Dr Melanie Hayes

Conjoint Lecturer

School of Health Sciences (Oral Health)

Career Summary

Biography

Melanie is a Conjoint Lecturer at the University of Newcastle. She completed her Bachelor of Oral Health in 2007, and then completed an Honours program achieving First Class honours and a Faculty Medal. She recently completed her PhD examining the occupational health of dental hygienists, with a particular focus on musculoskeletal pain. Melanie has had a number of papers published in peer reviewed journals, co-authored a book chapter and presented her research at a number of national and international conferences. 

Melanie has been an active member in the Dental Hygienists Association of Australia (DHAA) since graduating, and was the President of the New South Wales Branch from 2010-2012. She is currently the National President of the DHAA, and chairs the Dental Hygiene Research Fund Advisory panel.

Research Expertise
Melanie has completed a PhD investigating musculoskeletal disorders in the dental hygiene profession. Melanie also co-supervises honours students from the Bachelor of Oral Health program, with research projects focussing on nutrition and oral health, cultural competency and oral health habits.

Teaching Expertise
Lecturer in the Bachelor of Oral Health program since January 2010. Course co-ordinator for: HLSC1000 Transition to Health Sciences Education and Practice (Interdisciplinary course) ORHL1001 Oral health and ill health ORHL1004 Communicating oral health messages ORHL2002 Oral Pathology ORHL3001 Dental Hygiene Clinical Practice 1

Administrative Expertise
Academic placement liaison for the Bachelor of Oral Health Program.



Qualifications

  • PhD (Oral Health), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Oral Health, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours), University of Newcastle
  • Registered Dental Practitioner - Dental Hygienist, Dental Board of Australia
  • Graduate Certificate Practice of Tertiary Teaching, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Dental hygiene
  • Musculoskeletal disorders
  • Oral health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110599 Dentistry not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2012 -  Editorial Board - International Journal of Dental Hygiene International Journal of Dental Hygiene
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Lecturer

Oral Health

University of Newcastle
School of Health
Australia

Awards

Honours

Year Award
2009 High achievement in end-on honours
University of Newcastle
2009 Faculty Medal
University of Newcastle

Recipient

Year Award
2009 Australian Postgraduate Award
Unknown

Recognition

Year Award
2008 Golden Scaler Award
Unknown

Research Award

Year Award
2009 Award for research
Unknown

Invitations

External Examiner

Year Title / Rationale
2010 External examiner - dental hygiene
Organisation: University of Sydney Description: External examiner for final dental hygiene oral comprehensive and case presentation exams

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2012 Work related pain and the oral health practitioner.
Organisation: Australian Dental and Oral Health Therapists Association International Conference. Canberra, ACT, Australia
2010 Hayes MJ, Smith DR, Cockrell D. Prevalence and correlates of musculoskeletal disorders among Australian dental hygiene students. (Poster presentation)
Organisation: International Symposium on Dental Hygiene. Glasgow, Scotland
2010 Hayes MJ, Smith DR, Taylor JA. Musculoskeletal disorders among the Australian dental hygiene profession. (Oral Presentation)
Organisation: International Association for Dental Research, ANZ Division. Kiama, NSW, Australia
2009 Hayes MJ, Smith DR, Cockrell D. Prevalence and correlates of musculoskeletal disorders among Australian dental hygiene students. (Poster presentation)
Organisation: 16th International Student Congress of Medical Sciences (ISCOMS). Groningen, The Netherlands

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2012 Musculoskeletal pain and dental hygienists: Putting loupes under the microscope.
Organisation: Dental Hygienists Association of Australia National Symposium. Brisbane, QLD, Australia
2012 Musculoskeletal injuries in dental hygienists.
Organisation: The Safety Conference. Sydney, NSW, Australia
2012 Musculoskeletal pain and the dental professional. NSW Health Oral Health Continuing Professional Development Day
Organisation: Westmead Centre for Oral Health, NSW, Australia
2011 A blind date with knowledge: A personal experience in oral health research.
Organisation: Dental Hygienists’ Association of Australia National Symposium. Darwin, NT, Australia
2009 Musculoskeletal disorders in the dental profession: A real pain in the neck.
Organisation: NSW Dental and Oral Health Therapists Professional Development Day. Terrigal, NSW, Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Cockrell D, Hayes MJ, 'Oral Health Therapy Programs in Australia and New Zealand', Oral Health Therapy Programs in Australia and New Zealand, Robert T Watts, Queensland, Australia 181-194 (2010) [B2]

Journal article (18 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Hayes MJ, Cheng B, Musolino R, Rogers AA, 'Dietary analysis and nutritional counselling for caries prevention in dental practise: A pilot study', Australian Dental Journal, (2017)

