong Bay, China', Zhongguo Huanjing Kexue/China Environmental Science, 31 1904-1909 (2011)

A highly sensitive SPE-UPLC-MS/MS method was based on dansyl derivatization was developed to investigate the concentrations and distribution of steroidal estrogens in seawater in ... [more]

A highly sensitive SPE-UPLC-MS/MS method was based on dansyl derivatization was developed to investigate the concentrations and distribution of steroidal estrogens in seawater in Liaodong Bay, China, and further assess their ecological risk to wild so-iuy mullet. Estrone, 17ß-estradiol, 17a-estradiol, estriol and 17a-ethinylestradiol were detected in seawater samples with the average concentrations of 0.714±0.407, 0.089±0.077, 0.009±0.011, 0.008±0.008 and 0.001±0.003 ng/L, respectively. The total concentration of estrogens was higher in the sea area adjacent to Daliao River than adjacent to Shuangtaizi River, and was the lowest adjacent to Daling River and Xiaoling Rivers. The average of 17ß-estradiol equivalent concentration (EEQ-E2ß) in Liaodong Bay was 0.562±0.327 ng/L, and the probability of intersex caused by steroidal estrogens was approximately 0.83%, which was much lower than the incidence of intersex in wild so-iuy mullet. Therefore, further identification of causal chemicals is needed for effective environmental safety management of Liaodong Bay.

Citations Scopus - 1
2010 Wu X, Hu J, Jia A, Peng H, Wu S, Dong Z, 'Determination and occurrence of retinoic acids and their 4-oxo metabolites in Liaodong Bay, China, and its adjacent rivers', Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 29 2491-2497 (2010)

Retinoic acids (RAs) and their metabolites play an important role in abnormal morphological development and are speculated to be a possible cause for the increased rates of deform... [more]

Retinoic acids (RAs) and their metabolites play an important role in abnormal morphological development and are speculated to be a possible cause for the increased rates of deformities in wild frog populations. In the current study, a method using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was developed for simultaneously analyzing all-trans-RA (at-RA), 13-cis-RA (13c-RA), 9-cis-RA (9c-RA), and their 4-oxo metabolites, all-trans-4-oxo-RA (at-4-oxo-RA), 13-cis-4-oxo-RA (13c-4-oxo-RA), and 9-cis-4-oxo-RA (9c-4-oxo-RA) in wastewaters and surface waters. Method detection limits were matrix dependent, ranging from 0.02 to 0.37 ng/L. The method was used to investigate the occurrence of RAs and 4-oxo-RAs in Liaodong Bay and its adjacent rivers. Of these six retinoids, at-RA, 13c-RA, at-4-oxo-RA, and 13c-4-oxo-RA were detected in river waters at detection frequencies of 100%, 92%, 48.6%, and 21.6%, and concentrations of 0.05 to 1.23 ng/L, less than 0.03 to 0.41 ng/L, less than 0.02 to 1.00 ng/L, and less than 0.06 to 0.81 ng/L, respectively. Retinoic acids were detected for the first time in the aquatic environment and were found to be more persistent than 4-oxo-RAs. The hazard quotient for mortality of frog embryos caused by induction by retinoids detected in the current study was then estimated, and the value was calculated to be 0.09. No retinoid was detected in seawaters. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010;29:2491-2497. © 2010 SETAC Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

DOI 10.1002/etc.322
Citations Scopus - 10
2009 Shen LL, Hu JY, Dong ZM, Liu J, 'Health risk assessment of mercury on children s health in some regions of China', Zhongguo Huanjing Kexue/China Environmental Science, 29 1323-1326 (2009)

Due to the domestic situation of China, the researches on health risk of mercury were limited. In this study, health risk of mercury for children in China (some regions) were asse... [more]

Due to the domestic situation of China, the researches on health risk of mercury were limited. In this study, health risk of mercury for children in China (some regions) were assessed by intergrating the probabilities of both blood mercury and no observed adverse effect levels(NOAEL) in some parts of China. The health risk in most parts of China was in the range of 10 -7 to 10 -5 , the risk in Songyuan and Changchun located at Dier Songhuajiang River basin were 2.24×10 3 and 3.30×10 5 , respectively. Especially, residents in Guizhou mining areas were faced to risk as high as 6.87×10 -3 . The health risk of mercury showed a regional characteristics.

Citations Scopus - 1
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $1,140,183

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $860,918

A fully integrated risk assessment system$860,918

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Yanju Liu, Doctor Luchun Duan, Doctor Ayanka Wijayawardena, Doctor Morrow Dong, Professor Ravi Naidu
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700897
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

20162 grants / $253,265

Human Health Risk Assessment from Old Railway Sleepers - Port Hedland and Newman Mainline, WA$158,300

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Morrow Dong, Doctor Yanju Liu, Doctor Jianhua Du, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Dr Prashant Srivastava
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600616
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Measurement, Bioavailability and Exposure Characterisation of Beryllium Sourced from the Little Forest Burial Ground Legacy Waste Site, Sydney$94,965

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Peter Sanderson, Doctor Morrow Dong
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700311
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

20151 grants / $26,000

Integrated decision-making methodology and tools for groundwater remediation$26,000

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Morrow Dong, Dr Matthew Currell, Ms Anne Northway, Dr Jane Mullett, Dr Gang-Jun Liu
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1500938
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current3

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.55

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Chemistry of Beryllium in the Little Forest Burial Ground Legacy Waste Site, Sydney PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Measurement for Human Health Risk Assessment and Compliance Model for Heavy Metals PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Measurement for Human Health Risk Assessment and Compliance Model for Heavy Metals Enviro Studies Not Elswr Class, Global Centre for Environmental Remediation Co-Supervisor
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Dr Morrow Dong

Position

Research Fellow
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email morrow.dong@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room ATC
Building Advanced Technology Centre.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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