© 2017 Australian Dental Association. Background: Dental practitioners agree that dietary counselling is essential for caries prevention; however, they provide advice infrequentl... [more]

© 2017 Australian Dental Association. Background: Dental practitioners agree that dietary counselling is essential for caries prevention; however, they provide advice infrequently due to a lack of confidence and competence. This study aimed to improve practises through an online training module exploring the use of a brief counselling method, and a diet assessment of caries risk form. Methods: Dental practitioners (N = 41) completed a survey on current practises and confidence in providing dietary advice, followed by an online training module. Ten practitioners were involved in recruiting patients, eliciting a diet assessment of caries risk, and using brief counselling techniques with these patients. Patients were followed up at 6 months for a risk assessment review. Dental practitioners also completed a 6-month follow-up survey exploring changes in confidence and perceived barriers. Results: Dental hygienists' confidence improved significantly following the intervention (P < 0.025). Patients showed a significant reduction in high-risk behaviour pertaining to quantity and timing of sugar intake, and significant trends in improvement of behaviours relating to frequency, exposure time and drinking style (P < 0.05). Conclusions: It appears that a simple online learning module can improve hygienists' confidence in dietary advice provision, and have a positive impact on patient behaviour change, within a relatively short time-frame.

DOI 10.1111/adj.12524
2016 Nicholson SL, Hayes MJ, Taylor JA, 'Cultural competency education in academic dental institutions in Australia and New Zealand: A Survey Study', Journal of Dental Education, 80 966-974 (2016) [C1]

The aim of this study was to assess the status of cultural competency education in Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy programs. The study s... [more]

The aim of this study was to assess the status of cultural competency education in Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy programs. The study sought to explore the extent to which cultural competence is included in these programs' curricula, building on similar studies conducted in the United States and thus contributing to the international body of knowledge on this topic. A 12-item instrument was designed with questions in four areas (demographics, content of cultural competency education, organization of overall program curriculum, and educational methods used to teach cultural competence) and was sent to all Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy educational programs. Of the total 24 programs, 15 responded for a response rate of 62.5%. The results showed that lectures were the most frequent teaching method used in cultural competency education; however, the variation in responses indicated inconsistencies across study participants, as discussions and self-directed learning also featured prominently in the responses. The majority of respondents reported that cultural competence was not taught as a specific course but rather integrated into their programs' existing curricula. The variations in methods may indicate the need for a standardized framework for cultural competency education in these countries. In addition, the notion of cultural competency education in academic dental institutions demands additional evaluation, and further research is required to develop a solid evidence base on which to develop cultural competency education, specifically regarding content, most effective pedagogies, and assessment of student preparedness.

Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jane Taylor
2016 Hayes MJ, Wallace JP, Coxon A, 'Attitudes and barriers to providing dietary advice: perceptions of dental hygienists and oral health therapists', International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 14 255-260 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/idh.12239
Co-authors Janet Wallace
2016 Hayes MJ, Taylor JA, Smith DR, 'Introducing loupes to clinical practice: dental hygienists experiences and opinions', International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 14 226-230 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 John Wiley &amp; Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd. Objectives: Recent literature has identified a number of potential advantages in wearing loupes for ... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Objectives: Recent literature has identified a number of potential advantages in wearing loupes for dental hygienists, including improved quality of care and ergonomics. The aim of the study was to determine dental hygienists' opinions about wearing loupes. Methods: A short online survey was distributed to all dental hygienists who had recently participated in a study investigating the efficacy of loupes on musculoskeletal disorders; all had only worn loupes for a 6-month period, and prior to the study had not worn loupes. All of those invited completed the survey (n¿=¿12), achieving a 100% response rate. Results: The majority of respondents noted that the loupes were adaptable to wear; however, only one-quarter of hygienists surveyed were wearing them often following the study. Respondents identified that the biggest advantage to loupes was calculus removal (91.7%), and most indicated that they felt the quality of their work increased when wearing loupes (75%). The biggest disadvantage to wearing loupes was the adjustment period (50%), with limited depth of vision, headache, vertigo and infection control noted by at least one-third of respondents. Conclusions: This study revealed that hygienists identify both benefits and limitations to wearing loupes, and therefore, ongoing support may be required for hygienists adopting their use in clinical practice.

DOI 10.1111/idh.12128
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jane Taylor
2016 Hayes MJ, Osmotherly PG, Taylor JA, Smith DR, Ho A, 'The effect of loupes on neck pain and disability among dental hygienists', Work, 53 755-762 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 - IOS Press and the authors. BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal disorders represent a significant occupational health issue in dental hygiene, with high prevalence rates document... [more]

© 2016 - IOS Press and the authors. BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal disorders represent a significant occupational health issue in dental hygiene, with high prevalence rates documented. Despite this fact, there have been few advancements in the application of ergonomic principles in the dental hygiene profession. While the use of loupes is often promoted as an ergonomic solution, there is little published research to support this claim. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study, therefore, was to investigate the effect of the use of loupes on neck pain and disability in dental hygienists. METHODS: The study was conducted using an exploratory pre-test post-test design, comparing musculoskeletal measures in dental hygienists wearing loupes with final year dental hygiene students who do not wear loupes. Pre- and post-test measures included the Neck Pain and Disability Scale and a standardised physical assessment using previously validated measures. Statistical analysis was conducted as a series of mixed ANOVAs with time and treatment as the independent variables. RESULTS: While the analyses revealed no significant interactions between time and treatment (p < 0.05), there were general trends of improvement or deterioration for outcome measures. Improvements over time were noted in the treatment group for cervical range of motion and deep neck muscle endurance; however deteriorations were noted for forward head posture and cervical kinaesthetic sense. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, despite no statistically significant differences being detected, this study suggests that wearing loupes appears to have both positive and negative outcomes with regards to physical well-being. As such, further studies are required to more precisely determine the effects of loupes on MSD among dental hygienists, particularly long-term. Dental hygienists with existing neck pain exploring ergonomic equipment may reflect on the findings and consider the potential benefits and risks of wearing loupes.

DOI 10.3233/WOR-162253
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jane Taylor, Peter Osmotherly
2016 Hayes MJ, Franki J, Taylor JA, 'The Frequency of Dietary Advice Provision in a Dental Hygiene Clinic: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study', Journal of dental hygiene : JDH, 90 12-17 (2016)

Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists¿ Association. PURPOSE: The aim of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to assess the frequency of dietary advice provisi... [more]

Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists¿ Association. PURPOSE: The aim of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to assess the frequency of dietary advice provision by dental hygiene students. METHODS: Data was obtained from clinical records of third-year Bachelor of Oral Health students at the University of Newcastle. Frequency of dietary advice was recorded by students over a 12-month period. The study investigated associations between demographics, treatment provided and frequency of dietary advice. RESULTS: The results indicated dietary advice was provided infrequently by dental hygiene students, with only 6.48% of all patients seen during the 12-month period receiving dietary advice. A statistically significant correlation was observed between dietary advice and age, with children under the age of 18 being 2.5 times more likely than adults to receive dietary advice. Additionally, patients who received oral hygiene instruction were 2.5 times as likely to receive dietary advice. Strong correlations were also observed between topical and concentrated fluoride application and dietary advice. CONCLUSION: The findings indicate dietary advice is provided infrequently by dental hygiene students. Further research is required to strengthen the findings and to investigate barriers to dietary advice provision, as well as perceptions of dental practitioners regarding dietary advice.

Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jane Taylor
2014 Hayes MJ, Smith DR, Taylor JA, 'Musculoskeletal Disorders in a 3 Year Longitudinal Cohort of Dental Hygiene Students', Journal of Dental Hygiene, 88 37-42 (2014) [C1]
Co-authors Jane Taylor
2014 Hayes MJ, Smith DR, Taylor JA, 'Musculoskeletal disorders in a 3 year longitudinal cohort of dental hygiene students', Journal of dental hygiene : JDH, 88 36-41 (2014)

PURPOSE: Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a significant occupational health issue for the dental hygiene profession. There is increasing evidence that these problems commence ... [more]

PURPOSE: Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a significant occupational health issue for the dental hygiene profession. There is increasing evidence that these problems commence during undergraduate training; however, there is a surprising lack of studies investigating how MSD develops in student groups over the course of their study. The aim of this study was to determine the longitudinal MSD trends among a cohort of undergraduate dental hygiene students at an Australian university. METHODS: A previously validated self-reporting questionnaire was distributed to dental hygiene students in 3 consecutive years from 2008 to 2010. RESULTS: MSDs were most commonly reported in the neck (ranging from 66 to 68%) and lower back (ranging from 61 to 68%), with a marked increase in reported lower back pain by the final year of study. CONCLUSION: This study not only supports mounting evidence that MSDs are a common problem for dental hygiene students, but further demonstrates the magnitude of this occupational health issue across the training program. These findings are concerning for a group yet to embark on their professional careers, given that it raises some serious questions about career longevity and the efficacy of preventive measures.

Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Jane Taylor
2014 Franki J, Hayes MJ, Taylor JA, 'The provision of dietary advice by dental practitioners: a review of the literature', COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH, 31 9-14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1922/CDH_3297Hayes06
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jane Taylor
2014 Hayes MJ, Osmotherly PG, Taylor JA, Smith DR, Ho A, 'The effect of wearing loupes on upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders among dental hygienists', International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 12 174-179 (2014) [C1]

Objectives: It is well established that musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are a significant occupational health issue for dentists and hygienists. Despite this, there has been littl... [more]

Objectives: It is well established that musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are a significant occupational health issue for dentists and hygienists. Despite this, there has been little advancement in the application of ergonomic principles in the dental profession. While the use of loupes is often promoted as an ergonomic solution, there is little published research to robustly support this claim. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the use of loupes on upper extremity MSD among dental hygienists. Methods: The study was conducted using an exploratory pretest and post-test design, comparing musculoskeletal measures in practising dental hygienists wearing loupes with final-year dental hygiene students who did not wear loupes. Pre- and post-test measures included valid self-reported and objective outcome measures and were measured at baseline and 6 months following the intervention. Statistical analysis was conducted as a series of mixed anovas with time and treatment as the independent variables. Results: The analysis revealed a significant interaction between time and treatment for the Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm and Hand (DASH) scores (P < 0.04), indicating an improvement in symptoms for the treatment group but a reversed trend for the controls. There was also a significant mean increase in scapular position measures; however, this finding was evident in both groups, indicating that these were not a result of the intervention. Conclusions: Overall, this study suggests that wearing loupes appears to have both positive and negative effects on upper extremity MSD among dental hygienists. Ongoing research is required to determine the long-term effects of loupes wear, over an extended period of time. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/idh.12048
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Jane Taylor
2013 Hayes MJ, Smith DR, Taylor JA, 'Musculoskeletal disorders and symptom severity among Australian dental hygienists', BMC Research Notes, 6 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1756-0500-6-250
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Jane Taylor
2013 Hayes MJ, Smith DR, 'Tobacco use among Australian dental hygiene students is declining, but more still needs to be done', Tobacco Induced Diseases, 11 (2013) [C3]

While health care professionals have a responsibility to prevent and control the use of tobacco for improved health outcomes, it appears that some dental hygiene students continue... [more]

While health care professionals have a responsibility to prevent and control the use of tobacco for improved health outcomes, it appears that some dental hygiene students continue to smoke. A survey of Australian dental hygiene students found that up to 16.3% smoke, although this prevalence rate decreased with each year of study. As future role models, it is essential that smoking cessation counselling is embedded in the dental curriculum to not only discourage their own habits, but so that they may promote the importance of being tobacco free to the wider population. © 2013 Hayes and Smith; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1617-9625-11-22
2013 Hayes MJ, 'Oral health and nutrition guidance for patients.', Dental Nursing, 9 461-463 (2013) [C3]
2012 Taylor JA, Hayes MJ, Wallace LG, 'Dental hygiene student experiences in external placements in Australia', Journal of Dental Education, 76 651-655 (2012) [C1]
Co-authors Jane Taylor, Linda Wallace
2012 Hayes MJ, Taylor JA, Smith DR, 'Predictors of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental hygienists', International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 10 265-269 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Jane Taylor
2010 Hayes MJ, Smith DR, Cockrell DJ, 'An international review of musculoskeletal disorders in the dental hygiene profession', International Dental Journal, 60 343-352 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1922/IDJ-2514Hayes10
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Deborah Cockrell
2009 Hayes MJ, Smith DR, Cockrell DJ, 'Prevalence and correlates of musculoskeletal disorders among Australian dental hygiene students', International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 7 176-181 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1601-5037.2009.00370.x
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Deborah Cockrell
2009 Hayes MJ, Cockrell DJ, Smith DR, 'A systematic review of musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals', International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 7 159-165 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1601-5037.2009.00395.x
Citations Scopus - 117Web of Science - 88
Co-authors Deborah Cockrell
Show 15 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Hayes MJ, 'The effect of loupes on neck pain and disability among dental hygienists', International Journal of Dental Hygiene (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/idh.12055
2013 Hayes MJ, Osmotherly PG, Taylor JA, Smith DR, Ho A, 'The effect of surgical magnification (loupes) on neck pain and disability among dental hygienists.', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013 (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Jane Taylor, Peter Osmotherly
2013 Hayes MJ, Osmotherly PG, Taylor JA, Smith DR, Ho A, 'Does the use of surgical magnification (loupes) effect upper extremity pain, and disability among dental hygienists.', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013 (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Jane Taylor
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $1,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20131 grants / $1,500

19th International Symposium on Dental Hygiene, Cape Town South Africa, 14-17 August 2013$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Melanie Hayes
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300651
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.15

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2014 PhD Indirect Vision Training for Oral Health Students PhD (Oral Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Melanie Hayes

Position

Conjoint Lecturer
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Oral Health

Contact Details

Email melanie.hayes@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 43494514

Office

Building Health Precinct (BE Building)
Location Ourimbah
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
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